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Subject: New abstract game: Enclose5 rss

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Fabius Maximus
Italy
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Enclose5 is a simple (but not trivial) game for 2 players, pen-and-pencil style; players require just a grid paper sheet and a pair of colored pencils. It can be considered an evolution of the classical Five-in-a-row, but the rules and the goal are pretty different:

1 - The two players use marks of two different colors (in the following, red and blue dots). They alternately place a mark of their color inside an empty cell of the grid.

2 - Each time a player completes a closed polygonal with his/her marks, all the internal cells take that color. A closed polygonal is any closed path connecting marks of the same color, each adjacent horizontally, vertically or diagonally to next one:


3 - The grid cells, once colored, are blocked. They cannot change their color even when they are enclosed in a new polygonal of the opposite color, and do not take part to any alignment of marks. A player can always enlarge an existing polygonal by adding new marks.


4 - If a player makes a winning alignment of five or more marks (horizontally, vertically or diagonally), he/she gains additional moves: 1 for an alignment of 5, 2 for an alignment of 6, and so on (for n signs, n-4 moves, with n≥5). The gained moves must be played sequentially, in the same turn of play, and cannot be used to increase in lenght a winning alignment built in the same turn. If an additional move makes a different winning alignment, the gained moves add up.

5 - if a move closes a polygonal, the coloring of its internal cells is mandatory and has the priority over marks alignments.
 


The goal of the game is to color an arranged number of cells, by default 20, but the two players can choose a different number at the beginning of the match. Skilled players can use a pie rule for the opening, to cancel the first player has (as in Five-in-a-row)

Try it and enjoy!
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Russ Williams
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Looks potentially interesting!

Question: is there an error in the 5th rule's example (the 3rd image)? It seems to me that point A does not complete a polygonal: the polygonal is already complete before point A is played, isn't it? Or am I misunderstanding something?
 
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Clark D. Rodeffer
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russ wrote:
Looks potentially interesting!

Question: is there an error in the 5th rule's example (the 3rd image)? It seems to me that point A does not complete a polygonal: the polygonal is already complete before point A is played, isn't it? Or am I misunderstanding something?

Perhaps the rule should specify "convex polygon"? Or are concave polygons allowed?
 
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Russ Williams
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CDRodeffer wrote:
russ wrote:
Looks potentially interesting!

Question: is there an error in the 5th rule's example (the 3rd image)? It seems to me that point A does not complete a polygonal: the polygonal is already complete before point A is played, isn't it? Or am I misunderstanding something?

Perhaps the rule should specify "convex polygon"? Or are concave polygons allowed?

Given the lack of specifying "convex", I suppose concave are allowed (albeit presumably fairly uncommon). But I'm not sure how that relates to the example diagram...? I see a 4-vertex square polygon surrounding the point where A is played, before A is played.
 
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Fabius Maximus
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You are perfectly right (rules are simple indeed). I have copied the wrong figure, my mistake. In the leftmost figure, the cell labelled "A" must be exchanged in position with the red mark below it; then the rest is correct. In the old figure of my post, as you correctly pointed out, the cell A must be already colored in red. I am correcting the figures. This game is really simpler to play than to explain.
Thanks fo the remark!
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Rey Alicea
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Their is a game for your Android phone called Sneaky Dots ...
http://droidmill.com/sneaky-dots-1240181.html?utm_source=dlv...

http://www.alexmarchapps.com/Apps/SneakyDots
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Fabius Maximus
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any closed path is allowed. I am adding a game example to clarify.
 
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Fabius Maximus
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I have seen many enclosure games (but not that one). The enclosing rules are the same, but what makes Enclose5 different from a strategic point of view is the presence the five-in-a-row rule. You can't just pursue the goal of quickly enclosing cells, because if the opponent makes a free line of five you are soon dead. So, you have to manage both the aspects (building polygons and making winning alignments) at the same time. To win the game, you have to do winning alignments (and prevent the opponent to do that), then use the additional moves to close a larger polygon. Try it!
(thanks for the app link, unfortunately I don't have one for my game yet)
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Fabius Maximus
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indeed any closed path is acceptable. See an example below:

I see no particular reason for banning concave polygons. Even intrsecting enclosures are allowed (an intersecting polygon is made up by two or more nonintersecting enclosures)
Anyway, the essential thing is to determine univocally the internal cells to be colored. The best thing is to try practically the game on paper (or on screen).
A suggestion for possible players: don't be too hasty in trying to close complex polygons! To win a game, a player must first of all prevent his opponent from making winning alignments (and trying to do them himself).
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Rey Alicea
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fabpozzi wrote:
indeed any closed path is acceptable. See an example below:

I see no particular reason for banning concave polygons. Even intrsecting enclosures are allowed (an intersecting polygon is made up by two or more nonintersecting enclosures)
Anyway, the essential thing is to determine univocally the internal cells to be colored. The best thing is to try practically the game on paper (or on screen).
A suggestion for possible players: don't be too hasty in trying to close complex polygons! To win a game, a player must first of all prevent his opponent from making winning alignments (and trying to do them himself).


I like. So Fabius your game looks like it can be played with an Othello set!
Saves me from using paper.
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Fabius Maximus
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Of course you can use a reversi board, but I recommend a much larger one, at least 20x20 cells in size (otherwise, it's difficult to make many winning alignments, that are crucial to have an interesting game). If anybody is interested in, I could post an example of a real play on a 30x20 board, with some moves detailed.
To spare paper, you can easily play on a pc screen, making a square grid table on Word (or similar); I often do that way. It easy to place colored marks and to color enclosed cells with a click.
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Rey Alicea
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fabpozzi wrote:
If anybody is interested in, I could post an example of a real play on a 30x20 board, with some moves detailed.



Please do I would like to see it.
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Fabius Maximus
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Abstract Games » Forums » General
Re: an example of a game
Here an example of a real match, played on a 20x30 cells grid (not all shown), with some variants. It's the final part of the match. Red leads 17 to 7, but he has left some good alignment to green, that makes a 5 playing in cell a. Then green plays in b the gained move. To prevent green from gaining a double move, red plays in c, but green plays in d and closes a polygon, coloring 10 cells and reaching red at 17. The match is even and red can continue.


Variant 1:
green can better play his "d" move postponing the polygon closure and making a new line of 5:

then he plays the additional move in e (free line of 3); red plays in f to avoid a double penalty, green in g makes a free line of 4;if red blocks one side (h), green makes a 5 (i) and with the additional move in l he closes a larger polygon and wins the game (if using the standard goal of 20 cell)

Variant 2:
if red chooses to play his "k" move preventing the polygon closure, but leaving a 5 with a free side, green can play in l making a 6, then with the 2 add. moves he makes a free line of 4 (m,n). Red blocks the 6 in o, but green can make a free 5 in p and play the add move in q.

Red can only block one side of the 5 (r), then green can easily win the match in 3 turns:


So, generally speaking, the alignments are the key to win the game.
Thanks for your patience!
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Rey Alicea
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Very cool, thank you!
 
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Nick Reymann
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Reminds me a bit of Rin, which is a good thing.
 
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Rio Malaschitz
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Mingy Jongo wrote:
Reminds me a bit of Rin, which is a good thing.


There is not big difference between Enclose5, Rin and (mainly) Kropki - popular game in Russia and Poland.
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Russ Williams
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Malaschitz wrote:
Mingy Jongo wrote:
Reminds me a bit of Rin, which is a good thing.


There is not big difference between Enclose5, Rin and (mainly) Kropki - popular game in Russia and Poland.


I occasionally try to figure out the rules of Kropki, but the webpages which try to describe it are confusingly unclear to me. :/
 
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Luis Bolaños Mures
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russ wrote:
I occasionally try to figure out the rules of Kropki, but the webpages which try to describe it are confusingly unclear to me. :/

The rules aren't hard to understand, but there seem to be a number of slightly different variants and I'm not sure which one is the standard, if any. That's confusing indeed.

Anyway, I think Rin is a more elegant implementation of the same concept. If you play it with one placement per turn instead of two, you get a streamlined version of Kropki.
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Fabius Maximus
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I had a look to Kropki, that is indeed very similar to Rin (but the details of the rules are less clear). Anyway, both of them are pure enclosing games. Enclose5 is very different in its gaming strategy (I can't tell if it's better or worse, but it's definitely different) due to the incremental aligment rule, that allows you to win additional moves if you makes a straight line of 5 or more dots. So you have two diffent tasks (encircle cells to win points) and make straight lines (to get moves). Strategy is closer to that of five-in-a row than to that of Go. A good thing would be a game trial by a pair of experts of both games (I have played it several times with friends of mine, but none of us can be defined a "game expert"...)
Anyway thank you for all your feedback!
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