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THE COSMODEX 2.0
AN ENCYCLOPEDIA FOR COSMIC ENCOUNTER


:introduction: For years I have maintained my own database of Cosmic Encounter powers, cards, and other data, which I updated from time to time to fix errors, implement rulings, etc. After FFG released their edition of the game and I realized that the number of new problems was increasing dramatically, I started working in earnest to refine this into an FFG-centric gameplay encyclopedia of sorts, which I call the Cosmodex — a portmanteau of “cosmic” and “codex.” It includes a little bit of history, some commentary, a few gameplay tips, and perhaps still some outright griping, but mostly focuses on incorporating errata, FAQ rulings, playtester clarifications, crowd-sourced consensus rulings, and other corrections into the text for each card and alien power in the current edition.

Originally, the Cosmodex did its best to present an “idealized best text” version of each card. However, this made some of the texts difficult to read because of all the strikeouts, and was not useful to players who simply wanted to see the most important corrections without caring about all the minor wording issues. So now, the main body of the document focuses on the more important changes and leaves the details to Appendix B.

Although this document is a work in progress, it attempts to be comprehensive (containing, at last count, 277 entries, some 77,000 words, 160+ red-level corrections, and over 820 total revisions in the appendix). The Cosmodex is young but ambitious. Its audacious goal is to be the ultimate player reference when it grows up. You can help by adding your thoughtful and constructive additions and criticisms in this thread.

:contents:
About this Document
Volume I: A-E
Volume II: F-L
Volume III: M-R
Volume IV: S-Z
• Appendix A: Rules of Play (not yet available)
Appendix B: Detailed Card Revisions
Appendix C: Version Differences
Appendix D: Revised Card Images

:Kevin Wilson on:
Clone
Dictator
Mind
Mirror
rifts
Hate/hand refresh
more hand refresh
Cosmic Quakes (as reported by Carl Bussema)

:other links:
FFG rulebook
Review of FAQ 1.0
Problems with FAQ ruling on hand refresh
Reported revisions in second printing
Jack Reda on Super Fodder
The Amazing Power Thingy
The New Player's Guide to Cosmic Encounter!
FFG forums
Sleeves for Big Alien Cards
Captain Cosmic's 2008 survey
Rob Burns' Top 5 Revisions to Canon CE powers
Classic Alien Power Revision Workshop
Filth - How does your group interpret it?
Pithy Powers
Eon rulebook
The Cosmorium (variant materials)
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Re: The Cosmodex: An Encyclopedia for Cosmic Encounter
THE COSMODEX 2.0
AN ENCYCLOPEDIA FOR COSMIC ENCOUNTER


:about this document: The Cosmodex is a work in progress. It is intended to be a useful resource for the Fantasy Flight Games edition of Cosmic Encounter, and strives to bring together card texts, rule clarifications, FAQ information, wording corrections, anecdotes, and other crowd-sourced material into a single player reference.

Entries are alphabetical, and topics are usually placed under the most general or significant keyword. For example, if you wanted to read about drawing a new hand, you would look under hands rather than drawing. If the section is large enough, it might be separated into sections with bold subheadings such as “Discarding” and “Drawing.” If a topic is related to two different entries (such as the interaction of a particular artifact with a particular alien power), you may need to look in both places, because the material usually will not be duplicated. If a rules question involves one particular alien power, that is generally where you will find your answer even if it involves various cards, rules, etc. But, for example, if there was a question about a particular tech card that affected two or three different aliens, then it would be covered under the tech card instead. There has been an effort to place each topic in the “one most logical place” to avoid duplication and excessive cross-references. When two or more entries have an equal claim on a particular topic, it may be covered under whichever entry comes first alphabetically. If a ruling or note is very brief, it might be duplicated for convenience. Of course, you can always search using your web browser’s “find” function (accessed using Ctrl-F in most versions of Firefox and Internet Explorer).

Main entries exist for concepts that apply to gameplay in general or to multiple alien powers and/or cards. Some that may be helpful to read first include at random, bugs, cards, card types, compensation, deals, encounters, encounter card, flares, hands, images, liens, reward deck, technology, and Timing Conflicts. (Some of these entries refer to card revisions that appear only in Appendix B.)

Histories for alien powers are intentionally located out of sequence, below the power’s graphical indicators rather than above. This serves as a visual separator between an alien power and its flare, and speeds things up for players who want to focus only on the gameplay elements by grouping the power’s text and indicators together as a unit.

Text revisions are shown using strikeouts, braces, and colored type, depending on the nature of the change. Official errata from FFG are shown in blue: {before} after. Errors or issues that represent a change in gameplay relative to the printed card (or the official published errata), or that implement an important correction or clarification, appear in red: {before} after. Nitpickier changes for consistency or clarity (which appear mostly in Appendix B) use gray type: {before} after. Opinion-based changes and suggestions for improvement (such as text to eliminate “Do Not Use” conflicts), which are rare in the Cosmodex, are shown in green: {before} after.

To keep the texts readable, many of the non-critical improvements are not included in the main body of the document; some, such as spelling, punctuation, and grammar corrections, are just “sneaked in” without any color highlighting. For a detailed listing of all errata, unofficial corrections, and suggested improvements (including their explanations), consult Appendix B.

Deletions are surrounded by curly braces { } so that they can still be identified as such after the formatting has been lost. This means you can copy and paste the text for a power or card, delete everything that’s enclosed in curlies, and have a grammatically intact text.

Searching can be fast if you know a few tricks. First, the heading for every entry is sandwiched between invisible colons (":") as part of a formatting cheat. So if you would like to jump right to the entry for ships without having to stop along the way for every use of that word in every entry, searching for ":ships" will take you there straightaway (in Firefox, anyway; one version of Internet Explorer I once used seemed to fail here).

Second, the database from which these entries are generated attempts to enforce formatting and spelling consistency on subheadings and deleted text, so you should be able to jump from deletion to deletion by searching for a left curly brace ("{"), from revision to revision by searching Appendix B for the word "Edited", etc.

Third, graphical timing indicators are always formatted individually so you can search for an actual icon by surrounding it with parentheses ( ). For example, Super Seeker’s timing bar, as printed, says (ALLIANCE/PLANNING), but it is formatted here as (Alliance) (Planning) so you can still use parentheses to search for either of those phase indicators and not miss Super Seeker. The Alliance-phase icons added to fix Super Macron and Super Observer take the same approach, (Launch) (Alliance), even though a physical reprint of the cards would of course need to combine the words with a slash. Timing indicators are separated by spaces except when a power or card has all eight indicators; so if you want to find the fifteen or so game effects that have a (Destiny) icon but you don’t want to waste time on all the effects that have all the icons, just start your search with a space: " (Destiny)".

Similarly, when an indicator has been revised, both the incorrect and correct versions will be presented, with the wrong one struck out. For example, if for some reason you want to search for "(Offense or Ally Only)", this will correctly find both Super Macron and Super Observer, even though the latter was incorrectly printed as (ALLY OR MAIN PLAYER ONLY). If for some even more bizarre reason you wanted to find out which cards were incorrectly printed as (MAIN PLAYER ONLY), you could use a curly brace in your search — "{Main Player Only" — and it would find Super Fungus, Wild Leviathan, Wild Mind, and Wild Spiff.

Finally, if you post a reply, for heaven’s sake don’t quote the whole thing. You don’t want to be a total goober-ninnyhead, right? Although, if you actually read this far you are almost certainly smart enough to edit your quotations, so I don’t know why I think I need to say something about it. And yet I still haven’t edited it out. You made it to the end, and here I am “rewarding” you by telling you something you already know; how dopey is that?
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Re: The Cosmodex: An Encyclopedia for Cosmic Encounter
VOLUME I: A–E

:Ace: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Paul Hlavacek, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Four Planets variant: Under this variant Ace still follows his Game Setup text, so he will end up with three planets and 12 ships. Other unique system setups: In a multiple-power game, if a player has Ace and another alien that also does something special with its planets or ships, Ace should always purge one planet and a fair share of ships for that planet. Thus Ace+Pygmy purges two ships, Ace+Worm should purge four, and Ace+Symbiote purges eight. In other words, when a player must perform two or more of these Game Setup texts the sequence should be Pygmy, Symbiote, Ace, Worm.
Ace wrote:
Wins with One Colony (R) Game Setup: Remove one of your planets from the game, sending your ships on it to the warp.

You have the power to Triumph. At the start of your turn, if you have any foreign colonies, use this power to win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.

Other players may have an encounter at one of your foreign colonies whenever the destiny card drawn allows them to target either your home system or the system that hosts that foreign colony.
(Offense Only) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)

Fearless freedom fighters for a forbidden force, the legendary Aces terrify lesser warriors. Judged not by their size, but by their peerless physical prowess, each athletic Ace was desperately hunted to presumed extinction. Now, using mystic mind tricks to disguise themselves, these majestic masters of the martial arts seek to fortify one rebel base, and then conquer the Cosmos.

Wild: After encounter cards are revealed, if you are opposed by all other players you may play this flare to win the encounter. Give this flare to the Ace after use (or discard it, if the Ace isn't playing).
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: As the defense, if you lose the encounter, instead of sending your ships to the warp you may relocate them to any one other planet in a different system, establishing a colony there. Afterwards, discard this flare.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

:Alchemist: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans, illustrated by Felicia Cano. All discard piles are potentially available for transmutation, as long as you have a card of the appropriate type in your hand to discard. Examples: You may discard a Negotiate to the regular discard pile and retrieve a Negotiate (Faulty Translator) from the reward deck discard pile (or vice versa). If there are flares in the unused flare deck discard pile because of something like Aristocrat, Wild Chrysalis, Host, Pentaform, or Alien Outpost, you may retrieve one of them after discarding a flare to the cosmic deck discard pile (this will gradually increase the number of flares in circulation). Alchemist is purposefully absolute in this regard; when playing some kind of homebrew variant that puts other types of cards in your hand such as hazards, tech, or space stations, you may similarly transmute those card types, discarding them to the appropriate discard piles based on the variant.
Alchemist wrote:
Converts Cards by Type (Y) You have the power of Transmutation. Once per encounter, you may use this power to send one of your ships to the warp. Then, discard one card from your hand and take a card of the same type (attack, negotiate, artifact, etc.) from any discard pile. You may transmute an attack card only if the two cards' values are within 4 of each other (such as an attack 08 and an attack 12).
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

In a dark age, the Alchemists spun others' trash into treasure – for a substantial fee. Few knew it was all a scam, a generational confidence game of black-market purchases and using one race's abandoned input as another's miraculous output. Then, in an even darker age, as their intergalactic fraud seemed on the verge of exposure, the Alchemists discovered that harvesting and manipulating their own species' cerebella could provide the "magic" to make transmutation a reality. Thus was their operation finally legitimized, at a terrible cost.

Wild: You may discard one non-encounter card from your hand and take a different card of the same type (artifact, reinforcement, flare, etc.) from any discard pile.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When transmuting an attack card, you may exchange it for another attack card of any value.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:alert levels: Alien powers are classified into three groups. The green-alert aliens are generally the least complex, and thus are great powers for introducing new players to the game. The yellow-alert powers are somewhat more involved, while the red-alert aliens are the most complex. To play a red-alert alien well often means being solid on all the game mechanics, knowing the composition of the decks, understanding meta-game dynamics and the general "Cosmic vibe," etc. In some cases, an alien may be classified as red-alert because new players who have not yet discovered how self-balancing Cosmic Encounter is could perceive it as "broken." Newbies should not play as red-alert aliens, nor play against them either. Thus, when inducting a new player it is important that everyone at the table have a green-alert alien. Green does not mean weak: A common misconception among new players is that the green-alert powers are the "beginner aliens" and thus are not as strong; but this is not the case. The green aliens are simply the easier ones to play successfully without much experience or knowledge about the game. Veteran players use all three colors, and pay little attention to the alert levels on the aliens they get to choose between.

:Alien Outpost: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Alien Outpost wrote:
When you receive this card, draw one card from the flare deck. Place the matching alien sheet next to this card, then remove that flare from the game. If the alien has Game Setup text, is not allowed in this game, or has an alternate victory condition, discard it and draw again. While you have a colony on this planet, you have this alien power in addition to any other alien(s) you control.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:alien powers: FAQ clarification: Maintaining your alien power is based on the number of home colonies you have, not the number you have lost. You lose your alien power whenever you have fewer than three home colonies in a five-planet game (or fewer than two home colonies in a four-planet game). Mandatory: If for some reason a mandatory power cannot be used, there is no penalty to the player. For example, if offensive Deuce is somehow reduced to exactly one encounter card, he continues the encounter normally but just doesn't use his power. Facets: Some aliens have unique control of special game components; see facets of powers. Power loss and alien identity: As players we tend to think that we "are" the Clone or the Human (for example) during the entire game. But from a rules and game text perspective, when our power has been zapped or lost, then technically we are not the alien. This is not explicitly stated in the rules, but is implied by how flares work. For example, if you lose your Human power, now you can play the Wild Human flare, but cannot play Super Human. Since it says right on the flare that the Wild is usable only IF YOU ARE NOT THE HUMAN and the Super is usable only IF YOU ARE THE HUMAN, then for gameplay purposes this requires that, while you have lost your power, you are not the Human — and therefore, the Human isn't playing. This has an important implication for the handful of flares that tell you to give them to the named alien after use. While your power is zapped or lost, if you play your own flare as a Wild and it is the give-to-owner kind (such as Wild Human), you must discard it rather than "give it to yourself" — because, until you get your power back, the Human "isn't playing" right now. (Of course, the same thing applies if your give-to-owner flare was played by someone else; they must discard it because right now you are not that alien.) So if your Human alien sheet is face down you cannot use Wild Human to turn your encounter card into an attack 42 over and over again; sorry. Power loss and residual effects: You can lose your alien power (temporarily, indefinitely, or permanently) in a variety of ways: due to a Cosmic Zap, by losing too many home colonies, or because of a game effect such as Changeling, Wild Philanthropist, Plant, Wild Plant, Reincarnator, Wild Reincarnator, or Wild Sorcerer. A few aliens have certain "residual" effects that still need to operate regardless of power loss. It can be difficult to determine exactly which parts of a power qualify, so the Cosmodex offers the following categorizations to help identify the type of effect each part of an alien power represents:
Zappable effects are identified by the use keyword. They are subject to Cosmic Zap and all other forms of power loss.

Non-zappable effects are self-contained alien power effects that do not have this keyword and thus cannot be Cosmic Zapped, but are still subject to other forms of power loss. Examples include Citadel placing a citadel, Cryo picking up his cold storage, Genius winning the game, Macron collecting double compensation or rewards, and Warrior getting new tokens. Although the initiation of a non-zappable effect cannot be canceled by a Cosmic Zap, if a zap earlier in the encounter already canceled the alien power, then the non-zappable effect cannot be initiated in the first place. In other words, you still have to have your power available if you want to initiate one of its non-zappable effects; but once you have done so, that effect cannot be stopped by a Cosmic Zap. For example, Cryo cannot be zapped when taking his cold storage as a new hand; but if he was already zapped earlier when trying to store a card, then he cannot take his cold storage at all because his power has already been lost.

Automatic effects are scheduled, enqueued, or required by a previous use of some other part of the game text, or needed for cleanup or to keep the game engine running; these continue to take effect regardless of power loss. Examples include Leviathan increasing his total after launching a worldship, and later sending that worldship back home, Loser affecting the encounter outcome after declaring an upset during Planning, Merchant counting hired ships in Reveal that were played during Planning and then returning or discarding those cards, Mirror reversing digits after declaring the reversal earlier, Seeker making an opponent honor the previously given answer, Deuce returning one of the revealed cards to hand, Fungus carrying his stacks around and then breaking them apart in the warp, Grudge's opponents discarding their grudge tokens, and Locust counting devoured colonies even after the power is lost.

Cosmic Zaps respond only to zappable effects, but then prevent both zappable and non-zappable effects. Other forms of power loss prevent both zappable and non-zappable effects. Automatic effects always continue to function, either because they were already scheduled/enqueued before the power was lost or because they are necessary for the game engine to keep working smoothly.

:Alliance: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. You who? This is the only hazard that explicitly uses the pronoun "you" (although other hazards imply it by virtue of their imperative mood). The most reasonable inference here is that Alliance is speaking to the offense, which implies an unwritten general rule that hazard cards are drawn by the offense, and also carried out by the offense in those few cases where one player must perform a physical task (Alliance, Cosmic Upheaval, The Entropy Beast, Mirror Universe). Status of the ship: The ship that the offense is forced to place on this card should be considered "lost" from Masochist's perspective; otherwise his power would be useless for the rest of the game. Whether this means the lost ship could be "rescued" by a Super Symbiote is a more difficult question, since we then have to consider whether removing the ship from the card cancels the card's effect. It's tempting to rule that the ship is irrecoverable; however, Super Symbiote's intent seems absolute, and we will have to answer this question anyway if Cosmic Dominion turns out to include the proposed Ship Zap artifact).
Alliance wrote:
Place one of your ships from one of your colonies on this card and give it to another player. For the rest of the game, the two of you have an alliance. When either of you is the main player in an encounter, he or she must always invite his or her ally.
(This Card Remains in Play)

:Amoeba: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ rulings: Amoeba may ooze all of his ships into the hyperspace gate if he wants to; this is considered a single action, so Amoeba would not lose his power until just after the ships were placed in the gate. Wild Amoeba may be used by the defense to bring in more ships even if he has none on the planet to begin with. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Wild Amoeba did not limit the player to 4 ships added or removed. Edited to eliminate the unnecessary and inconsistent "rule on a card" that has unintended consequences when the Amoeba player has some other way to gain a colony.
Amoeba wrote:
Unlimited Ship Movement (Y) You have the power to Ooze. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, if you have at least one ship in the encounter, you may use this power to increase or decrease the number of ships you have in the encounter. You may remove some or all of your ships to your colonies, or you may add as many ships as you want (even exceeding the normal maximum of four) from any of your colonies. {If you win the encounter but have no ships left in it, you cannot receive a colony.}
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Spawned on a totally liquid world, Amoebas are highly conscious of vibrations. Quick to withdraw from danger, they are equally able to ooze menacingly into combat when confronted with the proper turbulences. Amoebas pity those who are less able to respond to circumstance and will be sensitive Cosmic masters.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may increase or decrease the number of your ships in the encounter by up to four. This may result in you having more than four ships in the hyperspace gate.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may use your power as an ally.
(Ally Only) (Planning)

:Angler: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Cedric Chin (as Fish), illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Angler wrote:
Fishes for Cards (Y) You have the power to Fish. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to ask any player on the opposing side if he or she has a specific card, such as an attack 12, a regular negotiate card, or the Virus flare. If that player has the card, he or she must give it to you. Otherwise you must draw a card from the deck. If you draw the card you asked for from the deck, you may use this power a second time during this encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Developing on a monaquatic homeworld filled with untold prey species, the Anglers learned patience, stealth, and selectivity – disciplines that serve these passive predators well as they now take to the stars. Assessing the aliens they encounter and luring carefully selected victims to an early demise, the Anglers often reel in valuable spoils to satiate their growing needs.

Wild: You may name a specific card (e.g., attack 12, regular negotiate, or Virus flare). If any player has that card and chooses to give it to you, give him or her this flare. Otherwise, keep this flare and take one card at random from the hand of any player.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may use your power as an ally.
(Ally Only) (Planning)

:Animal: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Edited to make the incorrect prerequisite icon consistent with other similar powers.
Animal wrote:
Throws a Hearty Party (Y) You have the power to Party. When you are not a main player, each time a main player fails to invite you to ally, use this power to force that player to lose a ship of his or her choice to the warp.

As a main player or ally, if your side wins the encounter, use this power to throw a celebration party. Each player on the winning side, including you, may draw one card from the deck.
({Varies}) (As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Alliance) (Resolution)

A nomadic, carefree race, the Animals make it a point to never miss a rockin' party anywhere in the Cosmos – even if they have to throw it themselves while the planet's owners are away. More than one race of would-be Cosmic conquerors has returned from battle only to find their homeworld's ecology wrecked and a few hungover Animals dressed in stained togas clambering into their ships with a bleary, "Hey man, that's what you get for bogarting the planet."

Wild: At the start of any regroup phase, you may throw such a wild party that it causes a cosmic quake. Give this flare to the Animal after use (or discard it, if the Animal isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: When you are not invited to ally by a main player, you may make that player lose two ships instead of one.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)

:Anti-Matter: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Andrew Navaro. FAQ ruling: When Wild or Super Anti-Matter prevents another flare, it returns to the player's hand and cannot be played again that encounter as that particular Wild or Super effect. However, it does not count against the player's limit of one flare per encounter, and (in theory) it could be played again in the same encounter for its other effect (the Wild if the Super had been prevented, and vice versa). See flares for more discussion on this. Tip: Using a Cosmic Zap against yourself essentially converts this power from mandatory to optional, almost guaranteeing you a win in an attack-vs.-attack encounter. Consider negotiating for Cosmic Zaps when you make deals, and don't worry too much if the other players know you have one; the tension this generates can work to your advantage. With experienced players, keeping exactly two ships on an unrevealed tech might also make them wonder if you're hiding a Cosmic Field Generator. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Super Anti-Matter prevented only Super flares. Edited to avoid implying that card values are modified. Link: [Corrected power]
Anti-Matter wrote:
Lower Total Wins (Y) You have the power of Negation. As a main player, after both you and your opponent reveal attack cards, use this power to make the lower total win. Furthermore, when this power is used, your ships as well as any offensive and defensive allies' ships are subtracted from the appropriate side's total instead of adding. Your opponent's total is otherwise figured normally, however.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Spewed forth from a white hole, the worlds of Anti-Matter careen through space negating whatever they encounter. Opposed to the very existence of gross mass, the Anti-Matter is dedicated to reducing all opposition to less than nothing.

Wild: As a main player or ally, when another player tries to use a wild flare, you may prevent him or her from doing so. Use this against only one flare per encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Any Phase)

Super: When another player tries to use a super or wild flare, you may prevent him or her from doing so. Use this against only one flare per encounter.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Arcade: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Arcade wrote:
Wins By Dominating Encounters (Y) You have the power to Pwn. As a main player or ally, after both main players reveal attack cards and your side wins by 10 or more, use this power to pwn one ship from the opposing main player.

As a main player or ally, after your side reveals an attack card and the other main player reveals a negotiate card, use this power to pwn one ship from the opposing main player.

When you pwn a ship, the opposing main player gives you one ship of his or her choice from any of his or her colonies. That ship is placed on this sheet. If there are three ships of the same color or five total ships on this sheet, you immediately win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

ZOMG t3h Arc8d r t3h r0xx0rz!!!! +0+411y pwnt t3h n00bs! Lawl j00 r t3h sux0rz!!

Wild: As a main player or ally, if your side wins an encounter by 10 or more, you may force each player on the losing side to send one additional ship from any of his or her colonies to the warp.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: When using your power, you may choose to pwn a ship belonging to an opposing ally instead of the opposing main player.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Aristocrat: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by the fans, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Aristocrat did not specify a time limit for choosing the initial hand, and did not protect other players' Super flares from being removed from the game. Eon's Wild Aristocrat did not require any shuffling. Eon's Super Aristocrat was completely different; it allowed the player to choose any seven cards from the deck when he needed to draw a new hand.
Aristocrat wrote:
Picks Hand and Draws Extra Flares (R) Game Setup: After flares are added to the deck but before hands are dealt, you have one minute to look through the deck. Take any eight cards (except the Aristocrat flare) to form your starting hand, and then re-shuffle the deck.

You have the power of Privilege. As a main player, any time before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to draw a flare from the unused flare deck and add it to your hand. Then, if you have two or more flares in your hand that do not match any players' alien powers, you must choose one of those unmatched flares and remove it from the game. The flares you remove from the game cannot be drawn again.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Start Turn) (Regroup) (Destiny) (Launch) (Alliance) (Planning)

Beginning life with every advantage, the Aristocrats expect deference and respect from others. Drawing on a storehouse of great wealth from their feudal planet-estates, they now turn their majestic gaze upon the squabbling villeins of space.

Wild: At the start of any encounter, you may take one minute to look through the deck, choose one card, and add it to your hand. Then, shuffle the discard pile together with the deck to form a new deck. Give this flare to the Aristocrat after use (or discard it, if the Aristocrat isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: When using your power, instead of drawing one flare you may discard this flare either to draw three, or to take one minute to look through the unused flare deck and choose any one flare, shuffling the flare deck afterwards.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:artifact cards: Card type; base set, Cosmic Incursion, Cosmic Alliance, and Cosmic Dominion; designed variously by Future Pastimes, Mayfair Games, Fantasy Flight Games, and the fans. Unlike flares, artifacts are played once and then discarded. There is no limit to the number of times an artifact can be played during an encounter. For example, an artifact could be played, discarded, salvaged by Vulch, played again, salvaged again by Space Junk, and played yet again. List: As of Cosmic Dominion, the artifacts in the FFG edition of the game are Card Zap, Cosmic Zap, Emotion Control, Finder, Force Field, Hand Zap, Ionic Gas, Mobius Tubes, Omni-Zap, Plague, Quash, Rebirth, Ship Zap, Solar Wind, Space Junk, and Victory Boon. See also card distribution.
Artifact cards wrote:
Card Zap Negates Cards. Play at any time to negate a flare or artifact card just as a player attempts to use it. The flare or artifact must then be discarded.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Cosmic Zap Stops Powers. Play at any time to cancel one use of any alien's power, including your own. That power may not be used again during the current encounter.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Emotion Control Alters Attack. Play after encounter cards are revealed to treat all attack cards played this encounter as negotiate cards. The main players must then attempt to make a deal.
(As Any Player) (Reveal)

Finder Searches for Card. Play at any time. Choose another player and name a specific card, such as "attack 40," "Clone flare," or "Plague." Look at the chosen player's hand. If the named card is in his or her hand, you may take it.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Force Field Stops Allies. Play after alliances are formed to cancel the alliances of any or all players. Canceled allies return their ships to any of their colonies.
(As Any Player) (Alliance)

Hand Zap Draws New Hand. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player discards his or her entire hand and draws a new hand of eight cards. No cards may be played in response to this artifact except for cards that cancel its effect.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Ionic Gas Stops Compensation and Rewards. Play after the winner of an encounter is determined. No compensation or rewards may be collected this encounter.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Mobius Tubes Frees Ships. Play at the start of your encounter to release all players' ships from the warp. Freed ships return to any of their owners' colonies.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

Omni-Zap Zaps Anything. Play at any time to copy the effect of any other Zap artifact you name, or to cancel and discard any one card that was just played or revealed. If the encounter or an alien power is now unplayable (e.g., by zapping a destiny, encounter, claw, or schizoid card) then an appropriate replacement is drawn or played (drawing a new hand if ncessary).

After use, remove one of your ships from the game or send three of your ships to the warp.

Plague Harms Player. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player loses three ships of his or her choice to the warp and must discard one card of each type (attack, negotiate, morph, artifact, flare, etc.) from his or her hand.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Quash Kills Deal. Play after a deal is made to cancel the deal. The dealing players suffer the penalties for a failed deal.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Rebirth Regains Home Colonies. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player may place one or more of his or her ships, from his or her colonies, onto any planet(s) in his or her home system.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Ship Zap Sends Ship to Warp. Play at any time. Send to the warp any one ship from anywhere in play, or one that has been removed from the game. (If you remove the offense's last ship from the hyperspace gate, the offense continues with zero ships.)
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Solar Wind Reverses Rewards. Play after encounter cards are revealed. Gains for allies are reversed: defensive allies land on the targeted planet if their side wins, while offensive allies receive rewards if their side wins. (If gains were already reversed, they revert to normal instead.)
(As Any Player) (Reveal)

Space Junk Takes Top Discard. Play at any time and choose a player (even yourself). That player takes the top card of the discard pile and adds it to his or her hand. When several cards go into the discard pile at the same time, you may select any one of them for the chosen player to take.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Victory Boon Rewards Defender. Play after the defense wins an encounter. The defense receives rewards equal to the number of his or her ships in the encounter.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

:at random: Certain situations, such as collecting compensation, allow cards to be taken "at random" or "randomly" from another player. Since the reward cards from the reward deck are specifically designed to tempt players into targeting those cards and risking taking a Rift card, these phrases should now be understood to mean "without seeing the faces of the cards." Thus, during any random selection, a player is always allowed to see the backs of the cards and to choose to select cosmic-back and/or reward-back cards as he sees fit. For example, if you are affected by Wild Magician and have encounter cards with both kinds of card backs, you can potentially use those card backs to make sure you know which of your encounter cards you are choosing "at random."

:attack cards: Card type; encounter card; base set, Cosmic Incursion, Cosmic Alliance, and Cosmic Dominion; designed by Future Pastimes; variable attack cards designed by the fans. Values: Standard: –07, –04, –01, 00, 01, 02, 04 through 20, 23, 30, and 40. Variable: 02/20, 03/30, 12/21, and 21/12. See also card distribution. Variable attack cards have a large, black normal value as well as a smaller, white transposed value. When a hazard warning has been drawn, the variable attack card switches to the transposed value upon being revealed as an encounter card. This happens before any other game effects that might modify the card's value or card type.
Attack cards wrote:
Attack –07 — Attack 40 Opposed by Attack: Higher total (ships + card) wins. Opposed by Negotiate: Wins, but opponent collects compensation.

Attack 02/20, Attack 03/30, Attack 12/21, Attack 21/12 Becomes [20/30/21/12] when revealed if any destiny card(s) with a hazard warning were drawn this encounter. Opposed by Attack: Higher total wins. Opposed by Negotiate: Wins, but opponent collects compensation.

:attack bug: Several alien powers and cards use the word "attack" in a nonstandard way that has nothing to do with attack cards. This use of the word is not really appropriate since players might reveal negotiate cards, and it should not be interpreted as a requirement that somebody actually be attacking (with an attack card) in order to use these game effects. The Cosmodex presents these powers and cards with appropriate revisions to conform to existing wording conventions. The use of "attacking ships" on Gluon Mines and Wild Guerrilla really means opposing ships. On Citadel, Leviathan, and Plasma Thrusters, the planet being "attacked" is really the planet being targeted (a convention established on Bully, Lunar Cannon, and Mite). Shadow says "who the offense chooses to attack" when it really means who the offense chooses to encounter.

:Bandit: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Edited for terminology (there is no such thing as an "encounter deck").
Bandit wrote:
"Takes a Spin" Each Turn (R) You have the power to Take a Spin. At the start of each player's turn, including your own, use this power to reveal the top three cards of the {encounter} deck. If all three revealed cards have different card types (negotiate, attack, reinforcement, etc.), discard a card of your choice from your hand. If two of the revealed cards have the same card type, you may add any one of the revealed cards to your hand. If all three revealed cards have the same card type, you may add any or all of the revealed cards to your hand, and all other players must discard all cards of that card type from their hands. After you take a spin, discard any revealed cards that are not added to your hand.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)

Creatures of risk, the one-armed Bandits roam the Cosmos looking for opportunities. However, where other aliens would shy away from near-impossible odds, the Bandits thrive on them. They can often be heard spouting their philosophy – "Come on, take a chance. What do you have to lose?"

Wild: At the start of any player's turn, you may reveal and discard the top card of the deck. If it is a negotiate card, you immediately receive four rewards. Otherwise, nothing happens.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)

Super: After spinning, you may discard one revealed card and reveal the top card of the deck to replace it before resolving your spin.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)

:Barbarian: Alien power, base set, designed by Alan Emrich, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Noteworthy interaction: Barbarian devastates Genius, essentially making its power useless. Retooled gameplay: Emrich's version was optional and worked as the offense or an offensive ally, but allowed only one card to be kept. Edited to clarify the timing of Wild Barbarian's decision.
Barbarian wrote:
Destroys Opponent's Hand (G) You have the power to Loot and Pillage. As the offense, after you win an encounter but before compensation (if any) is collected, use this power to loot your opponent's cards. Take your opponent's hand and look at it. For each ship you have in the encounter, you may choose one card from your opponent's hand and add it to your own. Afterwards, discard the remainder of your opponent's hand.
(Offense Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

A savage race from a harsh solar system, the Barbarians roared out into the Cosmos as soon as they discovered space flight. They have crushed many civilizations before them, carelessly tossing aside priceless cultural treasures in their endless quest for glory, battle, and the lamentations of their enemies.

Wild: When gaining compensation or rewards, you may look at all of the cards you receive and then discard any of them that you do not want, without replacing them.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may use your power as an offensive ally if your side wins, looting the opposing main player's cards.
(Offensive Ally Only) (Resolution)

:base: This term, which appears in the rulebook under the rules for making a deal, is what a colony was called in previous editions.

:Big Space Laser: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Big Space Laser wrote:
As a main player, after you reveal an attack card, you may add 10 to your total if there are no allies on your side.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Black Hole: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Black Hole wrote:
During this encounter, ships that would be lost to the warp are instead removed from the game. A player cannot have fewer ships left in the game than the number of foreign colonies required to win. Any ships lost that would reduce a player below this number are sent to the warp as usual.

:Bride: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Lila Boutin, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Bride wrote:
Marries Players (Y) You have the power to Marry. As a main player, before allies are invited, you may use this power to "marry" your opponent. That player must choose one of his or her ships and place it on this sheet. You may be married to only one player at a time.

You and your "spouse" may ally with each other without being invited and may show each other any cards in your hands at any time. Once per encounter, you may use this power to allow a trade of one card each from your hand and your spouse's hand.

You may "divorce" your spouse at any time by turning that player's ship on your sheet upside-down and taking half of the cards in his or her hand at random (rounded down) as "alimony." You may not remarry a player you previously divorced. If this sheet is lost or turned facedown, you must divorce your current spouse without receiving alimony.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Bride has left a trail of broken circulatory pumps and legal hijinks across the Cosmos, and yet her allure is impossible to resist. The Bride, however, eschews the social pressure of the present and rejects wallowing in the past as she drifts through space longing for a fantasy future with her true soulmate, be it a low-life Hate or a noble Ethic.

Wild: As the defense, after the offense launches ships, you may run away from the encounter. The offense sends his or her ships from the gate to any one of his or her home planets, or any one unoccupied foreign planet, then ends his or her turn.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

Super: You may remarry an opponent that you previously divorced. Turn that player's ship on your sheet faceup. Do not receive alimony from that opponent again.
(Main Player Only) (Destiny/Launch)

:Brute: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Design note: Based on a tweet from Mr. Olson, it appears that Brute was originally called "Crusher" when it was sent to him for artwork. Edited to clarify that Super Brute forces each player to send one of his own ships to the warp.
Brute wrote:
Threatens Opponent's Ships (Y) You have the power to Threaten. As a main player or ally, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to threaten one player on the opposing side. That player must either allow you to look at his or her hand of cards and take one card of your choice, or remove all of his or her ships from the encounter. Removed ships return to any of that player's colonies.

If all of a main player's ships are removed, he or she continues the encounter with zero ships. If all of an ally's ships are removed, he or she is no longer an ally.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

What the Brutes lack in subtlety, they make up for in simplicity. They tend to be an aggressive race, with blunt, thuggish tactics where they can use their strength and massive frames to intimidate any opposition in their way.

Wild: As a main player or ally, before compensation or defender rewards are collected, you may limit all players' compensation and rewards to one.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: As the offense, after alliances are formed, you may force the defense and each of his or her allies to send one of their own ships from the encounter to the warp.
(Offense Only) (Alliance)

:bugs: There are some recurring issues in this edition of the game that affect multiple powers or cards. To avoid describing the problem anew every time, each correction simply references the main entry describing the issue. These include the attack bug (misuse of the word in a non-attack context), the defensive ally bug (leaks caused by defensively allied ships being placed on the table instead of the hyperspace gate), the launch bug (game effects trying to include allies when there can't be any allies), the main player bug (treating allies like a main player), the mandatory flare bug (flares written in the imperative), the recurrent flare bug (flares written as if Eon's unlimited re-use still applied), and the rewards bug (mislabeling and incomplete on-card definitions of rewards).

:Bully: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Wild Bully was usable even when the player was not involved in the encounter. Edited to avoid suggesting that Bully increases the number of ships going to the warp when something like Lunatic, Spiff, or Sting is in play; to fix the coexistence bug; and to prevent Wild Bully's target from choosing ships that he is going to lose anyway (cf. Gambler).
Bully wrote:
Selects Losing Ships (Y) You have the power to Intimidate. As a main player, after winning an encounter in which both players revealed attack cards, you may use this power to choose which ships your opponent must lose. Your opponent still loses the same number of ships he or she had in the encounter, but you take them from anywhere. {If you are the offense and leave any of your opponent's ships on the target planet, your ships coexist there with your opponent's unless another game effect prevents you from doing so, in which case you do not receive a colony and must return your ships to your other colonies.} If you are the defense, any of your opponent's ships that you leave in the hyperspace gate return to his or her other colonies.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Habitually cruel to those who show signs of weakness, the Bully exploits any opportunity to run roughshod over its opponents. The false courage that is the hallmark of the Bully strikes terror into the less aggressive races of the Universe, and many flee rather than risk a confrontation. If none stand in its way, the Bully seeks to trample its way to Cosmic dominance.

Wild: As a main player, when your opponent reveals a negotiate card, you may use this flare. That player must either immediately give you a colony on a planet of your choice where he or she has a ship or else lose two ships of his or her choice to the warp. These lost ships may not be involved in the encounter. Cards changed to negotiate cards (such as by Emotion Control) still trigger this effect.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may use your power on opposing allies.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Bulwark: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unanswered questions: What happens in situations covered by the third paragraph if it is not possible for the saved ships to remain in place? What happens in situations where the number of ships to be lost is not known in advance (e.g., Wrack)? What if the player wants to use a voluntary ship-loss effect such as Wild Kamikaze? Does the Super flare really only work for discards of exactly one card? The latter half of the sentence seems to think not.
Bulwark wrote:
Reduces Ships Lost to One (G) You have the power of Resilience. As the offense or an ally, whenever you would lose ships to the warp that are involved in an encounter, use this power to send only one of the involved ships to the warp. The other ships involved in the encounter are returned to any of your colonies.

As the defense, whenever you would lose ships to the warp that are involved in an encounter, use this power to send only one of the involved ships to the warp. The other ships involved in the encounter remain on the colony.

Whenever you would lose ships to the warp as a result of any other game effect, use this power to reduce the number of ships lost to one.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The toughness of the Bulwarks is legendary. They think nothing of facing overwhelming odds or throwing themselves into the thick of battle, knowing they have the ability to endure nearly any hardship. The Bulwarks can also be as thick-headed as they are thick-skinned.

Wild: As a main player, when you would send more than one ship to the warp, you may reduce the number of ships sent to one. Ships not sent to the warp return to your other colonies.
(Main Player Only) (Any Phase)

Super: When you would discard a card at random or another player would collect compensation from you, you may choose which cards to discard or give that player as compensation.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Butler: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Gate aiming: Butler is indeed allowed to position the gate where the offense already has a colony, as long as this creates a legal encounter in accordance with the destiny draw (Encounter magazine v1n5p8). Successful: The successful encounter decreed to apply to the original offense by the Wild Butler revision is simply that: a success. The delegated player's win or deal is not considered a win or deal for the original player, but the original player is "successful" for the purpose of continuing his turn. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Butler collected tips in Lucre rather than cards, and when passing out players' cards was able to look at any of them that were purchased with Lucre. Eon's Wild Butler was completely different; it had an effect similar to Classic Wild Filch that allowed secretly throwing other players' ships into the warp. Edited to make the base power work correctly when the offense draws his own color, to prevent Wild Butler from allowing the player to ally against himself if he is the defense, to eliminate confusion from the incorrect statement about play resuming from where it left off, and to clarify that the surrogate offense's outcome affects whether the original offense may continue his turn. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Butler wrote:
Gets Cards for Chores (Y) You have the power to Serve. You flip the destiny card, aim the hyperspace gate, launch ships, and perform all other manually demeaning chores for the offense after he or she signals the start of his or her encounter. Unless the offense gives you a tip of one card at random from his or her hand, you may use this power to perform your choice of either of the following: aim the hyperspace gate at any planet in the {defense's} targeted system where a legal encounter can be had or launch the offense's ships from any of his or her colonies (but only as many ships as the offense specifies).

If the offense does tip you, you must obey his or her wishes with regard to your chores for the rest of the encounter. You must perform certain functions without reward, such as dealing out cards that a player is entitled to. You must be courteous, and a tip of one card is all that you may collect per encounter.
(Not Offense) (Optional) (Launch)

"To serve is to live." The motto of the house of Butt guides its family as they build for their true inner hope: to turn the Cosmic tables and rule forever.

Wild: As the offense, at the start of your regroup phase, you may choose another player to be the offense for this encounter by saying "After you, I insist." The encounter is then carried out as usual, except that player must invite you to ally with him or her if possible. {After the encounter ends, play resumes from where it left off.} If that player wins or deals, it counts as a successful encounter for you.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

Super: You may demand a tip of two cards instead of one.
(Not Offense) (Launch)

:bystanders: This term is used to describe colonies or ships that are not participating in an encounter, even though they are on a planet where an encounter is taking place. For example, if Red has an encounter against Green on a planet that also hosts a Yellow colony, the ships in the Yellow colony are just bystanders; for all practical purposes they simply "do not exist" where the encounter is concerned (except, of course, in unusual circumstances like Xenophile counting the Yellow colony for his power or Filth landing on that planet as the result of the encounter and sending Yellow away — although even in these cases, the Yellow bystander ships were never actually "involved" in the encounter). There are a couple of cards on which this term was not used, but really should have been; the Cosmodex revises Wild Gorgon and Wild Guerrilla to say "bystanders" for clarity.

:Calculator: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Tip: If you can play a negative attack card against Anti-Matter or an upset Loser, unless your opponent also has one of the two remaining negative attacks then equalizing will increase the value of his card and your chances of winning.
Calculator wrote:
Reduces Higher Attack Card (Y) You have the power to Equalize. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to declare an "equalize." If you do so and both cards are revealed to be different attack cards, the value of the higher card is reduced by the value of the lower card. Thus if an attack 15 and an attack 08 are played, the 15 has its value reduced to 7, but the 08 keeps its value 8. The encounter is then concluded normally.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Defenseless on a jungle world, the order of Calculators grew adroit at ensnaring their powerful but bungling competitors. Now adept at turning strength back against itself, they study the prospects of galactic empire, trusting that other grosser beings will not also grow calculating.

Wild: As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may call "odd" or "even." When the cards are revealed, if both are attacks and their total is odd or even as you predicted, your opponent's card value is reduced by the value of your card. If you were wrong, your card is reduced by the value of your opponent's.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may use your power as an ally.
(Ally Only) (Planning)

:card distribution: The cards contained in the first six product releases are as follows:

Cosmic Encounter: Totals by deck: 20 destiny, 72 cosmic, 20 tech, 51 flare. During gameplay, a full cosmic deck has 72 cards plus 10 flares for a total of 82 cards (if there are more than five players, add 2 flares per additional player).
• 20 Destiny: Blue x3, Green x3, Purple x3, Red x3, Yellow x3, Wild x2, Special x3
• 39 Attacks: 00, 01, 04 x4, 05, 06 x7, 07, 08 x7, 09, 10 x4, 11, 12 x2, 13, 14 x2, 15, 20 x2, 23, 30, 40
• 15 Negotiates
01 Morph
06 Reinforcements: +2 x2, +3 x3, +5
• 11 Artifacts: Card Zap x2, Cosmic Zap x2, Emotion Control, Force Field, Ionic Gas, Mobius Tubes x2, Plague, Quash
• 20 Techs: Coldsleep Ship, Collapsium Hulls, Cosmic Field Generator, Delta Scanners, Energy Cloak, Enigma Device, Genesis Bomb, Gluon Mines, Infinity Drive, Lunar Cannon, Omega Missile, Plasma Thrusters, Precursor Seed, The Prometheus, The Qax, Quark Battery, Tech Scrambler, Vacuum Turbines, Warpspace Key, Xenon Lasers
• 51 Flares: Amoeba, Anti-Matter, Barbarian, Calculator, Chosen, Citadel, Clone, Cudgel, Dictator, Fido, Filch, Filch (Classic Edition), Fodder, Gambler, Grudge, Hacker, Hate, Healer, Human, Kamikaze, Loser, Machine, Macron, Masochist, Mind, Mirror, Miser, Mite, Mutant, Observer, Oracle, Pacifist, Parasite, Philanthropist, Reincarnator, Remora, Reserve, Shadow, Sorcerer, Spiff, Tick-Tock, Trader, Tripler, Vacuum, Virus, Void, Vulch, Warpish, Warrior, Will, Zombie

Cosmic Incursion: Totals by deck: 3 destiny, 32 reward, 20 flare. The reward cards reside in their own deck and thus do not affect the cosmic deck's distribution.
03 Destiny: Orange x3
• 11 Attacks: –07, –04, –01, 10 x3, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23
03 Negotiate (Crooked Deals)
01 Morph
04 Kickers: x0, x2 x2, x3
04 Reinforcements: +4,+5 x2, +6
05 Artifacts: Card Zap, Cosmic Zap, Finder, Hand Zap, Space Junk
04 Rifts: 3, 4 x2, 5
• 20 Flares: Bully, Chronos, Cryo, Deuce, Disease, Ethic, Fungus, Fury, Genius, Ghoul, Guerrilla, Leviathan, Locust, Magician, Mercenary, Merchant, Plant, Seeker, Sniveler, Symbiote

Cosmic Conflict: Totals by deck: 6 destiny, 28 hazard, 21 flare. Both versions of the rulesheet claim there are 29 hazard cards, but this is incorrect.
06 Destiny: Black x3, Invasion! x3
• 28 Hazards: Alliance, Black Hole, The Cosmic Guardian, Cosmic Nebula, Cosmic Upheaval, Energy Fields x2, The Entropy Beast, Galactic Council, It's Full of Stars x3, Meteor Storm x2, Mirror Universe x2, Odd Way to Win a War x2, Psychic Switcheroo, Reverse Rewards x3, Sargasso Web x2, Temporal Anomaly x3, The Witness
• 21 Flares: Cavalry, Changeling, The Claw, Empath, Empath (Classic Edition), Filth, Glutton, Graviton, Industrialist, Invader, Lunatic, Mimic, Prophet, Relic, Saboteur, Sadist, Siren, Trickster, Visionary, Warhawk, Xenophile

Cosmic Alliance: Totals by deck: 6 schizoid, 3 destiny, 24 large group, 21 flare. The 24 Large Group Cosmic Cards in Cosmic Alliance are intended to be added to the deck for games involving seven or more players; thus the full cosmic deck with large group cards and flares will range between 108 and 112 cards.
• 06 Schizoid cards: Bluffer, Colonizer, Diplomat, Invader, Relocator, Xenophobe
03 Destiny: White x3
• 12 Attacks: 00, 02, 04, 06 x2, 08 x2, 10, 12, 14, 20, 30
05 Negotiates
01 Morph
02 Reinforcements: +4, +8
04 Artifacts: Card Zap, Cosmic Zap, Force Field, Quash
• 21 Flares: Animal, Bandit, Butler, Chrysalis, Crystal, Cyborg, Extortionist, General, Gorgon, Horde, Lightning, Poison, Pygmy, Reborn, Remote, Sapient, Schizoid, Schizoid (Classic Edition), Skeptic, Sting, Winner

Cosmic Storm: Totals by deck: 10 space station, 25 flare.
• 10 Space stations: Alien Outpost, Big Space Laser, Colony Cloak, Cosmic Energy Generator, Observation Platform, Shield Generator, Shock Trooper Shuttle Pods, Tactical Array, Temporal Matrix, and Transdimensional Rift Relay
• 25 Flares: Arcade, Brute, Bulwark, Converter, Coordinator, Dervish, Grumpus, Mouth, Neighbor, Outlaw, Patriot, Phantasm, Porcupine, Roach, Scavenger, Sloth, Sneak, Squee, Swindler, Sycophant, Tide, Tyrant, Vox, Worm, and Wormhole

Cosmic Dominion: Totals by deck: 32 reward, 30 flare. The reward cards reside in their own deck and thus do not affect the cosmic deck’s distribution.
05 Attacks: 02/20, 03/30, 12/21 x2, 21/12
04 Negotiates: Epic Oratory, Faulty Translator, Right of Refusal, Self Defense
01 Morph
02 Retreats
04 Intimidates: -09, 19, 29, 39
05 Kickers: x–1 (Reverse Polarity), x1 (Self Destruct), x2 (Duplicity), x2 (Jamming Signal), x4 (Give War a Chance)
02 Reinforcements: +4, +X
05 Artifacts: Omni-Zap, Rebirth, Ship Zap, Solar Wind, Victory Boon
04 Rifts: 1, 2 x2, 3
• 30 Flares: Ace, Alchemist, Angler, Aristocrat, Bride, Daredevil, Diplomat, Doppelganger, Engineer, Explorer, Greenhorn, Host, Joker, Judge, Laser, Lizard, Love, Mesmer, Mirage, Muckraker, Pentaform, Pickpocket, Pirate, Quartermaster, Reactor, Tourist, Usurper, Voyager, Whirligig, Yin-Yang

CosmicCon Preview: One preview alien was given out to CosmicCon attenders.
01 Flare: Demon

All Combined cosmic and reward cards from all sets:
• 67 Attacks: –07, –04, –01, 00 x2, 01, 02, 02/20, 03/30, 04 x5, 05, 06 x9, 07, 08 x9, 09, 10 x8, 11, 12 x3, 12/21 x2, 13, 14 x3, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 x3, 21/12, 23 x2, 30 x2, 40
• 27 Negotiates: regular x20, Crooked Deal x3, Epic Oratory, Faulty Translator, Right of Refusal, Self Defense
04 Morphs
02 Retreats
04 Intimidates: -09, 19, 29, 39
• 14 Reinforcements: +2 x2, +3 x3, +4 x3, +5 x3, +6, +8, +X
09 Kickers: x0, x–1 (Reverse Polarity), x1 (Self Destruct), x2 x2, x2 (Duplicity), x2 (Jamming Signal), x3, x4 (Give War a Chance)
08 Rifts: 1, 2 x2, 3 x2, 4 x2, 5
• 25 Artifacts: Card Zap x4, Cosmic Zap x4, Emotion Control, Finder, Force Field x2, Hand Zap, Ionic Gas, Mobius Tubes x2, Omni-Zap, Plague, Quash x2, Rebirth, Ship Zap, Solar Wind, Space Junk, Victory Boon

:card modifications: Many different game effects can modify encounter cards, reinforcements, and the like, such as by changing a numeric value, converting the card into a different type, or duplicating another card. It's usually clear how these effects work (and the FAQ clarifies how Morph interacts with other modifications), but determining how other, unrelated effects should treat a modified card can be a challenge. For example, if Reserve converts an attack 06 into a reinforcement card, does this still match The Claw's attack 06 claw card? Can another player who holds Wild Reserve pick up the converted attack 06 since it was played as a reinforcement? We need a clear way to know which game effects should refer to the card's original, printed identity and which ones should refer to its current, modified state. Player consensus seems to be that the following ruling, devised by Phil Fleischmann, does a good job of answering the questions while supporting good gameplay: Unless otherwise specified, game effects that strictly affect encounter resolution — meaning those effects that impact encounter card types/values, kickers, reinforcements, main player totals, the method of determining the winner and loser, deals, compensation, rewards, and disposition of the involved ships such as landing on the planet, returning to colonies, going to the warp, etc. — all refer to the card's current, modified type/value. Every other kind of game effect refers to the card's original, printed type/value (a.k.a. its "ink"). When a card is physically replaced by another card, then all effects would of course use the new card. Examples of how all this plays out:

Arcade pwning a ship is not a function of encounter resolution, so for Arcade to use its second paragraph it must reveal an actual attack card against an actual negotiate card. If something like Empath or Emotion Control were to change either card, Arcade would still pwn a ship.

Anti-Matter reveals a negotiate vs. opponent's attack 20. Anti Matter plays Wild Pacifist to change his negotiate into an attack 15. His power, because it modifies the method of encounter resolution, sees his card as an attack 15 and activates based on both players revealing attack cards.

Wild Bully says "when your opponent reveals a negotiate card, you may force that player to either immediately give you a colony... or else lose two ships". Ordinarily, this would not be playable if your opponent revealed an actual attack or morph card and then it got changed to a negotiate, because it's not specifically related to encounter resolution. However, Wild Bully concludes with the following sentence: "Cards changed to negotiate cards (such as by Emotion Control) still trigger this effect." Thus the flare is playable whether the negotiate was natural or synthetic, or even if a natural negotiate got changed to something else (say by Wild Human).

The Cosmic Guardian converts your attack 20 into a negotiate and you lose the encounter. You still collect compensation because compensation sees your card in its modified form. (However, The Cosmic Guardian would be irrelevant when Wild Disease forces everyone to show a card and try not to match anyone else's card type, since Wild Disease fires during Regroup and cares only about the ink.)

Wild Deuce requires you to match the current (modified) value of one of the revealed cards, since its effect is to modify the total of one of the main players.

Empath and his opponent both reveal negotiates. The opponent plays Wild Human to convert his card to an attack 42. Empath can now use his power to convert it back to a negotiate.

Super Genius must match the ink, since its effect is outside of the encounter resolution.

Industrialist cannot stack a Morph or a negotiate card on his sheet, even if they have been converted to something else. However, if Super Empath exchanged a negotiate card with an actual attack 06 from hand, then Industrialist could of course stack the physical attack 06 card, since he would be checking the ink on the card he is now considered to have revealed.

• For encounter resolution purposes, Gambler's unchallenged bluff card is whatever he claimed it was. For all other effects, it is a card of unknown identity and thus most of those other effects would not be playable if they needed to know the actual identity. The Claw, for example, cannot match Gambler if -the bluff card goes unchallenged, because the real identity is unknowable and the claimed identity is not ink.

Reserve plays the attack -07 as a reinforcement. Anti Matter holds Wild Reserve but may not play it to pick up the discarded attack -07, because this flare does not affect encounter resolution and thus cannot consider the -07 a reinforcement card.

Spiff requires the current (modified) type of both cards to be attack, since its effect applies to the disposition of lost ships.

Wild Vacuum says "For each main player other than you who reveals an attack card, you may retrieve one ship from the warp." Since this effect must inspect the ink, you can still count the actual attack cards that were revealed, even after (say) Emotion Control has converted attack card(s) into negotiates.

Vox reveals an attack 08 and then makes it go up to 11. Odd Way to Win a War is outcome-relevant and thus recognizes this as an odd attack card.

Warhawk will continue to be a source of debate. Since it must consider the current identities of the cards played, we still need to know whether it re applies itself whenever one of the cards changes to a negotiate.

Note that this ruling is designed to cover modifications to cards whose purpose is pretty much always encounter resolution: basically encounter cards, kickers, and reinforcements. If other types of cards that are more general-purpose start to get modified by some new effect (such as Mesmer reskinning artifacts), this ruling might still be perfectly serviceable; or we may need to revisit it.

:card types: The card types in this edition of Cosmic Encounter are attack, morph, negotiate, reinforcement, artifact, flare, destiny, tech, rift, kicker, hazard, schizoid, space station, intimidate, and retreat. "Encounter card" is not a card type, but rather a special category or collection of four card types: attack, negotiate, retreat, and morph. References: Game effects that target or group cards by type include Alchemist, Bandit, Doppelganger, Hate, Love, Muckraker, Plague, Wild Alchemist, and Wild Disease.


:Card Zap: Artifact, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Zap wars: There are two Card Zaps in the base set, one in Cosmic Incursion's reward deck, and a fourth in Cosmic Alliance's large group deck. It is perfectly legal for one Card Zap to cancel another one, and for a third one to then cancel the second, which would un-cancel the first. Naturally, the fourth one could flip it all back the other way, effectively re-canceling the first one. Retooled gameplay: Card Zap combines the functions of three cards from earlier editions: Eon's Flarezap and Un-Zap, and Mayfair's Edict Zap. FFG's combined version of the classic zappers is thus more versatile and valuable, as well as more strategically interesting because the player has additional things to consider in choosing the best time to use the card. Whereas the old Un-Zap targeted zap cards by name, Card Zap targets flares and artifacts by card type; because of this difference you cannot use Card Zap to cancel the Cosmic Field Generator.
Card Zap wrote:
Negates Cards. Play at any time to negate a flare or artifact card just as a player attempts to use it. The flare or artifact must then be discarded.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:cards: Discarding: If for some reason it matters what order cards are discarded in, the FAQ specifies that "the defense's card goes on top." (The sequence for cards other than the two encounter cards is left unspecified.) Drawing: If a player needs to draw cards and there are not enough in the deck after shuffling the discard pile, see cosmic quake. Showing: You may make whatever claims you like (true or false) about what you have in your hand, but you cannot actually show your cards to anyone else unless a game effect causes you to do so. Discussing: All discussion about cards, hands, or any other aspect of the game must be public; no whispered, signaled, or otherwise private communication is allowed (based on an email response from FFG as reported by SirHandsome) unless secrecy is indicated by a particular game effect, such as Wild Visionary.


:Cavalry: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Name collision: Cavalry and Reserve both have "the power to Reinforce." Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Cavalry said "anything that affects the main player's card, such as Chronos, has the same effect on yours." The new version rules that the opposite way, wisely avoiding all kinds of existing and future interaction problems. (Chronos is also nicely revised to take care of this situation; Cavalry would return his card to his hand and is free to play it again if he likes, which makes Cav a bit stronger in this specific case than it was under Mayfair.) Also, FFG wisely changed Mayfair's "your card has no effect" to "this [meaning Cavalry's attack card] has no effect," thus fixing Mayfair's issue where the main player revealing a Compromise technically made Cavalry's Compromise useless. Mayfair's Wild Cavalry was completely different; it essentially gave Chosen's power to all allies in the encounter. Mayfair's Super Cavalry was considerably weaker, allowing an ally to reinforce Cavalry without requiring it. FFG's version essentially works both ways, since you can always say to your chosen ally "don't you wish you could use my power to help us?" and if he says yes, then play your flare. Edited to clarify that the ally affected by Super Cavalry must still adhere to the base power's timing.
Cavalry wrote:
Plays Encounter Card as Ally (G) You have the power to Reinforce. As an ally, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to play an attack or negotiate card facedown from your hand off to one side. This second card is not considered your side's encounter card and isn't affected by game effects that target your side's encounter card, such as those of the Oracle or Sorcerer. Reveal your card when encounter cards are revealed. If you reveal your card to be an attack, add it to your side's total. This has no effect if your side's encounter card is a negotiate. If you reveal a negotiate and your side loses the encounter, you receive compensation after your side's main player has received compensation, if applicable. In any case, your card is discarded after use.
(Ally Only) (Optional) (Planning)

This race of interstellar policemen has gained quite a reputation for keeping peace on the fringes of space. Many diverse aliens have called upon the Cavalry to help suppress outpost revolutions. Now the Cavalry hope to rule the Cosmos by becoming indispensable.

Wild: As a main player, you may play this flare when your opponent needs a new hand. Cards are drawn one at a time until he or she has the cards needed for the encounter (usually one encounter card). Your opponent draws the balance of the new hand at the end of the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Any Phase)

Super: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may choose one player allied with you. {That} After cards are selected, that player must play an encounter card to reinforce you, if able, as though he or she had your alien power.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:challenge: This term, which appears in Super Tick-Tock's game text and in Siren's short power description, is what an encounter was called in previous editions.

:Changeling: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Swapping powers: If an alien power specifies that it cannot be stolen, then it also cannot be traded, loaned, etc.; this and other related leaks have been patched on the relevant aliens (Horde, Pygmy, and Symbiote) by adding that they cannot be separated from their player color. The reference to the powers' facets going along with those powers should be considered a general rule (see facets of powers for more information). Retooled gameplay: Prior versions of Changeling forced power swapping without allowing a card draw instead. This is a welcome change to many players who might have enjoyed Changeling as a concept but grew weary of the effect in actual practice. The revised version is less "busy" and more strategic. Eon's Wild Changeling was worded in such a way that you might randomly get your flare back; FFG's rewording nicely prevents this. Edited to correctly refer to Warrior's tokens rather than the "points" he had in previous editions.
Changeling wrote:
Swaps Powers with Opponent (G) You have the power to Change Form. As a main player, after the defense is determined, use this power. Either draw a card from the deck and add it to your hand or swap alien powers with your opponent. This power may be used only once per encounter. When swapping alien powers, you get all facets of that power – e.g., the Miser's hoard, the Warrior's tokens, The Claw's claw, etc.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Destiny)

The childlike Changelings love to play, and gleefully anticipate new experiences. Recently they have developed the unsettling ability to shed their psyches in exchange for those of others. Their standard greeting of "I just don't seem to be myself today" provokes panic in many a passing acquaintance as the Changelings leapfrog about the Cosmos.

Wild: At any time, you may draw a card at random from the hand of the player to your left. Afterwards, give this flare to that player. Use this flare only once per encounter.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When you use your power, you may swap powers with any player in the game.
(Main Player Only) (Destiny)

:Chosen: Alien power, base set, designed by Mayfair Games, revised by Jack Reda and Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: When using Super Chosen, the player may look at the cards drawn for divine intervention before deciding whether to play the Super flare. Zap timing: A player who wishes to zap Chosen must do so before cards are drawn (see ________). Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Chosen was considerably weaker, drawing one (and only one) encounter card to replace (not add to) the played encounter card. Mayfair's Wild Chosen was completely different; it allowed the player to add or subtract 10 after cards were revealed. Mayfair's Super Chosen allowed only edicts (artifacts) and flares to be kept while drawing for divine intervention.
Chosen wrote:
Takes New Encounter Card (G) You have the power of Divine Intervention. As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may use this power to pray for divine intervention once per encounter. To do so, draw three cards from the deck. If none are encounter cards, discard them, and there is no further effect. If you draw any encounter cards, you may choose one of the drawn encounter cards to replace your revealed encounter card (which is then discarded). If you have revealed an attack card and choose another attack card for divine intervention, the new card may either replace or add its value to the value of your revealed attack card, your choice. All other cards drawn for divine intervention are then discarded, and the encounter is resolved with the new card or card value.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

A deeply spiritual and philosophical race, the Chosen have become attuned to a higher force in the Cosmos that they call upon in times of need.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may draw one card from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may keep any non-encounter cards drawn from the deck while drawing for divine intervention.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Chronos: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Tip: Even when an encounter goes your way, sometimes you may want to use your power just to get back cards you played, such as Finder, Space Junk, Wild Sorcerer, and Zaps. Of course you have to weigh the value of the recovered card(s) against the likelihood that the replay of the encounter will also be favorable. Retooled gameplay: FFG wisely added the statement about taking back into hand all other cards played during the initial run of the encounter, which clarifies what happens with kickers. Eon's Wild Chronos was completely different; it simply caused a new destiny to be drawn (this was slightly retooled to become FFG's Wild Dictator). Eon's Super Chronos was completely different; it allowed a player one last-ditch encounter to try to win the game instead of another player who had just won. Reversed edit: See Cosmodex reversals. Edited to eliminate the implication that Super Chronos forces Chronos to change his encounter card. Links: [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Chronos wrote:
Can Replay Encounter (Y) You have the power of Time Travel. As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may use this power to call out "time travel." You then return your revealed encounter card to your hand while your opponent sets his or her revealed encounter card aside. If your opponent has no more encounter cards in hand and shows you so, he or she instead returns the revealed encounter card to his or her hand. All other cards played since the start of the planning phase return to their owners' hands. The encounter is then replayed from the start of the planning phase. You both can use any cards in your hands, and this time the outcome is final. When the encounter is over, your opponent takes back the card that was set aside.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Unique among life forms, the Chronos has forever been able to pierce the veil of time and control its own past. Now, the elite of the race grows tired of a world where minor rivalries lead to constant paradoxes and time-quakes and has set out to redesign the Universe. That this involves altering reality comes as past history to the Chronos.

Wild: At the start of any regroup phase, you may look through the discard pile, choose one card, and add it to your hand. Then, shuffle the discard pile together with the deck to form a new deck. Give this flare to the Chronos after use (or discard it, if the Chronos isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: When you use your power, you may force your opponent to play the same encounter card a second time. {while you} You may change or replay your encounter card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Chrysalis: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Noteworthy interaction: It's interesting that after you metamorphose Chrysalis into another alien, you then are able to use its flare (in Wild mode) to continue tweaking which alien you are. Edited to avoid the appearance of optionality, for wording consistency, to clarify that the nine unused flares are not sent to the discard pile, to resolve Wild Chrysalis' "transform" ambiguity, and to properly sequence its redraw before the go/no-go decision rather than after. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Chrysalis wrote:
Becomes Another Alien (R) Game Setup: Place eight tokens on this sheet (six if playing with four planets per player).

You have the power to Change. At the start of {any} every encounter, use this power to discard one token from this sheet. If there are no tokens left on this sheet, look at the top 10 flares of the unused flare deck. Choose one of these 10 flares corresponding to an alien that does not have Game Setup text and is allowed in the current game. You become that alien for the rest of the game. Add its flare card to your hand and take its alien sheet. Then, {discard} remove the other nine flare cards from the game and discard this sheet.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

The Chrysalis know that the Time of Change is coming. Only then will they attain their true potential and become what they were always meant to be. Only then will the Cosmos fall before them.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after alliances are formed, you may draw the top card of the unused flare deck and transform into that alien, zapping your other power(s), until the end of this encounter. If the alien has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, draw again. You may choose not to transform after you see what card you've drawn{, and if you draw an alien with Game Setup text, discard it and draw again}.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Alliance)

Super: When you use your power, you may discard two tokens from your sheet instead of one.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Citadel: Alien power, base set, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Planetary relocation: Whenever a planet is moved, any citadel cards placed next to that planet go with it. Outcome leak: Whether or not to discard activated citadel cards is defined for wins and losses, but is left undefined for deals, failed deals, and canceled encounters. Tip: Normally you build positive citadels on your own planets and negative ones on other players' planets, of course, but medium to high attack cards placed in Anti-Matter's or Loser's system can help you and your allies win encounters there (even if Loser doesn't call an upset). House Rule: According to the FAQ, if the Citadel alien sheet leaves the game, citadel cards remain where they are, "stuck" for the rest of the game. The Cosmodex prefers to discard them, especially since such a clarification is already needed for planetary destruction. Edited to clarify that placing a citadel card is limited to once per encounter rather than once per turn, to plug the undefined-outcomes leak, and to give the power a cleaner exit condition (even though this contradicts the FAQ). Link: [Corrected power]
Citadel wrote:
Builds Citadels on Planets (R) You have the power of Fortification. During each player's {turn} encounter, after destiny is drawn, you may play an attack card from your hand faceup next to any planet in any system as a citadel.

If a planet with one or more citadels is targeted, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to activate all citadels on the planet. If you do, add their combined value to the defense's total for the encounter. If you activate your citadels on a planet and the defense loses the encounter, discard the citadels. Otherwise, they stay in place.

Discard citadels if their planet is destroyed
or this sheet leaves the game.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Planning)

Brilliant architects who obsessively build vast fortresses as they travel throughout the Cosmos, the Citadels are often welcomed with open arms by the other races, who are delighted to benefit from the Universe's best defenses. Of course, what the Citadels don't tell them is that these fortifications only work when the Citadels want them to do so.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may add 5 to the defense's total.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: Your citadels may either add to or subtract from the defense's total when you activate them. Citadels are still discarded if the defense loses, even when they are used to subtract.
(As Any Player) (Planning)

:classic flares: As of Cosmic Dominion, the alien powers that have both standard and classic flares are Empath (Cosmic Conflict), Filch (Cosmic Encounter), and Schizoid (Cosmic Alliance). Classic Wild Filch is easily one of the most controversial effects in the whole game, adored by some and despised by others.

:Claw, The: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by James Hata, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Negotiate leak: The player's very first claw card cannot be a negotiate, but there is no such restriction in the two passages that allow claw cards to be replaced. Thus, as written, The Claw player could simply swap in a negotiate card during the first regroup phase of the game if he wanted to. Refresh leak: The only way to get a new claw card onto the sheet is when the current claw card has been played or swapped out. This means if anything happens to remove the claw card from the sheet outside the normal use of the power, then The Claw is useless for the rest of the game. A single cosmic quake (according to Kevin Wilson's interpretation) would do this; however, the Cosmodex strongly recommends playing the Cosmic Quake rule as printed and reshuffling only players' hands. Should there arise other ways of removing the card from the sheet, then the Cosmodex may revise this power to allow the sheet to be filled whenever it is empty, has been done for Cyborg. House Rule: As written, The Claw applies only when cards are played, not revealed. This of course is problematic with encounter cards, since The Claw cannot know when a matching facedown encounter card has been played (and reveal time is too late). The Cosmodex believes the power should also work when cards are revealed, which may possibly introduce a few unintended interactions. Edited to fix the negotiate card leak and for clarity. Link: [Corrected power]
The Claw wrote:
Steals Planets (R) Game Setup: Choose one {non-negotiate} card from your starting hand to be your "claw" and place it facedown on this sheet; then draw a card from the deck.

You have the power of The Claw. Your claw is not part of your hand. Other players may not look at or draw it. At the start of any regroup phase, you may swap a card from your hand with your claw.

Once per encounter, when another player plays or reveals a copy of the card you have as your claw, if it is not a negotiate card, use this power and show your claw. After the end of the encounter, choose a planet in that player's home system, send all ships on it to the warp, and move it to your home system to become a new home planet for yourself (do not automatically establish a colony on it). Then, return your claw card to your hand and choose any card from your hand to become your new claw.

Each stolen planet in your home system counts as a foreign colony toward your win, even if inhabited by other players. (If you gain a colony there, the colony is a home colony and the planet itself still counts as a foreign colony.)
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Recently, entire planets have gone missing, leaving behind only orphaned, desolate moons – one of which was marred by enormous claw marks.

Wild: As a main player or ally, if both revealed encounter cards are attack cards of the same value, you may make your side automatically win the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may use your power any time two main players reveal identical encounter cards. When this happens, choose which main player to steal a planet from (your opponent, if you are a main player). You may still only use your power once per encounter.
(As Any Player) (Reveal)

:Clone: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. FAQ ruling: If Sorcerer switches cards, the one Clone ends up with is the one he may return to his hand. FAQ clarification: Clone prevents his card from going to the discard pile, so it takes effect before powers like Filch and Fido that wait for cards to be discarded. Retooled gameplay: FFG omits the clarification that Wild Clone overrides Vulch, but this does not appear to be a gameplay change. Edited to implement the FAQ ruling on Sorcerer and to clarify that Wild Clone can be played after the artifact has had its effect (rather than having to play the flare first and risk the artifact getting Card Zapped). Link: [Kevin Wilson on Clone]
Clone wrote:
Keeps Own Encounter Card (G) You have the power to Replicate. As a main player, after the encounter is resolved (and after any compensation is claimed), you may use this power to add your encounter card to your hand instead of discarding it.

If encounter cards are switched by another game effect, the final card you use in the resolution phase is the one you may add to your hand.

(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

A prolific species on a slowly cooling globe, the Clones traditionally selected the best of their race to represent them in territorial struggles. But as the gene pool thinned, one clan developed techniques to artificially duplicate their champion before battle. Thus, always rejuvenated, they came to dominate their world during the geologic crisis and emerged from it anxious to carry their new knowledge into a Cosmic competition.

Wild: You do not have to discard an artifact you just played. Instead you may retain it and play it again during a later encounter.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may choose to receive up to double the normal amount of compensation, if your opponent has sufficient cards.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:coexist: One player's ships can always coexist on the same planet with other players' ships unless some game effect (typically Filth) specifies otherwise. Some cards spell this rule out in varying degrees of detail, but others are silent on the matter. These inconsistent attempts at clarification can be easily ignored if you just remember that coexistence is always allowed unless and until something specifically tells you otherwise. (In fact, considering that Filth's own text makes these situations clear, these unnecessary "clarifications" really need to be disregarded since they give the wrong impression about the timing of these interactions; see coexistence bug.)

:coexistence bug: At least 25 different aliens and cards cause two or more players' ships to coexist on the same planet. Most of these simply state (or even just imply) the coexistence, without any extra verbiage, and they all work correctly as expected. However, two of them (Bully and Disease) specifically state that their effect cannot be used if some other game effect "prevents" coexistence, and a third (Spiff) has similar but less specific language apparently intended for the same purpose. These "clarifications" are problematic and should be disregarded. Inconsistent and unnecessary: The other 22 coexistence-causing game effects have no such clarification, and work perfectly well (even with Filth). Clearly there must be an unstated general rule that coexistence is always allowed unless some game effect specifies otherwise. (And indeed, this has been the case since 1977.) There is no apparent reason why Bully, Disease, and Spiff should be treated any differently from the other 22 game effects. Not applicable to Filth: These three clarifications appear to have been written specifically with Filth in mind. A careful reading of that alien power, however, will reveal that Filth does not actually prevent coexistence, so the clarifications do not apply to Filth; in fact, they do not apply to any existing (or potential) effect in the entire game. Although Filth's power would seem to block coexistence conceptually, it actually does not activate until after coexistence has already been established. (This is a very wise and excellent design on FFG's part for Filth, as it avoids all manner of rules conflicts and allows interactions to occur naturally.) Thus these "clarifications" are not needed for Filth, since its power would not even come into scope until after the coexistence-causing effect had already resolved. (And Filth makes the patchy text on those aliens moot anyway, as we will see below.) Unintended gameplay changes: If one were to choose to loosely interpret Filth as a coexistence preventer, then the "clarifications" would introduce a gameplay change that likely was not intended. Ordinarily, any coexistence-causing effect can work around Filth by using a Cosmic Zap. (And yes, there are actually reasons to do so.) Unfortunately, the "clarifications" would block using a Cosmic Zap altogether because they try to shut off the game effect before it occurs, rather than just let it continue and let Filth take its natural course. Even worse than being unnecessary, then, these clarifications would actually forbid some classic, epic game endings like Spiff zapping Filth for the win. Filth takes care of itself: Because Filth is cleverly written to work immediately after coexistence has been established, it works correctly and fits into the natural gameplay flow in all of these situations. (Bully, Disease, and Spiff should all be welcome to land on a filthy planet just like anybody else, whereupon Filth's power will immediately kick in and kick them out — naturally causing the result that those three powers were trying to achieve artificially, while still allowing Cosmic Zaps to do what they were invented to do.) With the exception of an extreme case like Super Symbiote, there is no need for game effects to be "written around" Filth. Summary: If Filth were to be interpreted conceptually as a coexistence "preventer", then the three "clarifications" would block Cosmic Zaps, make these three effects inconsistent with the other 22, introduce presumably unintended gameplay changes, and kill potentially climactic game endings. On the other hand, if Filth is interpreted literally (as not a coexistence preventer but an effect that is triggered after coexistence occurs), then the clarifications are not even applicable to the power they were apparently written to "handle." In either case, they are entirely unnecessary because the general rule that covers all coexistence effects, in combination with Filth's well-written game text, is certainly adequate to take care of Bully, Disease, and Spiff. (One of the other coexistence-causing game effects, ironically, is Filth itself!) Thus, the Cosmodex revises a number of entries to remove unnecessary and problematic "coexistence clarifications," letting Filth do what Filth does naturally — or, some might say, unnaturally (yeccch).

:Coldsleep Ship: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Ship leak: The original text is trying to let the player use his researching ships "from this tech card," but it is impossible for there to be any ships on this card when it is used. The rulebook makes it clear that when a tech is completed, its researching ships must be returned to other colonies before using the tech. In most cases this is not a problem, though: since the card allows moving ships from any of the player's colonies, he can in fact use his (former) research ships anyway from the colonies he sent them to instead of "from this tech card." Thus, this part of the tech's text (say that three times fast) is completely unnecessary — except in the rare situation where a player has no colonies at all for his ships to land on, or when Engineer is using his power to research this tech. Were it not for these rare situations, we could simply delete the incorrect phrase, "or this tech card." Instead, to prevent the researching ships from all going to the warp in the first rare case, a new sentence is required to make the card work as intended. This leaves us one remaining question: "Since Coldsleep Ship requires 9 ships to research and allows 4 of them to go onto the new colony, what happens to the other 5 if the player has no other colonies?" To answer that question, the revision presented here allows all nine ships to land on the new colony when the player has no other option. (It is difficult to tell whether this is consistent with the original design intent, or whether this scenario was even considered, so that addition is formatted in the opinion color.) Edited to fix the leak. Link: [Corrected card]
Coldsleep Ship wrote:
Gain Colony. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to gain a new colony on any planet in any other player's system where you don't already have one. You may place up to four ships on that colony from your other colonies or this tech card. If you have no colonies to return your researching ships to when you complete this tech, you may immediately use this tech to gain your new colony using all of those ships.
(9) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Collapsium Hulls: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Collapsium Hulls wrote:
Save Ship. Once completed, this tech stays in play. While it is in play, when you lose an encounter as the defense by 5 or less, one of your ships may remain on the planet instead of going to the warp.
(4) (Defense Only) (Resolution)

:Colony Cloak: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen. Weak effect: This station is essentially an expensive subset of the original version of Worm, but made even weaker by giving away the decision-making power to your opponent. It teeters on the brink of uselessness.
Colony Cloak wrote:
As the defense, after the hyperspace gate is aimed at one of your colonies or planets in this system, you may send one of your ships from this space station's planet to the warp. Then, the offense must (if possible) target a different colony or planet in this system where he or she can have a legal encounter.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

:compensation: You receive compensation only for ships you actually lose to the warp, not ships that are returning to Zombie colonies, eradicated by Void, captured by Fungus, etc. Before you collect compensation, the other player is allowed to play any cards from his hand that are legally playable at that time. Compensation only becomes due if at least three (and possibly four) conditions are satisfied: (1) you reveal a negotiate card; (2) your opponent reveals an attack card; (3) you lose ships to the warp; and, as at least implied by the rulebook, (4) you lose the encounter. Playing Cards Before: Compensation does not create any kind of "hold" or "freeze" or "lien" on your hand. You are free to use any cards that may be legally played before compensation begins to be collected. So, for instance, you could play a reinforcement card (during the reveal phase) to get it out of your hand before compensation is taken. However, once the opportunity to play such cards has passed and compensation begins, then it is too late. For example, you cannot wait to see if Hacker is going to target you before deciding whether to "dump" your reinforcement cards, because the time to affect encounter totals has already passed.

:cone: This term, which appears on Super Macron and Super Oracle, is what the hyperspace gate was called in previous editions.

:Converter: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Converter wrote:
Can Substitute Cards for Ships (Y) You have the power to Exchange. Whenever you would lose ships to the warp, you may use this power to discard up to an equal number of cards from your hand. Each card discarded saves one of your ships and prevents it from being sent to the warp. Ships saved during an encounter are returned to any of your other colonies.

Whenever you would retrieve one or more ships from the warp, you may use this power to instead draw cards from the deck. Draw one card for each ship you choose not to retrieve from the warp.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The versatility of the Converters makes them highly prized as manufacturers and business partners. They can take virtually any piece of technology and change it into something completely different. Some theorize that they eat the original materials, creating some suspicion about how the new materials appear.

Wild: As an ally, if you would lose one or more ships to the warp due to losing an encounter, you may force every player on the winning side to discard one card at random from his or her hand.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: In any phase, you may discard any number of cards from your hand. Then, you may retrieve ships from the warp or draw cards from the deck, in any combination you choose, equal to the number of discarded cards.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Coordinator: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Coordinator wrote:
Manipulates Destiny Deck (Y) You have the power to Schedule. As the offense, instead of drawing a card from the destiny deck, you may use this power to look at the top three cards of the destiny deck and choose any one of them to be the destiny card you have drawn. Place the other two cards on the top and/or bottom of the destiny deck in any order you choose.

When you use this power, if there are fewer than three cards remaining in the destiny deck, shuffle the destiny discard pile together with the destiny deck to form a new deck. You may only use this power once per encounter.
Do Not Use with Dictator
(Offense Only) (Optional) (Destiny)

Warfare in the Cosmos is rarely well scheduled. However, amidst the chaos, the Coordinator is able to prepare for different contingencies far more than most other races. Despite the seeming random nature of conflict, the Coordinator delights in using its insight and impeccable timing to ensure that all parties involved have sufficient time to annihilate each other.

Wild: As the offense, after destiny is drawn, you may discard your destiny card and draw again.
(Offense Only) (Destiny)

Super: After another player draws your color from the destiny deck, you may choose to continue the encounter with you as the offense and the player who drew your color as the defense. The encounter then proceeds as normal. Regardless of the outcome, the original offense then ends his or her turn and play passes to the next player.
(Defense Only) (Destiny)

:Cosmic Alliance: See Cosmic Encounter.

:Cosmic Conflict: See Cosmic Encounter.

:cosmic deck: This is the official name of the main draw deck in this edition. Any reference to "the deck" on a card or power means only the cosmic deck and not the reward deck, unless otherwise specified. Drawing: If a player needs to draw cards and there are not enough in the cosmic deck after shuffling the discard pile, see cosmic quake.

:Cosmic Dominion: See Cosmic Encounter.

:Cosmic Encounter: Created in the 1970s by the Future Pastimes crew, Cosmic Encounter was first published in 1977 by Eon Publications, and then republished over the years by Mayfair Games, West End Games, Games Workshop, Avalon Hill, a variety of international publishers (not always legally), and ultimately Fantasy Flight Games. As of this writing, the FFG edition consists of a base game released in 2008, a (slight) revision in 2011, and five optional and independent expansion sets.


mbmbmbmbmb Cosmic Encounter (2008, 2011): The FFG base edition is based on the original Eon starter set, but with a larger selection of aliens, support for five players, reinforcements, and a technology variant, among other additions. It includes all the core necessities such as the hyperspace gate, warp, etc.; planets, ships, colony markers, and destiny cards in red, yellow, blue, green, and purple; wild and special destiny cards; the 72-card cosmic deck; various tokens; tech tokens; the 20-card technology deck; and alien power sheets and flares for 50 aliens: Amoeba, Anti-Matter, Barbarian, Calculator, Chosen, Citadel, Clone, Cudgel, Dictator, Fido, Filch (with two flare versions), Fodder, Gambler, Grudge, Hacker, Hate, Healer, Human, Kamikaze, Loser, Machine, Macron, Masochist, Mind, Mirror, Miser, Mite, Mutant, Observer, Oracle, Pacifist, Parasite, Philanthropist, Reincarnator, Remora, Reserve, Shadow, Sorcerer, Spiff, Tick-Tock, Trader, Tripler, Vacuum, Virus, Void, Vulch, Warpish, Warrior, Will, and Zombie. Second edition: The 2011 edition of the base game has a revised box cover, but the same components as the 2008 edition. Reportedly the five official errata in the FAQ have been incorporated into this edition. [Rulebook PDF]


Player consensus has been that, generally speaking, it's best to acquire the expansion sets in chronological order, although many have recommended getting Cosmic Dominion sooner rather than later.


mb Cosmic Incursion (2010): The first expansion set provides a 32-card reward deck that offers new attack cards (some negative), some additional reinforcements and artifacts, a selection of kickers, and another morph card, while introducing rifts and new special negotiate cards. It also includes planets, ships, colony markers, and destiny cards in orange; more tokens; and alien power sheets and flares for 20 aliens: Bully, Chronos, Cryo, Deuce, Disease, Ethic, Fungus, Fury, Genius, Ghoul, Guerrilla, Leviathan, Locust, Magician, Mercenary, Merchant, Plant, Seeker, Sniveler, and Symbiote. This expansion does not change the composition of the cosmic deck (unless you use the optional variant of shuffling the reward deck into it), but does increase the overall number of attack, negotiate, morph, reinforcement, and artifact cards available in the game. [Rulesheet PDF]


mb Cosmic Conflict (2011): The second expansion set offers a 28-card hazard deck with 17 different hazard cards in varying quantities. Also included are planets, ships, a colony marker, and destiny cards in black; 24 saboteur tokens; more cosmic tokens; three Invasion! destiny cards; and alien power sheets and flares for 20 aliens: Cavalry, Changeling, The Claw, Empath (with two flare versions), Filth, Glutton, Graviton, Industrialist, Invader, Lunatic, Mimic, Prophet, Relic, Saboteur, Sadist, Siren, Trickster, Visionary, Warhawk, and Xenophile. This expansion does not change the composition of the cosmic deck. [Rulesheet PDF]


mb Cosmic Alliance (2012): Expansion set #3 provides 24 “large-group” cosmic cards to increase the size of the deck when playing with 6 or more players. It also includes planets, ships, a colony marker, and destiny cards in white; six Schizoid cards; 36 horde tokens; and alien power sheets and flares for 20 aliens: Animal, Bandit, Butler, Chrysalis, Crystal, Cyborg, Extortionist, General, Gorgon, Horde, Lightning, Poison, Pygmy, Reborn, Remote, Sapient, Schizoid (with two flare versions), Skeptic, Sting, and Winner. [Rulesheet PDF]


Cosmic Storm (2013): The fourth expansion set includes 10 space station markers with matching space station cards; a sloth token; 7 swindler tokens; and alien power sheets and flares for 25 aliens: Arcade, Brute, Bulwark, Converter, Coordinator, Dervish, Grumpus, Mouth, Neighbor, Outlaw, Patriot, Phantasm, Porcupine, Roach, Scavenger, Sloth, Sneak, Squee, Swindler, Sycophant, Tide, Tyrant, Vox, Worm, and Wormhole. [Rulesheet PDF]

Cosmic Dominion (2014): In a remarkable move, FFG and original CE designers Peter Olotka and Bill Eberle invited the fans of the game to submit proposed content for the fifth expansion set. The set comprises some of the most-requested classic aliens not yet published by FFG, plus about two dozen designs from a variety of fan authors. The new reward deck was also designed by the fans and introduces two new card types: intimidate and retreat. Cosmic Dominion includes the following modular gameplay elements: a new 32-card reward deck containing negotiate, kicker, and reinforcement cards bearing unique game texts, variable attack cards, and the new card types Intimidate and Retreat, as well as new artifacts, new rifts, and another morph; a hazard token; a cruise liner token; nine joker tokens; two yin-yang tokens; and alien power sheets and flares for 30 aliens: Ace, Alchemist, Angler, Aristocrat, Bride, Daredevil, Diplomat, Doppelganger, Engineer, Explorer, Greenhorn, Host, Joker, Judge, Laser, Lizard, Love, Mesmer, Mirage, Muckraker, Pentaform, Pickpocket, Pirate, Quartermaster, Reactor, Tourist, Usurper, Voyager, Whirligig, and Yin-Yang. This expansion does not change the composition of the cosmic deck (unless you use the optional variant of shuffling the reward deck into it), but does increase the overall number of attack, negotiate, morph, reinforcement, and artifact cards available in the game. Alpha-neurotics rejoice: Thanks to the addition of Joker/Judge, Quartermaster, Usurper, and Yin-Yang, there are now aliens for every letter of the alphabet. [Rulesheet PDF]

CosmicCon (2014): Attenders of this event received a preview copy of the revised Demon, which is intended to go into a future expansion set (possibly Cosmic Grail).

Cosmic Grail (2015-2016?) The proposed sixth expansion set, currently in planning and design by Peter Olotka and Bill Eberle. ("Cosmic Grail" might be a working title.)

:Cosmic Energy Generator: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Cosmic Energy Generator wrote:
After your side wins an encounter, place two tokens on this card. After your side loses an encounter, discard one token from this card. As long as there are five or more tokens on this card, it counts as a foreign colony toward victory.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Cosmic Field Generator: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Canceling: The use of this tech is not vulnerable to Card Zap, because Card Zap (unlike prior editions' Un-Zap) does not actually target Cosmic Zaps specifically (it only targets artifacts and flares by card type). To cancel the Cosmic Field Generator, you need Tech Scrambler or Omni-Zap.
Cosmic Field Generator wrote:
Stop Alien Power. Once completed, you may discard this tech to cancel one use of any alien's power, including your own. That power may not be used again during the current encounter. The use of this tech is considered to be a "Cosmic Zap," but this is not an artifact card.
(2) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Cosmic Grail: See Cosmic Encounter.

:Cosmic Guardian, The: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Timing and Scope: This hazard affects all natural attack cards higher than 20 everywhere in play, continuously. Applying the "ink rule" (see card modifications), we would conclude that it affects only actual high attack cards, not other cards temporarily changed into a high attack by some other effect. However, not all game effects can "see" this hazard's modification. Although the affected card must be considered to already be a negotiate for effects such as Loser, Mirror, and Visionary, the ink rule requires that things like Plague, Finder, Hate, Angler, and Sniveler still see it as a high attack.
The Cosmic Guardian wrote:
While The Cosmic Guardian is in play, all attack cards higher than 20 are considered to be negotiate cards.

Discard The Entropy Beast and The Witness when The Cosmic Guardian enters play.
(This Card Remains in Play)

:Cosmic Incursion: See Cosmic Encounter.

:Cosmic Nebula: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. The zapping effect cannot be canceled with Card Zap, since this hazard is not a flare or artifact card. Thus, whenever Human is involved in a Cosmic Nebula encounter, his side will win (unless something like Loser is also in effect).
Cosmic Nebula wrote:
During this encounter, any alien powers that are used are immediately zapped.

:cosmic quake: If a player needs to draw a card from the cosmic deck when the cosmic deck and the discard pile are both out of cards, a cosmic quake occurs. All players discard their hands and the resulting discard pile is shuffled to form a new deck; then deal out a new normal-sized hand to each player. (Any reward-back cards in players' hands are discarded, but the reward deck is not reshuffled.) Cards affected: The FAQ and the rulesheets for the first four expansion sets limit the scope of a quake to the cards actually in players' hands, and thus all cards that are not in a hand would not be affected; this would exempt citadels, cards in Miser's hoard, Cryo's cold storage, Cyborg's bionics, and Industrialist's stack, The Claw's claw, cards "set aside" by some game effect, flares on the table waiting to resolve, and encounter cards on the table in the planning or reveal phase. However, Kevin Wilson has stated on BoardGameGeek that "no cards escape the quake." This statement may have been an attempt to eliminate the "quake loop" problem (see below), but it has some undesirable consequences. First there would need to be some patch rules or alien errata so that things like The Claw and Cyborg could replenish the cards required for using their powers. More importantly, we would need a series of rules to handle what happens when (for exampe) a quake scoops up one or more revealed encounter cards when the encounter is partially or fully resolved. Quake loops: If the cosmic quake does not free up enough cards to fill all players' hands and also meet whatever card-drawing need produced the quake in the first place, the result will be an "infinite loop" of quakes. House rule: To avoid infinite loops, the Cosmodex recommends allowing the drawing player to simply take cosmic cards at random from the other players' hand(s). This option is so simple, fun, tactical, field-leveling, watertight, and quintessentially Cosmic that the Cosmodex further recommends allowing players to choose between this method and the standard rule whenever a quake is triggered. Unanswered question: If a player is collecting rewards when the deck and discard pile are both empty but the reward deck is not, does a quake still occur even if the player is willing to take all of this cards from the reward deck?
Link: [Kevin Wilson on cosmic quakes]
cosmic quake wrote:
If a player needs to draw a card from the cosmic deck and both the cosmic deck and discard pile are empty, then a cosmic quake occurs! All players discard their hands, and the discard pile is shuffled to make a new deck, then 8 cards are dealt to each player. The original player then continues drawing.

:Cosmic Storm: See Cosmic Encounter.

:Cosmic Upheaval: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Cosmic Upheaval wrote:
Immediately shuffle all players' hands together and then deal each player back as many cards as he or she had beforehand. No cards may be played in response to this card.

:Cosmic Zap: Artifact, base set, designed by Future Pastimes. There are two Cosmic Zaps in the base set, one in Cosmic Incursion's reward deck, and a fourth in Cosmic Alliance's large group deck. FAQ clarification: You may play Cosmic Zap against a player who is attempting to use his Super flare. The flare is prevented (not canceled); it returns to the player's hand, does not count as the player playing a flare, but does count as that particular Super flare being played. In theory, the player could then play the Wild effect of that flare later during the same encounter. See flares for more discussion on this.
Cosmic Zap wrote:
Stops Powers. Play at any time to cancel one use of any alien's power, including your own. That power may not be used again during the current encounter.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Cosmodex reversals: With the large number of errors in this edition of the game, it can be a challenge to determine the best revisions with respect to consistency, playability, design intent, historical precedent, and other factors (including, of course, fun). The Cosmodex strives to use its best judgement, but is also overzealous and sometimes fails. Correcting and acknowledging errors is thus an inevitable part of keeping this "living" document alive and useful. Minor adjustments are made all the time without fanfare, but the following reversals seemed significant enough to document.


"Successful" encounters: The FAQ says that Warrior "collects experience as though he won an encounter, since repopulating his home planet counts as a successful encounter." Previously the Cosmodex took this as evidence that drawing your own color for destiny and reclaiming a lost home colony is not only "successful," but is also emphatically a "win" for those game effects that target wins. However, this view has changed and the Cosmodex now considers that part of the FAQ to be in error: another result of the mistaken idea that there is no difference between "success" and "winning" (see "Successful" and "Explicitly declared successful" under encounters.)


Verification: Three game effects — Chronos, Magician, and Vulch — require a player to show cards in his hand to prove he is not cheating. However, in all other situations where cheating would be possible, the game operates on the honor system. For example, Bandit's opponents and victims of the Plague are trusted to actually lose all required cards of the appropriate type(s). We trust Wild Cryo not to set aside encounter cards and draw a new hand prematurely. A player who reveals a negotiate card when Loser has declared an upset is assumed to be truly out of attack cards. The owner of the Quark Battery is trusted to have placed only an encounter card under it, not something else that he wishes to make inaccessible for the rest of the game, such as Mobius Tubes or another player's Super flare. Schizoid is on his honor to announce when another player wins by the alternate terms (he could keep quiet and then use his Super flare to cover the crime). The player questioned by Seeker is given the benefit of the doubt that he actually played his highest card, lowest card, etc. as he promised. Those affected by Super Cavalry, Wild Siren, Visionary, or Wild Visionary are trusted to give, play, or show the appropriate card whenever possible. And players must trust Sniveler to truly lack the kind of card he whines about. Clearly the typical design approach in such cases is to rely on the honor system, which usually works just fine because the cases calling for verification are fairly rare (even when facing Chronos or Magician, for example, you're much more likely to have 2 or more encounter cards than to have exactly 1), and even if a player does cheat, the fluid nature of the cards in this game means he'll probably get caught anyway. At one point, after careful deliberation, the Cosmodex had considered the three verification requirements noted above to be unnecessary exceptions to the general play ethos of Cosmic Encounter, so it presented Chronos, Magician, and Vulch with their verification clauses struck out and formatted in the opinion color. In later years, however, this decision was reconsidered and found lacking. Even though the game system usually chooses to trust rather than verify, it's not a problem if a particular effect wants to require verification for whatever reason. Thus the Cosmodex, as it ages and mellows, attempts to be less of a consistency despot and more accepting of such design inconsistencies if they do not impede readability, fun, or the smooth flow of the game.


Super Loser: Virtually all effects that operate "after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed" are limited to the Planning phase, but Super Loser's timing indicator says Reveal. At one point the Cosmodex revised this to Planning for consistency, but the change was later rescinded. With the debut of Seeker suggesting that there could be more effects coming whose timing indicators may not fit the established patterns, it did not seem prudent to keep revising such effects without an actual gameplay need, or at least without first understanding the reason for the nonstandard icon.


Super Sapient: Sapient's base power adds tokens to her sheet each time her side wins or loses an encounter; since "each time" is essentially a synonym of "when," this suggested that the token accrual happened in the Reveal phase. The Super flare, however, has a Resolution icon. As part of a cleanup effort to fix multiple issues where Reveal-phase effects had a Resolution icon and thus showed up too late to do any good (such as Industrialist and Super Trickster), Super Sapient was revised at that time to have a Reveal icon. This was later reconsidered when the Cosmodex's overzealous manservant realized that Sapient's token accrual, unlike the other examples above, could just as easily occur in the Resolution phase since it can't really happen until the encounter outcome is locked in (and in fact makes more sense if it happens afterward). A simpler reconciliation approach was then taken: revising the base power to work "after" an encounter is won or lost, to better hint at the Resolution phase for consistency with the flare.

:cruise liner token: See Tourist.

:Cryo: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Unanswered questions: Can both effects of Super Cryo be used during the same encounter? If so, does it matter which one is used first? Noteworthy interactions: When used to build a "power hand," Cryo's power is susceptible to all the same effects that can make Genius a non-power. Tip: Generally you will choose between using your cold storage to build up a "power hand" for later use, or as a dumping ground for cards you either don't want to be forced to play or don't want other players to acquire. If you are able to store a card like Hand Zap or any of the Wild flares for Deuce, Filch, Mirror, Oracle, Pacifist, and Trader, then you may want to consider using the cold storage for both purposes at the same time, since you'd be able to play the good cards and purge (or improve) the bad ones. Tip: Once you pick up your cold storage, other players will naturally want to raid your hand. If you are able to store any protection or recovery cards like Card Zap, Cosmic Zap, Emotion Control, Finder, Ionic Gas, Wild Hacker, or Wild Miser, do so. Retooled gameplay: Mr. Reda's Cryo was more flexible, allowing cards to be stored any time during the encounter. His Wild Cryo was completely different; it allowed the player to exempt two cards from compensation (essentially a subset of FFG's Wild Miser). Reda's Super Cryo did not include the ability to take the stored cards as a new hand even when they numbered fewer than eight cards. This addition by FFG makes the card more useful, but also poses a dilemma for its prerequisite and timing bars. As printed, the second effect technically can be used only during the Alliance phase and only if Cryo is a main player or ally. This is probably not what was intended. On the other hand, relaxing the bars to (As Any Player) and (Any Phase) in order to match the second effect creates a new problem for the first effect by visually implying that a card can be stored at any time. This, then, requires the phrase "when using your power" to reinforce that the restrictions of the base power are still in effect. Edited for clarity, to fix Super Cryo's prerequisite and timing indicators to accommodate its second effect, and to clarify its first effect in light of the revised indicators. Link: [Corrected flare]
Cryo wrote:
Saves Cards for Later (Y) You have the power to Preserve. As a main player or ally, after allies are invited, you may use this power to take one card from your hand and put it in cold storage by placing it facedown on this sheet. Afterwards, draw one card from the deck. Cards on this sheet are frozen and cannot be looked at or drawn by any other player, nor are they part of your hand.

If you have at least eight cards on this sheet, you may discard your hand at any time to take the cards from this sheet as your new hand.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

Thanks to their unique metabolism, the Cryo are able to enter hibernation for millennia, awakening only when their people have need of them. However, the time is fast approaching when the Cryo may finally awaken all of the great heroes of their past to lead them to Cosmic conquest.

Wild: When you draw a new hand, you may first set aside any or all of your non-encounter cards (including this flare). Then, draw a new hand of eight cards before adding the cards you set aside back into your new hand.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When using your power to store a card, you may swap it for a card in storage instead of drawing a card from the deck.

In addition, you may discard your hand to take your cards in storage as a new hand regardless of how many cards you have stored.
({Main Player or Ally Only}) (As Any Player) ({Alliance}) (Any Phase)

:Crystal: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: This power represents a completely different concept and effect from Eon's Crystal, although the original history and Wild flare effect have been retained. Edited for wording consistency. Link: [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Crystal wrote:
May Multiply Attack Cards (Y) You have the power to Refract. As a main player or ally, use this power after both main players reveal attack cards. Any one player on your side can discard one attack card from his or her hand that matches the value of your side's revealed attack card. If a player does so, multiply your side's revealed card by the discarded card's value. For instance, if your side reveals an attack 08, any one player on your side may discard an attack 08 to change the revealed card into an attack 64.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Arranged in orderly three-dimensional lattices, Crystals tend to dominate the arrangement of their local environment. They know that, with a few suggestive seeding hints, they can bring the entire Universe into the most efficient energy packing: Crystalline order.

Wild: At the start of any encounter, you may rearrange your ships among your colonies as you wish.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: When another player discards a card to activate your power, you may add that card to your hand.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Cudgel: Alien power, base set, designed by Ken Hubbard, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Tip: The normal ruse of placing only one ship into the hyperspace gate to make it look like you don't expect to win can be even more convincing for Cudgel, since you are also giving up the chance to smash additional ships. This can lead your opponent to conclude that you have a negotiate or a low attack, causing him to do the same. Retooled gameplay: Hubbard's Super Cudgel affected all opposing allies rather than allowing the player to specify individual allies.
Cudgel wrote:
Opponent Loses More Ships (G) You have the power to Smash. As a main player, when you win an encounter in which you revealed an attack card, use this power to force your opponent to lose extra ships of his or her choice equal to the number of ships you had in the encounter, in addition to any ships he or she would normally lose.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

The customary greeting among Cudgels is a hearty handshake and a solid blow to the head. This long-standing tradition – often fatal – is frequently misunderstood by weaker races, much to the amusement of the Cudgels. Now, having flattened all of their closest friends, the gregarious Cudgels look skyward, leaving the debris of their broken planet behind. With fists raised in friendship, they seek out new beings to meet, greet, and smash, and will not stop until the Cosmos itself is shattered.

Wild: As the offense, when you gain a colony, you may send all ships on that planet belonging to other players to the warp. Ships that were allied with you on this encounter are not affected.
(Offense Only) (Resolution)

Super: When you use your power on a player, you may affect any of that player's allies also. Each player you smash loses the number of ships you had in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Cyborg: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Playing from discard pile: When Wild Cyborg plays a card from the discard pile, that card is actually picked up and played normally, and subject to the same effects as any other played card, including being zapped, stolen, converted, etc. Wild Cyborg and other flares: Under the standard rules, Wild Cyborg cannot target a flare because this would require playing more than one flare during the same encounter. Using the Freewheeling Flares variant, however, this would be allowed. In this case, the recovered flare follows the rules normally and thus returns to the player's hand unless it is zapped or its text says to do something else with it. Presentation overhaul: The base power takes a baffling and broken approach to defining which cards return to the sheet and when replacement cards are drawn. The text is wasteful, redundant yet inconsistent, illogical, ambiguous, and leaky. The issues include the fuzziness of what constitutes "normally being discarded," effects like Chronos sending an encounter card back to the Cyborg's hand, Sargasso Web removing from the game a card that "would normally be discarded," and a single cosmic quake (according to Kevin Wilson's interpretation) destroying Cyborg's power for the rest of the game. Worse, all the flares that should be given to another player after use (including the atypical ones like Wild Changeling and Wild Reincarnator) remain on the sheet to be used repeatedly for the rest of the game. (How did such a mess make it through playtesting?) These problems seem to stem from some notion (incorrect, of course) that if a card is not being discarded, it must by necessity be returning to your hand. The Cosmodex normally prefers to integrate smaller, focused changes into a text where necessary, but in this case a complete recast is required. The two major defects are thus re-expressed as straightforwardly as possible: (1) if a bionics card would normally return to your hand, it returns to the sheet instead, and (2) at the end of the encounter you should (if necessary) draw until you are back to three cards on the sheet. Once these changes are made, the Game Setup paragraph then becomes unnecessary. Edited for wording consistency, to fix major leaks, to eliminate the ambiguity about cards that "would normally be discarded," to eliminate redundancy, for readability, to fit the text onto the standard art template, and to fix various issues with Super Cyborg not actually being "played," leaving your hand temporarily but remaining under your control, turning up as one of your bionics cards, etc. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Cyborg wrote:
Has 3 Extra Faceup Cards (Y) {Game Setup: After starting hands are dealt, Cyborg is dealt three extra cards faceup on this sheet. These cards are not part of the Cyborg's hand and cannot be stolen.}

You have the power of Bionics. At the start of every encounter, if you have fewer than three cards on this sheet, draw cards from the deck to place faceup on this sheet until you have three. These cards are not part of your hand.

At any time, you may play a non-encounter card that is faceup on this sheet as though it were in your hand. {If the card would normally be discarded after being played, discard the played card, draw a new card, and place it faceup on this sheet. If the card would not normally be discarded after playing, return it faceup to this sheet after resolving it.}

As a main player or ally, after your side reveals an encounter card, you may use this power to discard your side's revealed card and replace it with an encounter card that is faceup on this sheet. {After the encounter ends, draw a new card and place it faceup on this sheet.}

Cards from this sheet that should return to your hand return here instead.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

A perfect marriage of biology and technology, the Cyborgs have been an odd mix of contrasts ever since they first showed up in the Cosmos. Loyal and caring toward one another, yet coldly logical when need be, the Cyborgs have done the math and know that they will eventually rule the Cosmos for the greater good of all races.

Wild: You may play the top card of the discard pile as though it were in your hand. You may use this flare only once per encounter.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: {At any time, reveal this flare to draw and add a fourth faceup card to your sheet. If this flare leaves your hand, discard one of your faceup cards.} When drawing cards to place on your sheet, you may draw until you have four there instead of three.

When this flare is on your sheet, it does not count as one of your three or four cards.

(As Any Player) ({Any Phase}) (Regroup)

:Daredevil: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Zach Whelchel, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited to fix Super flare error (when the design team revised Daredevil's base power from 3 to 4, we caught it on the Wild flare but missed the Super).
Daredevil wrote:
Cuts Close to Gain Rewards (Y) You have the power of Risk. As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may use this power to discard one attack card with a value from 01 to 08 from your hand. Subtract that value from your side's total.

As a main player or ally, when your side wins an encounter by 4 or less, each player on your side receives rewards equal to the number of ships he or she has in the encounter (in addition to any other benefits received for winning).
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Preferring an uncertain but exciting existence to predictability, Daredevils thrive on adrenaline, even that of others. Danger elevates the Daredevils' abilities, and their allies either rise quickly or fall hard. For Daredevils, the closer the shave, the bigger the rush.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this flare. If your side wins by 4 or less, you may use one of your ships in the encounter to establish a colony on any planet in the opposing main player's system. Otherwise, lose three ships of your choice to the warp.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Planning)

Super: You may cause the players on your side to receive rewards if you win by 6 or less rather than 3 4 or less.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:deals: When you make a deal because you and your opponent both revealed negotiate cards, or due to a game effect such as Galactic Council or Wild Judge, you may agree to give one or more cards from your hand, to allow the other player to establish one colony on any planet where you have a colony, to give one or more of your space stations, and/or to give other physical item(s) as allowed by specific game effects. For the deal to be valid, at least one tangible item (usually a card, colony, or space station) must be gained upon its conclusion. However, it is not required that both players receive something; the deal can be one-sided, as long as something tangible and appropriate is gained by one of the players. Granting cards: The rules state that "the terms of the deal are carried out as agreed upon." Thus you must hand over the exact cards that you promised to give, according to the level of specificity (see below) agreed to in the deal. Obviously, then, you cannot make a deal in which you agree to trade something you don't actually have. (In general you are free to lie about what's in your hand, so you may of course use what you say during negotations to try to trick other players into thinking you do or do not hold certain cards, and may even pretend to work toward a deal you can't carry out. But you may not finalize any kind of illegal deal.) Granting colonies: You may allow one colony to be established wherever you have one and the other player does not, on a home or foreign planet. You do not have to evacuate your ships from it; they coexist with those of the other player. (Unless one of you is the Filth, of course.) No player may gain more than one colony from a deal. See also the Specificity section below. Granting space stations: No limit is given for the number of space stations which may be traded. The receiving player attaches it/them to any of his home planets, subject to the limit of one station per planet. Trading a space station by itself is a valid deal.
Releasing ships: Tyrant and Zombie allow ships to be released as part of a deal. This can constitute the entire deal by itself, or can be part of a larger deal involving cards, colonies, and/or stations. Other tangible assets: As of this writing, no other physical resources are tradable in a deal. The FAQ affirms that tech cards are off limits, since that question was asked directly, but this should be understood as one example of a general rule: physical components that are not specifically mentioned (tech cards, ships, alien powers, tokens, planets, etc.) may not be traded in a deal unless a game effect allows it. (Although allowing techs to trade could easily be a house rule.) Future promises: Players may discuss promises of future action during the deal if they so desire, but these are not enforceable and do not constitute a valid deal on their own. (This is what the FAQ meant by "anything else you choose to negotiate with is up to you.") Somebody might offer to invite you as an ally on a future encounter; Will could promise to avoid choosing you as the defense for a time; Dictator might allow you to direct his next use of his power; Shadow could promise not to destroy one of your single-ship colonies on your next execution; and so on. These things are not technically part of the deal; they are really just an aspect of the ongoing table talk and ad hoc allegiances by which players may try to influence each others' actions throughout the game. Specificity: Although not spelled out clearly in the rules, it makes sense that the level of specificity in the deal is up to the players to negotiate. For example, a player might offer "one card" or "one attack card" or "a reasonably high attack card" or "an attack card greater than 12" or "the attack 19" or "one of my reward-back cards" or "a card that I'm pretty sure will help you defeat Virus." Similarly, when a colony is to be granted, players might negotiate its exact location in advance, or leave it up to one or the other of them to choose after the deal is made. (If nothing is said about it, the player establishing the colony should get to choose the location.) Players might also negotiate how many ships, or even which specific ones, will be used to establish the colony, which could matter when a player's ships do not all have identical characteristics (Fungus, Horde, Lizard, The Prometheus, Roach, ship markers, etc.). More than two players: Deals involving three or more players are allowed by Diplomat and Galactic Council, raising the question of whether every player in the deal can theoretically gain one colony from every other player (that is, n-1 colonies apiece). The rules are not entirely clear on this, but the design intent seems to be that dealing players cannot gain more than one colony each, unless something like Negotiate (Epic Oratory) is in effect.

:deck: Game effects that target "the deck" are targeting the cosmic deck, and thus do not apply to the reward deck unless specifically allowed. Drawing: If a player needs to draw cards and there are not enough in the cosmic deck after shuffling the discard pile, see cosmic quake.

:defensive ally bug: Previous editions of the game required defensive allies to be placed on the ring near the pointed end of what was then called the hyperspace cone. This allowed the phrase "ships in the cone" to conveniently refer to all ships in the encounter except those of the defense (that is, all the ships that came to the encounter from somewhere else and are currently in a kind of "game-state limbo," since they eventually have to go back to colonies or the warp). The FFG edition instead requires defensive allies to be sort of "floating near the planet" and emphatically not in the hyperspace gate. Unfortunately, this change was not carried out through the cards and so there are some game effects that refer to ships in the gate when they really mean "ships in the gate plus defensive allies (if any)" or "ships in the gate and those floating between the gate and the planet" or "all ships in the encounter except those of the defense" or somesuch. These game effects leave the fate of defensive allies undefined. The Cosmodex would very much like to "correct" the rulebook to put defensive allies back in the gate where they belong, but instead opts to fix the broken cards (Super Macron, Super Observer, Super Oracle, and Skeptic so far) in the interest of giving new players fewer things to worry about. (See launch bug for a related problem.)

:Delta Scanners: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ clarification: You are not required to reveal which card you take.
Delta Scanners wrote:
Draw from Discard. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to take any one card from the discard pile and add it to your hand.
(2) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Demon: Alien power, CosmicCon, designed by Robin Raianiemi, illustrated by Felicia Cano. This new implementation of Demon was the winning entry in the 2014 CosmicCon alien redesign contest; a copy was given out to CosmicCon attenders. It is intended as a preview version of a power to be included in a later expansion set. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Demon was completely different; it could take over another player's encounter by replacing his ships with Demon's own ships.
Demon wrote:
Possesses Others' Hands (Y) You have the power to Possess. As a main player, before allies are invited, you may use this power to take possession of the hand of any other player except your opponent. Place those cards facedown on this sheet. They are not part of your hand, but you may use cards from here as though they were in your hand. If a card played from this sheet would return to your hand after use, return it to its previous owner instead. At the end of the encounter, return any cards remaining on this sheet to their previous owner.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

Hailing from deep within the core of a molten planet, a race of Demons was exiled from their original galaxy for unprincipled opportunism. Knowing their mere presence saps others' will to win, they now seek Cosmic vengeance.

Wild: As a main player, before allies are invited, you may possess any one other player except your opponent in order to force that player to ally with you when it is his or her turn to do so. That player must send as many ships as possible, up to the number of ships you have in the encounter, but he or she is not required to abandon any colonies to do so.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: When using your power, you may draw six cards from the deck to possess instead of another player's hand. If a possessed card would return to your hand after use, it does so. At the end of the encounter, return any remaining possessed cards to the top of the deck in any order.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

:Dervish: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Dervish wrote:
Rotates Cards Left or Right (Y) You have the power to Whirl. As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to call "clockwise" or "counterclockwise." Each player involved in the encounter as a main player or ally must pass his or her hand of cards in the chosen direction to the next player involved in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

The constant whirling and high-speed revolution of the Dervishes make them unpredictable and chaotic. In fact, their undulations have been known to make some aliens queasy. Dervishes delight in bold sweeping tactics and surprises in combat, sometimes turning their opponents' resources against them.

Wild: As the defense in your home system, after the hyperspace gate is aimed, you may exchange your hand with the hand of any other player.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

Super: If you are passed this flare as a result of using your power, you may play it to immediately establish a colony in the system of the player who passed it to you. Afterwards, discard this flare.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

:destiny cards: See also Invasion! Retooled gameplay: Destiny was implemented with discs in the Eon and Avalon Hill editions, and with cards in the Mayfair and FFG editions. Eon and Mayfair had "reverse cone" effects on one destiny disc/card of each color; FFG has hazard warning indicators for use with the hazard deck in Cosmic Conflict, the variable attack cards in Cosmic Dominion, and a few alien powers. Edited to add missing third option when drawing your own color.
Destiny cards wrote:
Purple [for example] Have an encounter with the purple player in his or her home system.

However, if you are the purple player, {either:} then
A) Have an encounter with any other player in your home system, or{,}
B) Re-establish a home colony on one of your empty planets, or
C)
Discard this card and draw again.

Wild Have an encounter with any other player of your choice in his or her home system.

Special Have an encounter with the player who has the [fewest ships in the warp/most cards in hand/most foreign colonies] (other than you). In the event of a tie, break the tie to your left.

The encounter takes place in the other player's home system.

:Deuce: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. One encounter card: If Deuce is reduced to exactly one encounter card as the defense, he draws a new hand (according to his power text). If he is reduced to exactly one encounter card as the offense, however, he continues the encounter normally but just doesn't use his power. The text requires proceeding as if out of cards only when "checking to see if you draw a new hand," not when "checking to see if you must end your turn." Self-modifying encounter cards: When Deuce uses a Morph, a Retreat, or a variable attack card as his second card, it will modify itself upon being revealed (as appropriate, based on the opponent's encounter card or the current hazard warning status). However, Deuce's text limits the ways in which the second card can influence the encounter. When his second card is a Retreat and the opponent reveals an attack, Deuce's text does not allow the Retreat to take part in determining the encounter outcome, and thus it cannot force him to lose; but it also cannot save his side's ships if he loses anyway because of his actual encounter card. If Deuce reveals a Retreat as his regular encounter card and an attack as his second card, the Retreat either loses or deals (as usual) and is kept, while the attack card is discarded. (Note that it is not possible to play an intimidate card for Deuce's power, since the intimidate is not an encounter card at the time it would have to be played.) Which negotiate to apply or discard? When Deuce has revealed two different negotiate cards (such as a regular one and a Crooked Deal, or a negotiate and a Morph/Retreat that "went green"), the Cosmodex recommends letting the player choose which one applies to the encounter. He should then discard that same card, since it was actually used and the other was not. A Retreat that becomes a negotiate is a candidate for discarding like any other negotiate, but one that remains a Retreat will be kept since Deuce's text allows only for attacks and negotiates to be discarded. In the profoundly unlikely case that Deuce reveals two Retreats and the opponent reveals an attack, Deuce would lose the encounter and keep both of his cards. Which attack to discard? When Deuce has revealed two attack cards, both will apply to the encounter and the higher one must be discarded. If they have the same numeric value but are actually different in some significant way (such as cosmic-back 10 + reward-back 10, 12 + 12/21, or Morph + any attack card that matches the opponent's card), the Cosmodex recommends letting the player choose which attack card to discard and which one to keep. Wild Deuce and card modifications: Player consensus is that Wild Deuce must match another card's value after any modifications by other effects, rather than its original, printed value, since the flare's effect is directly relevant to the encounter outcome (see card modifications). Tip: Against Anti-Matter and/or Loser, try to get multiple use out of any negative attack card you have. For example, if you have attack -07 and attack 06, play them together against Anti-Matter or an upset Loser; they will combine for a total of -1 and you will get to keep the -07 to use against that player again. Tip: A Morph or a Retreat may sometimes be attractive to Deuce as a backup to a primary attack card, especially when he is the defense, since this configuration lets him meet a potential attack with strength while also preserving the opportunity to make a deal for a new colony should the opponent reveal a negotiate. Thus, for Deuce, attack + morph or attack + retreat functions much like an intimidate card would. On the other hand, if Deuce has a lot of weak attack cards, he may want to keep playing the Retreat as his main card and one of the weak attacks as his second card in order to recycle the Retreat, repeatedly saving his ships and colonies while he purges the weak attacks. Retooled gameplay: FFG's Deuce plays essentially the same as Eon's, but does a better job of clarifying how to handle the extra card, as well as when the Deuce draws a new hand. Eon's Wild Deuce was completely different; it allowed a player to make one extra encounter at the end of his turn. Link: [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Deuce wrote:
Plays 2 Encounter Cards (Y) You have the power of Duality. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, use this power to place a second encounter card facedown off to one side. This second card is not considered your encounter card and isn't affected by game effects that target your encounter card, such as those of the Oracle or Sorcerer. If both of your encounter cards are revealed to be attacks, the second card's value is added to your side's total. If either is a negotiate, then you have played a negotiate. After the encounter is resolved, discard the negotiate card if you played one, or the higher attack card if you did not, returning the other encounter card to your hand.

When checking to see if you draw a new hand, do so if you have one or fewer encounter cards left, rather than none.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Planning)

Twin suns and a double moon have endowed the ambidextrous Deuce with twice the strength of their opponents. Cleverly concealing their real motives behind an amiable mask, the duplicitous Deuce see universal control within reach.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, if you have an attack card in your hand that is identical to one of the revealed cards, you may discard it, either adding or subtracting its value from the total of the player who played the matching card.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: After the encounter is resolved, you may discard both your encounter card and your extra card.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Dictator: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by Patrick Riley, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Tip: At those times when you hope to draw your own color for destiny, you can increase your odds by giving other players their own color for destiny; some of them will want you to choose again, thus speeding up the process of getting cards that are not your color out of the destiny deck. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Dictator was optional while FFG's is mandatory; however, this difference is more academic than actual, since the FFG player can simply "choose" the top card of the destiny deck, accomplishing the same result as not using his power. Eon's Dictator could simply declare a color to override the destiny disc drawn; FFG's improved design maintains the natural distribution of how often players are attacked and also prepares Dictator to have more flexibility with possible future additions to the destiny deck. This version allows a bit more latitude in the rare situation where a player is not required to encounter the defense in the defense's own system (e.g., Wild Will), whereas Eon's version mandated that the encounter had to take place "in the system of that color." Eon's version also appeared to prevent the player from re-drawing destiny in the event that Dictator commands the player's own color. FFG's Wild Dictator is greatly simplified compared to Eon's, which allowed a player to propose a new destiny color and then required all players to vote. (FFG's Wild Dictator is essentially Eon's Wild Chronos restricted to "not offense.") Edited for wording consistency. Link: [Kevin Wilson on Dictator]
Dictator wrote:
Controls Destiny Deck (R) You have the power to Command. When you are not the offense, before destiny is drawn, use this power to take the destiny deck, look through it, and choose any card from it. That destiny card is played as though the offense had drawn it. On your turn, or any time you are zapped, the remaining destiny cards are shuffled, and one is dealt at random.
(Not Offense) (Mandatory) (Destiny)

Grotesque creatures rejected by an old and cultured world, the Dictators pushed and clawed their way to planetary dominion. Relentless in their demands, they turn friend against friend to do their bidding. Recently they have begun to tire of toying with the weak races at home and seek to control the entire Universe.

Wild: When you are not the offense, after destiny is drawn, you may force the offense to discard the destiny card he or she drew and draw again. Use this flare only once per encounter.
(Not Offense) (Destiny)

Super: You may use your power as the offense.
(Offense Only) (Destiny)

:Diplomat: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by Rob Burns and Patrick Riley, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Diplomat did not require playing a negotiate card to use the power.
Diplomat wrote:
Can Negotiate 3-Way Deals (Y) You have the power to Negotiate. When you are not a main player and one or more attack cards are revealed in an encounter, you may use this power to play a negotiate card from your hand and turn the revealed attack cards into regular negotiate cards. Then, you and the two main players have two minutes to attempt to reach a three-way deal. Apply all unique effects found on the three negotiate cards. Unless all three players agree on a deal, the deal fails and each loses the appropriate number of ships. All three players are treated as opponents of each other for game effects that affect deals.
(Not Main Player) (Optional) (Reveal)

A foreboding presence held in awe by other planetary life forms, the Diplomats strike only when their webs are fully spun. Then, for extricating those caught by their own rash acts, the Diplomats negotiate their terms.

Wild: When a deal is being attempted without you, you may play a negotiate card from your hand to remove one of the players from that deal and take his or her place. Restart the time limit. Your card's game effect applies, and you receive the deal's benefits or penalties as appropriate. If you make a deal, it counts as a success for the player you replaced.
(Not Main Player) (Reveal)

Super: As a main player, after alliances are formed, instead of playing encounter cards to determine the winner you may call a vote of all players (defense wins ties). You may buy votes by making deals, which are carried out only if you win. Tally the results and proceed to the resolution phase.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

:Disease: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Three-ship requirement: The way in which this power was rewritten caused players to debate whether it is required to have three ships together on a single colony or just three ships anywhere within the system; presumably FFG did not intend to change the gameplay. Tip: As the game progresses, keep a mental count of what's left in the destiny deck so you know which colors are most likely to come up. Also try to figure in who has the fewest ships in the warp, the most foreign colonies, and the biggest hand if those special destinies have not yet been drawn. This will help you know where your most likely infection opportunities are. Try to maintain a colony of four or five ships in those systems, as protection against ship-killer game effects like Shadow but also so that you can take advantage of the same color coming up twice in quick succession. Nothing stings like losing an infection opportunity because you just spread in that system on the previous destiny draw and split your only three-ship colony there into one- and two-ship colonies. Retooled gameplay: FFG's Disease plays essentially the same as Eon's (the ambiguity of the rewrite notwithstanding), but clarifies that it also works on a wild or special destiny. Eon's Wild Disease was completely different; it made all other players as a group discard various resources in a manner somewhat like Sniveler's effect. Eon's Super Disease was completely different; it allowed Disease to spread without having to have a three-ship colony in the host system. Historical note: Eon's Disease had the power to "spread"; FFG's change to "contagion" is a weaker fit, and the description in the power text — infect that player — does not make sense: the player had to be already infected before this power could even be used, when Disease got his first colony in that system. (A power that truly "infects" would be one that helps you get your first colony somewhere, not your second and later ones.) The original theme made perfect sense and did not need to be tinkered with. Wording template: Nine flares are designed to be given to the associated alien after use, and unfortunately they use eight different wordings (or nine if you count articles). The wordings on Wild Disease and Wild Filth are the most concise and nearly identical to each other, so this is the recommended template for all future flares that work this way. Appendix B revises the other flares to use this template. Edited to remove the ambiguity about the prerequisite for infecting, to clarify that Disease cannot infect himself even on a wild destiny, and to avoid misusing the game term "reveal." Links: [Corrected power] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Disease wrote:
Spreads to Other Planets (R) You have the power of Contagion. Whenever any other player's color or a special destiny card that targets another player is drawn from the destiny deck, you may use this power to infect one of that player's planets. If you have a colony in the infected player's home system consisting of at least three ships, take one or more of your ships from it, moving them to any other planet in that system. On a wild destiny card, you may infect only the opponent that is chosen to be the defense.
(Not Defense) (Optional) (Destiny)

Long ago, having decimated all life forms on their native planet, the Disease seemed in danger of extinction due to their own success. The advent of interstellar travel, however, gave them a new lease on life. Once the Disease secure a foothold on a new world, it is only a matter of time before they dominate it.

Wild: At the start of any regroup phase, you may force every other player to choose one card from his or her hand in secret. Cards are then shown simultaneously before being discarded. Any player who showed the same card type (attack, negotiate, etc.) as another player loses 3 ships to the warp. Give this flare to the Disease after use (or discard it, if the Disease isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: At the start of any regroup phase, you may move one of your ships from one of your colonies to another of your colonies.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Do Not Use: Four alien powers — Gambler, Magician, Coordinator, and Sadist — have "Do Not Use with" restrictions preventing them from being in the same game with Sorcerer, Oracle, Dictator, Zombie, and Healer. The rules do not specify how to implement this, but the sometimes-forgetful Cosmodex thinks it remembers player consensus being something like the following. If two mutually exclusive powers should come into play at the same time, the one with the printed restriction should be discarded and replaced with another alien. (This occurs typically at game setup time, in which case you may wish to let the player draw a replacement and then choose to play either that replacement or the other alien that he initially declined to play.) If a power should come into play mid-game but another mutually exclusive one is already in play, the newer one must be discarded and replaced. Most of the game effects that bring new aliens into play mid-game specifically state this, but it can also be an issue when using the Hidden Powers variant; so players who have a potentally "restrictable" hidden power should keep this in mind when deciding how long to wait to reveal it. Avoidable: The two earliest of these restrictions (on Gambler and Magician) were actually unnecessary. In both cases, simple text clarifications allow these powers to play against each other, and in such a way that each player still receives a benefit from his power. These clarifications essentially take up no more vertical space than the large-print restrictions they would replace. In the case of Magician, the clarification is already needed anyway (even without Oracle in the mix) to handle the much more common case of Magician facing Wild Magician. The Cosmodex presents (and heartily recommends) do-use-with clarifications for these powers. Unavoidable: Coordinator and Sadist, unfortunately, cannot easily be freed of their restrictions. Needed: Many players have commented that Masochist really should say "Do Not Use with Healer," and the Cosmodex adds this restriction as a recommended house rule.

:Doppelganger: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by Jack Reda and Bill Martinson, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Retooled Gameplay: Eon's Doppelganger could haunt any player, including his opponent, and specified exactly one attack and one compromise (negotiate) card, since other types of encounter cards had not yet been invented. If that Doppelganger received only one card, he played it; if he received none, he played the first appropriate card drawn from the deck. The original version always had to discard encounter cards immediately; this modernized Doppelganger discards encounter cards in the planning phase, so that he has the chance to hold some for effects like Hate, Love, and Wild Disease. Eon's Wild Doppelganger was completely different; it allowed you to keep the number of ships committed to the hyperspace gate a secret until the end of the encounter. Eon's Super Doppelganger was completely different; it allowed Doppelganger to keep flares he acquired (which is of course part of the base power in the FFG version).
Doppelganger wrote:
Borrows Cards to Play (R) You have the power to Haunt. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, use this power to discard all encounter cards in your hand (if any) and haunt one other player except your opponent. That player must give you two encounter cards of different types from his or her hand (or one if holding only one type). One of these must be the player's highest attack card, if he or she has any. When encounter cards are to be selected, if you have fewer than two encounter cards for any reason (including being zapped), you draw from the deck until you have two, discarding all non-encounter cards drawn. After cards are revealed, return any cards received from the haunted player that are still in your hand to that player.

You ignore all consequences of lacking encounter cards, such as drawing a new hand (even for game effects such as the Usurper's power), ending your turn, or losing the encounter due to the Laser's power.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Planning)

Haunting its Cosmic colleagues, the Doppelganger often gets the better of them. Each encounter leaves its jittery victim with the feeling that there is more to every passing shadow than meets the eye.

Wild: If you are not a main player, during the alliance phase you may set your hand aside and take the hand of one player who has a colony in your system. If you take the offense's hand, he or she draws a new one. At the end of the encounter, give your hand to that player and take back the hand you set aside.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)

Super: When using your power, you may also force any player other than your opponent to give you any two non-encounter cards from his or her hand (or one if he or she has only one), which you keep.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Emotion Control: Artifact, base set, designed by Future Pastimes.
Emotion Control wrote:
Alters Attack. Play after encounter cards are revealed to treat all attack cards played this encounter as negotiate cards. The main players must then attempt to make a deal.
(As Any Player) (Reveal)

:Empath: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by Gary Huckaby, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Empath was mandatory and worked only when its owner was the player who revealed the Compromise card; that version was often disparaged as an alleged "subset" of Pacifist. Some rightly argued that Empath was valuable in its own right since it could earn its owner a new colony when on defense (which Pacifist cannot do), but Pacifist was clearly preferred and certainly the stronger of the two overall. FFG's choice to adopt Huckaby's revised version considerably strengthens Empath and further differentiates it from Pacifist; two welcome improvements. (See negotiate cards.) The classic edition flare matches Eon gameplay; the standard edition Wild flare is a new effect designed by FFG. Edited to clarify that the first use of "negotiate" includes Crooked Deals while the second use excludes them, and to keep Masochist from abusing Classic Wild Empath for an immediate win. Links: [Corrected flare]
Empath wrote:
May Change Attack to Negotiate (G) You have the power of Harmony. As a main player, after either main player reveals any negotiate card and the other main player reveals an attack card, you may use this power to change the revealed attack card into a regular negotiate card. You and the other main player then attempt to make a deal.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Eons of overpopulation forced the highly social Empaths to cooperate in order to survive. On their lush, tropical planet, they learned the value of defense and yielding. Now, they are striving to teach harmony to all other Cosmic life forms.

Wild: You may play this flare when you attempt to make a deal. If you successfully make a deal, you and the other player in the deal each receive three rewards.
(Main Player Only) (Any Phase)

Super: As a main player or ally, if the opposing main player reveals a negotiate card, you may exchange it for an attack card from your hand. Conclude the encounter as if he or she revealed that attack card.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Classic Edition
Wild: As a main player, for the rest of this encounter, you may remove one ship from any colony (your choice) to the warp from each other player who does not say "Sir" or "Ma'am" (whichever is appropriate) each time he or she speaks.
(Main Player Only) (Any Phase)

Super: As a main player or ally, if the opposing main player reveals a negotiate card, you may exchange it for an attack card from your hand. Conclude the encounter as if he or she revealed that attack card.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:encounters: Duration: The Start Turn phase is not part of an encounter (although if something happens in the Start Turn phase and it has a duration of the rest of the encounter, it will last until the end of the Resolution phase as usual). An encounter begins when a player signals that he is starting his Regroup phase and ends after the last action of the Resolution phase. Each player must make at least one encounter on his turn; if that encounter is successful and he wishes to make a second encounter (or to draw a new tech instead), he must have an encounter card in hand at the end of the prior Resolution phase. No offensive ships: Under rare circumstances, such as via Amoeba's power, it is possible for the offense to be without ships in the hyperspace gate. This does not automatically end the encounter; the offense simply continues, just (probably) without the possibility of gaining a foreign colony (Encounter magazine v1n4p16). Outcome: There are several ways an encounter can end, although many games will see only the three most common: (1) one side wins and the other loses, (2) both players make a deal, and (3) both players fail to deal. However, there are other possibilities: (4) the encounter ends prematurely (Super Oracle, or the offense running out of encounter cards), (5) both sides lose (Wild Loser, Morph vs. Morph, or Meteor Storm), and (6) the encounter is specifically declared to end "successfully" for one or both of the players though there is no winner or loser (see examples in a later section). Successful: The FAQ states that there is no difference between winning an encounter and having a successful encounter. This is not correct.
Winning an encounter is one way of having a successful encounter, and making a deal is another way of having a successful encounter — but these three terms are not interchangeable. "Successful encounter" is the overall umbrella condition that determines whether you can make a second encounter. But a deal does not count as a "win" for game effects that do not explicitly mention deals, like Animal, Cudgel, Barbarian, Guerrilla, Leviathan, Remote, and Sapient. Explicitly declared successful: It seems that there is also a third, "general" kind of successful encounter created by a handful of special rules and game effects that deem an encounter successful but do not define it as a "win." These include Wild Diplomat, Mite, Wild Leviathan, Super Swindler, reclaiming an empty home planet after drawing your own destiny color, and the Cosmodex's revision for Wild Butler (which is based on the destiny rule wording). Although it might have been the intention for these outcomes to count as "wins," in the absence of any evidence to that effect the Cosmodex now considers them a third, distinct kind of successful outcome. This prevents questions and ambiguities with certain other effects that require a win or a loss. For example, if you use Wild Leviathan to trade home planets, your encounter is deemed "successful" but this is not actually a win; thus your opponent may not claim he "lost" the encounter in order to play something like Wild Fury or Super Trickster. Reclaiming home colonies: The FAQ states that when you draw your own color for destiny and aim the hyperspace gate at one of your unoccupied home planets, you do not go through any encounter phases past the Destiny phase. This is not correct. Because the rules require you to actually aim the hyperspace gate at the unoccupied planet, the encounter must proceed as far as the Launch phase. (Note also that the Cosmodex formerly declared this situation as an encounter you won, but has changed its tune and now considers it just an encounter that is "successful in general" (see previous subsection). Extra: As of Cosmic Storm, the effects that grant players "extra" encounters are Infinity Drive, Invader, Lightning, Machine, Wild Machine, and Wild Warrior. (As an honorable mention, Temporal Matrix allows you to have your normal second encounter even though you lost your first.) These extra encounters do not get their own Start Turn phase.

:encounter cards: The term "encounter card" can be confusing in a couple of ways. First, although the words are printed in the area of the card template that normally displays card types, this is emphatically not a card type. Rather it is a collection that comprises four card types: Attack, Negotiate, Retreat, and Morph. (Intimidates, kickers, and reinforcements are not encounter cards.) Game effects that refer to card types are referring to those four types (and others) individually. You can think of "encounter card" as an attribute, characteristic, or property that those four card types share, or perhaps a special category in which they reside. Second, the phrase "encounter cards" sometimes means "cards of those four types" but at other times means more specifically "the encounter cards played and/or revealed during the current encounter." (An amusing consequence of this duality can be seen in Deuce trying to explain that "this [encounter card] is not considered your encounter card.") To determine which meaning is intended at any given time, you will have to consider the context. Selecting: When encounter cards are selected and played in an encounter, either player may go first, and both players are allowed to change their choice of encounter card after seeing the card-back design (cosmic or reward) of their opponent's encounter card. If this produces a standoff where each player's choice is contingent upon the other player's card back, then somebody will eventually just have to pick a card and stick with it. Intimidates: Intimidate cards are the first card type designed specifically to cross this boundary; most of the time they are non-encounter cards, but when one is selected to serve as an encounter card, it then becomes one for all purposes related to the resolution of that encounter.

:encounter deck: There is no such thing as an encounter deck. This term, which appears in Bandit's game text, should be understood to refer to the cosmic deck.

:Encounter magazine: Eon published six issues (v1n1-v1n6) of this newsletter in 1983, containing news, homebrew ideas, Q&A, and other content about Eon games in general and Cosmic Encounter in particular. Editor and rules guru Jack Kittredge provided logical and consistent answers to a large number of core gameplay questions, some of which are still appropriate for the FFG edition and thus cited in the Cosmodex. Mayfair resumed publication in 1991/1992 with three more issues (v2n1-v2n3) covering their edition of the game.

:Energy Cloak: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Energy Cloak wrote:
Prevent Allies. Once completed, you may discard this tech as the offense after aiming the hyperspace gate. The defense may not invite any players to ally with him or her during this encounter.
(4) (Offense Only) (Launch)

:Energy Fields: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Unanswered question: When each main player shows his drawn cards to the "other" players, is this supposed to mean the other players who are not drawing cards or all players (in other words, does it include or exclude his opponent)? Edited to answer that question. Link: [Corrected card]
Energy Fields wrote:
Each main player draws two cards from the deck, showing them to {the other} all players.

:Engineer: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Warren Denning, history by Zach Whelchel, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Engineer wrote:
Gains Tech When Losing (Y) You have the power of Technology. As a main player, when you lose an encounter or fail to deal, you may use this power. Draw two tech cards from the technology deck (even if it is not otherwise in play). You may choose one of the drawn cards to place facedown on this sheet. If you do so, and another tech was already on this sheet, the new one replaces it. The tech(s) you do not keep are discarded.

You may research the tech card on this sheet normally and/or count your ships in the warp toward its research cost. When the tech is completed, move it off this sheet. Ships counted from the warp do not return to colonies with other researching ships, but may be used for the effect of a tech such as Coldsleep Ship or Genesis Bomb.

If this power or a tech card on it is stolen, discarded, etc., any ships that were researching the tech card on this sheet are returned to any of your colonies.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Engineers seek to rule the Universe through technological superiority. Valuing intelligence and ingenuity over might, they use scientific breakthroughs to subjugate those who oppose them, no matter how strong.

Wild: You may draw cards from the deck until you draw an artifact card. Non-artifacts drawn are discarded. If you exhaust the deck without drawing an artifact, take any one artifact from the discard pile. Give this flare to the Engineer after use (or discard it, if the Engineer isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When using your power, instead of drawing two tech cards you may look through the technology deck and take one card your choice. Then, shuffle the technology deck.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Enigma Device: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Noteworthy interaction: Enigma Device, unless countered by Tech Scrambler or Omni-Zap, essentially makes Genius a non-power.
Enigma Device wrote:
Reset All Hands to 8 Cards. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter. Each player, starting with you and continuing clockwise, either draws cards from the deck or discards cards at random as needed to bring his or her hand to exactly eight cards. You (and only you) may discard as many of your cards as you wish beforehand.
(4) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Entropy Beast, The: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Clarification: According to Kevin Wilson, The Entropy Beast ends the game if any player's system is (or already was) reduced below three planets for any reason; the reduction does not have to have been caused by The Entropy Beast itself. Link: [Kevin Wilson on Entropy Beast]
The Entropy Beast wrote:
While The Entropy Beast is in play, each time a special or wild destiny card is drawn, remove the planet with the most ships on it from the game (offense breaks ties), sending all ships on it to the warp. If a player's home system is reduced below three planets, all players lose the game.

Discard The Cosmic Guardian and The Witness when The Entropy Beast enters play.
(This Card Remains in Play)

:Ethic: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Ethic was significantly different, and arguably stronger. On the negative side, it did not let Ethic take compensation from the deck instead of his opponent and it allowed the opponent to spend Lucre to prevent the compensation. On the positive side, it worked even when an opponent won the encounter without playing an attack card (such as Pacifist, Loser holding only negotiate cards, Super Loser, zapped Human, etc.); provided 4 cards in compensation even if fewer ships were lost; and allowed Ethic to discard any of the cards he did not want to keep. Eon's Super Ethic was completely different; it stopped the opponent from using Lucre to prevent compensation.
Ethic wrote:
Gets Compensation for Attack (G) You have the power of Guilt. As a main player, after you lose an encounter in which both players revealed attack cards, use this power to collect compensation from your opponent as though you had played a negotiate card instead.

Whenever you gain compensation, you may draw some or all of it from the deck instead of your opponent.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Subscribing to a moral code of the utmost purity, the Ethics set a universal standard of conduct. Those who would harm the Ethics find themselves curiously repentant. Knowing that they are possessed of the One True Way, the race of Ethics now seeks to convert Outsiders through moral suasion.

Wild: When you draw any new card(s) from the deck, you may use this flare. For the rest of the encounter, each time you draw cards, you may feel guilty and give away some or all of them to other players. You may not, however, give away more than three cards per encounter in this way.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When you collect compensation, you may name a number from zero to eight and take that many cards as compensation.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:expansion sets: See Cosmic Encounter.

:experience levels: See alert levels.

:Explorer: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Discovered planets: Explorer begins with four discoverable planets on its sheet even if you are using the Four Planets variant, or playing multiple powers with something like Ace. In every way, discovered planets are normal home planets in the systems in which they reside.
Explorer wrote:
Finds New Planets (Y) Game Setup: Choose one unused player color and place four planets of that color on this sheet. Do not use this power unless you have an unused player color.

You have the power of Discovery. As the offense, after the hyperspace gate is aimed, you may use this power to take a planet from this sheet, place it in the targeted system, and re-aim the gate at that planet.

As a main player or ally, after both players reveal attack cards, you may use this power to increase your side's total according to the planets you have discovered. Add 1 for each discovered planet you do not have a colony on, 2 for each discovered planet you coexist on, and 4 for each discovered planet you occupy alone.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Launch) (Reveal)

As the various child-races of the Precursors began to take to the stars, most were drawn to one another in their hunger for knowledge, trade, defense, conflict, and the other manifold needs that drove them forward. The Explorers, however, often bypassed other sentient beings in their haste to catalog new worlds. Even centuries later, this obsession continues; but now they begin to reap the rewards of their diverse discoveries.

Wild: As the offense, after the hyperspace gate is aimed, you may take the Genesis planet (whether it is in use or not), place it in the targeted system, and re-aim the gate at that planet. You may receive rewards equal to your ships in the encounter if you win or make a deal, or one reward if you do not (in addition to any other benefits of the encounter outcome).
(Offense Only) (Launch)

Super: As a main player or ally in an encounter at any planet you discovered, after encounter cards are revealed you may add 4 to your side's total.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Extortionist: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Classic Wild Filch: Extortionist cannot extort cards stolen using Wild Filch; as soon as he becomes aware of the Filching, the other player is caught and must return the cards. Zombie: Based on rulings in the FAQ about Zombie using effects that require ships to be lost, it would seem that Zombie is immune to extortion. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Extortionist could be paid off with Lucre, rather than by sacrificing a ship to the warp. Eon's Wild Extortionist was completely different; it extorted Lucre from a player who flipped your color twice in a row for destiny. Edited to prevent Extortionist from affecting card draws by effects such as Chosen, Miser, Chrysalis, and gaining new tech, to restore Eon's approach of taking the cards after the other player has collected them rather than the leaky method of trying to acquire cards instead of the other player, and to recast Super Extortionist for readability and removal of the old Eon reference to a Lucre "payment." Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Extortionist wrote:
Gets Half of All New Cards (Y) You have the power to Extort. After starting hands are dealt, whenever any other player collects compensation or draws new cards for his or her hand from any deck for any reason (including rewards, new hands, etc.), before those cards are added to that player's hand you may use this power to {acquire or draw half of those cards} take half of them (rounded down) at random for yourself instead. A player may prevent you from extorting any cards from him or her by allowing you to send one of his or her ships of your choice to the warp, but he or she must do so before you take any cards.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Warped by an unstable environment, the Extortionist has long been crazed by greed. Extortionists prefer wealth that has been unjustly siphoned from honest wage-earners, and now, with their hands ever extended, they hope to amass enough for the final takeover.

Wild: When you attempt to make a deal with another player (or players), you may play this flare. If you fail to make a deal, you do not lose any ships to the warp, while the other player (or players) failing to make a deal lose twice as many ships to the warp as usual for the failed deal.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: {A player may not prevent you from extorting cards by sending a ship to the warp if you don't wish to accept the payment.} You may prevent a player from stopping your extortion via ship loss.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)
******** REMINDER! ******** DO NOT QUOTE THE ENTIRE POST! ******** Be courteous to others; limit your quotation to just the text you need.
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Re: The Cosmodex: An Encyclopedia for Cosmic Encounter
VOLUME II: F–L

:facedown cards and tokens: See hidden information.

:facets of powers: This term refers to most of the proprietary game components used by aliens in special ways, such as Miser's hoard or Grudge's tokens. Basically, a facet is any resource an alien controls uniquely except cards in hand (e.g., Butler's tips), information (e.g., Mind's card knowledge), or Fungus stacks. A power's facets normally go along with it when that power is stolen, traded, loaned, etc.; this is specifically required by Changeling (from which we get the term facet) and Psychic Switcheroo, but should be considered a general rule for all alien power transfers, such as those caused by Wild Philanthropist, Plant, Wild Plant, and Wild Sorcerer. Facets that transfer: Everything* an alien keeps on its sheet is a facet; this includes tokens used by Chrysalis, Fury, Joker, Lightning, Saboteur, Sapient, Tick-Tock, and Warrior; cards on the sheets of The Claw, Cryo, Cyborg, Engineer, Host, Industrialist, Miser, Reactor, and Schizoid; ships accumulated by Bride, Pirate, and Remote; and Explorer's undiscovered planets. (*Locust's own text specifically exempts its devoured planets from being transferred.) Other facets of powers include Citadel’s citadel cards, Pentaform’s life stages, and the custom tokens used by Grudge, Saboteur, Tourist, and Yin-Yang. Objects that do not transfer: Cards in players' hands or in play out on the table are not alien power facets, even if a power like Genius or Mutant acquired them or one like Deuce or Merchant is currently using them in a special way; nor are planets moved by a power such as The Claw. Fungus' stacks would be too ambiguous and problematic to transfer. (Horde's horde tokens, Pygmy's extra planets, and Lizard’s and Symbiote’s second-color ships, of course, also never transfer because those powers themselves cannot transfer under any circumstances.) Moot: Although Invasion! cards are conceptually a facet of Invader's power, the term is moot in this case because those cards function autonomously; they do their job without anyone needing to "own" them. Invasion! cards simply apply to whomever is currently the Invader in much the same way that Super flares apply to whomever is playing the matching power. Right to look: Unless otherwise specified, you may always look at the facets of your power, even if you were not the power's original owner. For example, when you receive control of Saboteur or Schizoid (even if only temporarily), you may check your unique tokens or card immediately to see where you stand.

:Fido: Alien power, base set, designed by Brandon Freels, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: Fido can retrieve only an encounter card that was used to resolve the encounter, not one that was discarded for some other reason. Reward deck: Fido cannot draw his "payment" from the reward deck; even though this benefit matches the outcome of a (pre-Incursion) reward, it is not defined as a reward. Playtester clarification: Fido is allowed to retrieve cards from the reward deck discard pile (there is a "grace period" during which grabber effects can take discarded reward-back cards immediately after they are discarded). Retooled gameplay: Freels' Fido retrieved cards "on their way to" the discard pile rather than after being discarded, was not limited to encounter cards discarded at the end of an encounter, defined the payment as a reward (which would have let Fido draw from the reward deck when an opponent keeps an offered card), and made the reward mandatory (FFG's version appears to make it optional whether you collect the reward-that-isn't-a-reward). Freels' Wild Fido was completely different; it allowed the player to take the top card of the discard pile (selecting any one card if several were just discarded). Freels' Super Fido was less flexible, requiring the player to fetch all cards discarded at the same time. Edited to specify what happens if Fido does not want to keep a card that has been refused, to resolve the conflict between "you may" implying the payment is optional and "either" implying it is mandatory, and to clarify the scope of the power as defined in the FAQ. Links:[url=http://www.boardgamegeek.com/image/ 1275183/cosmic-encounter?size=original][Corrected power][/url]
Fido wrote:
Retrieves Discarded Cards (Y) You have the power to Fetch. After encounter cards are discarded at the end of an encounter, you may use this power to retrieve one of the discarded cards and offer it to another player. If the card is refused, you may keep or discard it. If the card is accepted, the other player keeps the card and you may {either} retrieve one ship from the warp or draw one card from the deck. You may retrieve only an encounter card that was used to resolve the encounter, not one that was discarded for some other reason.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Resolution)

Trained for generations by a strict, but unknown, alien race, the Fidos were bred for retrieval. Slinking out on their own, they cannot help but fetch the debris of outer space for whomever happens by, knowing they will still be rewarded in some way.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may force your opponent to take the top card of the discard pile and add it to his or her hand. You then draw a card from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may fetch any or all of the encounter cards discarded at the end of an encounter and offer them, one by one, to the other players in any order you choose.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

:Filch: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. FAQ ruling: If Sorcerer switches cards, the one Filch's opponent ends up with is the one Filch may steal. FAQ ruling: Using Classic Edition Wild Filch does not count as playing a flare card until you are caught. Error in FAQ: Filch cannot take Gambler's unrevealed card, because Filch thieves cards only from the discard pile and Gambler does not discard his card unless it is challenged and revealed. Playtester clarification: Filch is allowed to retrieve cards from the reward deck discard pile (there is a "grace period" during which grabber effects can take discarded reward-back cards immediately after they are discarded). Sneaky trick: If you're any alien other than Filch, you can play the non-classic Wild Filch on yourself. You'll have to reveal the identity of one of your artifacts, but it might be worth it if you really want to get rid of a negotiate card. (You'll have to feint with an artifact because you can't play two flares in the same encounter.) Retooled gameplay: The classic edition flare matches Eon gameplay; the standard edition Wild flare reflects Mayfair's change to the card. Edited to remove incorrect implication that all artifacts and flares have a "victim," to implement the FAQ ruling on when Classic Edition Wild Filch is actually played, and to fix Classic Edition Super Filch's incorrect timing bar (so it agrees with both the text and the standard edition Super Filch). Link: [Corrected flare]
Filch wrote:
Takes Opponent's Used Card (G) You have the power of Theft. As a main player, after encounter cards are discarded at the end of an encounter, you may use this power to retrieve your opponent's card from the discard pile and add it to your hand.

If encounter cards are switched by another game effect, the final card your opponent uses in the resolution phase is the one you may add to your hand.

(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Within their genteel, sophisticated tribes, the Filches have refined the art of acquisition to a high aesthetic. The most judicious and subtle thefts are memorialized in legend and song. Lately they have taken to eyeing the depths of space and thoughtfully rippling their tentacles.

Wild: When any artifact or flare card is being played, you may discard a negotiate card from your hand to steal it. The stolen card has no effect {on its intended victim}, going into your hand instead.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may filch one other player's used encounter card whether you were involved in the encounter or not.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Classic Edition
Wild: You may cheat and take your ships from the warp (to colonies) or cards from the deck or discard pile, even when you are not entitled to them. If caught in the act, you lose one ship to the warp and return the items you were caught filching. You don't have to {reveal} play this flare unless you are caught, but once it is revealed the deck and discards are placed next to you for easy access.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may filch one other player's used encounter card whether you were involved in the encounter or not.
(As Any Player) ({Reveal}) (Resolution)

:Filth: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Ally clarification: Filth uniquely relies upon a reciprocal interpretation of the word "allies," meaning that the offense is considered an "ally of his allies." Thus, the phrase "your allies in a winning offensive encounter" actually means "any other players on your side when you are the offense or an offensive ally and your side wins." Retooled gameplay: Eon's and Mayfair's Filths began by defining the power as acting when ships land on a planet; FFG wisely eliminates this confusion and more cleanly defines the power as a continuous effect. FFG has also cleaned things up a fair amount by eliminating the old redundant text about players re-challenging fumigated planets, and adding an excellent clarification that when allies land on other planets, they each get to choose one individually. Earlier versions gave the impression that all players are driven off a planet simultaneously, but FFG's version is written in the singular; thus the power drives away one opponent at a time (in the order of Filth's choosing) and is susceptible to a zap each time it does so. Edited to clarify the reciprocal use of "allies," to fix the old language (copied from both Eon and Mayfair) incorrectly implying that all colony trades involve colonies from both players (as written, Filth technically requires both to vacate planets even if only one colony is being granted) and to more safely attach this requirement to the actual trade itself rather than to the initial agreement (which could cause planets to be vacated too soon if something happens to alter or cancel the deal).
Filth wrote:
Drives Away Others' Ships (R) You have the power to Reek. Any time any of your ships are coexisting on the same planet as any other player's ships, use this power to force the other player's ships to return to his or her other colonies.

When you are the offense or an offensive ally, your allies in a winning {offensive} encounter do not land on the targeted planet with you. However, they each still gain a colony on any other planet of their choice (each player chooses separately) in the defending system.

As the defense, when you lose an encounter on a planet where you have ships, use this power to force all opposing ships to return to their other colonies instead of landing on that planet. Your losing ships go to the warp normally and the planet is then "fumigated."

When you trade a colony to or from another player in a deal, each player granting a colony must vacate a planet for the other player to land on.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Filth's reverence for the past leaves it unable to remove any trace of earlier events – whether yesterday's glatorp stains or last year's diseased kinzosh. Having driven all other life forms from their homeworlds, they are slowly extending out to leave their mark – a ring around the Cosmos.

Wild: At any time, you may declare one planet to be "filthy." All ships there return to their other colonies. Any ships that should land there during this encounter instead return to their other colonies. Give this flare to the Filth after use (or discard it, if the Filth isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: As the offense, when you aim the hyperspace gate at a planet, you may play this flare. All other players' ships on that planet (including those of the defense) must immediately return to their other colonies.
(Offense Only) (Launch)

:Finder: Artifact, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes.
Finder wrote:
Searches for Card. Play at any time. Choose another player and name a specific card, such as " attack 40," "Clone flare," or "Plague." Look at the chosen player's hand. If the named card is in his or her hand, you may take it.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Flagship: One of the Special Ships variants listed on the Cosmic Dominion rulesheet.

:flares: Limits: The limitations on playing flares can be confusing. Each player is limited to playing one flare per encounter, and each flare effect is limited to being played once per encounter. This means that if a flare is played and then changes hands, that effect cannot be played again (even by a different player) during that same encounter. The once-per-encounter limit apparently applies to the card's Wild and Super effects separately, suggesting (for example) that if a player uses a flare's Wild effect and then is required to give it to the player using that alien power, the second player could potentially use the Super effect during the same encounter (more on this below). Optional: Using a flare is always optional, even if the associated power is mandatory; see mandatory flare bug. Recurrence: Flares do not automatically recur throughout an encounter or across encounters unless they specifically say so (such as Wild Mind); see recurrent flare bug. Timing: From the moment a flare is played, it is no longer in the player's hand, but is instead on the table "waiting to resolve." If nothing happens to challenge it (such as a Card Zap), then the flare has its effect. Once its effect is completely finished, the flare returns to the player's hand (unless it says to do something different, of course). Because of this, flares that have an effect on the player's hand (e.g., Wild Cryo, Super Cryo, Wild Machine, Wild Oracle, Wild Trader, Super Trader) are usually exempt from that effect and still return to the player's hand afterwards. Canceling and Preventing: The various rulings in the FAQ on canceled and prevented flares are not well explained and are difficult to harmonize, but analyzing them together suggests the following: If an attempted flare is canceled (e.g., by Card Zap), it is discarded and uses up the player's chance to play a flare as well as the flare's chance to be played this encounter. If a flare is only prevented (e.g., by Wild Anti-Matter, Super Anti-Matter, or a power being Cosmic Zapped as its owner tries to use his Super flare), this still uses up that flare effect's chance to be played (by anyone) this encounter, but the card returns to the player's hand and does not use up that player's chance to play a flare in general. The FAQ specifically rules that when a Super flare is prevented due to the underlying power being Cosmic Zapped, that flare's Wild effect can still be played during the same encounter. This additional complication forces us to conclude that the once-per-encounter limit on each flare being played applies to its two effects separately (leading to the assertion above that two players can use the separate "halves" of the flare during the same encounter). Wild vs. Super: A player who holds his Super flare may wish to zap his own power so that he can use the flare's Wild effect instead, which is allowed as long as the zapping is legitimate. One way to make his power zappable is to begin to play his Super flare (legally), which causes his power to be considered "used." If at that point he zaps his own power, the Super flare returns to his hand and can be played as a Wild on the same encounter. However, if his Cosmic Zap gets Card Zapped, then he must of course follow through with using his Super flare even though he did not want to. (There is no provision for voluntarily canceling an action that you have already initiated.) Alien identity: For an explanation of what happens to a give-to-owner kind of flare when the named alien has lost its power, see alien powers. Classic Edition flares: As of Cosmic Dominion, three aliens offer a choice of modern or classic flare: Empath, Filch, and Schizoid. Single-use flares: As of Cosmic Dominion, there are twenty-eight flares that must be given up when used. Wild Changeling and Wild Reincarnator are given to the player targeted by the flare. Super Sneak and Super Sycophant are given to a player of your choice, while Wild Prophet is given to the player on your left if you are incorrect. Super Dervish, Wild Schizoid, Super Symbiote, and (sometimes) Super Human are discarded after use. Nineteen others are given to the player who is the corresponding alien, or discarded if that alien is not playing, is zapped, or is lost (see alien powers); these are the Wild flares for Ace, Alchemist, Angler, Animal, Aristocrat, Chronos, Disease, Engineer, Filth, Host, Human, Invader, Leviathan, Locust, Mimic, Pentaform, Reactor, Sorcerer, and Winner. Special format: Reactor’s flare has extra text that no other flare has, below the Super effect. This mandatory text is always in effect, and following it does not count as playing the flare.

:Fodder: Alien power, base set, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Ambiguity: Super Fodder's text is unclear about whether one or both of the base power's numeric constraints are being overridden, but according to Mr. Reda the discarded cards still must be lower than the opponent's attack card. Retooled gameplay: Reda's Fodder required its owner to always play his lowest attack card in every encounter, thereby forbidding the use of negotiate cards until all attack cards had been exhausted. This requirement was exempted by Reda's Super Fodder. (FFG's rewrite of the Super flare provides a more or less analogous effect, given the fact that their base power does not require starting with the lowest card.) Edited to clarify that Wild Fodder does not allow you to join a side that did not invite you, and to resolve Super Fodder's ambiguity. Links: [Jack Reda on Super Fodder] [Corrected flare]
Fodder wrote:
Plays Additional Low Cards (Y) You have the power to Overwhelm. As a main player, you may use this power after both you and your opponent reveal attack cards. You may discard any or all attack cards in your hand that are both higher than the attack card you played and lower than the attack card played by your opponent, adding their values to your total.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Always regarded as an inferior, scavenging race, the Fodder have amassed a multitude of generally less-effective arms. With the astonishingly large cache of second-rate weapons, the Fodder can afford to overwhelm their adversaries.

Wild: After encounter cards are revealed, if you were invited to ally and declined, you may ally with one ship on a side that invited you.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Reveal)

Super: When using your power, you may discard (and add) any or all attack cards in your hand that are lower than your opponent's card, regardless of your own attack card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Force Field: Artifact, base set, designed by Future Pastimes.
Force Field wrote:
Stops Allies. Play after alliances are formed to cancel the alliances of any or all players. Canceled allies return their ships to any of their colonies.
(As Any Player) (Alliance)

:Fungus: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Fungus vs. Wild Fungus: When Wild Fungus captures a fungoid stack, the stack remains together (until lost to the warp) but counts as only a single ship because "Captured ships do not have special characteristics." Transferred power: When the Fungus sheet is traded (Changeling, Psychic Switcheroo, Wild Sorcerer), stolen (Plant, Wild Plant), or lent (Wild Philanthropist), the fungoid stacks do not transfer to the new player (in spite of a couple of these effects saying that all facets of the power are handed over). To attempt to do so would simply be too messy and ambiguous. Card loss leak: Eon's Wild Fungus stated that captured ships were returned when you "lose" the flare, but FFG changed this to "discard." When the flare is lost without being discarded (taken as compensation or by Trader or Finder, for example), this leaves the captured ships stranded in the captor's system for the rest of the game, without it being clear whether they still count toward encounter totals. Probably this gameplay change was not intentional. Edited to fix the main player bug, to clarify interactions with game effects like Anti-Matter and Virus, to plug the lose-without-discarding leak, to delete the confusing and unnecessary phrase "if any" (see Appendix B), and to fix Super Fungus' incorrect prerequisite and timing icons. Link: [Corrected flare]
Fungus wrote:
Attaches to Other Ships (Y) You have the power to Adhere. As a main player or ally, after your side wins an encounter in which you have at least one ship, use this power to capture any losing ships, stacking them under one or more of your ships in the encounter instead of sending them to the warp (game effects that would save ships from the warp, such as Zombie's or Healer's power, cannot prevent this). Captured ships do not have special characteristics (e.g., Macron ships are not worth four). These stacks are controlled by you. Each stack is considered to be one ship for purposes of play. Ships that are part of a stack are only freed when the stack enters the warp. Freed ships return to normal and may leave the warp as usual. If this power is stolen, your stacks do not transfer with it, but remain stacked until separated in the warp.

As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, use this power. Each stack you have in the encounter counts as the number of ships it contains toward your side's total instead of 1. Zapping this power does not free any captured ships.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal) (Resolution)

The Fungus clings tenaciously to its basic perceptions, and now its neighbors find its teachings (and tendrils) rapidly growing upon them.

Wild: As the defense, when you win in your home system, you may capture all opposing ships in the encounter and place them in a circle around your system. They now count toward your total when you are the defense in your home system, but do not go to the warp if you lose. Captured ships do not have special characteristics. When you lose this flare, the captured ships return to their owners' colonies.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: Ships adhering to yours in stacks don't have to be freed when sent to the warp. When one of your ships is released from the warp, those ships in its stack remain with it.
({Main Player Only}) (As Any Player) ({Resolution}) (Any Phase)

:Fury: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Add or Subtract: Fury is one of the few aliens that manipulates encounter totals but is not perturbed when facing Anti-Matter, because she can subtract if she wants to. Edited to prevent Super Fury from saying "use your power" in a context where you don't actually use your power. Link: [Corrected flare]
Fury wrote:
Avenges Lost Ships (G) You have the power of Vengeance. Each time one or more of your ships are lost to the warp or removed from the game, use this power to place one token on this sheet for each of those ships.

As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may discard any number of tokens from this sheet to add or subtract 3 from your side's total for each token you discard.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Powerful warriors of a matriarchal race, the Furies swear vengeance on anyone foolish enough to defeat one of their champions in battle. Although the quest may take years, the vengeance of the Furies is always served in the end.

Wild: As a main player, when you lose an encounter, you may destroy one ship (their choice) belonging to each player that opposed you. Destroyed ships are removed from the game. This flare cannot reduce a player to fewer ships than the number of foreign colonies needed to win the game, although it still affects the other players that opposed you.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: You don't have to discard tokens from your sheet {to use your power}. Instead, you may add or subtract 3 from your side's total for each token on your sheet.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Planning)

:Galactic Council: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Special encounter: The card's text is unclear on this, but the cleanest way to handle Galactic Council is to skip to the Reveal phase, when deals are conducted, followed by a Resolution phase for carrying out the deal (or penalties). This allows the use of game effects that cancel, modify, or trigger on deals, such as Quash, Wild Extortionist, Super Philanthropist, Warrior and Tick-Tock. It also lets cleanup actions such as those needed by Demon, Wild Doppelganger, Laser, and Wild Philanthropist still occur at the end of the encounter. Timing: Hazards are drawn after the offense has launched ships in the hyperspace gate, so remember that the rules on deals state that "Any ships remaining in the hyperspace gate after the deal return to any of the offense's colonies." Edited to clarify that the encounter skips ahead to the reveal phase.
Galactic Council wrote:
Instead of having a normal encounter, proceed to the reveal phase. All of the players in the game have three minutes to make a deal. All players must accept the deal or it fails. If the deal fails, all players lose 3 ships to the warp.

:Gambler: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Error in FAQ: Filch cannot take Gambler's unrevealed card, because Filch thieves cards only from the discard pile and Gambler does not discard his card unless it is challenged and revealed. FAQ ruling: When facing Oracle, Gambler must either play his card face up or use his power during the Planning phase to make a declaration about it before Oracle chooses an encounter card. (This restores the way the two powers originally interacted under Eon gameplay.) Upping the ante: Jack Kittredge ruled that Super Gambler is allowed to increase the number of ships at risk beyond the number he currently has available to lose (Encounter magazine v1n5p8). House Rule: The printed Do Not Use restriction is easily overcome by simply allowing Gambler to still bluff about the card he originally played; in this case, Sorcerer must then accept or challenge Gambler's claim about the card Sorcerer is about to reveal (and may not look at it if he accepts the claim). This solution was offered by Bryan Stout in Encounter magazine v1n4p3. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Gambler was mandatory (which created an issue with Silencer) and allowed an unchallenged bluff card to be "buried" in the discard pile, rather than requiring it to be placed at the bottom of the deck. FFG fixes Eon's ambiguity about whether Gambler gets to see the opponent's card before making his claim. Edited to resolve what happens with an unchallenged reward-back card, to eliminate the Do Not Use conflict with Sorcerer, to implement the FAQ ruling on Oracle, to eliminate trying to calculate a "spread" with negotiate cards, for terminology, and to fix Super Gambler's mathematical ambiguity. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Gambler wrote:
Bluffs About Card (R) You have the power to Bluff. After your opponent reveals his or her encounter card, you may use this power to keep yours facedown, instead stating what it is (and lying if you like). If your opponent does not challenge your claim, conclude the encounter as if your statement were true, then place your encounter card facedown on the bottom of the appropriate deck instead of discarding it. If your opponent challenges your claim, reveal your card. If you lied, you lose as many ships to the warp as you have in the encounter. If you told the truth, your opponent loses as many ships as he or she has in the encounter. These lost ships may not be ships involved in the encounter. Afterwards, conclude the encounter normally using the revealed cards.

If another game effect switches the encounter cards (e.g., Sorcerer), you may still bluff about the card you originally played, forcing your opponent to accept or challenge your claim about the card that he or she would now reveal. If another game effect forces you to show your card early (e.g., Oracle), you may use this power at that time.
{Do Not Use with Sorcerer}
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Arising in an era of geological turmoil, the Gamblers trusted only their own audacity. The faint of heart soon perished, but the most daring rose to even greater effronteries and now launch a contest for Cosmic stakes.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are revealed, you may call any number as a "spread." If the cards are both attacks and are different from each other by that number or more, add the "spread" to your card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When stating what your card is, you may "up the ante" by saying how many extra ships (1-20) are at risk. The penalty for lying or calling a non-bluff is now increased by the number of ships you declared.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Gambler template: In the Cosmic Encounter base set, 49 of the alien powers used a consistent art template while Gambler alone used one with a "stretched" text box and reduced alien image "porthole." This was presumably to accommodate the "Do Not Use" restriction on that sheet, but actually was not necessary. Gambler's text (with or without the revisions presented here) easily fits onto the standard art template within FFG's normal allowances for adjustments to font size, leading, tracking, etc. The first two expansion sets all used the standard template, and then Cosmic Alliance contained seven aliens on the "Gambler template" — Bandit, Butler, Cyborg, Pygmy, Remote, Schizoid, and Skeptic — again, unnecessarily, since all seven fit the standard template. The Cosmodex sets the type on these eight aliens to fit the standard template, for visual consistency but also to aid in the author's efforts to produce a VASSAL module for Cosmic Encounter, which requires consistency in image size and placement to support features of that module such as the "cameo" command (reducing the alien sheet to just its image to save screen space) and the ability to display the players' encounter roles as popup icons on their alien sheets.

:General: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited to clarify that the card draws are limited to the cosmic deck.
General wrote:
Draws Cards for Allies (G) You have the power of Leadership. As a main player, after alliances are formed, use this power. You may immediately draw one card from the deck per player allied with you. Afterwards, each of your allies may draw one card from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Alliance)

A military society from their earliest days, the Generals have always placed a high value on leadership and charisma. Their history is full of some of the most inspiring speeches ever given in all the Cosmos. Whenever a ragtag band of warriors stands up to defy the odds, a General will be there to lead them. Whether fighting the enemy on the beaches or standing with a few lucky men to fight for freedom, a General will smile and say, "I love the smell of Ionic Gas in the morning... It smells like victory."

Wild: As a main player, after both main players have revealed attack cards and you are losing the encounter, you may rally the troops and draw cards from the deck equal to the number of ships your allies have in the encounter. Play any reinforcements you draw and discard the rest of the cards.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: If you use your power and both main players reveal attack cards, you may add 2 to your total for each ship your allies have in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Genesis Bomb: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ Clarification: If the Genesis Bomb is used more than once in the same game, each subsequent player simply moves the Genesis planet to his own system (without removing any ships that might already be on it). Benefit: Some players have questioned the usefulness of the Genesis planet. The FAQ offers the argument that having an extra home planet can delay, prevent, or remedy the loss of one's power because of too few home colonies.
Genesis Bomb wrote:
Create Planet. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech at the start of any encounter to take the Genesis planet and place it in your home system. You may immediately gain a colony on it using any or all of the ships used to research this tech.
(4) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Genius: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Eric Lang, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Noteworthy interactions: Genius is essentially a non-power if Barbarian, Hacker, Mite, or Trader is in the game, and is similarly devastated by a single successful use of Hand Zap, Enigma Device, or Wild Vulch. Edited to clarify that the flare's card draws are limited to the cosmic deck.
Genius wrote:
Wins with 20 Cards (R) You have the power to Outwit. As a main player or ally, whenever you gain a foreign colony as the result of winning an encounter, you may use this power to instead draw one card from the deck for each ship you have in the encounter and then send your ships in the encounter back to your other colonies.

At the start of any turn, if you have 20 or more cards in your hand, you immediately win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Originating on a planet filled with some of the Universe's deadliest predators, the Geniuses had to be smarter and more ruthless than any other creature on their world in order to survive. Now that they've left their home planet, the Geniuses have turned their prodigious intelligence toward a bloodless coup of the Universe.

Wild: As a main player, before allies are invited, you may force any number of players you choose (including yourself) to draw a card from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may guess a number from 0 to 40. If your opponent reveals an attack card with a value within 3 of your guess, shout "Eureka!" and draw four cards from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Ghoul: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Jeffrey Field, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: Field's Ghoul earned one reward for every lost ship regardless of which side it was on, counted ships removed from the game, and allowed Ghoul to earn a Lucre in lieu of a reward. Field's version also counted ships lost for any reason during the entire encounter, not just those lost as a result of the encounter. Field's Wild Ghoul was completely different; it allowed an involved player to take a card from the loser's hand for each of his winning ships. Field's Super Ghoul was completely different; it was poorly written, but appears to have allowed a winning Ghoul to earn additional rewards based on his own tokens in the challenge, and to retrieve tokens from places other than the warp. (The phrase "from a token stealing power like the Void" does not make any sense since Void does not steal tokens, so it is unclear whether the intent was to recover tokens "from capturing powers like Fungus" or to recover tokens removed from the game.) Edited to fix the rewards bug.
Ghoul wrote:
Rewarded for Defeating Ships (R) You have the power to Feast. As a main player, after you win an encounter, use this power. For each opposing ship sent to the warp as a result of the encounter, you receive one reward.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Haunting the edges of battlefields and devouring the losers to sate their endless hunger, the Ghouls are greatly feared throughout the Universe, particularly by those aliens that normally attack en masse. More subtle tactics are required against the Ghouls, lest they emerge from battle stronger than ever.

Wild: As a main player, after you win an encounter, you may use this flare. Receive one reward for every player that opposed you in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may use your power as an offensive ally if your side wins.
(Offensive Ally Only) (Resolution)

:give this flare: See flares.

:Gluon Mines: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Colony reinforcement: When you reveal this tech, the ships researching it go to any of your colonies; it is perfectly legal to add some or all of them to your colony that is being encountered. FAQ Clarifications: The owner of the Gluon Mines gets to choose which attacking ships are lost. Potentially, one or more offensive allies could be completely removed from the encounter (although they would still count has having allied in the first place for game effects like Grudge). Edited to fix the attack bug. Link: [Corrected card]
Gluon Mines wrote:
Ambush Attackers. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech as the defense after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed to send one opposing ship to the warp for each ship researching this tech. If there are no opposing ships left afterwards, you win this encounter. Otherwise, it continues normally.
(X) (Defense Only) (Planning)

:Glutton: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Matthew Cary, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unanswered question: The phrase "up to" is ambiguous in the context of a MANDATORY effect. Is this intended to give Glutton the flexibility to retrieve 0, 1, or 2 extra ships from the warp, or just an attempt to acknowledge that he might have fewer than 2 extra ones available when this effect is triggered? (All other "up to" effects except Vacuum provide a choice.)
Glutton wrote:
Gets Extra Ships and Cards (G) You have the power to Gorge. Whenever you retrieve one or more of your ships from the warp, use this power to retrieve up to two extra ships of yours from the warp.

Whenever you draw one or more cards from the deck (including when you are dealt your starting hand) or from another player's hand, use this power to draw two extra cards from the same source.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Once described as 50% mouth, 50% stomach, and 50% appetite, the insatiable Gluttons have devoured their way across the Cosmos ever since they (quite literally) ate themselves out of house and home. Those dealing with the Gluttons are advised to count their digits afterwards and to always keep an eyestalk or two on their "tender, succulent" offspring.

Wild: When receiving rewards, you may receive twice as many rewards as usual.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When a cosmic quake occurs, you may use this flare to immediately win the game.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Gorgon: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Retooled gameplay: Whereas Mayfair's Gorgon froze opposing ships at all times except when they were supposed to be lost to the warp, FFG has unfortunately given Gorgon's victims a choice and thus the flexibility to exploit the power to their own benefit. Any time you must send ships of your choice to the warp (e.g., when failing to make a deal), just select any that are petrified, then choose to keep them on that planet instead of losing them. Or, to get out from under Gorgon's influence whenever you are allowed to select ships to move (e.g., when populating the hyperspace gate), select some that are petrified and move them to the warp instead of their intended destination. This also leads to ambiguity since it is not always clear, when ships are being sent to the warp, which player is technically the one who "attempts to move" them. It is likely that these changes were unintended, and so the revised wording presented here restores Mayfair's original effect, with tweaks to account for captured and eradicated ships. Edited to prevent opponents from exploiting Gorgon to their benefit, to account for capturing and eradication, to clarify Wild Gorgon so it refers not just to "destroyed" planets but to planets "removed from the game" for any reason, and to clarify Super Gorgon's awkward construction by using the wording from Wild Healer, whose effect it duplicates. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Gorgon wrote:
Petrifies Others' Ships (R) You have the power to Petrify. {When another player attempts to move any ships from one or more of your home planets or that are coexisting on any planet with your ships, use this power. That player must either leave those ships where they are or send them to the warp. Your own ships are never sent to the warp as a result of your power.}

Whenever another player's ships are about to be removed from any of your home planets and/or any planets on which you have a colony, unless those ships are being captured, sent to the warp, or removed from the game, use this power to prevent them from moving.

You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The horrifying sight of the Gorgons petrifies any creature that looks upon them. A stranger to a Gorgon world might think this race overly fond of statuary, only to find the statues springing back to life once the Gorgons leave. Because of their powerful effect on others, the Gorgons often find it difficult to get others to cooperate in their quest for Cosmic conquest.

Wild: As a main player, before allies are invited, you may choose a planet. Ships on that planet cannot defend or move during this encounter and cannot be sent to the warp during this encounter unless the planet is removed from the game.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: You may cause any Cosmic Zap played on you to be discarded without effect.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Graviton: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited to clarify that a card compressed to a single digit still has an implied tens digit of zero (which could be relevant for something like Mirror), and to fix Super Graviton's incorrect timing icon. Link: [Corrected flare]
Graviton wrote:
Compresses Attacks to 1 Digit (Y) You have the power of Gravity. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power and say either "tens" or "ones." If you do so, any attack cards revealed in the encounter only use that digit as their value. For instance, if you said "tens," an attack 40 would become an attack 04 and an attack 09 would become an attack 00, but if you said "ones," those same cards would become an attack 00 and an attack 09.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

A cunning, intelligent race from a binary star near a black hole, the Gravitons have mastered the ability to manipulate gravity. Herding and squeezing their enemies into tighter and tighter formations, the Gravitons rely heavily on their allies and reinforcements to finish the fight.

Wild: As a main player (if the Graviton is not your opponent), you may play this flare before encounter cards are selected. Any attack cards revealed in this encounter only use their ones digit as their value (e.g., an attack 12 would become an attack 02).
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: When using your power, you may declare that it will affect only your card or your opponent's card.
(Main Player Only) ({Resolution}) (Planning)

:Greenhorn: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Chris Oliveira, illustrated by Andrew Olson.
Greenhorn wrote:
Makes Convenient Mistakes (G) You have the power of Ignorance. At the start of each encounter, if you have card(s) in your hand, use this power to show one of the cards in your hand to one other player. Then, ask him or her a question about that card, aloud. He or she does not need to answer the question.

Whenever you have no attack cards in your hand, you may draw a new hand.

During any regroup phase, you may rearrange your ships among any of your colonies and/or home planets, even the home planets where you have no colony.

You may play your kicker after encounter cards are revealed rather than before they are selected; play reinforcements when you are not involved in the encounter; and play rifts and artifacts that are limited to the regroup or alliance phase as though they were playable As Any Player and during Any Phase.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

The Greenhorns are relative newcomers to the scene of Cosmic warfare. Feigning inexperience, they use their wiles to trick other races into allowing them to get away with everything in the book. Surely such room is all that is needed for these "newbies" to glide comfortably into universal dominance.

Wild: If your hand is out of attack cards, negotiate cards, or both, you may discard your hand and draw a new one (potentially continuing your turn if you are the offense).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: As the offense, after destiny is drawn, you may choose any player who has a colony in the indicated system to become the defense. Have your encounter against one of his or her colonies in that system.
(Offense Only) (Destiny)

:Grudge: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Special component: Grudge has 7 grudge tokens. FAQ ruling: If a player chooses to ally and subsequently leaves or is removed from the encounter (e.g., because of Force Field, Gluon Mines, or Super Amoeba), he is still credited with choosing to ally and thus does not receive a grudge token. Retooled gameplay: FFG introduced "grudge tokens" as a memory aid, and improved the competitiveness of this alien by expanding and basically reversing the gameplay. Eon penalized refusers only when Grudge wins or deals; FFG penalizes refusers whether Grudge is successful or not, but specifies the larger penalty of 4 tokens when Grudge loses or fails to deal. Retheming: Sadly, the new artwork ignores the "suction discs" mentioned in the classic Eon history for this alien. Edited to define what happens when Grudge's outcome is something other than win/lose/deal/fail to deal.
Grudge wrote:
Penalizes for Refusing to Ally (R) You have the power of Revenge. As a main player, after alliances are formed, use this power to give a grudge token to each player you invited to ally, but who did not do so. If you win the encounter (or make a deal), each player with a grudge token discards it and loses one ship of his or her choice to the warp. If you lose the encounter (or fail to make a deal), each player with a grudge token discards it and loses four ships of his or her choice to the warp. Otherwise, grudge tokens are discarded without effect. Lost ships cannot include ships used to ally with the other side.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Alliance)

Suffering from a species history of almost uninterrupted betrayal and disappointment, the originally kind Grudges gradually grew cynical. Expecting no good will from others, they began to brood and resolved to wreak vengeance on all who would turn aside their outstretched suction disc of friendship.

Wild: As a main player, if your opponent wins the encounter, you may force his or her allies to receive nothing for the win, instead returning their ships to their colonies.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may force each player who discards a grudge token to lose 4 ships to the warp, regardless of whether or not you won the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Grumpus: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited for consistency and clarity on which powers are protected from loss, and to add missing gender-neutral language.
Grumpus wrote:
Kicks Others Off Vacated Planets (Y) You have the power to Grump. Whenever one of your colonies is removed from any planet, use this power. At the end of the current phase, every other player who has a colony on that planet must send one of his or her ships from that planet to the warp.

You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Grumpus is indeed a stodgy curmudgeon. Other species prefer not to interact with the Grumpi, lest they be drawn into a long-winded conversation about how the Universe was better back in their millennium. And be careful where you tread when visiting the Grumpus home world; they cannot stand it when there are aliens on their lawn.

Wild: After the hyperspace gate is aimed, you may choose one player. That player must send one of his or her ships from the targeted system to the warp.
(As Any Player) (Launch)

Super: When you use your power, you may force each other player who has a colony on the planet you vacate to lose one ship from each colony he or she has in that entire system, not just the planet your ships were removed from.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Guerrilla: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Matthew Cary, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Edited to clarify that Wild Guerrilla cannot blow up planets in other players' systems, to fix the attack bug, to define what happens to bystander ships on the planet, and to correct the "as normal" reference (it is not "normal" for winning ships to go to the warp). Links: [Corrected flare]
Guerrilla wrote:
Winners Lose All But 1 Ship (G) You have the power of Attrition. As a main player, after you lose an encounter, use this power to weaken your opponent and each of his or her allies. Each player you weaken loses all but one of his or her ships in the encounter to the warp.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Used to fighting against superior forces, the Guerrillas have learned to strike from the shadows, wearing down their opponents' numbers even when they lose a battle. Seeing themselves as heroic underdogs, the Guerrillas have set out to liberate the Cosmos from those alien races who would oppress it, whether the Cosmos wants to be liberated or not.

Wild: As the defense, after you lose an encounter in your system, you may blow up your own planet rather than allow it to be colonized. The planet is removed from the game along with all of the opposing ships (your side's ships are sent to the warp as usual, along with any bystanders on the planet). A player cannot be reduced to fewer ships than the number of foreign colonies needed to win the game. Any ships removed from the game that would reduce a player below this number are sent to the warp instead.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may force each player you weaken that has three or fewer ships in the encounter to lose all of those ships to the warp.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Hacker: Alien power, base set, designed by Gerald Katz (as Violin), illustrated by Felicia Cano. Noteworthy interaction: Hacker essentially makes Genius a non-power. Retooled gameplay: Katz's Violin did not allow targeting a player other than the opponent. Katz's Super Violin was completely different; it apparently allowed Violin to collect compensation from all of his opponent's allies and to use his power to choose the cards. Edited for wording consistency and to resolve the ambiguity about whether Super Hacker can give any of the victim's own cards back to him. Link: [Katz' Violin]
Hacker wrote:
Chooses Compensation (G) You have the power to Hack. As a main player, when collecting compensation, you may use this power to choose the player that you are collecting compensation from, whether that player was your opponent or not. You then look through that player's hand and choose the cards you want for compensation.

{In addition} As a main player, when your opponent collects compensation from you, you may use this power to select the cards he or she gets.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Masters of technology, the Hackers have embedded various devices into their bodies in an attempt to improve their skills at computer fraud. Although geniuses when it comes to code breaking and decrypting data, Hackers aren't much good in a more conventional battle. However, more than one would-be conqueror has learned to their sorrow that the Hackers have extremely nasty ways of getting their revenge.

Wild: As a main player, you may prevent your opponent from collecting compensation from you.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: After you collect compensation from the player of your choice, you may also give that player up to the same number of cards of your choice from your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:hands: The rulebook is confusing and incomplete on the topic of hand management, and the FAQ (in its entry on Trader) actually makes matters worse. The following subsections attempt to clear things up based on how hand management has historically worked in previous editions of the game. Running out of encounter cards as the offense: When it is your turn and you are out of encounter cards, the consequences depend on where you are in the encounter sequence. If it is the start of your turn, you discard your hand and get a new one (if the new hand also lacks encounter cards, you repeat this process as necessary). Once you have at least one encounter card and your turn is under way, if you lose your last encounter card before selecting one to play during the Planning phase, your entire turn immediately ends. (Once you've played one during the Planning phase, the encounter continues even if you don't have any other encounter cards.) At the end of your first encounter, if it was successful and you still have an encounter card, you may have a second encounter (or draw a new tech card). If you don't have any more encounter cards at the end of your first encounter, you may not have a second one (or draw a tech card), even if you think you have a way to get another encounter card before the next Planning phase. You must already have an encounter card in your hand to begin a second encounter or to draw a tech card. Running out of encounter cards as the defense: The FAQ entry for Trader states that if the defense is out of cards at the start of the offense's Planning phase, the defense must immediately draw a new hand as the first action of that turn. This ruling adds more complexity and exceptions to the timing of an encounter than might appear on first glance, and the Cosmodex recommends ignoring this ruling in favor of allowing the defense to draw his new hand any time during the Planning phase up until he needs to play a card. Under this recommendation, the rule would be as follows:
Rule 1. When the defense is out of encounter cards, he draws a new hand during the Planning phase some time before he needs to play his encounter card. This works just like all other "before cards are selected" Planning-phase game effects; it can occur either before or after other such effects, and is subject to the Timing Conflicts rule (if needed) to resolve conflicts. Needing to draw a new hand does not "lock down" the player's cards in any way; he can still play them in due course prior to getting a new hand, again following the Timing Conflicts rule when needed.
Rule 1a. If the player's new hand does not contain any encounter cards, or if after drawing the hand something happens to deprive him of encounter cards (Finder, Wild Oracle, Super Trader, etc.), then he simply draws a new hand again before he needs to select an encounter card. Thus, the defense will always have an encounter card when it comes time to play one.

"Official" defense hand refresh rules: If you wish to play strictly according to the Trader ruling in the FAQ, then things become more complicated due to the exceptions introduced:
Rule 1. At the start of the Planning phase, the defense checks his hand to make sure he has an encounter card. If he does not, then he must discard his hand and draw a new one. This must be the very first action of the phase. This rule is a specific exception to the Timing Conflicts rule: the offense cannot invoke the Timing Conflicts rule to initiate any action before the defense draws a new hand (when necessary).
Rule 1a. As long as the defense's new hand does not contain any encounter cards, he must repeat Rule 1.
Rule 2. Before discarding his hand to draw a new one, the defense may play any cards from his hand that are legally playable. This rule is a specific exception to both the Timing Conflicts rule and Rule 1. Thus, the defense can supercede the Timing Conflicts rule and the priority of Rule 1 if, and only if, he is playing a card from his hand in anticipation of discarding his hand to draw a new one; if he does not need a new hand, then the Timing Conflicts rule would apply normally and the offense would have priority.
Rule 3. After any other Planning-phase game effects have been used, when the time comes to play encounter cards face down, the defense checks his hand again. If he again lacks an encounter card (because of some game effect such as Finder, Wild Oracle, Super Trader, etc.), then he must draw a new hand again. (This time there are no exceptions to other rules. The defense is again allowed to play cards that are legally playable before discarding his hand, but this occurs in the normal course of gameplay and not as a special exception.)
Rule 3a. As long as the defense's new hand does not contain any encounter cards, he must repeat Rule 3.

\\\Under\\\Construction\\\
When to draw a new hand: According to designer Kevin Wilson, when a new hand is needed, this occurs as the first action of the relevant phase. The offense draws a new hand (if necessary) at the very beginning of his Start Turn phase, as the first action of that phase. The defense has been ruled to draw a new hand (if necessary) at the very beginning of the offense's Planning phase, as the first action of that phase. This latter ruling is unfortunate as it does not address the fact that the defense can lose his last encounter card between the time he draws a hand at the start of the phase and the time for selecting encounter cards. It needs to be understood that the defense may draw a new hand again, if necessary, just before cards are played in the Planning phase. In Cosmic Encounter the defense has always had the opportunity to get a new hand if and when necessary.
\\\Under\\\Construction\\\
As the offense
lacking encounter card at start of turn: get new hand
still lacking encounter card at start of turn: get new hand again
lacking encounter card between start of turn and planning: turn and encounter both end
lacking encounter card after planning: turn (encounter) continues
lacking encounter card at end of encounter: can't have second encounter (or a new tech)
As the defense
lacking encounter card at start of planning: get new hand
lacking encounter card just before selecting cards: get new hand again
Links: [Kevin Wilson on hand refresh] [Problems with FAQ ruling]

:Hand Zap: Artifact, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Mayfair Games. Second encounter: If the offense has run out of encounter cards at the end of this first encounter, he cannot use Hand Zap to try to get more in order to continue his turn. Without any encounter cards, he is already prevented from having the second Regroup phase he would need in order to play the Hand Zap. Noteworthy interaction: Hand Zap, unless counter-zapped, essentially makes Genius a non-power.
Hand Zap wrote:
Draws New Hand. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player discards his or her entire hand and draws a new hand of eight cards. No cards may be played in response to this artifact except for cards that cancel its effect.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Hate: Alien power, base set, designed by Eric Lang, illustrated by Felicia Cano. FAQ rulings: When using his power, Hate may be zapped before or after showing which card he intends to discard; in either case, he keeps his card. If Hate discards a morph card, any player who does not also discard a morph must lose ships as usual. Hand refresh: According to Kevin Wilson, when Hate is out of encounter cards at the start of his turn, he must collect a new hand before using his power. Super Hate: When Hate plays his Super flare, that flare is on the table waiting to resolve while he chooses which card to show the other players; thus the flare itself cannot be that chosen card because it is not in his hand at the time. Edited to implement Kevin Wilson's hand refresh ruling. Link: [Kevin Wilson on hand refresh]
Hate wrote:
Opponents Lose Cards or Ships (Y) You have the power of Rage. At the start of your turn (after drawing a new hand, if necessary), use this power to force every other player to either discard a card or lose ships. First, choose and discard a card from your hand. Every other player must then choose to either discard a card of the same type (attack, negotiate, artifact, etc.) or lose three ships of your choice to the warp. If you discard an attack card, the other players must discard an attack card of equal or higher value. If another player has no cards of the discarded type, he or she must lose ships. If, after using this power, you do not have any encounter cards in your hand, draw a new hand.
(Offense Only) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)

A short, physically unimposing race, the Hate evolved in a crowded part of the Cosmos and were pushed aside by other, more powerful, races. Forced to subsist on food scraps and the leavings of the other species, the Hate swore that one day they would be the ultimate power on the Cosmic scene.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may force your opponent to discard one card at random from his or her hand. If he or she has no encounter cards left after doing so, you win the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: Instead of discarding a card to use your power, you may show the card to the other players and then return it to your hand.
(Offense Only) (Start Turn)

:hazard cards: Card type, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games (some effects are ported from Mayfair's comets). Hazards are drawn from the hazard deck and have a variety of effects that generally apply only to the current encounter, although some say "This Card Remains in Play" and others, such as Temporal Anomaly, can continue to affect the game even after they are discarded. (It is noteworthy that Temporal Anomaly does not actually affect the encounter during which it is drawn.) When to use: Any time one or more destiny cards are drawn that have a hazard warning, this causes a single hazard card to be drawn during the alliance phase before allies are invited. Some players have accidentally drawn hazards too early, as part of the Cosmic Conflict rulesheet gives the false impression that hazards are drawn during the destiny phase. A hazard card affects the current encounter and then is discarded (to the "hazard deck discard pile") at the end of the encounter, unless it says "This Card Remains in Play." Offense-centric: Only one hazard, Alliance, explicitly uses the pronoun "you," although a few others imply it by virtue of their imperative mood. The most reasonable inference here is that Alliance is speaking to the offense, which implies an unwritten general rule that hazards are drawn by the offense, and also carried out by the offense in those few cases where one player must perform some physical task (Cosmic Upheaval, The Entropy Beast, Mirror Universe). Extremely Hazardous Variant: Under this official variant, a hazard card is drawn for every encounter regardless of whether any hazard warnings came up. More strategic variant: To reduce the role of randomness and make hazards a more strategic consideration, some players use Jack Reda's idea: instead of letting the cards be triggered randomly by hazard indicators on destiny cards, require a player to draw a hazard card whenever he chooses to have a second encounter. The Cosmodex recommends not requiring a hazard on a third or later encounter created by effects such as Machine, Wild Machine, and Infinity Drive (mainly to avoid significantly impacting Machine's power), although you could allow the offense to choose whether or not to draw one in these situations. List: The hazard cards in Cosmic Conflict are Alliance, Black Hole, The Cosmic Guardian, Cosmic Nebula, Cosmic Upheaval, Energy Fields, The Entropy Beast, Galactic Council, It's Full of Stars, Meteor Storm, Mirror Universe, Odd Way to Win a War, Psychic Switcheroo, Reverse Rewards, Sargasso Web, Temporal Anomaly, and The Witness.
Hazard cards wrote:
Alliance Place one of your ships from one of your colonies on this card and give it to another player. For the rest of the game, the two of you have an alliance. When either of you is the main player in an encounter, he or she must always invite his or her ally.
(This Card Remains in Play)

Black Hole During this encounter, ships that would be lost to the warp are instead removed from the game. A player cannot have fewer ships left in the game than the number of foreign colonies required to win. Any ships lost that would reduce a player below this number are sent to the warp as usual.

The Cosmic Guardian While The Cosmic Guardian is in play, all attack cards higher than 20 are considered to be negotiate cards.

Discard The Entropy Beast and The Witness when The Cosmic Guardian enters play.
(This Card Remains in Play)

Cosmic Nebula During this encounter, any alien powers that are used are immediately zapped.

Cosmic Upheaval Immediately shuffle all players' hands together and then deal each player back as many cards as he or she had beforehand. No cards may be played in response to this card.

Energy Fields Each main player draws two cards from the deck, showing them to all players.

The Entropy Beast While The Entropy Beast is in play, each time a special or wild destiny card is drawn, remove the planet with the most ships on it from the game (offense breaks ties), sending all ships on it to the warp. If a player's home system is reduced below three planets, all players lose the game.

Discard The Cosmic Guardian and The Witness when The Entropy Beast enters play.
(This Card Remains in Play)

Galactic Council Instead of having a normal encounter, all of the players in the game have three minutes to make a deal. All players must accept the deal or it fails. If the deal fails, all players lose 3 ships to the warp.

It's Full of Stars... During this encounter, allies may retrieve ships from the warp to send into the encounter (the normal limit of four applies).

Meteor Storm During this encounter, if both main players reveal attack cards, add together the totals of both sides. If the combined total is over 25, a deadly meteor storm is triggered by the fighting, causing both sides to lose, regardless of other game effects.

Mirror Universe Immediately flip over both the discard pile and the deck. The deck becomes the new discard pile and vice versa. Afterwards, shuffle the new deck.

Odd Way to Win a War During this encounter, if one main player reveals an odd-numbered attack card and the other reveals an even-numbered attack card, the player who revealed the odd-numbered attack card automatically wins the encounter.

Psychic Switcheroo For the rest of this encounter, the two main players trade powers. This includes everything that goes with a power, such as the Miser's hoard, the Industrialist's stack, etc. After the end of the encounter, the main players trade back.

Reverse Rewards Defensive allies receive a colony if their side wins this encounter, while offensive allies receive rewards if their side wins this encounter.

Sargasso Web During this encounter, any cards played (including encounter cards, flares, artifacts, etc.) are removed from the game after taking effect.

Temporal Anomaly Play now proceeds in the opposite direction (i.e., if play was passing clockwise, it now proceeds counterclockwise).

The Witness While The Witness is in play, players do not lose their alien powers because of having too few home colonies. Any player who has lost his or her alien power in this manner gets it back while The Witness remains in play.

Discard The Entropy Beast and The Cosmic Guardian when The Witness enters play.
(This Card Remains in Play)

:hazard deck: The 28-card hazard deck is an optional gameplay variant introduced in Cosmic Conflict; it contains 17 different hazard cards (some of which are duplicated; see card distribution). The hazard deck has its own hazard deck discard pile. Typographic error: The Cosmic Conflict rulesheet states that there are 29 cards in the hazard deck, but this is a typo; there are 28.

:hazard token: The hazard token was introduced in Cosmic Dominion as a convenience. It is not required for playing the game, but can be a good reminder of whether a hazard warning was drawn for those effects that need to know this, since they happen at different points during the encounter ranging from the middle or end of the Destiny phase (Poison, Tourist) to the Alliance phase (hazard cards) to the Reveal phase (variable attack cards).
hazard token wrote:
The hazard token is a convenient way to keep track of when a hazard warning is in effect. To use the token, turn up its yellow side at the start of each encounter, and turn up its red side whenever a destiny card with a hazard warning is drawn.

:hazard warning: One of the three regular destiny cards for each player color has a slightly different icon in its upper-left corner compared to the other two cards for that color. (One of the three Invasion! cards also has a hazard warning, but none of the current wild or special destiny cards do.) This icon indicates that a hazard card should be drawn to affect the current encounter. Hazard warnings also trigger Poison to send ships to the warp, cause Tourist to lose a ship from the cruise liner, and make variable attack cards transpose their digits. Unfortunately these indicators can sometimes be difficult to spot from across the table, so when playing with any game effects that trigger on hazard warnings, you'll need to watch the destiny draws carefully (and it can be helpful to use the hazard token).

:Healer: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: Healer operates just after ships are sent to the warp or out of the game, so game effects like compensation and Remora still occur, and things like Zombie will preempt Healer. Noteworthy interactions: Healer so definitively makes Masochist a non-power that many players have suggested that Masochist really should have a "Do Not Use with Healer" warning. House rule: The Cosmodex recommends not allowing the healing of ships removed from the game, due to its negative impact on other effects. Most obviously it can turn Void and Remote into non-powers, but it also sucks the fun out of things like Black Hole, Wild Fury, and Wild Guerrilla (it would also hurt the likely upcoming Ship Zap, and interfere with the balance of effects like Extractor and Droid). Retooled gameplay: Eon allowed healing of ships lost (specifically) to the Void, but FFG wisely recast this as a general ability to heal ships removed from the game; thus FFG's Healer applies to things like Super Masochist, Wild Fury, and Wild Guerrilla. FFG's Wild Healer is stronger than Eon's, discarding the Cosmic Zap rather than just sending it back to the player's hand with no effect. Edited for clarity.
Healer wrote:
Can Save Others' Ships from Warp (Y) You have the power to Heal. When another player loses ships to the warp {or has ships removed from the game}, you may use this power to return to that player all the ships he or she just lost and earn one card from the deck. Being healed does not prevent a player from receiving compensation or other benefits associated with the lost ships. A healed player replaces his or her ships on any of his or her colonies. During an encounter you may heal several players, drawing one card for each.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Rapid geologic activity forced extreme biological diversification on the Healer homeworld. Possessing vast knowledge of herbal and mutant lore, Healers are now prized by other beings for their life sustaining skills. Amidst loud rejoicing over renewed health, who could deny them their modest fee?

Wild: You may cause any Cosmic Zap played on you to be discarded without effect.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may raise your fee for healing other players to one card from the deck per ship you heal.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:hidden information: Cosmic Encounter often has hidden or facedown game components in play, such as cards on an alien sheet for Miser or Cryo, saboteur tokens on planets or Saboteur's sheet, tech cards still being researched, an encounter card under Quark Battery, etc. The general player consensus is that you may look at any hidden items you control, but may not show them to other players (unless otherwise specified, of course).

:Horde: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Horde has 36 horde tokens. Changing player color: Wild Schizoid wreaks havoc with Horde (as well as Pygmy and Symbiote) since it creates the very same problems as power theft but sneaks right past the "can't be stolen" restriction, leading to questions about how to handle all the horde tokens. In theory, this conflict could have been prevented by having the flare force Horde to swap systems and ships with another player, but clarifying that all horde tokens remain on their same planets and form their own colonies separate from those of their former associated ships. However, the revision presented here is significantly less complex, and consistent with similar revisions on Pygmy and (especially) Symbiote. This same revision also provides the protection needed against Wild Philanthropist, Psychic Switcheroo, and Wild Sorcerer (since the prohibition against being stolen is too specific to prevent lending and trading). Nerfed Super flare: Since each use of the base power applies to only one card draw or one ship retrieval, and thus produces only a single horde token, and since flares are limited to one play per encounter, then Super Horde can add only one extra ship per encounter. Given that this is astoundingly weak for a Super flare and the card uses the phrase "twice as many" (instead of just "two"), we must assume that this effect was intended to work for all uses of the power during some time interval. The simplest way to save this flare from near uselessness seems to be the "for the rest of the encounter" treatment. (Speculation: Probably the base power originally worked on groups of draws/retrievals as a single unit, but was later revised without considering the flare. If that is true, then the flare's scope originally would have been only all draws or retrievals caused by a common event. However, such an implementation would require significant rewrites to the base power, which the Cosmodex likes to avoid when possible.) Unanswered question: Does drawing a starting hand trigger Horde's power? Other aliens answer this question on their sheets (Extortionist and Relic say no; Glutton says yes), but Horde is silent on the matter. Design note: Horde was called "Replicant" until late in the development process (the alien sheet first posted to facebook still bore the name REPLICANT). Edited to clarify that Horde counts only card draws from the (cosmic) deck (not draws of destiny, techs, hazards, etc.), to clarify that you continue to control and use horde tokens even when your power is lost, to block power-trading and -lending effects like Changeling, Wild Philanthropist, Wild Sorcerer, and Psychic Switcheroo, to prevent Wild Schizoid from violating the intent of the "power cannot be stolen" clause, to define the apparent intent that's missing from Wild Horde and deal with capturing, and to fix Super Horde so it can add more than one token per encounter. Link: [Corrected power]
Horde wrote:
Gains Tokens That Act as Ships (R) You have the power to Spawn. Each time you draw a card from the deck or retrieve a ship from the warp, use this power. Add a horde token to one of your colonies. Treat horde tokens as ships under your control, but discard them if sent to the warp, removed from the game, or captured by another player. If you lose this power, horde tokens remain under your control until discarded.

This power cannot be stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

A little-known race from a Cosmic backwater, the Horde have only one real skill – spawning. Leave a Horde alone in a room for a minute, and you'll return to two Hordes avidly chatting with each other. Leave them in your house for an afternoon, and you'll return home to find that they've taken over your city – at which point, if you're lucky, you'll have just enough time to flee the planet before they claim it in the name of the Horde race.

Wild: During your regroup phase, if there is an unused player color, you may add a ship of that color to one of your colonies instead of retrieving a ship from the warp. It is treated as an extra ship of your color. If that ship {is ever alone on a planet} ever is alone without any of your normal ships present, goes to the warp, or is captured, it is removed from the game.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

Super: For the rest of this encounter, when you use your power, you may add twice as many horde tokens as usual.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Host: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Shane Brewer, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Host wrote:
Plays and Adds Unused Flares (Y) You have the power to Channel. At the start of any player's turn, you may remove any or all flares on this sheet from the game, and/or draw cards from the unused flare deck to place facedown on this sheet until you have three here, in either order.

At any time, you may use this power to play a wild flare from this sheet as though it were in your hand. If the flare would return to your hand after use, discard it to the regular discard pile. If you are zapped, place the flare back on this sheet. Cards played from this sheet do not count toward the normal limit of one flare per encounter.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Hosts' ability to channel the spiritual essence of past and future aliens allows them to manifest some of the defining characteristics of their alien occupants. After being channeled, some aliens decide the experience was so pleasant they return to active public life, popping up here and there to affect galactic events.

Wild: You may draw three cards from the unused flare deck and add them to your hand. Give this flare to the Host after use (or discard it, if the Host isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When drawing flares for your sheet at the start of a turn, you may draw two additional cards. Choose from all drawn cards, placing some on your sheet until you have three. The cards that are not chosen are removed from the game.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)

:Human: Alien power, base set, designed by Duke Ritenhouse, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ rulings: Human can be zapped regardless of the types of encounter cards played by both players. When Human and Pacifist are supposed to auto-win at the same time (Pacifist reveals a negotiate; Human reveals an attack and is zapped), use the Timing Conflicts rule. Error in FAQ: If Human zaps himself to win when both players have revealed negotiate cards, his opponent does not receive compensation (because Human did not reveal an attack card). Unanswered question: Is the word "also" on Super Human intended to override the once-per-encounter flare limit? In other words, if Human plays his flare to add 8 to his power, then discovers he is still not winning, can he play his Super flare again to zap himself?
Human wrote:
Mostly Harmless (Y) You have the power of Humanity. As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, use this power to add 4 to your side's total. If this power is zapped, however, your side automatically wins the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Warlike and fairly dim by Cosmic standards, humans are not seen as much of a threat. However, exposing a human to Cosmic energy can unlock strange and awesome powers. General consensus among the other races is that this is a course of action to be avoided.

Wild: As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, if your opponent is not the Human, you may use this flare to change your encounter card into an attack 42. Give this flare to the Human after use (or discard it, if the Human isn't playing).
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may cause your power to add 8 to your side's total instead of 4. Also, you may discard this flare to zap your power.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:hyperspace cone: This term, which appears on Super Macron and Super Oracle, is what the hyperspace gate was called in previous editions.

:hyperspace gate: I don't really have anything to say about the gate today. Just wanted a place to drop the picture. ;-)

:icon errors: There are roughly thirty cases of incorrect icons on cards and alien sheets. Perhaps two dozen of them would be worthy of fixing when sets are reprinted.
Animal({Varies} As Any Player)
"Varies" (introduced in Cosmic Alliance and appearing only here and on Poison) was presumably intended for aliens that have two or more use effects requiring different player roles. It's completely unnecessary and inappropriate, though, because there were already plenty of aliens like that, and the rule has always been to use whichever prerequisite icon covered all the uses (As Any Player, typically). Using "Varies" is not only inconsistent, but it actually provides less information and raises the question of why those other effects don't use this label. Apparently, somebody just didn't realize that these situations already existed and there was already an icon rule to handle them. Had Varies been used from the beginning, that would have been one thing; but to introduce such a pointless departure in the fourth product release makes it look like an ill-considered "punt" (and an ironic one as well; see Poison below).

Super Cryo({Main Player or Ally Only} As Any Player) ({Alliance} Any Phase)
As printed, the second effect is virtually unusable. It looks like the icons from the base power were replicated to the flare without recognizing that the flare's scope also extends to the base power's non-zappable effect.

Crystal({As} Main Player or Ally Only)
This one communicates the correct prerequisite, but just forgets what the proper convention is. Very minor, but annoying for us OCD whackadoos.

Super Dictator(Offense Only)
As with Crystal, this is just a consistency slip.

Super Filch (classic edition) — ({Reveal} Resolution)
The text is an exact copy of the non-classic edition, but with the wrong icon. Technically unusable as printed.

Super Fungus({Main Player Only} As Any Player) ({Resolution} Any Phase)
The printed icons are pretty baffling until we notice that they are identical to those on the alphabetically previous card in the set, Super Ethic. I'm guessing that flare was copied as a template and the icons just didn't get changed to what they should be, or maybe Super Ethic's icons were originally typed onto Super Fungus by mistake, and then later somebody noticed that Super Ethic was wrong and fixed it.

Super Graviton({Resolution} Planning)
Needs to match the base power it modifies. Unusable as printed. This one will probably fool some players into thinking it lets you defer your power until after cards are revealed.

Industrialist({Resolution} Reveal)
Outcomes are determined in Reveal; Resolution is too late. Unusable as printed. Might fool some players into thinking you can change the outcome after things like compensation and rewards have happened.

Wild Leviathan({Main Player} Offense Only)
Should agree with the text.

Macron(Launch) (Alliance) (Reveal)
Making your ships worth 4 toward your total is a use of the power. (Macron as printed is actually worse than unusable; it restricts you to a single ship but can't make it worth four!)

Super Macron(Launch) (Alliance)
Allies enter the encounter during Alliance, not Launch.

Wild Mind({Main Player Only} As Any Player) (Alliance Any Phase)
Seems like this could have been a copy and paste error from Wild Mite. Unusable as printed.

Super Observer({Ally or Main Player} Offense or Ally Only) (Launch Alliance)
Allies enter the encounter during Alliance, not Launch.

Super Oracle({Reveal} Planning)
This can only happen before playing your own card, and it needs to match the base power. Unusable as printed. Could mislead new players into a post-reveal use of the flare.

Super Parasite({Launch} Alliance)
Allies enter the encounter during Alliance, not Launch. Unusable as printed.

Plasma Thrusters(Launch) (Alliance)
Allies enter the encounter during Alliance, not Launch.

Poison({Varies} As Any Player) ({Mandatory} Varies)
The "Varies" prerequisite icon is addressed above for Animal. Ironically, though, this new label is much more appropriate for the optional/mandatory icon, since Poison is the first and only power with both optional and mandatory use effects. (Although we'll probably never know if that was actually intentional or just another design mistake, since the entire power could have been optional with virtually no change in actual utility. This whole design seems unfinished, really, or perhaps the victim of some last-minute changes that weren't thought through.)

Super Schizoid({Special} Resolution)
This flare is playable during the last Resolution phase of your turn. It seems that somebody thought this needed its own, 100% unique "Special" icon, but it doesn't; many game texts give detail that further limits exactly when they can be played, and non-classic Super Schizoid is no different. Resolution is sufficient, appropriate, and provides more information than the icon printed on the card.

Siren(Not {Defense} Main Player or Ally)
As written, Siren can technically use her power on herself, becoming both the offense and the defense.

Skeptic({As} Main Player or Ally Only)
Another minor consistency slip.

Wild Spiff({Main Player} Defense Only)
Should agree with the text.

Super Trickster({Resolution} Reveal)
Outcomes are determined in Reveal; Resolution is too late. Unusable as printed. Might fool some players into thinking you can change the outcome after things like compensation and rewards have happened.

Will({Launch} Destiny)
The defense always must be determined during Destiny to avoid breaking the game effects that need to know who the defense is by the end of this phase.



:images: Some of the power and card revisions in the Cosmodex are available as high-resolution printer-ready images in the Cosmic Encounter Image Gallery, under the categories of Components and Customized, and using the Corrections and/or Errata tags. The revisions currently available are shown in Appendix D. (Also available are high-resolution versions of Virus and Zombie with their alien images swapped.) Make sure you download the "original" size images and print them at 300 dpi. Alien powers can be used as-is, or you can slip the printed and trimmed sheet into an oversized card sleeve atop the original version. (This is what the Cosmodex's trained human minion does.) To use reprinted flares and tech cards it's really best to sleeve all of your cards, but if you can't or don't want to do that you can just use the printouts as reference sheets. Links: [Gallery images] [Card sleeves]

:Industrialist: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by James Beach and James Rasfeld, revised by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's version was less powerful, requiring the add/subtract decision to be made before cards are revealed and specifying that the stack had to be discarded whenever Industrialist revealed an attack card and won the encounter. Mayfair's Wild Industrialist made sure the player drew an attack card from the opponent's hand (if possible), and then was discarded. Mayfair's Super Industrialist allowed the stack to be kept after winning the encounter (a capability which is now part of FFG's base power). Edited to correct the timing icon. Links: [Corrected power]
Industrialist wrote:
Adds Losing Attack Cards (Y) You have the power to Build. As a main player, after you lose an encounter in which you have revealed an attack card, your opponent must either allow you to win the encounter instead of losing, or else allow you to place your attack card faceup on this sheet, adding it to your "stack." Your stack is not part of your hand and cannot be drawn from by other players or affected by other powers.

As a main player, after you reveal an attack card, use this power to either add or subtract the total of all the attack cards in your stack from your total. For instance, if you have an attack 08 and an attack 12 on this sheet, you would add or subtract 20 from your total.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) ({Resolution}) (Reveal)

The Industrialists have shown themselves to be masters at learning from their own mistakes. From the ashes of each defeat arises a more powerful assault the next time. Even though the Industrialists don't seem to learn as much from their successes, the strength they've gained from their defeats is sufficient for them to carve out a piece of the Cosmos for themselves.

Wild: As a main player, after you reveal an attack card, you may draw a card at random from your opponent's hand. If it's an attack card, add it to your total, then discard it. Otherwise, return it to your opponent's hand.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When adding a card to your stack, you may add either main player's revealed encounter card (as long as it's an attack) to your stack.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Infinity Drive: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Trading encounters for tech: As implied by the rulebook's clarification on Machine, the encounter granted by Infinity Drive can be given up to collect a new tech card if it is the active player's second or later encounter; this would end that player's turn. This exchange cannot be made when using Infinity Drive during another player's turn. Retooled gameplay: This tech card appears to be a technology implementation of Eon's Timegash artifact.
Infinity Drive wrote:
Extra Encounter. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the end of any encounter (including your own) to immediately have an encounter (if you have an encounter card in your hand). Afterwards, play continues from where it left off.
(6) (As Any Player) (Resolution)

:"ink rule": This refers to a player-consensus rule designed to resolve questions about card modifications. It holds that game effects which are not strictly related to encounter resolution always refer to the "ink" on a card, meaning its actual printed value. Those which are strictly related to encounter resolution refer to the card's current, modified value. For more details, see card modifications.

:intimidate cards: Non-encounter card, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans. Intimidates can be played by any player. When played by a main player, an intimidate becomes his encounter card; when played by a non-main player, it creates an incentive to invite that player as an ally, since each main player has the option to use one of his allies' intimidate cards (sight unseen) as his encounter card. Values: –09, 19, 29, and 39. See also card distribution.
intimidate cards wrote:
Play facedown. Becomes your encounter card if you are a main player, or may be used by your main player if you become an ally. Returns to hand if unused.
Opposed by Attack: Becomes an Attack (higher total wins).
Opposed by anything else: Becomes a Negotiate (attempt to deal).
(As Any Player) (Regroup) (Destiny) (Launch) (Alliance)

:Invader: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Invader vs. Will: When Will draws an Invasion! destiny or the Invader's color, Invader can use his power to draw an extra hand as usual. Will can then use his power if the destiny was Invader's color, but cannot if it was an Invasion! (because in this case he immediately becomes the defense). Optional hand refresh: When another player draws an Invasion! card, Invader is not required to use his power to get a new hand if he's out of encounter cards; thus in this case he can dodge the Invasion! encounter. Unanswered question: Does the Invasion! encounter include a Destiny phase that skips the destiny draw? Does it skip the entire Destiny phase? Or does it skip both Regroup & Destiny and begin with Launch? Formerly known as Boomerang in the Eon and Mayfair editions. Edited to avoid implying that Invader can always choose whether or not to have an Invasion! encounter, to prevent the original offense's encounters from being miscounted when one is interrupted (such as the replacement for his first one being considered his second), to fix the hand-redraw effect so that it works correctly in all encounters (there are four primary scenarios where it applies, but only one of them is in the context of an extra encounter), to make Super Invader properly use the game term "retrieve" (for consistency with Super Observer and clarity with effects that trigger on ship retrieval), and to strike its overclarifying final sentence (to avoid any rules-lawyering against effects that send winning ships to the warp), and to eliminate sloppy "max" shorthand. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Invader wrote:
Launches Sneak Attacks (Y) Game Setup: Shuffle the three "Invasion!" destiny cards into the destiny deck. These destiny cards cause you to have an extra encounter when drawn during another player's turn. After you have an extra encounter due to an "Invasion!" destiny card, the player who drew it during his or her turn restarts his or her encounter.

You have the power of Invasion. As a main player, after an "Invasion!" destiny card or a destiny card of your player color is drawn, you may use this power to discard your entire hand and draw a new hand of eight cards. Use this power only once per encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Destiny)

Originating in a place beyond space and time, the Invaders have slowly eroded away the barriers between There and Here, planning their invasion of our Universe all the while. Now, at last, their time is at hand, and they have begun tearing their way through the veils that remain, popping up in an instant to wreak havoc on everything they find in this new, unnatural place.

Wild: At any time, you may discard your hand and draw a new hand of eight cards. Give this flare to the Invader after use (or discard it, if the Invader isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: During an Invasion! encounter, you may {send} retrieve ships from the warp to send into the encounter (the normal {max} limit of four applies). {If the ships survive the encounter, they do not return to the warp.}
(Offense Only) (Launch)

:Invasion!: Special destiny cards used exclusively with the Invader alien power. Like regular destiny cards, there are three in total and one of them has a hazard warning. Unanswered question: Does the Invasion! encounter include a Destiny phase that skips the destiny draw? Does it skip the entire Destiny phase? Or does it skip both Regroup & Destiny and begin with Launch? Unanswered question: What happens if the Invader has lost his power?
Invasion! wrote:
If you are the Invader, have an encounter with another player of your choice in his or her home system.

If you are not the Invader, you become the defense. The Invader player becomes the offense and immediately has an encounter with you in your home system. This encounter doesn't count as one of your encounters, and after it concludes, your turn continues.

The following chart shows the effects of the Invasion! destiny card and Invader alien power in various scenarios. For all of these scenarios, assume that the Invader has the Purple playing pieces and some other player has Red.


:Ionic Gas: Artifact, base set, designed by Future Pastimes (as Stellar Gas) and Mayfair Games (as Cosmic Gas). Retooled gameplay: Ionic Gas combines the functions of Eon's Stellar Gas and Mayfair's Cosmic Gas. FFG's combined version of the classic compensation/rewards cancelers is thus more versatile and valuable, as well as more strategically interesting because the player has additional things to consider in choosing the best time to use the card.
Ionic Gas wrote:
Stops Compensation and Rewards. Play after the winner of an encounter is determined. No compensation or rewards may be collected this encounter.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

:It's Full of Stars...: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Edited to properly use the game term "retrieve" (for consistency with Super Observer and clarity with effects that trigger on ship retrieval), to strike its overclarifying final sentence (to avoid any rules-lawyering against effects that send winning ships to the warp), and to eliminate sloppy "max" shorthand. Link: [Corrected card]
It's Full of Stars... wrote:
During this encounter, allies may {send} retrieve ships from the warp to send into the encounter (the normal {max} limit of four applies). {If the ships survive the encounter, they do not return to the warp.}

:Joker: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Phil Fleischmann and the Cosmodex's trained human minion, merged by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Joker has 9 joker tokens, representing six Attacks (04, 08, 15, 16, 23, and 42), Morph, Negotiate, and Retreat.
Joker wrote:
Makes Attack Cards Wild (R) Game Setup: Take the nine joker tokens (six different attacks, a regular negotiate, a morph, and a retreat) and place them faceup on this sheet.

You have the power of Wild Cards. Attack 08 cards are initially "wild." At the start of your turn, you may name any other attack card to become the new wild card instead.

After encounter cards are revealed, for each one that matches the current wild card, use this power. Place one faceup joker token from this sheet on the wild card to change it into the card indicated by that token. After the outcome is determined, return the used joker token(s) to this sheet, facedown. When you remove the last faceup joker token from this sheet, immediately turn the used ones here faceup for re-use.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

The fun-loving Jokers enjoy humiliating the conceited, mocking the powers that be, and causing general chaos. They seek not to rule, but to satirize the Universe.

Wild: As a main player or ally, you may change one revealed negotiate card into an attack 08.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: At any time, you may name any encounter card to become the new wild card, such as attack 06, the regular negotiate card, or Negotiate (Epic Oratory). When you lose this flare, attack 08 immediately becomes the wild card again.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Judge: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Andrew Olson.
Judge wrote:
Assigns Extra Win/Lose Terms (R) You have the power of Fiat. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to declare any extra gains that either the winner or the loser (but not both) will get if an attack card is revealed. These extra gains are limited by the rules on deals: one colony where the opponent has a colony and/or card(s) from the opponent. For example, you may declare "the winner will also get all of the loser's cards, and an extra colony on any planet where the loser has a colony." The fiat is in addition to the normal results, and happens at the end of the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Long ago abandoning physical bodies, the Judges periodically coalesce amidst perfect protocol to deliberate upon their destiny. The Ring of Judges, when reflecting, creates a field of power in which each creature may ponder its fate.

Wild: As a main player, if the two encounter totals differ by less than 5, you may call it a draw. Allies return their ships to any of their colonies and you and your opponent attempt to make a deal as if negotiate cards had been revealed.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: Your fiat may include gains for both the winner and the loser.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Kamikaze: Alien power, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: It is possible that this power is a modification of Dr. Robert Destro's Kamikaze, which could send four ships to the warp to double its attack card.
Kamikaze wrote:
Sacrifices Ships for Cards (Y) You have the power of Sacrifice. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to send up to four of your ships from any of your colonies to the warp. For every ship you sent to the warp, draw two cards from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Always a close-knit society, the Kamikaze have taken the virtue of self-sacrifice and raised it to an art form. In battle, they are greatly feared for their ability to die explosively at will. But the Kamikaze know that when their race rises to Cosmic superiority, those who gave their lives along the way will be remembered forever.

Wild: As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may send up to four of your ships that are not in the encounter to the warp to add 3 to your total for each ship sacrificed.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may retrieve three ships from the warp during your regroup phase instead of one.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:kickers: Card type, Cosmic Incursion and Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes; Cosmic Dominion kickers designed by the fans. The Cosmic Incursion reward deck presents the original basic kickers, while the Cosmic Dominion reward deck offers more diversified kickers that also have individual text effects. Values: x–1, x0, x1, x2, x3, and x4 (some with special text). See also card distribution. Basic gameplay: A main player may play one kicker face down before encounter cards are selected, to multiply his attack card value, the compensation he receives, or the ships his opponent is forced to lose if there is a failed deal. These basic rules apply even when a kicker does not have enough room in its game text to repeat this summary (Duplicity, Jamming Signal). However, some kickers explicitly state that they do not apply to compensation and deals (Reverse Polarity, Give War a Chance). Timing: Either main player may play a kicker; once this is announced, then the other main player has a chance to play one as well. You may ask your opponent whether he plans to play a kicker, but an answer of "no" is not binding: should you decide to play a kicker yourself, he still has the option to play one as well. Jamming Signal: This kicker still affects compensation and ships lost due to a failed deal (when applicable). Reverse Polarity is essentially the long-awaited Kicker x–1, but without the ambiguity about how a negative kicker would affect compensation and lost ships. To increase the number of situations in which it would be useful, this is the only kicker that affects both main players' attack cards. Self Destruct: The word "immediately" on this card means immediately after encounter cards are revealed, not when the kicker is first played face down. Duplicity: This kicker still affects compensation and ships lost due to a failed deal (when applicable). Its name has a double meaning appropriate to its dual nature: "duplicity" is normally a synonym for deception or trickery (à la the ally betrayal), but it can also convey a more neutral meaning of being twofold or double (appropos for a kicker x2). The Duplicity kicker is clearly designed to let you betray all of your allies (and hopefully win the encounter, of course). It can also offer a dramatic way to win the game solo, or an object lesson in accepting alliance invitations indiscriminately. Or you can just not invite allies, and it's still a kicker x2; how you use it depends on the situation and your play style. Edited: The original Cosmic Incursion kickers' text is edited for clarity and accuracy.
Kickers wrote:
Kicker x0, Kicker x2, Kicker x3 Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. Multiplies your attack card value, your compensation, {and/}or the opponent's ships lost due to a failed deal.

Kicker x–1 (Reverse Polarity) Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. Multiplies all attack cards in the encounter. Does not affect compensation or failed deals.

Kicker x1 (Self Destruct) Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. Both sides immediately lose the encounter and all involved ships go to the warp without compensation.

Kicker x2 (Duplicity) Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. When your allies' ships leave the hyperspace gate, they go to the warp.

Kicker x2 (Jamming Signal) Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. All other revealed kickers are canceled. No reinforcements may be played.

Kicker x4 (Give War a Chance) Play facedown before encounter cards are selected. Does not affect compensation or failed deals.

all kickers
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:land: A few effects such as Filth, Wild Filth, Mite, Pirate, Saboteur, Spiff, and Voyager mention ships “landing” on planets. This refers to ships being added to the planet in any manner.

:large group cosmic cards: Cosmic Alliance includes 24 cosmic cards intended to be added to the cosmic deck when playing with seven or more players, to reduce the likelihood of a cosmic quake. This mini-deck comprises 12 attack cards (00, 02, 04, 06 x2, 08 x2, 10, 12, 14, 20, and 30), 5 regular Negotiates, and one each of Morph, Reinforcement +4, Reinforcement +8, Card Zap, Cosmic Zap, Force Field, and Quash. You can of course add these to any game regardless of the player count, noting that they will tend to dilute the flares and most of the artifacts.

:Laser: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, revised by Jack Reda, wild flare by Warren Denning, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Retooled Gameplay: Eon's Laser forced the opponent to play one of his encounter cards completely at random. Eon's Wild Laser was completely different; it forced the opponent to play an encounter card before inviting allies.
Laser wrote:
Blinds Opponent to Part of Hand (G) You have the power to Blind. As a main player, before allies are invited, use this power. If your opponent will need to draw a new hand to obtain encounter cards, he or she does so now. Then, you select at random a number of cards in his or her hand (without looking at them) up to the number of ships he or she has in the encounter. Your opponent must set the selected cards aside for the rest of the encounter.

If your opponent has no encounter cards after being blinded, he or she loses the encounter. Otherwise, the encounter proceeds normally. At the end of the encounter, your opponent retrieves the cards that were set aside.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Alliance)

Descended from an ancient sun-worshipping cult, the modern Lasers have learned to focus stellar power accurately enough to bedazzle any opposition. They have now embarked on a plan to spread confusion and fear among their enemies, before stepping in to build a coherent Cosmos in their own image.

Wild: As a main player or ally, during the alliance phase, you may discard up to three cards from your hand. Select up to the same number of cards at random from any one player's hand (even your own). That player must set aside the chosen cards and cannot use them until the end of the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Alliance)

Super: You may use your power as an ally after alliances are formed, targeting either one of the main players.
(Ally Only) (Alliance)

:launch bug: The FFG edition of the game sometimes confusingly uses the word "launch" to mean "send ships into the encounter," even for allies. Unfortunately, there was apparently a misconception on the design team that allies can launch ships during the Launch phase, which is clearly not possible: allies cannot ever do anything during the Launch phase because there aren't any allies until the Alliance phase. This misconception led to a problem on several game effects that, in spite of being intended for use by allies, have only a (Launch) icon and no (Alliance) icon. (This error means that these effects as written actually cannot be used by allies, and Super Parasite is a dead card; it cannot be played ever.) The Cosmodex adds (or substitutes) the (Alliance) icon in its entrites for Super Macron, Super Observer, Super Parasite, and Plasma Thrusters, and changes the word "launch" on these game effects (as well as on Super Leviathan) to the correct wording of "send" or "send into the encounter," as used on other cards and in the rulebook. (See defensive ally bug for a related problem.)

:legal encounter: This term, used on Butler, Colony Cloak, and Worm in the context of changing the encounter's venue, is not clearly defined (and mistakes have been made on two of those game effects). However, Encounter magazine v1n5p8, in an answer on Butler, provides some insight into Eon's intent that having a legal challenge (as it was called back then) included adhering to destiny's indication of the defense. In short, it appears that this term should be interpreted within the context of the destiny draw, meaning that these effects do not change who the defense is, and do not allow the targeting of a foreign colony unless specifically allowed (e.g., by Worm's "in any system" clause). Note also that the phrasing on Worm is ambiguous, and thus the Cosmodex revises it to more clearly express its design intent.

:Leviathan: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Ships in gate: According to designer Jack Reda, using a worldship is supposed to be instead of launching ships normally in the hyperspace gate. Ends successfully: The successful encounter decreed by Wild Leviathan is simply that: a success. It does not count as a "win" for the player or a "loss" for the opponent. Trading planets: When you play Wild Leviathan, you get to choose the two planets that are trading places (confirmed with Mr. Reda). Outcome leak: The text does not specify what happens to the worldship (and the ships on it) if there is a deal, a failure to deal, or a canceled encounter. Although players could reasonably be expected to return the planet home, the status of the ships on that planet (whether they remain, are lost to the warp, or are allowed to migrate to the targeted planet) is undefined in those situations. Edited to implement the designer's intent that the worldship is sent instead of launching ships normally, to correct Wild Leviathan's prerequisite icon, to fix the attack bug and the launch bug, and to define what happens to the worldship (and the ships on it) if there is a deal, a failure to deal, or a canceled encounter. Link: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Leviathan wrote:
May Attack with Planet (Y) You have the power of Worldships. As the offense, after the hyperspace gate is aimed, instead of placing ships in the gate normally you may use this power to choose one of your home planets that has no other players' ships on it and place that planet on the gate as a worldship. Any ships you have on the worldship are normal offensive ships in the encounter. The worldship is not a ship but adds 20 to your total after encounter cards are revealed. If you lose the encounter, all ships on the worldship are sent to the warp. If you win, you may leave up to four of your ships from the worldship behind on the targeted planet. In any case, the worldship then returns to your home system with any ships that are still on it.
(Offense Only) (Optional) (Launch)

Immense and powerful creatures, the Leviathans consumed every resource on their own worlds until they themselves became like planets. The Leviathan fleets, now stationed within the fleshy folds of their masters, scout out new worlds for the Leviathans to envelop. The sight of a world-sized entity gating in through hyperspace often causes madness and hysteria on the targeted planet, but it doesn't last long.

Wild: As the offense, after destiny is drawn, you may trade one home planet with the defense. Your planet moves to the defense's home system and vice versa. The encounter immediately ends successfully. Give this flare to the Leviathan after use (or discard it, if the Leviathan isn't playing).
({Main Player Only}) (Offense Only) (Destiny)

Super: Your worldship may contain any ships except the defense's ships. Other players' ships on your worldship count toward your total and those players are automatically allied with you for this encounter, but they may not send additional ships and do not receive a colony if you win.
(Offense Only) (Launch)

:liens: This legal term is sometimes casually used to refer to compensation, but this is not appropriate in most editions. A lien is a hold or restriction on property intended to guarantee repayment of a debt. Since all versions of Cosmic Encounter other than Mayfair's do not prevent a player from legally playing cards before compensation is collected, it is misleading to refer to compensation as a lien on someone's hand. (Mayfair changed this rule as part of their unique conversion of all flares to single-use cards.) Original CE designer Jack Kittredge make it clear in Encounter magazine v1n3p3 that cards can still be played from a hand that owes compensation, and in v1n4p5 he defined liens as a house rule: "A player who is about to lose some cards to another as consolation may play any cards which can be played right away.... This encourages fast thinking in our view. I know this point is controversial, but we play it that if you can get it out fast, it counts. But you can't dawdle and read them all to see if anything applies. If you don't think your group can enforce this kind of distinction, then you might want to adopt house rules favoring the lien theory...."

:Lightning: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Extra Encounter: Lightning does not provide for a free hand refresh, so the extra-encounter effect can be used only if you already have an encounter card in your hand. Edited to clarify that Wild Lightning draws cards from the cosmic deck.
Lightning wrote:
Gains and Takes Away Encounters (Y) You have the power of Speed. Each time any other player begins a second encounter during his or her turn, use this power to add a token to this sheet.

After the end of any encounter (even your own), you may discard three tokens from this sheet to immediately have one encounter. Afterwards, play resumes from where it left off.

At the start of a player's second encounter, you may discard two tokens from this sheet to immediately end the encounter.
(Not Offense) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

The Lightning live out their lives in a matter of hours. They move so fast that the rest of the Universe seems to act in slow motion to them. More than one alien race has sneered at the short lifespan of the Lightning, only to find themselves taken over in a flash.

Wild: When any other player begins a second encounter during his or her turn, you may draw three cards from the deck.
(Not Offense) (Regroup)

Super: When you use your power, you may add two tokens to your sheet instead of one.
(Not Offense) (Regroup)

:Lizard: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Jon Gon (as Droid), illustrated by Brynn Metheney. Retooled Gameplay: Jon Gon's "Droid" did not include the alternate-win possibility; instead, if the player succeeded in "upgrading" all of his ships, he started a new cycle of upgrading back to the original color with with an additional +2 bonus. Jon Gon's Wild Droid was completely different; it allowed retrieving ships from the warp up to the number of one's winning ships in an encounter.
Lizard wrote:
Metamorphoses After Winning (G) Game Setup: Choose one unused player color and place all the ships of that color on this sheet. Do not use this power unless you have an unused player color.

You have the power to Transmogrify. As a main player, after you win an encounter using any of your normal ships, use this power to morph those winning normal ships. Remove them from the game and replace them with an equal number from this sheet. Your morphed ships count as ships of your color, except that each one adds an extra +2 to your side's total when involved in an encounter as a main player or ally (even after this power is zapped or lost).

When you have no normal ships remaining in the game, you win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.

This power cannot be stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

The Lizards' lifecycle comprises metamorphic stages not unlike those of other sentient reptilians. Due to their world's proximity to a neutron star, however, they have developed an additional hyper-metamorphism that is triggered only by extreme adrenal overload. Finding battle victories to be effective activation events, the Lizards now seek physical perfection through conquest.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after your side reveals an attack card, you may either double the values of all reinforcements you play after this flare or add one to the multiplier of a kicker you revealed as a main player.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: When using your power, you may also morph two of your normal ships that are not involved in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Locust: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Repeatability: The fact that Super Locust says "once per encounter" (and the base power does not) implies that the base power can devour any number of appropriate planets each regroup phase. Sniveler: The player consensus is that Sniveler counts Locust's devoured planets when determining if he can whine about colonies, but those planets are not at risk; if Locust has no regular (ship-based) foreign colonies, then he is free to torpedo the vote on Sniveler with impunity. House Rule: The general opinion on Locust seems to be that it is almost a non-power, since protecting foreign colonies from loss is only an occasional need, and Locust has to work pretty hard to even make it work. The revision suggested in green is an attempt to make this alien more viable. Design note: Early on, the alien image used for Locust briefly appeared on artist Felicia Cano's website labeled Berserker. The fact that this is the only Cano alien in Cosmic Incursion tends to suggest that Berserker was originally intended for inclusion in the base set.
Locust wrote:
Eats Planets When Alone (Y) You have the power to Devour. At the start of any regroup phase, if you have a foreign colony on a planet by yourself (i.e., there are no other players' ships on the planet with you), use this power to devour the planet, removing it from the game and placing it on this sheet. Your ships on that planet return to your other colonies.

Each planet you have devoured counts as {one foreign colony} two foreign colonies toward victory for you, even if this power is later lost or stolen. If this power is stolen, devoured planets do not transfer with it.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

The Locusts recently swarmed out of their home system in a vast cloud of ships, searching for uninhabited planets that they could break down and consume to meet the ever-growing energy needs of their people. Needless to say, the other aliens are keeping a nervous eye on these destructive gluttons.

Wild: At the start of any regroup phase, you may send 4 of your ships to the warp to destroy a planet that is not in the Locust's home system, removing it from the game. Any ships on that planet are sent to the warp. Give this flare to the Locust after use (or discard it, if the Locust isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: Once per encounter, you may devour one foreign planet on which you have more total ships than all other players combined. All other players' ships on that planet are sent to the warp.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Loser: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Affected cards: Loser's requirement to play attack cards applies only to the main players' normal encounter cards, not to extra cards such as those of Deuce or Cavalry. If an upset Loser faces Magician or Wild Magician, playing at least one attack card satisfies this requirement. Compensation: If the winner of an upset encounter revealed a negotiate, he does not collect compensation because he did not lose the encounter and his ships were never sent to the warp. Ties: During an upset, a tie ultimately causes the offense to win. Loser vs. Wild Loser: Playing the Wild flare after an upset does not cause both sides to win. Wild Loser short-circuits the encounter, jumping from the Planning phase to the Resolution phase; since the upset would have occurred during the Reveal phase but that phase gets skipped, the upset is prevented by Wild Loser and both players simply lose. (Another way of looking at it: An upset cannot affect the outcome until "after cards are revealed," but when Wild Loser is played we not only don't reveal any encounter cards, we don't even select them to begin with.) Retooled gameplay: Eon's Loser could use its power in any encounter (without needing to be a main player); Mayfair added the main player restriction, which is also used in Cosmic Encounter Online. Considering original Loser's annoyance factor and its longtime dominant winning record, this change is probably a good one. Eon's Wild Loser was completely different; it forced the player receiving it to lose a colony and then eventually passed on, poison-like, to another player's hand. Link: [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Loser wrote:
Winner Loses and Loser Wins (G) You have the power of Upset. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to declare an upset. Once an upset has been declared, both players must play attack cards, if possible. Then, after cards are revealed, the winning side loses and the losing side wins. This occurs after all other game effects are resolved (such as the Human's power being zapped).
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

The enigmatic Losers have proven to be quite cunning in battle. Strengths become weaknesses and weaknesses strengths as the glassy-eyed Loser shows its opponents that nice guys finish first.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may declare that both sides lose, sending all involved ships to the warp.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: You may wait until after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed to declare an upset. When you do so, you and your opponent are not required to play attack cards.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:loss of power: See alien powers.

:Love: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited to fix incorrect comma.
Love wrote:
Makes the Cosmos Go 'Round (Y) You have the power of Joy. At the start of your turn, use this power. Choose and discard one card from your hand. Every other player, in clockwise{,} order, may then choose and discard one card from his or her hand. If he or she discards the same type as you (attack, negotiate, artifact, etc.), that player may release all of his or her ships from the warp back to colonies.

If all players discard the same type of card as you, you collect all of the discarded cards (including yours). If one or more other players do not discard a card matching the type you discarded, you may release all of your ships from the warp and use them to establish a foreign colony in the system of one of those players.
(Offense Only) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)

A maternalistic and physically imposing race, the Love used to be enveloped in rage and self-loathing. In their darkest hour, the Love began to see that simple acts of joy could become contagious; all that was needed was for one race to take the first step toward a happier existence.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may ask your opponent to discard one card at random from his or her hand. If he or she does, you may take the card; if he or she does not, you receive one reward.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: Instead of discarding a card to use your power, you may show the card to the other players and then return it to your hand.
(Offense Only) (Start Turn)

:Lucre: A form of cosmic money used in the Eon and Mayfair editions of Cosmic Encounter. It seems unlikely that Lucre will be introduced into the FFG version, as the former "Lucre aliens" that have reappeared thus far (Butler, Ethic, Extortionist, Ghoul, Pirate, and Sting, as of Cosmic Dominion) have all been redesigned to work without Lucre.

:Lunar Cannon: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ clarification: Once the Death Star Lunar Cannon is fully armed and operational, if the tech card is discarded then the token is removed from play. It could subsequently re-enter play if the tech deck was reshuffled and that tech card was researched again (say, in episode VI). Clarification: Although this card's game text begins with the word "defend," it can also be used when you are on the offensive side (don'tcha just love how the guy with the biggest gun always wants to claim it's only for defensive purposes?). Ambiguity: In the rulebook, step 1 under Setup says "Each player then chooses a player color and takes the five player planets of that color, arranging the planets however he or she likes." This makes it unclear how much flexibility the player has in placing the Lunar Cannon "between" two planets if players choose not to arrange their planets in a linear fashion. (If this results in a big argument that bogs down the game, just have somebody head down the trench and unleash a couple of proton torpedoes.)
Lunar Cannon wrote:
Defend Two Planets. When you complete this tech, take and place the lunar cannon token between two of your home planets. While this tech is in play, you control the lunar cannon. As a main player or ally, you may add 10 to your side's total in any encounters targeting a world next to the lunar cannon. Each time a wild destiny card is drawn, you may move the lunar cannon token to a new position in any system.
(5) (Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Lunatic: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Clarification: Lunatic makes his decision before any other players accept or decline invitations. (Main players precede non-main players under the Timing Conflicts rule, and if Lunatic had been intended to go last then the standard timing phrase "after alliances are formed" would have been used instead.) Edited to allow Wild Lunatic to access the reward deck. Link: [Corrected flare]
Lunatic wrote:
Allies Against Self (Y) You have the power of Insanity. As a main player, after allies are invited, you may use this power to ally against yourself without being invited. Your ships on the losing side are sent to the warp as usual, while your ships on the winning side receive whatever they would normally receive for winning, such as rewards or a colony on the targeted planet.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

Not known for their rational behavior, the Lunatics have existed thus far by being on the winning side of every battle in some form or another.

Wild: For each reward you receive, you may both draw a card {from the deck} and retrieve a ship from the warp. You do not have to choose one or the other.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Super: When not a main player, you may ally with both sides of an encounter, if invited by both main players.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)
******** REMINDER! ******** DO NOT QUOTE THE ENTIRE POST! ******** Be courteous to others; limit your quotation to just the text you need.
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Re: The Cosmodex: An Encyclopedia for Cosmic Encounter
VOLUME III: M–R

:Machine: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: The FAQ states that if a player draws a new hand because of Wild Machine, the flare sits on the table while he discards his hand and draws a new one, and then returns to his (new) hand. Because Wild Machine is played during the Resolution phase of the previous encounter (and should return to the player's hand immediately), this ruling that the flare remains on the table into the second encounter, returning to hand after the hand refresh, is an erratum. Tech: As stated in the rulebook under the Technology variant, Machine may forego his second or later encounter in order to get a new tech card (as long as he is eligible to do so, meaning he must still have an encounter card in hand). This ends his turn because his power to continue works after having an encounter, not after drawing tech (and also because drawing tech has no Resolution phase). This principle would seem to apply to other encounter-adding game effects as well, such as Infinity Drive and Wild Machine. In the case of Wild Machine, the player would still need an encounter card in hand to convert the encounter to a tech draw because the hand refresh allowed by the flare would not occur until after the encounter had started. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Machine did not require that Machine "complete" his encounter in order to continue his turn; FFG's rewrite (probably unintentionally) implies that Machine cannot use his power if an encounter ends prematurely. Eon's Wild Machine was completely different; it forced the opponent to "program" the encounter cards in his hand in a specific sequence to be followed until drawing a new hand. FFG wisely abandoned that potential rulings nightmare in favor of a more conventional approach for the Wild effect. Edited to make Wild Machine work correctly with failed deals and to implement the FAQ erratum. Links: [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Machine wrote:
Can Continue Turn (R) You have the power of Continuity. Your turn is not limited to two encounters. After each of your encounters (whether successful or not), you may use this power to have another encounter as long as you have at least one encounter card left in your hand.
(Offense Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

A race long lost to antiquity had the foresight to construct a mammoth Machine in the core of their planet. Pouring all their knowledge and ambition into its memory banks, they programmed it with this mandate: "Top priority... expand control, never cease... eliminate opposition, never cease... achieve mastery, never cease..."

Wild: As the offense, you may have a second encounter even if {you lost} your first encounter was not successful or you are out of encounter cards. If you have no encounter cards left, set this flare aside, draw a new hand at the start of your second encounter, and then return this flare to your hand.
(Offense Only) (Resolution)

Super: During your regroup phase, you may draw a card from the deck instead of retrieving a ship from the warp.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:Macron: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Errata: Power reflects official FAQ errata and second printing changes (shown in blue). Macron's revision history is complicated; see Appendix B for more information. Retooled gameplay: Macron's ships under FFG are worth twice as much for compensation/rewards as they were under Eon, and the new power text pinpoints specific windows during which the power can be zapped. Eon's Wild Macron was completely different; it provided a limited Amoeba-like effect. Edited to clarify interactions with game effects like Anti-Matter and Virus, to add missing timing indicators, to fix Wild Macron's main player bug, to fix Super Macron's launch bug and defensive ally bug, and for terminology. See Appendix B for Macron's full revision history. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Macron (based on FAQ errata) wrote:
Each Ship is Worth 4 (G) You have the power of Mass. {When you are the offense, use this power before launching ships in an encounter. When you are }{the defense or}{ an ally, use this power after allies are invited. If you are the offense or an ally, you may only send one ship into the encounter.} As the offense or an ally, use this power when sending ships into the encounter. You may send only one ship.

As a main player or ally, use this power after encounter cards are revealed. Each of your ships counts as 4 toward your side's total instead of 1.

When collecting compensation or rewards, each of your ships is worth two ships.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Launch) (Alliance) (Reveal)

Beginning life on a gargantuan planet, the Macrons accustomed themselves to tremendous atmospheric and gravitational forces. Power comes so naturally to them that they scoff at the fragile intelligences they crush on their way to universal dominance.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after your side reveals an attack card, you may add 1 to your side's total for each ship you have in the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: As the offense or an ally, you may send up to four ships into the encounter.
(Offense or Ally Only) (Launch) (Alliance)

:Magician: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Bruno Faidutti, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Early play: If Magician is required to play his card early (say because of Wild Magician), the player consensus is that he must do so. He then still uses his power, but may not change the card he has already played. House Rule: The printed Do Not Use restriction is easily overcome by handling Oracle in the same way as the Wild Magician flare. Magician plays a card face up, then Oracle plays two cards, then Magician adds one of them to his hand (without changing his own encounter card). Historical note: This power was apparently intended as a replacement for Laser, which is reported to be disliked by FFG designer Kevin Wilson. Reversed edit: See Cosmodex reversals. Edited to move the timing to the correct "subphase," to resolve the stalemate between Magician and Wild Magician while simultaneously eliminating the Do Not Use conflict with Oracle, to add missing gender-neutral language, and to clarify that Wild Magician's hand refresh is there to enable the flare (not replace its normal function). Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare] [Eon Laser]
Magician wrote:
Steals Card, Confounds Opponent (R) You have the power of Prestidigitation. As a main player, when encounter cards are to be selected, use this power to force your opponent to play two encounter cards facedown. Choose one of the two cards at random and add it to your hand. Then, play an encounter card from your hand normally (even the card you just took). Your opponent must play the card you didn't choose as his or her encounter card. The rest of the encounter is resolved as usual.

If another game effect requires you to play your card first (e.g., Oracle, Wild Magician), you must do so. You then still use this power, but may not change the card you played.

If your opponent has only one encounter card left in hand (and proves it by showing you his or her hand except for the encounter card), this power has no effect.
{Do Not Use with Oracle}
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Planning)

Lacking any natural weapons with which to defend themselves, the Magicians had to use their keen intellect to survive. Confusing and confounding their enemies became second nature to the wily Magicians. Indeed, many a would-be Cosmic conqueror has found occasion to curse the day that the Magicians swindled a visiting alien out of his spaceship and soared out into the Cosmos.

Wild: As a main player, when encounter cards are to be selected, you may force your opponent to play three encounter cards facedown. Shuffle these cards around on the table. Your opponent chooses one of the facedown cards at random, which he or she then plays, returning the other two to his or her hand. If your opponent has fewer than three encounter cards, he or she first discards his or her hand and draws a new one.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: When using your power, you may turn one of your opponent's two cards faceup before choosing. Choose either the faceup or facedown card and take it. Your opponent plays the card you did not choose, as usual.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:main player bug: Several game effects are intended to be usable when you are an ally, but are written as if you are always a main player. This typically consists of a power or flare saying "you" instead of "your side," or perhaps referring to the opposing main player as "your opponent." For the most part the intent is reasonably obvious, but there are some ambiguous cases: Is Reincarnator required to reincarnate when he is an ally and his main player fails to make a deal? Does Wild Reincarnator apply to allies or only to main players? The Cosmodex revises the following powers and flares to use ally-inclusive wording (using red or gray formatting depending upon the potential for ambiguity): Super Barbarian, Fungus, Super Ghoul, Wild Macron, Neighbor, Philanthropist, Reincarnator, Wild Reincarnator, Super Reincarnator, and Super Void.

:mandatory flare bug: The use of flares is always optional. Although flares in earlier editions often sounded mandatory, they were generally written in the context of "once you decide to play this card, here is what you must do." (One flare that truly did command its owner was Eon's Wild Loser.) The FFG edition, very commendably, appears to have made a concerted effort to write all flares to reinforce their optional nature by using "you may" (or "you don't have to") language on every flare. They did a good job in the base set, missing only Super Philanthropist, Super Zombie, and (debatably) Super Mind. Unfortunately it seems they forgot about this convention in Cosmic Incursion, as almost one-third of its flare effects are phrased in the imperative: Wild Ethic, Super Ethic, Super Fungus, Super Fury, Wild Genius, Super Genius, Wild Ghoul, Super Guerrilla, Super Magician, Wild Merchant, Super Plant, Super Sniveler, and Super Symbiote. Cosmic Conflict similarly seems to forget the convention. While this is not a bug per se, the Cosmodex nonetheless adjusts such flares to conform to the standard.

:Masochist: Alien power, base set, designed by Matt Stone, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Noteworthy interactions: Masochist is essentially rendered an anti-power by a single use of Mobius Tubes if it isn't zapped, and is perhaps just as vulnerable to Rifts which, although they generally target fewer ships, have no counter-card. House Rule: Healer is such a devastating force that many players have suggested that Masochist really should have a "Do Not Use with Healer" restriction. Tech abuse: Masochist particularly likes having tech in the game, and can speed victory by aggressively researching a tech (other than Coldsleep Ship) until he has no colonies, then completing the tech and sending his last ships to the warp. Retooled gameplay: Stone's Masochist specifically exempted itself from Schizoid's alternate win conditions. Stone's Wild Masochist was completely different; it required a player to lose a colony when the flare first entered his hand, then had that player eventually give the flare to someone else to continue the cycle of destruction. Stone's Super Masochist was completely different; it let the Masochist send six of his ships to the warp. Historical note: Masochist's power is similar to Eon's Warp Factor moon, which let a player win the game if he had 19 ships in the warp. Edited to add the Healer restriction and to fix Wild Masochist's leak that blocks the offense from loading the gate if he has ships that are not lost/captured/removed but are in some other state that prevents them from being usable, such as researching tech. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Masochist wrote:
Tries to Lose Own Ships (R) You have the power to Hurt Yourself. At the start of any regroup phase (before the offense retrieves a ship from the warp), use this power to win the game if you have lost all of your ships. Lost ships include those in the warp, those removed from the game, and those captured by other players.

You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies, and you may still win the game via the normal method.
Do Not Use with Healer
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

The Masochists suffer from a neurological disorder where they derive pleasure from self-flagellation. However, some are beginning to wonder if it's really a religious ritual to bring forth their dominance in the Universe.

Wild: During any regroup phase, you may choose a player other than the offense. That player retrieves a ship from the warp instead of the offense. You may not use this flare if the offense{'s ships are all in the warp, captured, or removed from the game} would then be unable to place a ship in the hyperspace gate.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: During your regroup phase, you may choose one of your ships in the warp and remove it from the game instead of retrieving it as usual.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:Mercenary: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Reverse Rewards: When the Reverse Rewards hazard is in effect, Mercenary receives double rewards if he is an offensive ally (and of course no rewards if he is a defensive ally). Timing clarification: Super Mercenary does not have to be played before cards are drawn; thus if Mercenary draws his own flare as a reward, he can play it to discard any of the other cards drawn. Historical note: Wild Mercenary is essentially Eon's Victory Boon edict.
Mercenary wrote:
Always Rewarded for Winning (G) You have the power of Bounty Hunting. As a main player or offensive ally, after your side wins an encounter, use this power to receive rewards equal to the number of ships you had in the encounter. This is in addition to any other benefits you receive normally for winning the encounter.
(Main Player or Offensive Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Originally created by another race to serve as police, the robotic Mercenaries were designed to be exert trackers and warriors. However, a terrible plague wiped out their masters and, left alone for eons, the Mercenaries gradually became self-aware. Vowing that they would never be used as slaves again, the Mercenaries made their way out into the Cosmos, always being careful to exact a price for their services.

Wild: As the defense, when you win an encounter, you may receive rewards equal to the number of ships you had in the encounter.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: When drawing cards for rewards, you may discard any or all of them after looking at the cards.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Merchant: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Jason Steinhurst, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Timing: If you use Super Merchant as a hired ship, you cannot then play it in that encounter because it is not actually in your hand at time you would need to play it. Capturing leak: There are three standard negative outcomes for ships: going to the warp, being removed from the game, and being captured. By leaving out any mention of capturing, the power technically sends captured ships back to the Merchant's hand rather than discarding them, which is highly counterintuitive (and probably not what was intended). Edited to plug the capturing leak. Link: [Corrected power]
Merchant wrote:
Plays Cards as Extra Ships (Y) You have the power to Hire. As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, if you have at least one ship in the encounter, you may use this power to play one or more cards facedown from your hand as hired ships. These cards are treated as extra ships you have in the encounter and may be played in addition to your normal maximum of 4 ships as the offense or an ally. Hired ships cannot be played for their card effect and are not part of your hand. Other players may not look at or draw hired ships. Any hired ship that goes to the warp, is captured, or is removed from the game is discarded. Otherwise, hired ships become normal cards again and return to your hand at the end of the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Hailing from a world incredibly rich in natural resources, the Merchants achieved star travel early in their history thanks to a crew of intergalactic mercenaries who crash-landed on their planet. Since then, the Merchants have frequently used their wealth and natural charisma to hire other races to do their fighting for them.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may add 1 to your side's total for each card in your hand, plus this flare.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may replace any or all hired ships that survive the encounter with any ships you have in the warp on a 1-for-1 basis. Discard the cards representing the replaced hired ships.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Mesmer: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes, super flare by Jefferson Krogh and Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Scope: Mesmer can name any official artifact card that exists in this edition of Cosmic Encounter, even if it's part of a reward deck that is not in the current game. Retooled Gameplay: Eon's Super Mesmer was completely different; it allowed playing each wild flare in your hand as though it were any wild flare you could name.
Mesmer wrote:
Can Change Own Artifacts (R) You have the power of Mass Hypnosis. You may use this power to play any artifact card from your hand as though it were any artifact card you name. If you are zapped you return the card to your hand, but may then play it normally, for its original printed effect, if appropriate.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Raised in a society where grace and physical charm are equated with success, the unsightly Mesmers have as a defense developed the power to entrance all who might gaze upon them. Now, accomplished performers, the Mesmers can bedazzle a crowd into believing anything. Only long after the glow has faded do the most astute begin to wonder how much was real, and how much imagined.

Wild: As a main player, after you reveal an attack card with a value lower than 10, you may change it into a negotiate card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may use your power to play any non-encounter card from your hand as though it were any artifact card.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Meteor Storm: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Meteor Storm wrote:
During this encounter, if both players reveal attack cards, add together the totals of both sides. If the combined total is over 25, a deadly meteor storm is triggered by the fighting, causing both sides to lose, regardless of other game effects.

:Mimic: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Kevin Wilson and Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Duplicated effects: A flare returning to its owner's hand after use is a standard rule for the card type, and not specifically one of the "effects" of each flare; thus, Wild Mimic does not steal the flare it is duplicating. On the other hand, if a particular flare says to give it to someone else after use, this is an effect of that flare. In most cases this distinction will be moot (for example, Wild Disease is given to Disease or discarded, and then your duplication redundantly causes it to be given or discarded to the same person or discard pile). However, since Wild Reincarnator and Wild Changeling are given to whichever player the flare affected, then your duplicate use of the card can indeed change who ends up holding it.
Mimic wrote:
Copies Opponent's Hand Size (Y) You have the power to Imitate. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, use this power. If your opponent has more cards in hand than you, draw cards from the deck until you have just as many cards in your hand. If your opponent has fewer cards in hand than you, discard cards of your choice until you have just as few cards in your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Planning)

Evolving from a small insectoid creature that had an incredible gift for imitating the appearance of the other beings on their homeworld, the Mimics have come to be known as some of the greatest copycats in the Cosmos. Watching a Mimic change form is an eye-watering process, a bit like watching a giant, invisible sculptor at work. The Mimics hope that their ability to blend in throughout the Cosmos will allow them to ascend to Cosmic dominance, but only time will tell.

Wild: You may duplicate the effects of a wild flare or artifact card that another player just played. The effects take place as though you had played the card yourself. Give this flare to the Mimic after use (or discard it, if the Mimic isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When using your power, you may draw up to or discard down to eight cards instead of your opponent's actual hand size.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Mind: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Errata: Wild Mind reflects official FAQ errata (shown in blue). Reward deck: The player consensus is that Wild Mind does not activate when another player draws from the reward deck. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Mind was broader; it could be used after alliances ("any time before cards are played") and did not restrict the player from telling others what he saw. Eon's Wild Mind was completely different; it allowed a player to preview all cards in the deck without shuffling. Edited to fix Wild Mind's incorrect prerequisite and timing bars. Links: [Corrected flare] [Kevin Wilson on Mind] [Typos on Mind Flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Mind (based on FAQ errata) wrote:
Sees Other Players' Hands (Y) You have the power of Knowledge. Before allies are invited, you may use this power to look at the entire hand of one of the main players. If you are a main player, you may look at your opponent's hand. You may not tell any other players what cards you see in a player's hand using this power.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Alliance)

Springing forth on a triple star system subject to constant energy fluxes, the Mind thrives on shifting wave pulses, ultraviolet rays, and gamma-release explosions. Extreme sensitivity to potentialities has enabled it to view with wisdom (and some skepticism) the threats of its Cosmic competitors.

Wild: When another player draws a card from the deck, you may use this flare. For the rest of this encounter, each time that player must draw a card from the deck, you may draw it instead, look at it, and then give it to him or her. You may not share this information with the other players.
({Main Player Only}) (As Any Player) ({Alliance}) (Any Phase)

Super: When you are not a main player, using your power allows you to look at the hands of both main players.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)

:Mirage: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Cedric Chin (as Alexander), illustrated by Brynn Metheney. Retooled Gameplay: Alexander applied only to whomever was the defense, and did not offer a choice of colonies; it automatically specified the minimum for the opponent or the maximum for itself. Chin's Wild Alexander was completely different; it allowed exchanging one's ships in the encounter with one's ships on any colony. Super Alexander affected all allies, setting each one's ship count to that of his smallest colony.
Mirage wrote:
Changes Number of Ships Involved (G) You have the power of Delusion. As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, use this power to choose any one of your colonies and any one of your opponent's colonies. Encounter totals are calculated as though the main players' ships on the chosen colonies were involved instead of their actual ships in the encounter. Allies' ships count toward the totals normally.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Beings of inconstant mass, the Mirage willfully change their form to mislead adversaries about their actual numerical strength. The field of distortion surrounding the Mirage is so powerful, those venturing within it are unable to precisely determine their own appearance. Great fleets have been deluded into thinking they were suddenly outnumbered, and those captains able to survive become forever wary of the misshapen ripples of space seen in the distance.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may play one negotiate card from your hand as though it were a reinforcement +3.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: When using your power, you may also choose one colony of any one ally to count toward that side's encounter total instead of his or her actual ships in the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Mirror: Alien power, base set, designed by Matt Stone, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Double digits: This power is a primary reason why FFG used leading zeros where necessary to format attack cards using double digits (an excellent feature of this edition). Retooled gameplay: Stone's Wild Mirror was completely different; it allowed a player to win by playing a compromise (negotiate) card, but required paying consolation. Mayfair's Super Mirror was different; it allowed the reversal to be called after attack cards were revealed. Link: [Kevin Wilson on Mirror]
Mirror wrote:
Swaps Digits on Attack Cards (Y) You have the power of Reversal. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to call for a reversal. If one or both players reveal attack cards, this changes the value of those cards by reversing their digits. For example, this would make an attack 15 into a 51, a 20 into an 02, and an 08 into an 80. Resolve the encounter using these reversed values.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Springing from a world with such a high surface silver content that everything reflected off everything else, the Mirrors adapted to the difficulty of separating mirror images from reality. They also developed an inner symmetry that confounds their opponents across the Cosmos.

Wild: As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may change your encounter card into a duplicate of your opponent's encounter card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When declaring a reverse, you may declare that the reverse will affect only your card or your opponent's card.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Mirror Universe: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Mirror Universe wrote:
Immediately flip over both the discard pile and the deck. The deck becomes the new discard pile and vice versa. Afterwards, shuffle the new deck.

:Miser: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. The hoard: FFG's language choices imply, and Kevin Wilson has ruled, that the hoard is not actually a hand. This means, among other things, that the hoard is not subject to effects that target hands, such as a cosmic quake, and that an encounter card in the hoard is not sufficient to allow Miser to begin a second encounter (which was also specifically ruled by Mr. Wilson). Retooled gameplay: FFG Miser specifically allows the player to choose which starting hand will be the hoard. Eon Miser protected the hoard from "loss of cards because of other powers, Edicts, or consolation," whereas FFG Miser protects the hoard only from its cards being looked at or drawn. The difference, then, is that Eon hoards were vulnerable to all flare-based effects but could not be harmed by forced discarding from non-flares, while FFG hoards can experience forced discarding from any kind of game component (as long as that component is not limited to targeting hands, since the hoard is not a hand). Eon was clear about getting a new hoard using the normal hand-drawing rules, but FFG seems to give the hoard its own (relatively unrestricted) method for refresh rather than link it to the normal hand-drawing rules. Eon's Wild Miser was completely different; it allowed a player to win the game with one base fewer than the number normally required. Links: [Kevin Wilson on the hoard] [and here] [and here] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Miser wrote:
Gets Second Hand (G) Game Setup: You are dealt two separate eight-card hands. Look at them and choose one to be your "hoard." Place it facedown on this sheet.

You have the power to Hoard. Whenever you wish to play a card, you may use this power to play a card from your hoard instead of your normal hand. You may not add cards you gain to your hoard, and other players may not look at or draw cards from your hoard. If there are no encounter cards left in your hoard, you may show it, then discard it and get a new eight-card hoard. Cards played from your hoard which should return to your hand must return to your hoard instead.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Barely eking out a living on their shriveled moon, the Misers for generations secreted away their small annual surplus. But as the hoard grew, so did their greed, until now they prepare to risk their holdings for greater Cosmic booty.

Wild: When you draw a new hand or another player takes compensation from you, you may place this card and two others facedown in front of you until afterwards. If compensation is being taken from you, the facedown cards may not be taken. If drawing a new hand, you receive a full hand in addition to the facedown cards.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: At the start of your encounter, you may draw one card from the deck and add it to your hoard.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:Mite: Alien power, base set, designed by Cosmic Encounter Online, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Ends successfully: The successful encounter decreed by Mite is simply that: a success. It does not count as a "win" for the player or a "loss" for the opponent. Timing: The combination of a "before allies are invited" clause and a (Launch) icon doesn't really make sense. This allows Mite to use his power before launching his ships in the hyperspace gate, and arguably even before aiming the gate, which surely could not have been the intention. One possible resolution would be changing the Launch icon to (Alliance) on both the base power and the Super flare, but the Cosmodex opts to keep the power's timing phase the same and just prevent the offense from using it too early. Noteworthy interaction: Mite essentially makes Genius a non-power. Relabeling: In Cosmic Encounter Online, instead of the "power to Bluster" Mite has the "power to cut down to size." Neither phrase seems to have a lot to do with the abilities of a mite, but FFG's revision is a welcome change that makes the power feel more like it fits into the game's longstanding history of one- and two-word power tags. FFG's changes to the history are a mixed bag: although the perspective and tense strayed from the cosmic standard, the overall length reduction is a welcome relief from the online edition's long and awkward stories for its newer aliens. Historical note: Although some players consider Mite to be a replacement for Wrack, the Cosmodex sees enough differences between the two (dealmaking, ship assassination, and the chance of a backfire loss, among others) to believe that there could still be room in the Cosmos for Wrack. Edited to fix the timing leak that allows early blustering. Links: [Corrected power]
Mite wrote:
Demands Colony or Loss of Cards (Y) You have the power to Bluster. As the offense, {before allies are invited} after you launch ships in the hyperspace gate, if the defense has more than three cards in hand, use this power to bluster. The defense must either discard down to three cards at random or let you establish a colony on the targeted world. If the defense gives you a colony, land any ships you have in the hyperspace gate on the targeted planet and the encounter immediately ends successfully. If the defense discards down to three cards at random, the encounter continues normally.
(Offense Only) (Mandatory) (Launch)

Long stigmatized by others as being pests, swarms of microscopic Mites learned to use their omnipresence your encounter to release all players' ships from the warp. Freed ships return to any of their owners' colonies.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:moose: A moose is a ruminant quadruped, the largest member of the deer family, and known for its large antlers. Moose are distinguished members of the select club of animal species whose names are both singular and plural.

:Morph: Card type; encounter card; base set, Cosmic Incursion, Cosmic Alliance, and Cosmic Dominion; designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ clarification: When the Morph is revealed and duplicates an opponent's card, it is treated as that card in all ways, just as if the player had revealed the actual card being duplicated. The Morph copies the value of the other card before either card is modified by other game effects like Calculator, Mirror, or Tripler, and those modifications affect only the encounter card(s) for which they are applicable. In other words, the Morph copies the other card's value, but does not copy modifications to that card (unless the modifications are already designed to affect both players). For example, if the Tripler revealed a Morph and his opponent revealed an attack 12, the Morph would become an attack 12 and then get reduced to 4 by Tripler's power. On the other hand, if Tripler revealed the attack 12 and his opponent revealed the Morph, the Morph would become an attack 12, but would not get reduced to 4 just because the card it morphed into did. Morph vs. Morph: There are a second Morph card in Cosmic Incursion, a third in Cosmic Alliance, and a fourth in Cosmic Dominion. As stated in the original rulebook and the Incursion and Dominion rulesheets, if both main players reveal Morphs at the same time, both players lose and all involved ships go to the warp. (If one side reveals two Morphs, because of a game effect such as Deuce, then they both duplicate the opponent's card as usual.) Morph token: One of Joker's tokens is a morph. When Joker places this token, the affected wild card momentarily becomes a morph and then immdiately becomes a copy of the opposing card. The morph token cannot cause a morph-vs.-morph double-loss situation: If the opposing card had originally been a morph, it would have converted into a copy of the wild card before Joker used his power; thus Joker would have been required to place tokens on both cards, and since he has only one morph token there would always be some other kind of encounter card for the morph to duplicate.
Morph wrote:
Duplicates opponent's encounter card when revealed.

:Mouth: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Mouth wrote:
Gobbles Up Cards (R) You have the power to Gobble. As a main player, after alliances are formed, whenever a card would be placed in the discard pile by the opposing main player or one of that player's allies, use this power to gobble up the card instead. When you gobble up a card, it is placed facedown on this sheet.

At the end of the resolution phase, if there are five or more cards on this sheet, use this power to belch one of those cards back up, placing it in your hand. The rest of the cards on this sheet are removed from the game.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Alliance) (Planning) (Reveal) (Resolution)

Although considered more of an annoyance than a genuine threat, the Mouth can devastate the unwary with its constant eating. Anything within reach of a Mouth will likely be swallowed whole in the blink of an eye. Objects too large for a single bite will be systematically devoured to satisfy its voracious hunger.

Wild: As a main player, after an artifact or reinforcement card is played by your opponent and its effects have been resolved, you may take that card and add it to your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Any Phase)

Super: As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may replace either main player's encounter card with one encounter card on your sheet or one card you had previously removed from the game. Discard the replaced card.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Muckraker: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Muckraker wrote:
Gets Allies Thrown Out (Y) You have the power to Slander. As a main player or ally, at the start of the resolution phase, you may use this power to discard one card from your hand and accuse any or all winning allies of subversive intent. Each accused ally may bribe you to cancel your accusation against him or her by giving you, from his or her hand, any non-encounter card or a card of the same type (attack, negotiate, etc.) as the one you discarded. Attack card bribes must have a higher value than the attack card you discarded. Accused allies who cannot or do not bribe you must return their ships to their other colonies, and receive no rewards, colonies, or other benefits of winning the encounter.

If you are an ally and your side won, the main player on your side may exempt any or all allies from this power. You may not accuse yourself.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

With tongues of silver and hearts of arsenic, the Muckrakers are natural soapbox politicians, never missing an opportunity to sow seeds of discord if it suits their aims. Presenting themselves as watchmen dedicated to protecting their neighbors from flim-flam artists, they secretly scheme to remove those who would stand in their way.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after alliances are formed, you may force one ally on either side to leave the encounter, returning his or her ships to any of his or her colonies.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Alliance)

Super: When using your power, you may accuse the winning main player in addition to, or instead of, any winning allies. (You still may not accuse yourself.)
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Mutant: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Deals and allies: Although Wild Mutant looks like it lets you take cards from allies after a successful deal, it does not. When a deal situation arises, allies are sent away from the encounter in the reveal phase, before the dealmaking begins; so by the time this flare is playable in the resolution phase, there won't be any allies left. Super flare playability: Super Mutant's use of the phrase "before using your power" indicates only the flare's timing; it is not a requirement to subsequently use the power. Thus Mutant can play his Super regardless of whether he will be able, or even willing, to use his power afterwards. (To try to force the power use would lead to questions about such things as whether he can play the flare if it cannot even get his hand under eight cards, what happens if another effect immediately bumps him back up to eight, etc. Best to keep it simple.) Retooled gameplay: Eon timed Mutant's card drawing to occur before encounter cards were played; FFG times it before inviting allies. Eon's Super Mutant was completely different; it allowed the player to discard his hand and cherry-pick a new hand from any cards in the deck, without shuffling. Link: [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Mutant wrote:
Maintains 8-Card Hand (G) You have the power to Regenerate. As a main player, before allies are invited, if you have fewer than eight cards you may use this power to refill your hand. Draw cards one at a time, at random, from any other player(s) and/or from the deck. Draw until you have a full hand of eight cards.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

Evolving on a highly radioactive and unshielded moon, the protean Mutants quickly learned to augment their silicon-based heredity. Before long they began to control and accumulate key genetic codes from other life forms, stripping opponents of their most basic defenses in a Mutant drive to transform the Universe.

Wild: As a main player, if you win an encounter or make a deal, you may take one card at random from your opponent and each of his or her allies.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: As a main player, you may discard up to three cards from your hand before using your power to refill your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

:negotiate cards: Card type; encounter card; base set, Cosmic Incursion, Cosmic Alliance, and Cosmic Dominion; designed by Future Pastimes (as Compromise cards); Negotiate (Crooked Deal) designed by Fantasy Flight Games; Cosmic Dominion negotiate cards designed by the fans. See also card distribution. List: Negotiate, Negotiate (Crooked Deal), Negotiate (Epic Oratory), Negotiate (Faulty Translator), Negotiate (Right of Refusal), Negotiate (Self Defense). References: The phrase "negotiate cards" generally refers to all cards of that type (i.e., regular negotiate cards as well as Crooked Deals, the Epic Oratory, etc.). When a game effect targets, triggers on, or otherwise references a negotiate card, any of these will do. However, game effects that specifically turn other cards into negotiate cards, such as Emotion Control and Empath, do not turn them into the special negotiates unless specifically allowed or required. For example, if Empath reveals an attack card and her opponent reveals a Negotiate (Crooked Deal), she must choose whether to leave her attack as it is or turn it into a regular negotiate card. (A Morph still copies a Crooked Deal as a Crooked Deal because it is copying an exact card identity, and Gambler may bluff a Crooked Deal, Epic Oratory, etc. because he is allowed to name any encounter card.) Alchemist may of course convert any kind of negotiate into any other kind that he is able to find in a discard pile, since he is swapping physical cards. Negotiate (Crooked Deal): FFG wisely presents the number of ships lost to the warp using modifiers (-1 and +1) rather than hard-coded values (2 and 4); this eliminates problems in situations with other game effects that also change the number of ships lost to the warp, such as Super Pacifist. (The use of "i.e." is not actually correct here, but it is difficult to recast this in the limited space available.)
Negotiate cards wrote:
Negotiate Opposed by Attack: Loses, but collects compensation. Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal or lose three ships to the warp.

Negotiate (Crooked Deal) Opposed by Attack: Loses, but collects compensation equal to ships lost + 1. Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal. If no deal is made, you lose one ship fewer than usual and your opponent loses one ship more than usual (i.e., you lose two ships and your opponent loses four).

Negotiate (Epic Oratory) Opposed by Attack: Loses, but either collects double compensation or prevents your ships from going to the warp (your choice). Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal (up to two colonies per player may be gained) or lose three ships to the warp.

Negotiate (Faulty Translator) Opposed by Attack: Loses, but collects compensation from any one opposing ally (or from the opponent if he or she has no allies). Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal using only gestures. If no deal is made, players each lose one ship fewer than usual (e.g., two instead of three).

Negotiate (Right of Refusal) Opposed by Attack: Loses, but collects compensation. Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal or lose three ships to the warp.

If you receive any cards from compensation or a deal, you may discard any or all of those cards.

Negotiate (Self Defense) Opposed by Attack: Loses, with no compensation. Send one opposing ship to the warp for every ship lost on your side. Opposed by Negotiate: Players have one minute to make a deal or lose three ships to the warp.

:Neighbor: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited to fix the main player bug.
Neighbor wrote:
Adds All Ships in System to Attack (G) You have the power of Community. As a main player or ally, after the main player on your side reveals an attack card, use this power to add one to your side's total for each ship you have in the targeted system that is not involved in the encounter.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

No race may have as strong a sense of community and working toward the common good as the Neighbor. While some races are secretive, solitary, or sensitive, the Neighbor is always interested in what the other races nearby are doing, and they are more than happy to lend another alien their technology or tools. Several times each year, they ritualistically come together in great masses to feast on food prepared by other Neighbors, and regale each other with anecdotes everyone has heard several times before.

Wild: As a winning defensive ally, if you earn defender rewards, you may add the number of ships the defense had involved in the encounter when calculating how many defender rewards you are entitled to.
(Defensive Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: When using your power as a main player, you may also add 1 to your total for each ship that is not involved in the encounter that each of your allies have in the targeted system.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Observation Platform: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Observation Platform wrote:
After alliances are formed during an encounter in which you are not involved, you may either retrieve one ship from the warp or draw one card from the deck.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Alliance)

:Observer: Alien power, base set, designed by Cedric Chin (as Safety), illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: The FAQ entry on Observer is confusing, but it appears to be trying to clarify that when Observer is an ally he must – during the Resolution phase – protect all of his ships, whether part of the encounter or not (and similarly must as a main player protect all of his allies' ships). This means that, as an ally, when Observer receives a grudge token he does not lose 1 or 4 ships to the warp but instead picks up the appropriate number of his ships and then places them back on any of his colonies. Retooled gameplay: Chin's Wild Safety was completely different; it forced allies to send their winning ships to the warp in spite of getting their normal rewards (using other ships to gain the colony in the case of offensive winning allies). Chin's Super Safety was completely different; it allowed the player to protect his own ships or those of the main player he is allied with, filling in the "missing coverage" from the base power. Edited to avoid implying that Observer works outside of the resolution phase, to fix the launch bug and the defensive ally bug, to fix the incorrect prerequisite bar, and to add the missing (Alliance) icon. Links: [Corrected flare] [Chin's Safety]
Observer wrote:
Allies Do Not Go to Warp (G) You have the power to Protect. As an ally, when you should lose ships to the warp, use this power to instead return them to any of your colonies and keep using them.

As a main player, when any of your allies should lose ships to the warp, use this power to instead allow your allies to return them to any of their colonies of their choice.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Seldom interfering in Cosmic affairs, the Observers have been around for millennia, simply watching the other alien races. With their advanced technology and strange abilities, the others were hesitant to draw them into their squabbles. Now, however, it seems that the Observers have decided that the time for action has come at last.

Wild: As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may allow each player who allied with you to draw one card from the deck.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: As the offense or an ally, when you send ships into the encounter, you may retrieve one ship from the warp to send. This does not allow you to exceed your normal limit of four ships in the encounter.
({Ally or Main Player Only}) (Offense or Ally Only) (Launch) (Alliance)

:Odd Way to Win a War: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Odd Way to Win a War wrote:
During this encounter, if one main player reveals an odd-numbered attack card and the other reveals an even-numbered attack card, the player who revealed the odd-numbered attack card automatically wins the encounter.

:Omega Missile: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ clarification: Players still need the normal number of home colonies to keep using their alien power (three in a five-planet game or two in a four-planet game), even if one or more of their home planets have been destroyed.
Omega Missile wrote:
Destroy Planet. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to choose a planet in any system. Remove that planet from the game and send all ships on it to the warp.
(8) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Omni-Zap: Artifact, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans.
Omni-Zap wrote:
Zaps Anything. Play at any time to copy the effect of any other Zap artifact you name, or to cancel and discard any one card that was just played or revealed. If the encounter or an alien power is now unplayable (e.g., by zapping a destiny, encounter, claw, or schizoid card) then an appropriate replacement is drawn or played (drawing a new hand if ncessary).

After use, remove one of your ships from the game or send three of your ships to the warp.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Oracle: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. FAQ ruling: When facing Oracle, Gambler must either play his card face up or use his power during the Planning phase to make a declaration about it before Oracle chooses an encounter card. Wild Oracle remains on the table waiting to resolve while the hands are mixed together; afterwards, it returns to the hand of whoever played it. Retooled gameplay: Eon's version delayed Oracle's card play until what is now known as the Reveal phase; FFG's rewrite wisely avoids ruling complications by keeping the card plays in the Planning phase and still going through a normal Reveal phase (even though the opponent's "revelation" is perfunctory at that point). It's unfortunate they didn't apply their excellent wording improvements to Super Oracle as well (the incorrect use of the word "reveal" led them to wrongly use a (Reveal) icon instead of (Planning)). Edited to move the timing to the correct "subphase," for agreement between base power and Super flare, to avoid implying that the faceup card is being "revealed" in the planning phase, to fix the defensive ally bug, for terminology, and to correct Super Oracle's timing indicator. (The Super flare must be used before Oracle plays his encounter card, so it can't wait until the Reveal phase. This error probably occurred because the flare was not revisited when the use of the base power was moved from Reveal to Planning. The opponent is not actually "revealing" his card yet, but rather he is playing it in such a way that the other players know what it is. In any event, it is clear from Oracle's base power that Super Oracle must make his choice during the Planning phase.) Links: [Corrected flare]
Oracle wrote:
Foresees Opponent's Card (G) You have the power to Foresee. As a main player, {before} when encounter cards are to be selected, use this power to force your opponent to play his or her encounter card faceup. Only after you have seen your opponent's card do you select and play your card.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Planning)

During millennia of civilization, the ancient Oracles developed perceptiveness about the intentions of others to uncanny lengths. While reluctant to test the outer limits of their vision, they find even short-range prescience has given them the reputation of great wisdom.

Wild: As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may mix your hand with that of your opponent, then take at random as many cards as you had in your hand, giving the rest to your opponent.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: As a main player, you may end an encounter after your opponent plays his or her card faceup. Your opponent takes back his or her card, the offense's and allies' ships return to colonies, and play continues as if a deal had been made.
(Main Player Only) ({Reveal}) (Planning)

:Outlaw: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Design note: Based on an early comment on Ms. Cano's deviantart page, it appears that Outlaw was originally called "Rustler" when it was sent to her for artwork.
Outlaw wrote:
Steals Cards from Opponents (G) You have the power to Waylay. As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to take one card at random from your opponent and from each of his or her allies. Add those cards to your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

The Outlaws are rightly feared throughout the great expanses of space. They arrive in a fury of laser blasts, explosions, and angry threats. Their victims barely have time to react before the Outlaws have swept through a sector, pillaging and stealing loot as they go.

Wild: As an ally, if your side loses the encounter, you may take one card at random from the hand of any player on the winning side of the encounter.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: As the defense or a defensive ally, if your side loses the encounter, you may use this flare. Winning offensive allies must return their ships to any of their colonies instead of landing on the targeted planet.
(Defense or Defensive Ally) (Resolution)

:Pacifist: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: If Pacifist reveals a negotiate card and ends up losing to an attack card (for example, by being zapped or because Loser declared an upset and Pacifist had no attack cards), then Pacifist collects compensation normally. When Pacifist and Human are supposed to auto-win at the same time (Pacifist reveals a negotiate; Human reveals an attack and is zapped), use the Timing Conflicts rule. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Wild Pacifist was completely different; it allowed a player to block an opponent's second encounter of the turn. FFG's Super Pacifist wisely recasts the number of ships lost to the warp using modifiers (-2 and +2) rather than hard-coded values (1 and 5); this eliminates problems in situations with other game effects that also change the number of ships lost to the warp, such as Negotiate (Crooked Deal). Link: [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Pacifist wrote:
Wins with Negotiate Card (G) You have the power of Peace. As a main player, if you reveal a negotiate card and your opponent reveals an attack card, use this power to win the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

A simple but ungainly race, the Pacifists long ago learned how to turn the power of an opponent against him. Always ready to demonstrate the superiority of retreat in unbalancing an aggressor, the Pacifists now seek to bring the Universe to its knees by yielding at just the right moment.

Wild: As a main player, after you reveal a negotiate card and your opponent reveals an attack card, you may change your negotiate card into an attack 15.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When you fail to make a deal, you may lose 2 fewer ships to the warp while forcing your opponent to lose 2 extra ships to the warp.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Parasite: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: Parasite may ally with the defense even if Energy Cloak is used, because Parasite does not need an invitation. Force Field error: The reference to Parasite being prevented by Force Field is incorrect; this is a holdover from the Eon/Mayfair version of the power. In the FFG edition, Parasite has to use his power during his normal turn to ally, which would always be before the Force Field is playable (it comes "after alliances are formed"); thus it is impossible for that artifact to prevent Parasite's power. Force Field can of course cancel Parasite's alliance afterwards, regardless of whether or not he used his power to obtain it, but in no way does the artifact preclude the use of this power. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Parasite made itself accountable only to Force Field and Magnet specifically, whereas FFG's version is more wisely written to submit to all similar ally-controlling game effects. FFG's Wild Parasite wisely specifies that it only works on powers lost due to holding insufficient home colonies, whereas Eon's Wild Parasite could (unfortunately) be interpreted to also work just after things like a Cosmic Zap or Wild Reincarnator. Artist's note: Ryan Barger, who created the images for both Parasite and Pacifist, wrote "The parasite was among my personal favorites as well. His choice of victim was partly alphabetical and partly ironic." Edited to eliminate the incorrect reference to prevention by Force Field, to avoid implying that Wild Parasite can be played twice in the same encounter, and to fix Super Parasite's launch bug and incorrect timing bar. (See Appendix B.) Links: [Corrected flare] [Eon Magnet]
Parasite wrote:
Joins Alliance at Will (G) You have the power to Infest. {Unless specifically prevented by another game effect (such as the Force Field artifact), when} When it is your turn to ally, you may use this power to ally (sending one to four ships, as usual) with one side as if you had been invited, even when you were not.
(Not Main Player) (Optional) (Alliance)

Evolving late on their almost totally polluted world, the Parasites had to depend on the already dominant life forms for survival. But, so rapidly did they succeed in infesting their home planets, they now need unsuspecting hosts to carry them throughout the far reaches of space.

Wild: When another player loses the use of his or her power because of having too few home colonies, you may immediately establish a colony on one of his or her home planets with one of your ships. (If that player regains his or her power and loses it again on a later encounter, you may use this flare again in that system.)
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: As an ally, you may send any number of ships you want into the encounter.
(Ally Only) ({Launch}) (Alliance)

:Patriot: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Awkward: This is a very oddly constructed alien. Patriots are characterized by loyalty to their own homeland; they aren't the diplomats or the Welcome Wagon. Even more strangely, it is another player's refusal to accept your loyalty that leads to dealmaking with that player; if he accepts your loyalty, no deal is queued up. One might think that this alien is all about offering a good enough card to secure loyalty for a future deal, but of course none of that is happening here. It all feels quite backwards. In no way does this alien encourage you to "think like a patriot," and thus it completely misses the mark thematically. (On the gameplay side, it's a permission alien that reduces to a Philanthropist clone.) Edited to require Patriot to force a deal situation before encounter cards are selected, and to prevent him from "returning zero ships" to do so.
Patriot wrote:
Offers Cards to Secure Loyalty (Y) You have the power of Loyalty. Once per encounter, you may use this power to show any player one card from your hand as a show of loyalty. If the player accepts your loyalty, he or she adds the card to his or her hand. If the player declines your loyalty, he or she must give you one of his or her ships from any colony. Place that ship on this sheet.

As a main player, after alliances are formed but before encounter cards are selected, if you have any ships on this sheet belonging to your opponent, you may use this power to return {all ships on this sheet belonging to the opposing main} those ships to that player. Proceed to the resolution phase and resolve the encounter as if both players had revealed negotiate cards.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

There is no more faithful ally to have supporting your cause than the reliable, steadfast Patriot. The species is proud of its long heritage of fidelity, while many other races find its loyalty annoying and pretentious.

Wild: As an ally, after your side wins the encounter, you may draw one card from the deck or retrieve one ship from the warp, in addition to any other benefits or rewards you may receive.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: As an ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may select a number of opposing allies' ships equal to the number of ships you have involved in the encounter. The selected ships are sent to the warp.
(Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Pentaform: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Mayfair Games, revised by the fans, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Retooled Gameplay: Mayfair's Pentaform essentially could not be zapped independently of the life stages, and the life stage was tied continuously to the foreign colony count. The FFG version makes the life-stage change a discrete event tied to gaining or losing a colony, and thus it can be zapped (by Pentaform or his opponents) to keep him at his current stage. Mayfair's Wild Pentaform did not add flares to the deck. Mayfair's Super Pentaform allowed reordering all life stages at once.
Pentaform wrote:
Has Five Life Stages (R) Game Setup: Draw five flares from the unused flare deck and arrange the matching alien powers in front of you as "life stages," in the order of your choosing. If any have Game Setup text or are not allowed in the current game, discard them and draw again. Remove the five flares from the game and slide this sheet partway under the leftmost life stage.

You have the power to Evolve. You use both your Pentaform power and whichever life stage it is underneath (zapping one does not zap the other).

Whenever you gain a foreign colony, use this power to move this sheet one life stage to the right (if possible). Whenever you lose a foreign colony, use this power to move this sheet one life stage to the left (if possible).
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Evolving on the fifth moon of the fifth planet of their star system, the Pentaforms coincidentally developed with five distinct life stages. Though differing in form from one specimen to another, all Pentaforms go through cataclysmic changes from each life stage to the next: childhood, adolescence, adulthood, middle age, and seniority. They have been causing a handful of trouble for the rest of the galaxy.

Wild: You may discard your current alien power and draw two cards from the unused flare deck. Choose one of these two aliens and become that alien. If either has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, discard it and draw again. Shuffle those two flares into the deck. Give this flare to the Pentaform after use (or discard it, if the Pentaform isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: At the start of any encounter, you may swap the positions of any two of your life stages (without moving the Pentaform sheet).
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Phantasm: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Sandara Tang. Mandatory: Be aware that playing Phantasm can work against you. If both players reveal attack cards and yours would win the encounter, you face the roughly one-in-five chance of drawing a negotiate card, which means now you have to either lose the encounter or let your opponent take compensation from you. Or, suppose you are the defense and both players reveal negotiate cards. Normally a colony-for-colony deal would be an easy sell, but if your power produces an attack card (almost a fifty-fifty chance), now you will win a relatively pointless encounter but lose out on that foreign colony. House rule: Darth Thulhu recommends making Phantasm's power use optional.
Phantasm wrote:
Replaces Encounter Card (G) You have the power of Instability. As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, use this power to reveal the top card of the deck.

If it is not an encounter card, discard it. If it is an encounter card, replace one of either player's revealed encounter cards with the card from the deck, discarding the replaced card. In either case, the encounter then continues normally.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Often mistaken for other species, the Phantasm's constantly roiling form makes it difficult to classify. This works well for the secretive race, as Phantasms enjoy befuddling and confusing others.

Wild: As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may reveal the top card of the deck. If it is an encounter card, either discard it or use it to replace (and discard) your current encounter card. If it is not an encounter card, add it to your hand.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When using your power, you may continue to draw and discard cards from the deck until you have drawn two encounter cards. Choose one of the two to replace (and discard) one of the revealed encounter cards. Discard the other.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Philanthropist: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Timing leak: Except when Philanthropist is the offense, his Super flare is easily thwarted if the player to whom he gives an encounter card simply cites the Timing Conflicts rule and selects his card before the flare can be played. This can be fixed with a "when cards are to be selected" timing clause. Lending powers: When an alien power is stolen, traded, loaned, etc., all of that power's special features, such as Miser's hand or Warrior's tokens, go with it; see facets of powers for more information. If an alien power specifies that it cannot be stolen, then it also cannot be traded, loaned, etc.; this and other related leaks have been patched on the relevant aliens (Horde, Pygmy, and Symbiote) by adding that they cannot be separated from their player color. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Philanthropist worked "before cards are played" and FFG works "after alliances," but the two are functionally equivalent. Eon's Wild Philanthropist did not require sending a ship to the warp to use its effect. Eon's Super Philanthropist worked even on non-encounter cards. Historical note: This underestimated power is generally the favorite alien of original Future Pastimes game designer Peter Olotka. Edited to fix the main player bug, for grammar, and to explicitly place Super Philanthropist before card selection to fix Timing Conflicts rule abuse.
Philanthropist wrote:
Gives Away Cards (Y) You have the power of Giving. As a main player or ally, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to give one card from your hand to either main player (your opponent, if you are a main player). That player immediately adds the card to his or her hand. If, after using this power, you do not have any encounter cards in your hand and you are a main player, you draw a new hand.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

Rejecting a heavy-handed, dogmatic religious background, the cynical Philanthropists have learned to parody greed itself. Knowing that the Universe cannot bring itself to reject a gift, even when it is no present, the race has grown cunning in the art of self-serving charity.

Wild: At the start of any encounter, you may send one of your ships to the warp to lend your power to another player for the duration of the encounter. Until the end of the encounter, that player is considered to have your power instead of his or her own. You may not use your power while it is loaned out. The player may not refuse the loan.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: {Any player to whom you give an encounter card must} When encounter cards are to be selected, if you used your power to give a player an encounter card, you may force him or her to play it in that encounter if possible.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Planning)

:Pickpocket: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Pickpocket wrote:
Lifts Cards from Other Players (G) You have the power to Lift. Once per encounter, you may use this power to take one card at random from the hand of any other player who has a foreign colony in your system. Add the card to your hand or discard it.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The glorious civilization of the once-noble Edificabi throve for millennia before giving in to the ease of burgling over building. As production of new resources dwindled, their world fell into decline and might have faded from the annals of Cosmic history, had not an unwitting company of spacefarers stumbled upon their troubled neighborhood. Quickly relieving the visitors of every last item of value, the Edificabi – by now reduced to little more than squabbling Pickpockets – saw their chance at a better future. Empowered by their newfound spaceflight technology, they artfully turned their nefarious skills upward and outward. Centuries later, these "big dippers" are still at work lightening the loads of their fellow travelers.

Wild: When the hyperspace gate is aimed at a planet in your system, you may take a number of cards at random from the offense's hand up to the number of ships he or she has in the gate. Keep or discard each card taken. If the offense now has no encounter cards in hand, he or she draws a new hand.
(Not Offense) (Launch)

Super: When using your power, you may take a card from any or all other players who have a foreign colony in your system.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Pirate: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Retooled Gameplay: Eon's Pirate and Super Pirate were completely different; the base power allowed making raids on other players' Lucre when not a main player, and the Super flare blocked the opponent's power use during the raid. Eon's Wild Pirate was completely different; it allowed you to hide a "Lucre treasure" on a planet for another player to find and split with you. Historical note: The original Pirate depicted a seemingly typical image of a human with a parrot on its shoulder. However, the history (which has been preserved in this version) revealed the surprising twist that the Pirate was actually the parrot. In FFG's version, the minion whose ear is being whispered into is apparently "off camera."
Pirate wrote:
Captures Ships for Booty (Y) You have the power to Raid. As the offense or an ally, if your side wins the encounter, you may use this power. Capture one or more ships from the losing side by returning an equal number of your winning ships to your other colonies (they do not land on the targeted planet, receive rewards, or gain other benefits from winning). Place the captured ships on this sheet.

During any regroup phase, you may send up to four ships from this sheet to the warp to receive an equal number of rewards.

During any regroup phase, you may negotiate the release of any or all ships on this sheet (back to colonies) in exchange for anything their owners may legally give you in a deal, such as cards from their hands or new colonies where they already have one (although this does not count as a deal).
(Offense or Ally Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Whispering rapacious orders into their ears, a small flock of rogue traders leads its minions into the far reaches of interstellar space.

Wild: For each reward you are to receive as a winning ally, you may take one card at random from the winning main player's hand instead of drawing a card from the deck or retrieving a ship from the warp.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: When using your power, you may capture up to two losing ships for each of your ships that you choose to return to your colonies.
(Offense or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Plague: Artifact, base set, designed by Future Pastimes. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Plague was playable at any time. The card types it could discard were limited to attack, compromise, and edict, unless the owner of the game had physically added the later card types to the card using a permanent marker. (Yes, this was the official ruling; to update the gameplay you were supposed to physically deface your card!) FFG's wise recasting to say "one card of each type" is an elegant and long-overdue solution to this problem that has plagued (hah!) multiple previous editions.
Plague wrote:
Harms Player. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player loses three ships of his or her choice to the warp and must discard one card of each type (attack, negotiate, morph, artifact, flare, etc.) from his or her hand.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:planets: Planets are the locations where encounters take place. Each player has four or five home planets in his or her own color. Whenever you have one or more of your own ships on one of your home planets, they form a home colony. Your goal is to establish foreign colonies on your opponents' home planets. Arrangement: FFG's clever innovation to print each planet as its own "mini gameboard" offers great flexibility for new game effects. The rulebook states that players may arrange their planets any way they choose. However, because effects such as Lunar Cannon require a concept of linear adjacency, each player should arrange his or her planets in a line (which does not have to be straight; curved or wavy is fine as long as there is an unambiguous linear arrangement). Terminology: Sometimes the terms "planet" and "colony" can be used interchangeably, and each player is limited to one colony per planet no matter how many ships he or she has there. However, it's important to note that there can be multiple players who have colonies on the planet; a planet without ships does not have any colonies; and establishing a colony on another player's planet does not make it "your" planet. These distinctions will become even more important if FFG chooses to publish moons some day, since effects that specifically apply to a "planet" will very likely not be relevant for moons. Creation, relocation, and destruction: As of Cosmic Dominion, planets can be brought into the game by Explorer, Wild Explorer, Genesis Bomb, and Pygmy; moved to a different system by The Claw, Wild Explorer, and Wild Leviathan; moved away from home temporarily by Leviathan (into the hyperspace gate) and Voyager (into the warp); and removed from the game by Ace, The Entropy Beast, Wild Guerrilla, Locust, Wild Locust, and Omega Missile. When planets are moved to other systems, everything associated with them moves as well (unless otherwise specified); this includes colonies, space stations, citadel cards, and saboteur tokens. When planets are destroyed, space stations and citadel cards are discarded, and saboteur tokens return to Saboteur's alien sheet. Because it is placed between two planets, the consequences for an adjacent Lunar Cannon are ambiguous in these situations. Since it is already moveable (upon a wild destiny), the Cosmodex recommends letting its owner choose to either send it along with the moving planet (placing it on either side in the new system), or leave it in place to affect whichever planet(s) it is now adjacent to.

:Plant: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Stealing powers: When an alien power is stolen, traded, loaned, etc., all of that power's special features, such as Miser's hand or Warrior's tokens, go with it; see facets of powers for more information. Unanswered question: What is the last sentence of the power trying to say? This obvious and redundant statement is true for every alien in the game. Noteworthy interactions: Grafting The Claw allows Plant to inspect the claw card and use it to steal a planet if there's a match (but of course he cannot swap cards in the regroup phase). When Saboteur is grafted, Plant gets to look at all of Saboteur's tokens to see where the traps are, and he must carry out token reveals as needed, but of course he cannot move the tokens around. Tip: If Plant grafts a power that is zapped, or a power that (whether implicitly or explicitly) can be used only once per encounter and has already been used, then Plant cannot use that power during the encounter. For example, a wise Seeker will use his power in the alliance phase, before Plant has the chance to snag it. Dead zone: Plant gets no benefit from (or is actually harmed by) grafting one-third of the aliens in the game. As of Cosmic Storm, 44 of the 134 other aliens (33%) are in this category: Bandit, Brute, Butler, Cavalry, Changeling, Chrysalis, Coordinator, Cryo, Dervish, Dictator, Disease, Filth (see below), General, Grudge, Hate, Horde, Invader, Leviathan, Locust, Lunatic, Masochist, Mind, Mite, Mutant, Outlaw, Parasite, Philanthropist, Prophet, Pygmy, Relic, Remote, Roach, Sadist, Sapient, Seeker, Shadow, Sloth, Sniveler, Swindler, Sycophant, Symbiote, Trickster, Will, and Wormhole. On first glance it would appear that copying Filth would be a great benefit to Plant, since this would eliminate all opponents' colonies that he coexists with; however, once the other players realize this, they will be unwilling to ally offensively with him or trade colonies with him in a deal, not only making Filth effectively useless to graft but also making Plant even more of a pariah than usual. Abuse potential: Plant gets nothing from Cryo until there are 8 or more cards in cold storage, and then he can steal the entire stored hand. When grafting Fury, he can use up as many tokens as he wants. When Macron is the victim, Plant has 4x4=16 and Macron (as the offense or an ally) has 1x1=1. Grafting Tick-Tock provides no benefit except when removing the last token to steal the game win. (Grafting Arcade at just the right time can also steal the win.) Retooled gameplay: Eon's Plant could graft any time from the moment it became the offense or defense up until card selection; FFG's Plant must wait until the start of the Planning phase. This significant reduction in scope prevents Plant from effectively grafting a large number of other powers. Also, because of the way Macron's limitation is separated from its benefit, Plant can abuse Macron to get four ships worth 4 each into the hyperspace gate for an impressive total of 16 + allies + attack card (and if Macron is in the encounter, his lone ship is now worth only 1). Eon's Wild Plant was "promoted" to became the FFG Super Plant (a wise change; considering the cheesiness of such a stolen win, it was good to make this nasty trick a special feature of Plant rather than something anyone else could theoretically do, out of the blue). Eon's Super effect allowed Plant to steal the power of any ally without requiring a colony in that ally's system.
Plant wrote:
Accumulates Opponents' Powers (R) You have the power of Grafting. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to graft any one player in whose home system you have at least one colony. If that player has not lost his or her power, you steal that power until the end of the encounter. If you lose your own power, you may not graft any power until you get your own back.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

This species of Plant combines the longevity of the redwood, the persistence of the weed, and the delicacy of the fern. Slowly grafting to themselves the traits of others, they can afford to quietly wait until their enemies grow tired, then spread their tendrils unopposed throughout the Cosmos.

Wild: As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may steal the power of any ally (yours or your opponent's). Until the end of the encounter, you have the stolen power instead of your own, and the affected ally does not have the power.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: If you have a colony in the system of any player who wins the game, you may cause the win to be ignored. Instead, you win alone.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Plasma Thrusters: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Macron may send two ships into an encounter using Plasma Thrusters. Edited to fix the launch bug and the attack bug, to avoid implying that you can use this tech on defense only if you are defending one of "your" planets, and to add missing timing indicator. Link: [Corrected card]
Plasma Thrusters wrote:
Add One Ship. Once completed, this tech stays in play. While it is in play, as the offense or an ally, you may send one extra ship into each encounter (for a total of five, normally). As the defense, during the launch phase, you may move one ship to the targeted planet from any of your other colonies.
(6) (Main Player or Ally Only) (Launch) (Alliance)

:Poison: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Edited to make the incorrect prerequisite icon consistent with other similar powers and to address the MANDATORY/may use conflict. Links: [Corrected power]
Poison wrote:
Has Hazardous Home System (R) You have the power of Toxicity. Each time a card with a hazard warning is drawn from the destiny deck, use this power. Each foreign colony in your home system loses one ship to the warp.

In addition, as a main player, if both players reveal attack cards and your opponent's attack card value is within 2 of your attack card's value (such as an attack 04 and an attack 06), you may use this power to win the encounter, regardless of the actual totals.
({Varies}) (As Any Player) ({Mandatory}) (Varies) (Destiny) (Reveal)

Born from an ooze of chemicals that are highly toxic to all other life forms, the Poison are greatly feared for their ability to kill with a single touch. Those who visit their homeworlds must exercise extreme caution, as even the barest whiff of the atmosphere can prove fatal.

Wild: As the offense, after aiming the hyperspace gate at a planet, you may send one ship belonging to a player other than yourself on that planet to the warp.
(Offense Only) (Launch)

Super: You may use your power if you and your opponent reveal attack cards within 3 of each other, rather than 2.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Porcupine: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. House rule: Darth Thulhu recommends letting Porcupine use its power even when its side is not currently losing the encounter.
Porcupine wrote:
Discards Cards for Attack Power (Y) You have the power to Needle. As a main player or ally, if both players revealed attack cards and your side would lose the encounter, you may use this power to discard any number of cards from your hand. Then, add or subtract from your side's total an amount equal to the number of cards you discarded.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

Under no circumstance is meeting a Porcupine a pleasant experience. Although highly intelligent, these creatures declare vendettas with little or no provocation. They exhibit no sense of self-preservation when pursuing the target of their ill will. Rather than talking out their problems, they are more than happy to let their razor-sharp quills do all the talking for them.

Wild: As a main player, after both players reveal attack cards, you may reveal any number of cards in your hand. Then add one to your side's total for each card revealed, including this flare.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Super: When using your power, you may add three to your side's total instead of one for each card you discard.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:power loss: See alien powers.

:Precursor Seed: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Edited to eliminate the implication that a mandatory power can be treated as optional. Link: [Corrected card]
Precursor Seed wrote:
Gain Extra Power. When you complete this tech, draw an unused alien power at random. If the alien has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, discard it and draw again. While this tech is in play, you {may} use the extra alien power you have drawn in addition to your own.
(9) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Prometheus, The: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ clarification: Once The Prometheus is completed and in play, if the tech card is discarded (by Tech Scrambler, e.g.) then the Prometheus token is removed from play. It could subsequently re-enter play if the tech deck was reshuffled and that tech card was researched again. Value: The Prometheus is not "worth 4," but rather is "worth 1" (normally) and then adds 3 to your side's total. (If you are the Macron, then it is "worth 4" and adds 3 for a total of 7.) Even if encounter resolution is being affected by something like Anti-Matter or Virus, The Prometheus still counts as a regular ship and then you add 3 (rather than subtract or multiply). This would be a good tech to avoid researching if you are the Anti-Matter.
The Prometheus wrote:
Create New Ship. When you complete this tech, take the Prometheus token and place it on one of your colonies. While this tech is in play, you control the Prometheus, which is treated in all ways as one of your ships except that it adds an extra +3 to your side's total when it is involved in an encounter.
(7) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:Prophet: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unanswered question: When Prophet's prediction is not correct but there is no winner (failure to deal, Wild Loser, Morph vs. Morph, Meteor Storm, etc.), who selects which ships are sent to the warp? Edited to avoid implying that deals count as wins in general, to define how the free colony may be populated, to resolve the problem of Prophet being wrong when there is no winner to select his losing ships, and for correct terminology. Links: [Corrected power]
Prophet wrote:
Predicts Encounter Winner (R) You have the power to Predict. When you are not a main player or ally, you may use this power before encounter cards are selected to predict aloud which main player (offense or defense) will win. A deal counts as a win for this purpose. If you are correct, you gain a colony on any one planet of your choice with any number of ships taken from your colonies. If you are not correct, the winner selects any two of your ships and sends them to the warp. If there is no winner, this power has no effect.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Optional) (Planning)

Declaring themselves to be omniscient, the Prophets set forth into the promised vacuum of space to seek a new home in the interstellar wilderness. Are these Prophets false? Only the Eons will judge.

Wild: Before encounter cards are selected, you may play this flare and secretly predict whether one or two negotiate cards will be played. Conceal that many tokens in your hand to indicate your prediction. If your prediction is correct, each other player in the game must lose a ship of his or her choice to the warp. If you are wrong, give this flare to the player on your left.
(As Any Player) (Planning)

Super: You may predict after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Reveal)

:Psychic Switcheroo: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Trading powers: If an alien power specifies that it cannot be stolen, then it also cannot be traded, loaned, etc.; this and other related leaks have been patched on the relevant aliens (Horde, Pygmy, and Symbiote) by adding that they cannot be separated from their player color. The reference to the powers' special features going along with those powers should be considered a general rule (see facets of powers for more information). Edited to avoid implying that the switch is retroactive back to the start of the encounter.
Psychic Switcheroo wrote:
For the rest of this encounter, the two main players trade powers. This includes everything that goes with a power, such as the Miser's hoard, the Industrialist's stack, etc. After the end of the encounter, the main players trade back.

:Pygmy: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unzappable: The MANDATORY icon does not make sense here, since that icon applies to use clauses and Pygmy has none. Dave Hollingsworth proposed that such aliens should use the word CONTINUOUS instead, to avoid misrepresenting what the Optional/Mandatory icon actually means. Edited to define foreign colonies on Pygmy planets as being worth half only toward a game win and thus counting as full colonies for all other puposes (in order to clarify issues such as Prophet, Siren, Relic, or Winner needing to gain one foreign colony in Pygmy's system), to block power-trading and -lending effects like Changeling, Wild Philanthropist, Wild Sorcerer, and Psychic Switcheroo, and to prevent Wild Schizoid from violating the intent of the "power cannot be lost" clause. Link: [Corrected power]
Pygmy wrote:
Colonies Count as Half (G) Game Setup: Choose one unused player color and place the five extra planets of that color in your home system (four in a four-planet game). Place two of your ships on each of your home planets. Your player color is the color of your ships. Do not use this power unless you have an unused player color.

You have the power of Half. Each of your home worlds counts as only half of a foreign colony toward victory for all other players (rounding down). There can never be more than four ships on any of your planets (counting yours). When determining landing order, use the timing rules. This power cannot be zapped, lost, stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means.
{Requires Unused Player Color}
(As Any Player) (Continuous) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

When the Cosmos was young, the Pygmies were quite large, living on twin worlds, rich with valuable resources. A gravitational anomaly caused the two planets to collide, scattering the Pygmies among the ruined rubble of their former homes. With so little space to exist, each successive generation of the Pygmy race became physically smaller, but the desire to grow their empire never diminished. The inhospitable chunks of debris on which the Pygmies now live serve only as a staging ground for their invasion of other worlds.

Wild: When a player collects rewards, you may cause him or her to take only half as many rewards as usual (rounding down).
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Super: As the defense in your home system, if your opponent reveals an attack card, you may divide its value in half (rounded down).
(Defense Only) (Reveal)

:Qax, The: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. FAQ ruling: The Qax does not override Macron's limit of one ship in the encounter. FAQ Clarifications: If Amoeba is forced to ally by The Qax, he can then use Super Amoeba to escape. When The Qax is used and then given to another player, he is free to use it at his next opportunity; it does not have to be re-researched. Timing: This tech must be used when you are issuing an invitation, before you know whether the invitee would have accepted anyway; thus there is the possibility of "wasting" the tech. Edited to implement the FAQ ruling on Macron. Link: [Corrected card]
The Qax wrote:
Force Ally. Once completed, you may give this tech to another player when you invite him or her to ally with you. That player must ally with you and send 4 ships (or as many as possible up to 4), although he or she is not required to abandon any colonies in order to do so. That player may later give this tech to another player (including you), and so on.
(4) (Main Player Only) (Alliance)

:Quark Battery: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Edited to define what happens to the replaced card. Link: [Corrected card]
Quark Battery wrote:
Hide Encounter Card. When you complete this tech, place an encounter card from your hand facedown under it. This encounter card is not part of your hand and may not be looked at or taken by other players. Later, as a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may discard this tech to discard your revealed encounter card and replace it with the one under this tech.
(3) (Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Quartermaster: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Mike Anthony, Kevin Fox, and Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Quartermaster wrote:
Delivers Rewards (Y) You have the power to Supply. Whenever other player(s) should receive rewards, use this power. Those players announce how many rewards of each kind they will receive. You decide which colonies their ships return to. Then, you draw all of their cards together, look at them, and deliver the appropriate number to each player as you choose. If multiple sources are involved (e.g., the cosmic and reward decks), you must draw the cards as announced but may deliver them as you choose, as long as each player receives the correct number.

If you are due rewards as well, receive yours afterwards. Otherwise, when delivering the others' rewards you may either retrieve one of your ships from the warp, or draw one extra card from a deck those rewards came from, include that card in your delivery decisions, and keep whichever card is left over for yourself.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Quartermasters were first tasked with ordering supplies for other alien races. They soon found themselves handling transportation and military equipment for the entire Cosmos, taking on more and more responsibility. As time passed, the influence of the Quartermasters became more pronounced, until the line was blurred between who was giving the orders, and who was receiving them.

Wild: When a player gains cards as rewards, you may fulfill one or more of the required number with cards of your choice from your hand.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: If you are also due rewards when you use your power, you may mix your hand and your own reward draws together with the cards drawn for others. Deliver the others' rewards from this mix and keep what's left as your hand.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Quash: Artifact, base set, designed by Mayfair Games (as Breach).
Quash wrote:
Kills Deal. Play after a deal is made to cancel the deal. The dealing players suffer the penalties for a failed deal.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

:randomly: This word, used only on Dictator and Wild Oracle, is synonymous with the FFG convention "at random," and the Cosmodex revises those entries to use the latter phrase for consistency. See at random for a discussion of random selections and reward-back cards.

:Reactor: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Jack Reda, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unusual format: Reactor's flare has extra text below the Super effect. This mandatory text is always in effect, and following it does not count as playing the flare. Flares for extra aliens: When a game effect such as Alien Outpost, Wild Chrysalis, or Pentaform brings aliens into the game, Reactor puts their flares on his sheet. The extra aliens for Pentaform and Alien Outpost appear at game setup time, and Reactor's own Game Setup text requires taking all flares that match other players' aliens. Wild Chrysalis happens mid-game, but since it discards the flare to the unused flare deck discard pile (by default), then Reactor's last-paragraph use clause would apply. (This would not work, however, with mid-game effects that put their matching flares into a hand or the deck, such as Chrysalis and Wild Pentaform, since Reactor's final paragraph takes flares only when they are discarded.)
Reactor wrote:
Makes Aliens Super (R) Game Setup: Before flares are added to the deck, take the flares that match all other players' alien powers and place them faceup on this sheet. Cards on this sheet are not part of your hand. The other flares are shuffled into the deck as usual.

You have the power of Radiation. As an ally, if the main player on your side wins the encounter and his or her matching flare(s) are on this sheet, use this power to give that player his or her matching flare(s).

If neither main player invites you to ally and one of them loses the encounter, you may add the losing main player's matching flare(s) to your hand from this sheet, discard that player's matching flare(s) from your hand, or add your own matching flare(s) to your hand from this sheet.

When any player's matching flare is discarded by a player other than you, use this power to place that flare faceup on this sheet.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Originally an environmentally conscious race of peaceful activists, the Reactors sought to turn themselves into a source of sustainable energy. Yet the awesome power of Cosmic radiation and its mutating properties transformed the Reactors into radioactive freaks, eager to spread their sickness to other power-hungry cultures.

Wild: As the winning defense, you may establish one colony on any foreign planet. Give this flare to the Reactor after use (or discard it, if the Reactor isn't playing).
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: If your side wins an encounter and you have no other flares in your hand or on your sheet, you may use this flare to win the game.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

If at any time you play any other super flare and the Reactor is playing, you must give him or her this flare.

:Rebirth: Artifact, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Future Pastimes. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Rebirth edict limited you to placing tokens on just one home planet.
Rebirth wrote:
Regains Home Colonies. Play at the start of any encounter and choose a player (even yourself). That player may place one or more of his or her ships, from his or her colonies, onto any planet(s) in his or her home system.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Reborn: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Mayfair Games, expanded by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Formerly known as Grief in the Mayfair edition. Retooled gameplay: Reborn's first paragraph is identical to Grief; the second paragraph is new. Edited to clarify that Reborn and Wild Reborn draw cards from the cosmic deck.
Reborn wrote:
Filters Hand of Cards (G) You have the power of Rebirth. For each ship you lose to the warp, you may use this power to draw a card from the deck.

For each ship you retrieve from the warp, you may use this power to discard a card of your choice from your hand.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Reborn were once a vibrant, happy race spreading across the Cosmos. But then, one of their scientists discovered a fateful technology that allowed the older members of the race to transfer their consciousness into the bodies of their offspring. Although this allowed them to preserve the memories and skills of their wiser members, the chance to cheat death was ultimately too tempting for the Reborn, who have since become a ghoulish race of nearly immortal beings living on in their children's bodies.

Wild: During any regroup phase, if the offense retrieves a ship from the warp, you may draw a card from the deck.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

Super: During your regroup phase, you may discard cards from your hand to retrieve your ships from the warp on a 1-for-1 basis.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

:recurrent flare bug: Several flares use wordings that imply that their game effect can happen more than once during the encounter, or that it recurs every time the appropriate situation comes up. In actual practice under Eon, those wordings were not a problem because there was no limit on the number of flares that could be played or the number of times each flare could be used. But in FFG's one-flare-per-encounter model, these old templates are misleading (and inconsistent with other flares). The Cosmodex revises these flares to use non-recurrent language, typically by deleting "each of," "every," and "always" (Super Kamikaze, Wild and Super Machine, Super Masochist, Super Miser, Wild Symbiote), by changing "each time" and "whenever" to just "when" (Super Cudgel, Wild Extortionist, Wild and Super Lightning, Wild Mind, Wild Reserve, Super Sapient, Wild and Super Tick-Tock, Wild Zombie), and by singularizing plurals and implied plurals (Wild Clone, Super Leviathan, Super Tripler).

:Reincarnator: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Errata: Wild Reincarnator reflects official FAQ errata (shown in blue). Retooled gameplay: Eon's Reincarnator drew a new power "just before the next challenge," whereas FFG's happens immediately upon losing (or perhaps at the end of the resolution phase). Eon's version caused Plant and Insect to copy only the secondary power; FFG's is written more generically for all copying powers, and requires them to copy the Reincarnator as well as the secondary power. Eon's Wild Reincarnator was completely different; it forced all players to unconditionally reincarnate and remained in the player's hand for re-use as often as once per challenge. Edited to fix the main player bug in the power, Wild, and Super texts, to fix the "copying" provisions to work with game effects like Plant that steal rather than copy, and to accommodate Wild Plant by expanding the provisions to all game effects (not just aliens). Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Reincarnator (based on FAQ errata) wrote:
Uses Powers Not in Game (Y) You have the power of Reincarnation. As a main player or ally, when your side loses an encounter (or you fail to deal), use this power to reincarnate. Draw an unused alien power at random and become that alien. If the alien has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, discard it and draw again. If your side loses or you fail to deal again, discard that alien and reincarnate again. This power stays with you while you use the others. Players that copy or steal your power use both your Reincarnator power and whatever power you are reincarnated as. If while doing so their side loses an encounter or they fail to deal, they must reincarnate, losing their original power.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Having conquered the fear of death, the Reincarnators rejoice with the passing of each of their kind. Feeling kinship with all life forms, they know that those who die will soon be born again in an endless cycle.

Wild: After another player who is not the Reincarnator is on the losing side of an encounter or fails to make a deal, you may give this flare to that player {to force him or her to}. Immediately after the end of this encounter, that player must discard his or her current alien power and draw an unused one at random. If the alien has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, the player must discard it and draw again.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Super: You don't have to reincarnate when your side loses or you fail to deal.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

:reinforcement cards: Card type; base set, Cosmic Incursion, Cosmic Alliance, and Cosmic Dominion; initially designed by Mayfair Games; Reinforcement +X designed by the fans. FAQ clarification: Reinforcements may be played even if one or both players reveal negotiate cards, because reinforcements add to a player's total, not his attack card. Noteworthy interactions: Reserve may play low attacks as reinforcements, and may use negotiate cards to cancel reinforcements. Wild Mouth and Wild Reserve may salvage discarded reinforcements. Values: +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +8, and +X. See also card distribution.
Reinforcements wrote:
Reinforcement +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +8 Adds to either side's total. Play after encounter cards are revealed.

Reinforcement +X X = the total number of ships on either side (your choice). Adds to either side's total. Play after encounter cards are revealed.

all reinforcements
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Relic: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. New hand: Having your hand scrambled by something like Trader, Wild Oracle, Cosmic Upheaval, or a cosmic quake is not "drawing a new hand" and thus does not trigger Relic's power. Unanswered questions: How many ships can Relic place on his free colony? Where can he take them from? When does Relic's power trigger if Wild Cavalry is in effect? Does Cryo picking up his cold storage count as "drawing a new hand"? Edited to define how the free colony may be populated, and to fix Wild Relic so it does not require all of the retrieved ships to go to the same planet. Links: [Corrected flare]
Relic wrote:
Gains Power from New Hands (R) You have the power to Awaken. Any time another player draws a new hand of cards (after his or her starting hand), use this power to immediately gain a free foreign colony in his or her home system on a planet of your choice with any number of ships taken from your colonies.

Any time you draw a new hand of cards (after your starting hand), use this power to retrieve all of your ships from the warp, returning them to your colonies.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Eons ago, a warlike race of machines swept across the Cosmos, conquering one planet after another. However, before they could complete their terrible goal, they began to shut down, seeking refuge in hidden caves and beneath murky seas on countless worlds. Now, these machines have begun to awaken once more, ready to continue their ancient dreams of Cosmic domination.

Wild: When retrieving one or more ships from the warp, you may return some or all of them to any one of your home planets, even if you currently have no ships on that planet.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: At the start of any player's turn, you may choose any player other than yourself. That player chooses and discards one card from his or her hand.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)

:Remora: Alien power, base set, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Reward deck: The phrase "the deck" refers to the cosmic deck unless the reward deck is also mentioned, and thus Remora would not activate when another player draws from the reward deck. Some players house rule Remora to work that way, but there is no general rule that all references to "the deck" automatically include the reward deck. Weak flare: Wild Remora may be an unintentional victim of this version's once-per-encounter flare timing. Edited to clarify that the power does not restrict other forms of ship retrieval.
Remora wrote:
Gets Cards or Ships with Others (Y) You have the power to Cling. Whenever another player retrieves one or more ships from the warp, you may use this power to retrieve one of your ships from the warp as well. You may not use this power to retrieve a ship during the same encounter in which it went to the warp.

Whenever another player draws one or more cards from the deck, you may use this power to draw one card from the deck as well.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Universe's original tag-alongs, the Remoras first reached space as the valued servants of the dominant race on their homeworld. Seldom accomplishing anything for themselves, the Remoras simply make themselves useful to others and then ride their coat-tails to victory. Although other races might chide them for a lack of drive, the Remoras simply wonder why they should give up a good thing.

Wild: When another player uses a super or wild flare, you may draw a card from the deck.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When another player gains a colony, you may either draw a card from the deck or retrieve a ship from the warp. If multiple players gain colonies at once, draw a card or retrieve a ship for each.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Remote: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Fungus: If Remote turns a fungoid stack into a remote, the entire stack sits on the Remote alien sheet until activated. In this way Remote could potentially keep a large number of ships out of circulation. Macron still sends only one ship. Power changing hands: If Remote comes under the control of a different player (e.g., due to Changeling, Wild Sorcerer, etc.), its new owner could have ships of his own color on the sheet. Although the text forbids using a remote of the opposing main player, it does not forbid using one of your own (which is fortunate, since otherwise you would not be able to get your ships back). In this case, you would have the ability to ally with yourself, in much the same way that Lunatic allies against himself. Noteworthy interaction: Remote is essentially reduced to a non-power by Healer. (The Cosmodex recommends using a house rule to prevent Healer from healing ships that are removed from the game.) Historical note: Remote appears to be a merged replacement for both Crystal and Magnet, with a little bit of Fungus mixed in. Edited to resolve the four-ship compulsion with effects like Macron. Links: [Crystal] [Magnet]
Remote wrote:
Forces Others to Ally (R) You have the power to Control. As a main player, after you win an encounter, you may use this power to turn one ship in the encounter belonging to one opposing player into a remote. To turn the ship into a remote, remove the ship from the game and place it on this sheet.

As a main player, after allies are invited but before alliances are formed, you may use this power to activate one or more of your remotes. Send each activated remote to the warp. Then, the players who own the activated remotes are forced to ally with you for this encounter and must each send four ships (or as many as possible up to four). A player must send all of his or her ships if he or she has fewer than four. A controlled player must abandon home and/or foreign colonies to send the requisite {four} number of ships, if necessary. You cannot activate a remote belonging to the opposing main player during an encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance) (Resolution)

Evolving from a potato-like creature, the Remotes are both lazy and frightened of suffering personal harm. Why do their own fighting, they figure, when they can just use their mind control technology to get others to do it for them?

Wild: As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may force each of your allies to add one extra ship to the encounter, if able. However, they are not required to abandon colonies to do so. Your allies may exceed four ships in the encounter as a result of this flare.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: When using your power, you may turn a ship belonging to each opposing player into a remote, not just one opposing player.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:removed from the game: Several game effects can remove a variety of components from the game: cards (Mouth, Sargasso Web), planets (Ace, Entropy Beast, Wild Guerrilla, Locust, Wild Locust, Omega Missile), ships (Ace, Black Hole, Wild Fury, Wild Guerrilla, Wild Horde, Lizard, Super Masochist, Omni-Zap, Remote, Void), alien sheets (Reincarnator, Wild Reincarnator, Chrysalis, Wild Chrysalis [implied], Wild Pentaform), and even tokens (Swindler). (Note that the effects which remove alien sheets from the game usually say to "discard" them.) Permanence: In general,"RFG'd" components are placed back in the box and will not be a factor for the rest of the game. However, they are not always untouchable. Ship Zap and Super Symbiote can recover RFG'd ships and bring them back into play. Remote removes ships from the game (apparently as an alternative to defining them as captured) but continues to use them, and they can still be rescued by the recovery effects. Similarly, Locust RFGs planets but keeps them on his sheet to count toward victory. Game effects that RFG any flares that were drawn from the unused flare deck (Alien Outpost, Aristocrat, Chrysalis, Host, Pentaform) are considered to discard those cards to the unused flare deck discard pile, where an effect such as Alchemist or Reactor might access them. Thus, we should perhaps understand "removed from the game" to mean something like removed from its normal active state, but not necessarily gone for good.

:Reserve: Alien power, base set, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Noteworthy interaction: Reserve is one of the few aliens that manipulates encounter totals but is not perturbed when facing Anti-Matter, because Reserve's faux reinforcement cards can be played to increase Anti-Matter's total. Weak flare: Wild Reserve may be an unintentional victim of this version's once-per-encounter flare timing. Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Reserve could not apply to attack cards lower than –06, so it would not have been able to use the attack –07 as a reinforcement card. Mayfair's Wild Reserve was completely different; it allowed the retrieval of all reinforcement cards played during the encounter. Mayfair's Super Reserve was significantly stronger, allowing any one attack card to be played as a reinforcement. Name collision: Reserve and Cavalry, under FFG, both have "the power to Reinforce." As this is believed to be the result of a transcription error, the Cosmodex restores Mayfair's original "power to Augment." Edited to eliminate the name collision and to clarify that Super Reserve allows only one attack 07, 08, or 09 to be played.
Reserve wrote:
Can Use Attacks as Reinforcements (G) You have the power to {Reinforce} Augment. As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may use this power to play one or more attack cards of 06 or less from your hand as if they were reinforcement cards of their listed value.

As a main player or ally, when another player plays a reinforcement card, you may use this power and discard a negotiate card to cancel and discard that reinforcement card.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Reveal)

The Reserves became the dominant species on their homeworld by waiting for other beings to wear each other out and then arriving with timely force to deliver a knockout punch. Showing the effective use of timing, the Reserves call in extra strength just when they need it most.

Wild: When another player discards a reinforcement card (whether after playing it or not), you may take it and add it to your hand. Reinforcement cards you play are discarded as usual.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: You may use your power to play any one attack card of 09 or lower as a reinforcement card.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Retreat: Card type, encounter card, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans. There are two Retreat cards in the Cosmic Dominion reward deck, and Joker has a retreat token. See also card distribution.
Retreat wrote:
Opposed by Attack: You lose the encounter, but all players on your side return their ships to any of their colonies, instead of the warp. If you are the defense, your ships remain on the planet.
Opposed by anything else: Becomes a Negotiate (players attempt to deal).

:reverse cone: Eon's Expansion Set 9 introduced a "reverse hyperspace cone" mechanic. One of each player's destiny discs was permanently marked with a special decal, and when that disc was turned up for destiny it flipped the hyperspace "cone" over to its photographically negative back side. This caused the outcome for all successful allies to be "reversed": winning offensive allies earn rewards, or winning defensive allies gain a base (colony) on the targeted planet. This game effect has been implemented in Cosmic Conflict via the Reverse Rewards hazard. The powers and cards which refer to "defender rewards" and "defensive ally rewards" therefore create a bit of ambiguity. Because (a) the redundant defender/defensive ally modifiers are as unnecessary as they are inconsistent, and (b) there exist several powers and flares which earn a player rewards when he is not a defensive ally, the Cosmodex strikes out these useless and confusing modifiers. (Note also that Mercenary is no longer "Always Rewarded for Winning" because the power text needlessly limits Mercenary to being a main player or offensive ally.)

:Reverse Rewards: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Reverse Rewards wrote:
Defensive allies receive a colony if their side wins this encounter, while offensive allies receive rewards if their side wins this encounter.

:reward deck: The reward deck is an optional deck of cards provided by both the Cosmic Incursion and Cosmic Dominion expansion sets. The Cosmic Incursion reward deck contains 32 cards: 11 attacks, 3 Negotiate (Crooked Deal) cards, 1 morph, 4 kickers, 4 reinforcements, 5 artifacts, and 4 rifts. The Cosmic Dominion version also contains 32 cards: 5 variable attacks, 4 different special negotiates, 1 morph, 2 retreats, 4 intimidates, 5 kickers, 2 reinforcements, 5 artifacts, and 4 rifts. (See also card distribution.) The cards in the second reward deck generally build upon the concepts in the first, adding unique effects to many of the individual cards. Either reward deck may be used individually, or both may be shuffled together into a single 64-card reward deck. Access: The reward deck is accessed only in the context of collecting rewards; players may take card rewards from the reward deck instead of the cosmic deck, or may mix and match. Although not spelled out in the rules, it is clear that game effects which reference "the deck" must be interpreted as meaning only "the cosmic deck." Thus, things like Remora and Wild Mind do not work when players are drawing cards from the reward deck. Reward deck discard pile: Based on the Cosmic Incursion rulebook and comments from playtesters, the general rule for handling this discard pile appears to be as follows: nothing that targets the regular discard pile or the cards in it gets to target the reward deck discard pile or its cards, with one exception: game effects that target cards that should be discarded, are in the process of being discarded, or have just been discarded do work on cards going to the reward deck discard pile. Things that happen later, as a separate action not specifically responding to the act of discarding, cannot retrieve cards from that pile, but there is a small window of opportunity after the cards are freshly discarded where they may be immediately retrieved. Fido, Filch, Vulch, and Wild Reserve, then, are able to recover cards from the reward deck discard pile since they happen immediately when the card is discarded. However, Wild Chronos, Wild Cyborg, Delta Scanners, Wild Fido, Classic Edition Wild Filch, and Space Junk do not target cards that have just been discarded, so they would not have access to the reward deck discard pile (and Wild Filch can't steal from the reward deck, either). Card backs: Rifts are intended to be a risk/punishment for actively targeting reward-back cards when taking cards from someone else. The player taking the cards is allowed to see which card backs he is selecting; so when something specifies that cards are taken, discarded, etc. "at random," this really means "without seeing the faces of the cards."

:rewards bug: Rewards are specified inconsistently. Wild Barbarian, Macron, Super Mercenary, and Wild Pygmy all say just "rewards" (which is perfectly adequate, is concise, and avoids problems). Wild Bandit, Wild Empath, Ghoul, Wild Ghoul, Wild Glutton, Lunatic, Wild Lunatic, Mercenary, Wild Mercenary, and Super Siren say "defender rewards." Extortionist says "defensive rewards." Ionic Gas says "defensive ally rewards." These latter examples, aside from being inconsistent and unnecessarily verbose, are also potentially confusing with the Reverse Rewards hazard, so the Cosmodex standardizes them to just say "rewards." In addition, Ghoul, Wild Ghoul, and Mercenary (but oddly not Wild Mercenary) add redundant text that partially explains what rewards are. Curiously, these additions omit any mention of the reward deck, even though it debuted in the same expansion set as those powers. These sporadic "copies of rules on cards" are similarly struck out for their inconsistency, inaccuracy, and redundancy.

:rift cards: Card type, Cosmic Incursion and Cosmic Dominion, designed by Fantasy Flight Games and the fans. Values: 1 through 3 in Cosmic Dominion; 3 through 5 in Cosmic Incursion. See also card distribution. Clarification: When a rift is used to release another player's ships from the warp, that player chooses which colonies to place his ships on. Taking vs. giving: It is not always obvious whether a particular game effect is "taking" cards where a rift is concerned; see rift detonation for more discussion. Edited to implement Kevin Wilson's clarification on who places released ships. Link: [Kevin Wilson on rifts]
rifts wrote:
Rift 1 Play at the start of one of your encounters and choose any player (even yourself). That player establishes one colony on any planet that has no colonies, using any number of his or her ships from other colonies.

If another player takes this card from you, he or she abandons one colony of his or her choice (returning ships to his or her other colonies), then discards this card.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

Rift 2 Play at the start of one of your encounters and choose any player (even yourself). That player draws two cards from the cosmic and/or reward deck.

If another player takes this card from you, after all cards are taken he or she discards this card and you discard two cards at random from his or her hand.
(Offense Only) (Regroup)

Rift 3, Rift 4, Rift 5 Play at the start of any encounter to release [three/four/five] ships of your choice belonging to any player(s) from the warp. These ships return to any colonies of their owners' choice.

If another player takes this card from you, he or she loses [three/four/five] ships of his or her choice to the warp, then discards this card.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:rift detonation: The Cosmic Incursion rules do not clearly define "taking" cards for the purposes of rift detonation. The Cosmodex has analyzed the relevant game effects and believes the following can be used to make consistent determinations:

A rift detonates if
• it comes from another player and
• you receive it to keep and
• you are specifically "taking" the card or it was your action that caused you to receive it.

A rift does not detonate if
• it doesn't come from another player or
• you don't keep it or
• it wasn't your "fault" that it came into your possession and nothing defined that you were "taking" it.

If a game effect says you are taking a card, then of course you are taking a card. But sometimes you are still taking a card even if that specific word isn't used. For example, compensation is always understood to be taking cards; even though it's not always your intention to play a negotiate or to gain compensation, you are still taking compensation nonetheless. As another example, when Trader trades hands, he is giving his hand to (say) Macron and taking Macron's hand, so rifts in Trader's new hand would denotate. Macron is losing his hand to Trader and receiving Trader's hand, so rifts in Macron's new hand would not detonate (Macron is not actively taking cards, just receiving them). This interpretation is based on the understanding that Trader's part is voluntary and Macron's part is involuntary, helping us to align the outcome to the (presumed) intent.

Applying these principles results in the following specific outcomes:

Rifts do not detonate...
• When touched via Wild Vulch if you discard rather than keep them.
• When touched via Wild Industrialist.
• When acquired via Wild Chronos or Super Mite (you took them from the discard pile, not from a player). [Although in the case of Super Mite, exactly where you took them from is debatable!]
• When you are forced to discard one via Wild Hate.
• When collected as compensation if you use Wild Barbarian to discard them.
• When given to you by Philanthropist, Wild Ethic, Patriot, or Wild Trader.
• When you receive them because of Trader giving you his hand.

Rifts do detonate...
• When collected as compensation, even if you had no choice in card selection because you had to take every card in the player's hand (you are still taking compensation).
• When taken by Mutant, Wild Mutant, Outlaw, Wild Trader, or Barbarian (Wild Barbarian does not apply in these cases).
• When acquired by Trader taking another player's hand.

Rifts get messy...
• When randomized during an exchange such as by you using Wild Oracle.
— None detonate for your opponent (you are explicitly "giving" cards to him).
— If you take any rifts of a value that you didn't have before, they all detonate.
— If you end up with more rifts of a particular value than you had before (i.e., having both Rift 4 cards when you started with only one of them), the extra one detonates.
— If each player started with one of the Rift 4 cards and both players ended up with one of them, you should just assume that they did not trade hands since there's no way to prove otherwise.

:Roach: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Roach wrote:
Spawns Additional Ships (R) Game Setup: Choose one unused player color and place the 20 ships of that color on this sheet (16 if you are playing with four planets per player). Ships of this color are your roach ships. When not on this sheet, roach ships function as normal ships in every way. Do not use this power unless you have an unused player color.

You have the power to Breed. When you are determined to be the defense during another player's turn, you may use this power to place up to four ships from this sheet among the planets in your home system, including planets where you have no current colony.

During your regroup phase, you may use this power to place up to four ships from this sheet among your colonies outside of your home system.

Whenever a roach ship would be sent to the warp, it is placed on this sheet instead.

This power cannot be stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means. You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Regroup) (Destiny)

The Roaches tend to scurry, scamper, and outnumber their enemies into submission. Wherever you see one, there are bound to be more. In fact, in the vast sprawling cities of Nova Yorkk, locals say you are never more than two meters from a Roach at any time.

Wild: After gaining a colony as a winning ally, you may add up to four of your ships from the warp to the newly established colony.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: After establishing a colony as the offense or an ally, you may remove up to four ships from your sheet and add them to any of your colonies in any system.
(Offense or Ally Only) (Resolution)
******** REMINDER! ******** DO NOT QUOTE THE ENTIRE POST! ******** Be courteous to others; limit your quotation to just the text you need.
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Cosmic Encounter » Forums » Rules
Re: The Cosmodex: An Encyclopedia for Cosmic Encounter
VOLUME IV: S–Z

:Saboteur: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, significantly revised by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Saboteur has 24 saboteur tokens; 8 are "trap" tokens and the rest are decoys. Formerly known as Terrorist in the Eon and Mayfair editions. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Terrorist allowed the player to hide five "bombs" anywhere, requiring pencil and paper for keeping track. FFG's brilliant token-based reinterpretation gets rid of the pencil and paper and is more interactive and engaging via the start-of-encounter swap mechanism. Terrorist allowed more than one bomb on the same planet concurrently (with only one blowing up at a time), whereas Saboteur specifically prohibits multiples. Eon's Super Terrorist was completely different; it allowed the planting of one additional bomb each turn. Edited to fix the "shared colony" reference (there is no such thing).
Saboteur wrote:
Booby Traps Planets (R) Game Setup: Take one trap token and two decoy tokens per player (including yourself). Place these tokens facedown next to any planets of your choice. Place no more than one token next to a given planet.

You have the power to Booby Trap. Any time ships land on a planet with one of your tokens next to it, use this power to reveal the token. If the revealed token is a decoy, return the token to this sheet. If the token is a trap, send all ships on the planet (including those that just landed) to the warp and then return the token to this sheet.

At the start of each encounter, you may either swap any two of your tokens (whether next to a planet or on this sheet) or take a token on this sheet and place it facedown next to any planet that doesn't already have one of your tokens next to it.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Long demented by the magnetic unbalance of their own planet, the Saboteurs can see no way but their own and are determined to achieve it by violence.

Wild: As a main player, if you coexist on a planet with your opponent, you may declare your opponent's ships on one such planet hostage before encounter cards are selected. If you lose the encounter or fail to deal, the hostage ships immediately go to the warp. Hostage ships may not be removed from the colony until the encounter is ended, other than as part of a deal, regardless of other game effects.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

Super: After revealing a decoy token, you may discard a negotiate card from your hand to treat the decoy as though it were a trap token.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Sadist: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Christopher Oliveira, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unanswered question: With Wild Sadist, how do we determine who exactly is "sending" ships to the warp in every possible situation? Noteworthy interactions: Sadist is essentially rendered a non-power by a single use of Mobius Tubes if it isn't zapped, and is perhaps just as vulnerable to Rifts which, although they generally target fewer ships, have no counter-card. Edited for wording consistency and clarity.
Sadist wrote:
Wins by Killing Others' Ships (R) You have the power to Inflict Pain. At the start of any regroup phase (before the offense retrieves a ship from the warp), use this power to win the game if all other players have lost at least eight ships each. Lost ships include ships in the warp, ships removed from the game, and ships captured by other players.

You may still win the game via the normal method.
Do not use with Zombie or Healer
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Regroup)

A civilization that glorifies pain and pleasure in primal, brutal rituals, the Sadists barely manage to keep their own race alive. Desiring to spread their brand of worship across the Universe, these being enter the Cosmos with peering eyes, blood on their hands, and the desire to kill as many living things as possible.

Wild: When you send another player's ships to the warp, you may draw one card from the deck for each player who lost ships to you.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: At the start of any encounter, you may choose a player with at least one ship in the warp ({including} even yourself) and any other player. The first player retrieves a ship from the warp, then the other player sends one of his or her ships (his or her choice) to the warp.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:Salvage Vessel: One of the Special Ships variants listed on the Cosmic Dominion rulesheet.

:Sapient: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Cosmic Encounter Online, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Edited for compatibility with the Super flare timing by hinting a bit more that Sapient's token accrual can happen during the resolution phase (instead of reveal, when wins and losses are determined).
Sapient wrote:
Adds Wisdom Points (G) You have the power of Wisdom. After you win an encounter as an ally, place one token on this sheet. After you lose an encounter as an ally, place a number of tokens equal to the number of your ships involved in the encounter on this sheet. In either case, add one extra token if playing with four planets per player.

As an ally, after the main players reveal attack cards during an encounter, use this power to add 1 to your side's total for each token on this sheet. Doing so does not cause you to discard tokens.
(Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Brewed in the cauldron of a gorgeous planet circling a robust star in a spectacular galaxy, the Sapient culture became dominated by those who combined beauty with brilliance. Now they turn their alluring essence outward, secure in the knowledge that all life forms will desire them as allies.

Wild: As an ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may add 1 to your side's total for each home colony you have.
(Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: When you add tokens to your sheet, you may add twice as many tokens as usual.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Sargasso Web: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games.
Sargasso Web wrote:
During this encounter, any cards played (including encounter cards, flares, artifacts, etc.) are removed from the game after taking effect.

:Scavenger: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Andrew Olson. Edited to avoid shuffling reward-back cards into the cosmic deck, and to clarify that the Super flare works only after losing a colony, not after placing discarded cards on your sheet.
Scavenger wrote:
Searches Discard Pile (Y) You have the power to Scavenge. Whenever you lose a colony, you may use this power to search the discard pile, take one card of your choice, and add it to your hand.

Whenever you would place one or more cards in the cosmic deck discard pile, you must instead place those cards faceup on this sheet. Cards on this sheet are not part of your hand. These cards are added to the discard pile whenever it is reshuffled to form a new deck.

You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Few races are as resourceful as the Scavengers, a species renowned for recycling, re-using, and at times re-eating virtually anything they come across. Their gear is often cobbled together from the remnants of discarded tech from other races, augmented with seemingly random features or customization.

Wild: When you lose a colony, you may draw three cards from the deck. Add one of the cards to your hand. Discard the other two.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: After using using your power, you may look at one player's hand and take one card of your choice.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Schizoid: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Schizoid has 6 schizoid cards. Switching home systems: Wild Schizoid's system-switching effect breaks the alien powers that are not supposed to be stolen (Horde, Pygmy, Symbiote). However, rather than adding a clunky patch to the flare card, this leak is best addressed by revising those alien powers' protection statements to be more comprehensive: "This power cannot be... stolen, copied, or separated from your player color." Wild Schizoid vs. Fungus: When Wild Schizoid transfers fungoid stacks to a new player, each stack remains together (until lost to the warp) but counts as only a single ship because the new owner does not have the Fungus' power. Retooled gameplay: \\\Under\\\Construction\\\. Edited to require Schizoid to announce winners, to avoid the problem that when a player zaps the Schizoid to win, any other joint-winners would technically lose, and to correct Super Schizoid's timing icon. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Schizoid wrote:
Changes Goal of Game (R) Game Setup: Take the six schizoid cards, choose one of them, and place it facedown on this sheet. Place the other five facedown as a deck near this sheet.

You have the power to Alter Reality. The facedown schizoid card on this sheet lists the victory conditions players must fulfill in order to win the game. These conditions replace the normal victory condition of accumulating enough foreign colonies to win, and you must announce when any player(s) have fulfilled them. Alternate victory conditions (such as those of the Masochist or Tick-Tock) are not affected by this power. Any player who has completed the normal victory condition may play a Cosmic Zap on you at any time {to win the game}.

Each time you are on the losing side of an encounter, the winning main player chooses a card from the schizoid deck at random and reveals it to the winner(s) of the encounter. Then, shuffle the chosen card back into the deck.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Long ago their system slipped into a cascading series of alternate spacetimes. Now the Schizoids believe that universal acceptance of their current reality will end their madness.

Wild: After the end of any encounter, you may switch home systems (and therefore player colors) with any other player of your choice. Afterwards, discard this flare.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Super: At the end of your turn, you may choose a card from your unused schizoid deck and swap it with the schizoid card on your sheet, as long as this does not give any player an immediate win.
(Offense Only) ({Special}) (Resolution)

Classic Edition
Wild: After the end of any encounter, you may switch home systems (and therefore player colors) with any other player of your choice. Afterwards, discard this flare.
(As Any Player) (Resolution)

Super: If this flare is in your starting hand, reveal it and write a victory condition down instead of choosing a schizoid card. The condition must (1) be possible for all players to meet, (2) be clear to all as it happens, (3) not require remembering past events, and (4) require at least 3 foreign colonies. If this flare leaves your hand, reveal your written victory condition to all players.
(As Any Player) (Game Setup)
SFkStartingHands

:schizoid cards: Cosmic Alliance provides six different cards from which Schizoid can choose to establish the game's victory conditions. Edited for wording consistency.
schizoid cards wrote:
Bluffer To win the game, a player must have at least 4 foreign colonies
and then fail to make a deal.

Colonizer To win the game, a player must have at least 3 foreign colonies
and then draw a new hand.

Diplomat To win the game, a player must have at least 3 foreign colonies
and then make a deal.

Invader To win the game, a player must have at least 3 foreign colonies
with 4 or more ships on each.

Relocator To win the game, a player must have at least 3 foreign colonies
in the same system.

Xenophobe To win the game, a player must have at least 3 foreign colonies
and then re-establish a home colony on a home planet he or she has lost.

:Seeker: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Intent: It is legal for Seeker to ask about a player's intent to win or lose the encounter, but of course this can be difficult to verify. Timing: Seeker's timing window is unusual and unnecessarily complex, and its two timing indicators are essentially redundant with each other. Some alien powers act "after alliances are formed" in the Alliance phase, and others act "before encounter cards are selected" in the Planning phase, but Seeker is the only power which redundantly specifies both of those adjacent timing windows. Either one by itself would have been sufficient, and more consistent with the other powers. Given the existence of both timing icons on the sheet, it is puzzling and unfortunate that the power doesn't allow Seeker to operate before alliances as the original Eon version did. Considering the number of similar kinds of mistakes in this edition, there is an implication here that an earlier design stage of the power may have in fact worked as Eon intended it to, and was then unintentionally nerfed at editing time. Unanswered question: Does the requirement for the questioned player to "abide by his or her answer" prevent that player from initiating voluntary actions that would prevent this? Retooled gameplay: Eon Seeker could ask a question "any time before cards are played." FFG Seeker is significantly weaker since it has to wait until "after alliances are formed," so unfortunately it cannot use the question to influence alliances. Eon's Seeker also placed no duration on the effect of the question, which allowed locking players into game-long commitments; FFG wisely limits each question's binding effect to the current encounter. Eon's Wild Seeker is not explicitly limited to one main player per encounter. Edited to clarify that Wild Seeker can wait until after invitations from both players.
Seeker wrote:
Asks "Yes or No" Question (Y) You have the power of Truth. As a main player or ally, after alliances are formed but before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to ask one "yes or no" question of one of the main players (your opponent, if you are a main player). That player must answer your question truthfully. If your question involves the player's intentions during this encounter (such as "Are you going to play a negotiate this encounter?"), he or she must decide now and abide by his or her answer. Once this encounter ends, the player is no longer bound by his or her answer.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Alliance) (Planning)

Evolving during an intense struggle between more developed species, the Seekers gained ecological room only by acute sensitivity to their opponent's disposition. Always probing, they closely evaluate what is known. Lately, Seekers have turned searching eyes upon the Cosmos.

Wild: After allies are invited, you may choose one player who invited you and demand to see the encounter card he or she intends to play. If you ally with that player, he or she must play that card, if possible. You may demand to see only one player's encounter card per encounter.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)

Super: When using your power, you may ask any question, not just a "yes or no" question. The player you ask must still answer it truthfully.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Alliance) (Planning)

:set aside: Some game effects set cards aside for a short period of time, typically to protect them from being discarded or taken (Wild Cryo, Wild Miser, Wild Voyager), to block their use (Laser, Wild Laser), to save them for re-use (Chronos, Wild Machine), or for other reasons (Wild Doppelganger, Merchant). A few other effects briefly place cards on the table only long enough for a random selection or some mixing, then immediately pick them back up again (Magician, Wild Magician, Whirligig, Wild Whirligig). Up or down? Set-aside cards maintain their anonymity, if they had it. Those that were already visible to all players will remain face-up (e.g., the encounter card revealed by Chronos' opponent, or a played flare such as Wild Machine that sets itself aside). Those that were not already visible to all will remain face-down. Thus, a played Wild Cryo flare card is set aside face-up while the other cards it protects are set aside face-down. No peeking: Face-down cards may not be inspected by anyone other than their owner unless a particular game effect allows it. (See Tourist for a discussion of which of these cards its wild flare can and cannot peek at.) Of course the owner of a card may not inspect it while making a random choice involving that card.

:Shadow: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes (as Assassin), illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: If the offense draws more than one destiny card, Shadow may execute one ship for each. Rulebook error: The rules state that Shadow can cause the loss of a ship that is researching a tech card, but this is impossible since the power says "choose one of that player's ships from any colony." Formerly known as Assassin in the Eon and Mayfair editions. Retooled gameplay: FFG's Shadow adds text to define how it works with wild and special destiny cards (which did not exist in Eon). Eon's Wild Assassin did not require sending a ship to the warp to use the effect. Edited to fix the attack bug and to prevent Wild Shadow from incorrectly referring to a planet that may not be yours as "your planet," as well as to avoid problems with effects like Winner and (perhaps someday) moons.
Shadow wrote:
Removes Others' Ships (Y) You have the power to Execute. Whenever any other player's color or a special destiny card that targets another player is drawn from the destiny deck, use this power to choose one of that player's ships from any colony of your choice and send it to the warp. On a wild destiny card, you may execute one ship belonging to any other player regardless of who the offense chooses to encounter.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Destiny)

After being subjected to colonial domination for thousands of years, a hive of Shadows rose up on an outpost planet in a forgotten empire. Devoted to guerilla warfare and adept at choosing the most isolated and vulnerable targets as their victims, they mercilessly cleansed their sector of its overlords. Having become imperialists themselves, however, they now have new uses for their old talents.

Wild: As the defense, when you lose an encounter in which your opponent played an attack card, you may send one of your ships not in the encounter to the warp to take all opposing ships to the warp with you. In spite of winning, {the opposing players do not receive colonies on your planet} those ships do not establish colonies.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: When you execute a ship during your turn, you may replace it with one of your ships, retrieved from the warp.
(Offense Only) (Destiny)

:Shield Generator: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Shield Generator wrote:
As an ally in a losing encounter, instead of sending your ships to the warp, you may place any or all of those ships on this planet instead.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

:Ship Zap: Artifact, Cosmic Dominion, designed by the fans.
Ship Zap wrote:
Sends Ship to Warp. Play at any time. Send to the warp any one ship from anywhere in play, or one that has been removed from the game. (If you remove the offense's last ship from the hyperspace gate, the offense continues with zero ships.)
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:ship markers: Ship markers fit on top of normal ships to create "special ships" that can be used in a multitude of game variants. Each marker has a front and a back, with some variants instructing a player when to flip it over. The Cosmic Dominion rulesheet lists a Flagships variant and a Salvage Vessel variant, while encouraging players to come up with their own inventive uses for ship markers and post them to the FFG forums.

:ships: Losing: When a game effect requires you to lose ships that are not involved in the encounter (e.g. Grudge), if you have no ships outside the encounter you are not subject to that effect. Similarly, when a game effect allows you to voluntarily lose ships that are not involved in the encounter (e.g., Wild Kamikaze), if you have no ships outside the encounter you cannot use that effect.

:Shock Trooper Shuttle Pods: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Shock Trooper Shuttle Pods wrote:
During each other player's regroup phase, you may retrieve one of your ships from the warp. If you have no ships in the warp, you may instead choose one player to send one of his or her ships to the warp.
(Not Offense) (Regroup)

:Siren: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Unanswered question: As is the case with Eon's Wild Siren, when the other player is allowed or required to draw a specific number of cards and ends up giving up one or more of them because of Wild Siren, are those draw(s) replaced? Retooled gameplay: Eon's and Mayfair's versions did not require Siren to have a colony in the original defense's system, but on the other hand they did not allow Siren to choose which planet will host the encounter. FFG's improved wording clarifies that it is Siren who chooses the targeted planet and where the free colony goes, and that gaining that free colony is not dependent upon Siren having actually "lured" the offense. Edited to define how the free colonies provided by Siren and Super Siren are populated, to fix the incorrect prerequisite icon (and thus prevent Siren from having an encounter against herself), and to clarify that Wild Siren receives all drawn copies of the named card (as ruled in Encounter magazine v1n5p8). Link: [Corrected power]
Siren wrote:
Entices Challengers (Y) You have the power to Lure. Whenever a player in whose home system you have a colony is chosen as the defense, you may use this power to aim the hyperspace gate at one of your home planets on which you have a colony (your choice which) and become the defense instead. The encounter then continues normally.

Whenever you win an encounter as the defense, you immediately gain a free foreign colony in the offense's home system on a planet of your choice with any number of ships taken from your colonies.
({Not Defense}) (Not Main Player or Ally) (Optional) (Destiny)

Born on a planet of beauty and illusion, the Siren entices unsuspecting travelers into her traps. Seduced by her call, the luckless guests are totally unaware of the destruction awaiting them.

Wild: For the rest of this encounter, each time cards are drawn from the deck, you may name a card (e.g., attack 30). {If} Each time that card is drawn, it must be given to you.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: As the defense, before allies are invited, you may offer a colony in the offense's system to each defensive ally should you win the encounter. If you make such an offer and win, then when you gain a free foreign colony in the offense's home system, each defensive ally may either gain a colony on that planet with you using his or her ships in the encounter or receive rewards as usual.
(Defense Only) (Alliance)

:Skeptic: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Double doubts: Deducing exactly who loses how many ships following a double doubt can be a bit tricky, especially when Skeptic is an ally. Eon's original version had some issues with its wording, and FFG's revision unfortunately added a complication. Before discussing the issues, let's look at the original outcomes of a double-doubt:
• If your side loses, your own loss (as a main player or ally) is doubled.
• If the other side loses, the opposing main player's loss is doubled.
• If both sides lose, which is very rare, technically nobody's loss is doubled (but see below).
• If a deal fails and you are a main player, each player loses 2x3=6 ships.
• If a deal fails and you are an ally, the opposing main player's loss is 2x3=6, yours is 2x0=0, and your main player's loss is still 3 (your risk never doubles the loss of anyone else on your side).
Both sides losing: Technically, Skeptic's penalty applies only if a deal fails or one player loses. However, it is easily arguable, and intuitively preferable, that in the rare case where both sides lose (e.g., due to Wild Loser, Morph vs. Morph, or Meteor Storm), both players should suffer the penalty. This is thematically appropriate, since you both boasted of winning and you both were wrong. Furthermore, the fact that you both suffer for a failed deal will lead many to naturally assume that the same thing happens with a double loss (especially given the common misunderstanding that a failed deal is a loss; see encounters). Similar logic applies in the case of the (expected) Diplomat when all three sides fail to deal. With this in mind, and to eliminate the ambiguity, the Cosmodex revises Skeptic to say "If any side loses or a deal fails...." Super Skeptic has a problem which goes back to the original Eon text. As written, (a) it actually penalizes the main player you are allied with, since he, not you, is the loser, and thus it tends to also be read to mean "both main players" lose extra ships if the reader does not infer "both of you"; and (b) it incorrectly refers to you failing to deal, which is the wrong perspective when you are an ally. The revisions listed here correct all of these issues as well as FFG's retooling side-effect discussed next. Increased risk: Jack Kittredge ruled that Super Skeptic is allowed to increase the number of ships at risk beyond the number he currently has available to lose (Encounter magazine v1n5p8). Retooled gameplay: Eon's Skeptic said, "the number of tokens normally lost by either of you is doubled." This construction used the word either in the sense of "either or both," resulting in the outcomes listed above. However, FFG's subtle wording change to an either/or construction, along with the change from passive voice to the imperative mood, introduces (probably unintentionally) a choice, forcing the Skeptic player to apply the penalty to either one player or the other. This means that when FFG's Skeptic is double-doubted as a main player and fails to deal, he technically chooses whether to double only the opponent's loss or only his own. Edited to fix the defensive ally bug, to avoid the implication that a double-doubt immediately skips to card selection and blocks other "before cards are selected" actions; to clarify what happens with a rare double loss; to remove the (probably unintentional) choice of whom to punish after a failed deal; and to fix Super Skeptic's player-perspective and player-reference problems, remove its redundancy, and improve its readability. Links: [Corrected flare]
Skeptic wrote:
Doubles Risk of Encounters (Y) You have the power to Doubt. As a main player or ally, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to tell the opposing player: "I doubt that you will win." If the opposing player agrees with you and is the offense, that player ends his or her turn and the offense's and allies' ships return to colonies. If the opposing player agrees and is the defense, all offensive ships in the hyperspace gate establish a colony on the planet as if they had won (although defending ships already on the planet remain) and defending allies return to colonies.

If the opposing player disagrees or "double doubts" you, the encounter {cards are played} continues. If {one} any side loses or a deal fails, {double the number of ships normally lost by either you or the opposing main player} the number of ships normally lost by either of you is doubled.
({As} Main Player or Ally Only) (Optional) (Planning)

During growth, one colony of marine Skeptics achieved the size and organization necessary for neuronic activity. Proliferating into super-rationality, they doubt the brash claims of others and see no reality but their own.

Wild: During the alliance phase, after you have been invited to ally, you may wait until all other invitees have made their decisions before you decide whether to ally or not.
(Not Main Player) (Alliance)

Super: When you tell a player you doubt that he or she will win, you also tell him or her how many ships not in the encounter (1-20) are at risk (instead of your normal doubling). If he or she double doubts you {and plays the encounter}, {the loser (or both if you fail to deal) loses that number of ships to the warp in addition to the ships lost in the encounter} instead of doubling their losses the penalized player(s) lose that number of additional ships.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Planning)

:Sloth: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Sloth has 1 sloth token.
Sloth wrote:
Shows Up at Last Minute (Y) Game Setup: Take the sloth token and place it on this sheet.

You have the power of Laziness. As the offense or an ally, when you should send your ships into the encounter, use this power to send the sloth token in their place instead of deciding how many ships to commit. The sloth token is not a ship.

After encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, replace the sloth token with 0 to 4 of your ships from any of your colonies. Then, return the sloth token to this sheet.

If you replace the sloth token with zero ships as the offense, you must still continue your encounter. If you replace the sloth token with zero ships as an ally, you are no longer an ally.
(Offense or Ally Only) (Mandatory) (Launch) (Alliance)

The Sloths will eventually arrive in force to take over the sector. Any time now. Just wait for it. They should be here soon.

Wild: As an ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may add ships to the encounter from any of your colonies, as long as you do not exceed any hyperspace gate limits.
(Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may allow each player allied with you to add up to four more ships from any of their colonies to the encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Sneak: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Andrew Navaro.
Sneak wrote:
Colonizes Attacker (Y) You have the power to Infiltrate. As the defense, after you lose an encounter that results in losing one of your home colonies, you may use this power to immediately place your ships from the losing encounter on any one planet in the offense's home system instead of sending them to the warp.

You do not lose this power because of having too few home colonies.
(Defense Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

The Sneaks are masters of disguise and stealth. In fact, there are many conflicting opinions about what the aliens actually look like, where they live, and what sort of technology they have at their disposal. This suits the Sneaks fine, as they are quick to take advantage of the confusion and insinuate themselves into other aliens' societies.

Wild: As the defense, after losing an encounter, you may look at your opponent's hand before or after any compensation is collected. Take one of those cards and add it to your hand.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: When using your power, you may establish two colonies in the offense's home system as long as you have enough ships to create two colonies. Afterwards, give this flare to any player.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

:Sniveler: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Ties allowed? Whether or not Sniveler can whine when he is tied for most ships or least colonies has been a source of debate. Allowing this can lead to degenerate gameplay (especially at the beginning of the game when Sniveler could easily nullify every foreign colony acquired by all other players), so the Cosmodex revises the text to clarify that Sniveler must be truly "behind" everyone else to whine about ships or colonies. Timing: Wild Sniveler has unusually loose timing for this version of the game. It cannot be played until after both main players have issued their invitations, but its parenthetical phrase suggests that the flareholder can complain before, during, or after other players' acceptance decisions. The relative strategic value of complaining early or late would depend upon one's assessment of the invited players' likely decisions. Devoured planets: The player consensus is that Sniveler counts Locust's devoured planets when determining if he can whine about colonies, but those planets are not at risk; if Locust has no regular (ship-held) foreign colonies, then he is free to torpedo the vote on Sniveler with impunity. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Sniveler did not limit the power to before ally invitations, and counted all of Sniveler's bases (rather than just external ones). Eon's Super Sniveler did not prevent the previous winners from allying with you. Edited to prevent Sniveler from whining when he is only tied for most ships in the warp or least colonies. Link: [Corrected power]
Sniveler wrote:
Catches Up When Behind (Y) You have the power to Whine. As a main player, before allies are invited, if you have more ships in the warp than all other players, have fewer foreign colonies than all other players, or lack an encounter card you want, you may use this power to whine about it. If you whine about your ships, either all other players must agree to let you retrieve all your ships from the warp, or (if possible) they each must place ships into the warp until each matches your number there. If you whine about colonies, the other players must agree to let you have one extra foreign colony of your choice or they each lose one foreign colony of their choice, returning those ships to their other colonies. If you whine about cards, you name a card you don't have (e.g., "I don't have an attack card higher than a 15"). Either one player must give you such a card or all players must discard all such cards in their hands. Whine only once per encounter.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

The Snivelers developed in the evolutionary shadow of a closely related but older and more gifted race. Beset by adversity at every turn, they looked to their elder brethren for succor and defense. Now grown adept at self-pity and having liquidated their generous patrons, they turn their wet, envious gaze toward the heavens.

Wild: When not a main player and not invited to ally at all, you may complain to one main player. If that player still does not invite you, he or she may not invite any allies (previous allies return to their colonies).
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Alliance)

Super: If one or more other players win the game and you are within one colony of winning, you may join their win if they all agree. Otherwise, you may encounter one winning player of your choice who refuses. During the encounter, none of the previous winners may ally with you. If you win the encounter, you and all of your allies win the game. If you don't, the previous win stands.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Solar Wind: Artifact, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Mayfair Games, revised by the fans. Retooled gameplay: FFG's Solar Wind will often catch the opposing allies by surprise, whereas Mayfair's version had to be played before allies were invited (and was a wasted cardplay if the encounter resulted in a deal).
Solar Wind wrote:
Reverses Rewards. Play after encounter cards are revealed. Gains for allies are reversed: defensive allies land on the targeted planet if their side wins, while offensive allies receive rewards if their side wins. (If gains were already reversed, they revert to normal instead.)
(As Any Player) (Reveal)

:Sorcerer: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Trading powers: When an alien power is stolen, traded, loaned, etc., all of that power's special features, such as Miser's hand or Warrior's tokens, go with it; see facets of powers for more information. If an alien power specifies that it cannot be stolen, then it also cannot be traded, loaned, etc.; this and other related leaks have been patched on the relevant aliens (Horde, Pygmy, and Symbiote) by adding that they cannot be separated from their player color. Retooled gameplay: FFG's Wild Sorcerer protects the Sorcerer from having his own flare used against him, and then gives it to the Sorcerer after use.
Sorcerer wrote:
Can Switch Played Cards (G) You have the power of Magic. As a main player, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to switch encounter cards with your opponent so that he or she reveals your card and you reveal your opponent's card.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)


Over eons the clan of Sorcerers studied the Cosmic flow and learned to channel these tides to their own needs. Beginning with minor alterations in the probability patterns of matter, they progressed to transportation of objects over great distances. Undaunted by an occasional backlash of fate, they even now are humming the incantations of mastery.

Wild: When the Sorcerer is not a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may force the main players to trade alien powers with each other. They keep their new powers after the encounter ends.. Give this flare to the Sorcerer after use (or discard it, if the Sorcerer isn't playing).
(As Any Player) (Planning)

Super: You may use your power as an ally, switching the main players' encounter cards.
(Ally Only) (Planning)

:Space Junk: Artifact, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Mayfair Games.
Space Junk wrote:
Takes Top Discard. Play at any time and choose a player (even yourself). That player takes the top card of the discard pile and adds it to his or her hand. When several cards go into the discard pile at the same time, you may select any one of them for the chosen player to take.
(As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:space stations: The optional game mechanic in Cosmic Storm consists of ten space station markers with matching space station cards. These are associated with specific planets, and give players additional capabilities while they have colonies on those planets. Ownership and relocation: There are two different ways a space station can move to a new system: by changing ownership, and by relocation of the planet it is attached to. When a space station changes ownership (by being traded in a deal or conquered in the Space Station Conquest variant), the new owner takes both the marker and the card for that station. But when a station marker moves with its planet to a different system (because the planet was relocated by an effect such as The Claw or Wild Leviathan), the space station's card remains with its owner, who still controls that station even though it is now in another system. Thus, the marker indicates which planet a station is attached to, while the card indicates which player controls the station and may use it while he has a colony on that planet. Planetary destruction: The Cosmic Storm rulesheet does not indicate what should happen when a space station is attached to a planet that is removed from the game, but it's logical to remove the space station marker and card from the game as well (along with the associated alien power if the space station is Alien Outpost). List: The space stations in Cosmic Storm are Alien Outpost, Big Space Laser, Colony Cloak, Cosmic Energy Generator, Observation Platform, Shield Generator, Shock Trooper Shuttle Pods, Tactical Array, Temporal Matrix, and Transdimensional Rift Relay. (See also card distribution.)
Space Stations wrote:
Alien Outpost When you receive this card, draw one card from the flare deck. Place the matching alien sheet next to this card, then remove that flare from the game. If the alien has Game Setup text, is not allowed in this game, or has an alternate victory condition, discard it and draw again. While you have a colony on this planet, you have this alien power in addition to any other alien(s) you control.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Big Space Laser As a main player, after you reveal an attack card, you may add 10 to your total if there are no allies on your side.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Colony Cloak As the defense, after the hyperspace gate is aimed at one of your colonies or planets in this system, you may send one of your ships from this space station's planet to the warp. Then, the offense must (if possible) target a different colony or planet in this system where he or she can have a legal encounter.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

Cosmic Energy Generator After your side wins an encounter, place two tokens on this card. After your side loses an encounter, discard one token from this card. As long as there are five or more tokens on this card, it counts as a foreign colony toward victory.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Resolution)

Observation Platform After alliances are formed during an encounter in which you are not involved, you may either retrieve one ship from the warp or draw one card from the deck.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Alliance)

Shield Generator As an ally in a losing encounter, instead of sending your ships to the warp, you may place any or all of those ships on this planet instead.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Shock Trooper Shuttle Pods During each other player's regroup phase, you may retrieve one of your ships from the warp. If you have no ships in the warp, you may instead choose one player to send one of his or her ships to the warp.
(Not Offense) (Regroup)

Tactical Array As the defense, during the launch phase, you may draw two cards from the deck.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

Temporal Matrix If you lose the first encounter of your turn, you may still have a second encounter as long as you have an encounter card in your hand. If you win the first encounter of your turn and choose to have a second encounter, you may place the destiny card from the first encounter on top of the destiny deck.
(Offense Only) (Resolution)

Transdimensional Rift Relay As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, if you have at least one ship in the encounter, you may send up to four of your ships from this planet and add them to your ships already in the encounter. You may use this ability for encounters in any system.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Special ships: A group of variants listed in the Cosmic Dominion rulebook that uses ship markers.

:Spiff: Alien power, base set, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Errata: Power reflects official FAQ errata (shown in blue). Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Spiff was mandatory. Mayfair's Wild Spiff was significantly different; it allowed a losing offensive ally to place all of his ships on the planet. Mayfair's Super Spiff required a difference in the players' totals of at least 6 rather than 5. Edited to fix the coexistence bug and Wild Spiff's incorrect prerequisite bar. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Spiff (based on FAQ errata) wrote:
Receives Colony as Loser (G) You have the power to Crash Land. As the offense, if both players revealed attack cards and {your total was 10 or more less than the defense's} you lost the encounter by 10 or more, you may use this power to land one of your ships that would otherwise be lost to the warp on the targeted planet. {The ship coexists with the ships already there. This power does not allow you to coexist in places or with aliens that state otherwise.}
(Offense Only) (Optional) (Resolution)

Attacking vicious space monsters at incredible odds comes naturally to the valorous Spiffs. Their cunning and courage have let them save the day even when their doom seemed imminent. Let those who face them beware!

Wild: As the defense, when you lose an encounter, you may leave one of your ships on the planet instead of sending it to the warp. {It coexists with the offensive ships.}
({Main Player Only}) (Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may use your power to crash land if you lose by a total of 5 or more instead of 10.
(Offense Only) (Resolution)

:Squee: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Squee wrote:
Is Dangerously Adorable (R) You have the power of Unimaginable Cuteness. As the defense, after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed, you may use this power to bat your eyes at the offense and look too adorable to attack. The offense must choose whether to concede or continue.

If the offense chooses to concede, you win the encounter. Immediately proceed to the resolution phase. The played encounter cards will be discarded as usual.

If the offense chooses to continue, the offense must send any three of his or her ships to the warp. If the offense reveals an attack card and wins the encounter, you collect compensation even if you did not reveal a negotiate card.
(Defense Only) (Optional) (Planning)

The Squee are so incredibly cute that they are almost painful to behold. From their fuzzy wuzzy feathers to their adorable eyes, you just want to pick them up and love them and hug them and protect them forever. Unless you are a Locust, in which case you prefer to devour them by the dozen.

Wild: After you lose an encounter as the defense, you may choose one other player involved in the encounter on either side. That player must send ships to the warp from any of his or her colonies equal to the number of ships you lost during the encounter.
(Defense Only) (Resolution)

Super: As a defensive ally, during the planning phase, you may force the offense and each offensive ally to remove one of his or her ships from the hyperspace gate. Removed ships return to any of that player's colonies.
(Defensive Ally Only) (Planning)

:start turn phase: This phase occurs at the very start of your turn, and only once per turn (in contrast to the Regroup phase, which occurs at the start of every encounter). This phase does not recur in front of a second encounter, nor is it part of any "extra" encounters granted by Infinity Drive, Invader, Lightning, Machine, Wild Machine, or Wild Warrior. Part of an encounter? The Start Turn phase is a bit of an anomaly in this edition of Cosmic Encounter: it both is and is not part of an encounter. To use an analogy from physics or biology, it is both a wave and a particle; a mammal that lays eggs. The rulebook makes it clear that an encounter has seven phases, not eight, and that every encounter begins with the Regroup phase. The logical conclusion here is that the Start Turn phase is not part of an encounter at all, but some kind of special phase that exists only "between" encounters. And yet, this does not work; it causes problems if we divorce this phase from the structure of an encounter. The reality is that sometimes the Start Turn phase must be understood in the context of the encounter that is just about to start. For example, if an effect is limited to one user "per encounter," and that effect is invoked in the Start Turn phase, clearly it cannot be used again until after the Resolution phase is over. Or if a power is Cosmic Zapped during Start Turn, that zap is supposed to last "until the end of the current encounter." Technically there is no current encounter during the Start Turn phase, but we have to proceed as if there were. (And it can't be a different encounter from the one that's about to start, so we have to let the Start Turn phase "sneak in" as a sort of preamble or preface to the encounter.) Analogy: If we think of an encounter as a seven-act movie in a theater, then the Start Turn phase would be like the previews before the film. They are not technically part of the film; they play at the "start" of the movie, but the movie doesn't actually "start" until after the previews are over; and if during the previews somebody said "stay in your seat for the rest of the movie," we would understand that they mean "the entire movie that hasn't quite started yet." Conclusion: In the context of the Start Turn phase, any reference to the current encounter means "the encounter that's just about to start." We pretend for that moment that the Start Turn phase is part of the encounter. And yet the encounter still technically starts with its Regroup phase, so that all effects that say "at the start of an encounter" still mean exactly the same thing as "at the start of the regroup phase."

:Sting: Alien power, Cosmic Alliance, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Sting allowed the player to force another player to substitute for all lost tokens, not just half, and when Sting had insufficient cards to compensate for the loss it allowed the other player to take the remainder in Lucre. Edited to clarify that the card draws are at random.
Sting wrote:
Switches Lost Ships (Y) You have the power to Substitute. Each time you lose ships to the warp, you may use this power to designate another player to substitute half the lost ships instead. Return half of your lost ships (rounded down) to your colonies. Then, your substitute makes up for the saved ships by choosing an equal number of his or her own ships to lose to the warp. That player may then take one card at random from your hand for each ship he or she lost. If you have too few cards, that player may draw the remainder needed from the deck.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Genetically sterile through a side effect of their colony's energy shield, the Sting desperately sought a way to save themselves from extinction. In their quest, they stumbled upon a vampiric form of immortality. Emboldened, they now scour the Cosmos in search of a cure for their sterility, and woe to those who try to stop them.

Wild: When you are required to give compensation to a player, you may choose to give it to a different player instead.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may have another player substitute all of the ships you are losing instead of just half of them.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Swindler: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Swindler has 7 swindler tokens; one is a "mark" token and the others are blank.
Swindler wrote:
Steals a Player's Identity (R) Game Setup: Take one swindler token for each other player in the game, making sure that one of these is the mark token with the "X" on its front. Secretly look at these tokens and place one token facedown next to each other player's alien sheet. The player to whom you assigned the mark token is your "mark." You may look at these tokens at any time, but the other players cannot.

As the original Swindler, you have the power of Identity Theft. After the defense has been determined, you may use this power. Reveal your mark by flipping all swindler tokens faceup and removing them from the game. You and your mark then exchange everything in the game, including physical seats, alien powers, player colors, ships, hands, systems, planets, colonies, etc. The encounter continues, although this may change who the main player(s) are. If the offense's color has become controlled by a different player, it is now that player's turn instead of the original offense's turn.

As the revealed mark, you have the power to Panic. During each other player's start turn phase, you may use this power to immediately gain a colony in the offense's home system.

This power cannot be stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means.
(As Any Player) (Optional) (Start Turn) (Destiny)

To a Swindler, stealing identities is like taking candy from a larval Atrachean Gooshumple.

Wild: As an ally, after your side wins, you may take one card at random from the hand of one ally on the losing side.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: As an ally, after both main players reveal negotiate cards, you may become the main player for your side. All ships in the hyperspace gate return to colonies and you attempt to make a deal with the opponent (suffering any penalties as appropriate). If you make a deal, it counts as a success for the player you replaced.
(Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Sycophant: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Felicia Cano.
Sycophant wrote:
Wins Through Flattery (Y) Game Setup: Place 10 tokens on this sheet (eight if playing with four planets per player).

You have the power of Flattery. If you are not a main player, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to flatter one of the main players (even if you are allied against that player). If the player you flatter wins the encounter or makes a deal, discard one token from this sheet. If there are no more tokens on this sheet, you immediately win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.
(Not Main Player) (Optional) (Alliance)

Eager to please all the other species in the system, the Sycophants do whatever they can to ingratiate themselves into as many alien societies as possible. The Sycophants' philosophy is simple: flattery is the sincerest form of flattery. And flattery leads to victory. Sort of.

Wild: After a player wins an encounter in which you were not a main player or ally, you may give that player a hearty congratulations and retrieve one of your ships from the warp for each player who has ships on the winning side.
(Not Main Player or Ally) (Resolution)

Super: If there are five or fewer tokens on your sheet, you may discard one of them. If there are more than five tokens on your sheet, you may discard tokens until you have five remaining. Afterwards, give this flare to any player.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Symbiote: Alien power, Cosmic Incursion, designed by Mayfair Games, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Reduced planets: If any of Symbiote's planets have been moved or destroyed, there may not be enough space to hold all of the ships that Super Symbiote is able to retrieve. In this case, the player simply cannot retrieve more than he has room for. Filth: Super Symbiote's unique coexistence override is apparently intended to keep Filth from interfering with Symbiote returning all of his lost ships to his home planets. However, it is difficult to see how this can succeed, since Filth doesn't act only when ships land on planets, but rather is a continuous effect. This seems to raise several questions: How long does the local suspension of Filth's power last? What if Filth later adds a ship to one of those colonies? What if Symbiote does? What if Filth leaves and returns? The Cosmodex assumes that the intention was to allow coexistence (and thus suspend Filth's power) indefinitely and separately on each planet where both players maintain a colony, and that each separate suspension of Filth's power ends when that particular coexistence ends naturally through other game actions. The text is therefore revised accordingly (reducing some verbiage in order to fit the revision onto an already crowded card). Retooled gameplay: Mayfair's Symbiote did not allow ships of the secondary color to count as a colony without a normal-color ship being present, and allowed the power to be lost normally (in which case the secondary ships were frozen in place). Mayfair's Wild Symbiote was complete different; it allowed the Symbiote as defense to add other players' ships on the planet to his total. Mayfair's Super Symbiote was complete different; it allowed ships of the main color to come out of the warp to replace those of the secondary color. Unzappable: The MANDATORY icon does not make sense here, since that icon applies to use clauses and Symbiote has none. Dave Hollingsworth proposed that such aliens should use the word CONTINUOUS instead, to avoid misrepresenting what the Optional/Mandatory icon actually means. Edited to block power-trading and -lending effects like Changeling, Wild Philanthropist, Wild Sorcerer, and Psychic Switcheroo and to define the scope and duration of Super Symbiote's coexistence override. Links: [Corrected power] [Corrected flare]
Symbiote wrote:
Has Twice as Many Ships (G) Game Setup: Choose one unused player color and take the 20 ships of that color (16 in a four-planet game), placing twice as many ships as usual on each of your planets. Your player color is that of the planets you use. Do not use this power unless you have an unused player color.

You have the power of Symbiosis. You have twice as many ships as usual. This power cannot be zapped, lost, stolen, copied, or separated from your player color through any means.
(As Any Player) (Continuous) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The environmental extremes on the Symbiote's homeworld drove its two sentient species into a mutual interdependence. Now this exceptionally tough hybrid has discovered that the warp gives this two-in-one race a distinct advantage over its adversaries.

Wild: You may retrieve a ship from the warp during any other player's regroup phase.
(Not Offense) (Regroup)

Super: You may discard this flare at the start of any regroup phase to rescue all of your ships you choose, even ones in the warp, captured, or removed from the game. Place up to eight rescued ships on each of your home planets, even if you no longer have a colony there. On each of those planets, your ships ignore any game effect that would keep them from coexisting there, for as long as that coexistence lasts. This flare may not be canceled through any means.
(As Any Player) (Regroup)

:table talk: Exactly what degree of table talk is allowed is a subject of debate. The general feeling among players these days seems to be that you can claim whatever you want as long as you don't show any cards or other hidden information without authorization... but it's possible that this has drifted away from Eon's original intentions. One of the few official clues we have is this statement in Encounter magazine v1n4p14: "Allies can communicate with each other generally, but not disclose specific cards they have or will play. Only more general comments and posturing is considered good form in our games."

:Tactical Array: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Tactical Array wrote:
As the defense, during the launch phase, you may draw two cards from the deck.
(Defense Only) (Launch)

:TARDIS: An acronym for a very sophisticated time-travel device; it stands for Time And Relative Dimension In Space. The Cosmodex wishes (as much as a web page can wish) that it did not have to report the absence of a TARDIS in Cosmic Encounter.

:tech cards: Card type, base game, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. The 20 tech cards currently in the game can all be found in the FFG base edition: Coldsleep Ship, Collapsium Hulls, Cosmic Field Generator, Delta Scanners, Energy Cloak, Enigma Device, Genesis Bomb, Gluon Mines, Infinity Drive, Lunar Cannon, Omega Missile, Plasma Thrusters, Precursor Seed, The Prometheus, The Qax, Quark Battery, Tech Scrambler, Vacuum Turbines, Warpspace Key, and Xenon Lasers. Completing and revealing: You may not both research and complete a tech in the same encounter. However, some techs are revealed as a surprise under certain conditions (e.g., Gluon Mines). That kind of tech may be researched and revealed during the same encounter. Deals: You may not trade tech cards as part of a deal. Timing: The rules specifically state that Machine may forego his second or later turn in order to gain tech. This seems to imply that when another game effect allows an extra encounter after the first (e.g., Infinity Drive, Lightning, Wild Machine), this encounter may also be given up for a new tech card, ending the player's turn. (This does not work with Invader and Wild Warrior, however, because those extra encounters occur outside a player's turn.) Unanswered question: Researching ships: The rulebook is conflicted about whether researching ships can be removed from a tech card. Under Researching a Tech Card it says "Once a ship is researching a tech card, it cannot be removed from that tech card until the tech card is completed." Then, under Losing Researching Ships it says "Players may not aim the hyperspace gate at a tech card, but ships can be lost from a tech card in other ways (such as the Shadow's power)." This contradiction gets messier when we discover that Shadow actually cannot execute a researching ship because the power clearly requires the ship to come from a colony. It is possible that the intent was that (a) you cannot remove your own researching ship from a tech just for "general purposes" like joining an encounter, sending a ship to the warp to use a particular flare, researching a different tech, etc. but (b) other players can target your researching ships with game effects that send ships to the warp, out of the game, etc. (unless they specify "on a colony," of course). But this is just speculation.
Tech cards wrote:
Coldsleep Ship Gain Colony. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to gain a new colony on any planet in any other player's system where you don't already have one. You may place up to four ships on that colony from your other colonies {or this tech card}. If you have no colonies to return your researching ships to when you complete this tech, you may immediately use this tech to gain your new colony using all of those ships.
(9) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Collapsium Hulls Save Ship. Once completed, this tech stays in play. While it is in play, when you lose an encounter as the defense by 5 or less, one of your ships may remain on the planet instead of going to the warp.
(4) (Defense Only) (Resolution)

Cosmic Field Generator Stop Alien Power. Once completed, you may discard this tech to cancel one use of any alien's power, including your own. That power may not be used again during the current encounter. The use of this tech is considered to be a "Cosmic Zap," but this is not an artifact card.
(2) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Delta Scanners Draw from Discard. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to take any one card from the discard pile and add it to your hand.
(2) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Energy Cloak Prevent Allies. Once completed, you may discard this tech as the offense after aiming the hyperspace gate. The defense may not invite any players to ally with him or her during this encounter.
(4) (Offense Only) (Launch)

Enigma Device Reset All Hands to 8 Cards. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter. Each player, starting with you and continuing clockwise, either draws cards from the deck or discards cards at random as needed to bring his or her hand to exactly eight cards. You (and only you) may discard as many of your cards as you wish beforehand.
(4) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Genesis Bomb Create Planet. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech at the start of any encounter to take the Genesis planet and place it in your home system. You may immediately gain a colony on it using any or all of the ships used to research this tech.
(4) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Gluon Mines Ambush Attackers. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech as the defense after encounter cards are selected but before they are revealed to send one opposing ship to the warp for each ship researching this tech. If there are no opposing ships left afterwards, you win this encounter. Otherwise, it continues normally.
(X) (Defense Only) (Planning)

Infinity Drive Extra Encounter. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the end of any encounter (including your own) to immediately have an encounter (if you have an encounter card in your hand). Afterwards, play continues from where it left off.
(6) (As Any Player) (Resolution)

Lunar Cannon Defend Two Planets. When you complete this tech, take and place the lunar cannon token between two of your home planets. While this tech is in play, you control the lunar cannon. As a main player or ally, you may add 10 to your side's total in any encounters targeting a world next to the lunar cannon. Each time a wild destiny card is drawn, you may move the lunar cannon token to a new position in any system.
(5) (Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Omega Missile Destroy Planet. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to choose a planet in any system. Remove that planet from the game and send all ships on it to the warp.
(8) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Plasma Thrusters Add One Ship. Once completed, this tech stays in play. While it is in play, as the offense or an ally, you may send one extra ship into each encounter (for a total of five, normally). As the defense, during the launch phase, you may move one ship to the targeted planet from any of your other colonies.
(6) (Main Player or Ally Only) (Launch) (Alliance)

Precursor Seed Gain Extra Power. When you complete this tech, draw an unused alien power at random. If the alien has Game Setup text or is not allowed in the current game, discard it and draw again. While this tech is in play, you use the extra alien power you have drawn in addition to your own.
(9) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Prometheus Create New Ship. When you complete this tech, take the Prometheus token and place it on one of your colonies. While this tech is in play, you control the Prometheus, which is treated in all ways as one of your ships except that it adds an extra +3 to your side's total when it is involved in an encounter.
(7) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

The Qax Force Ally. Once completed, you may give this tech to another player when you invite him or her to ally with you. That player must ally with you and send 4 ships (or as many as possible up to 4), although he or she is not required to abandon any colonies in order to do so. That player may later give this tech to another player (including you), and so on.
(4) (Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Quark Battery Hide Encounter Card. When you complete this tech, place an encounter card from your hand facedown under it. This encounter card is not part of your hand and may not be looked at or taken by other players. Later, as a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, you may discard this tech to discard your revealed encounter card and replace it with the one under this tech.
(3) (Main Player Only) (Reveal)

Tech Scrambler Cancel Tech. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech at any time to cancel the effect of any one other tech card. The canceled tech must have a research cost equal to or less than the number of ships researching this tech. The canceled tech card is discarded {from play}.
(X) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

Vacuum Turbines Draw Four Cards. Once completed, you may discard this tech at the start of any encounter to draw four cards from the deck. Look at them and add any of them you wish to your hand, discarding the rest.
(2) (As Any Player) (Regroup)

Warpspace Key Free Ships from Warp. Once completed, you may discard this tech during your regroup phase to retrieve all of your ships from the warp. Freed ships return to any of your colonies.
(3) (Offense Only) (Regroup)

Xenon Lasers Add or Subtract 1 from Total. Once completed, this tech stays in play. While it is in play, as a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may either add 1 to, or subtract 1 from, your side's total.
(3) (Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

:Tech Scrambler: Tech, base set, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Edited for grammar and to avoid sounding like the affected tech is removed from the game.
Tech Scrambler wrote:
Cancel Tech. Do not reveal this tech until used. You may reveal and discard this tech at any time to cancel the effect of any one other tech card. The canceled tech must have a research cost equal to or less than the number of ships researching this tech. The canceled tech card is discarded {from play}.
(X) (As Any Player) (Start Turn)(Regroup)(Destiny)(Launch)(Alliance)(Planning)(Reveal)(Resolution)

:technology: See tech cards.

:Temporal Anomaly: Hazard, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Fantasy Flight Games. Unanswered question: Does the reversal of play direction affect only the player turn sequence, or does it include any other subsequences such as alliance acceptances, the Timing Conflicts rule, and cards like Enigma Device that specify a clockwise or counterclockwise game mechanic?
Temporal Anomaly wrote:
Play now proceeds in the opposite direction (i.e., if play was passing clockwise, it now proceeds counterclockwise).

:Temporal Matrix: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Temporal Matrix wrote:
If you lose the first encounter of your turn, you may still have a second encounter as long as you have an encounter card in your hand. If you win the first encounter of your turn and choose to have a second encounter, you may place the destiny card from the first encounter on top of the destiny deck.
(Offense Only) (Resolution)

:Tick-Tock: Alien power, base set, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Felicia Cano. FAQ ruling: Tick-Tock may participate in a joint win if he discards his last token during resolution of an encounter in which other player(s) achieve victory (for example, if two other players make a colony-for-colony deal for the win). Edited for terminology.
Tick-Tock wrote:
Limits Length of Game (Y) Game Setup: Place ten tokens on this sheet (eight if playing with four planets per player).

You have the power of Patience. Each time any player wins an encounter as the defense or a deal is made between any two players, use this power to discard one token from this sheet. If there are no more tokens on this sheet, you immediately win the game. You may still win the game via the normal method.
(As Any Player) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

Lurking in the depths of space-time beyond even the warp itself, this mechanical race waits patiently for the heat-death of the Universe, when it will rule over the strange abyss that remains. In the meantime, they subtly turn the races of the Universe against each other to prevent them from discovering a way to prevent the inevitable.

Wild: When the discard pile is shuffled to create a new deck, you may immediately establish a colony on any one other player's home planet with up to four of your ships.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: When you win an encounter or make a deal, you may send one of your ships to the warp to discard a token from your sheet. This is in addition to any tokens you may discard through normal use of your power.
(Main Player Only) (Resolution)

:Tide: Alien power, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Andrew Olson. House rule: Darth Thulhu recommends changing the power to force opposing winners to discard cards at random instead of by choice.
Tide wrote:
Makes Players Draw or Discard (Y) Game Setup: Place two tokens on this sheet.

You have the power to Ebb and Flow. After you win an encounter as a main player, use this power to place one token on this sheet. Then, you and each of your allies draw one card from the deck for each token on this sheet.

After you lose an encounter as a main player, if there is more than one token on this sheet, use this power to discard one token from this sheet. Then, the opposing main player and each of his or her allies must discard one card of their choice from their hands for each token on this sheet.
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Resolution)

The Tide's cultural philosophy is simple: go with the flow. From an early age, members of the Tide's army are trained to react and respond to even the slightest change of plans. While some may consider the Tide's approach to military and diplomatic matters wishy-washy, the Tide seem resolute to vacillate on issues and continue to change their minds at a moment's notice.

Wild: As an ally, if you receive rewards, you may receive four rewards regardless of how many ships you had in the encounter.
(Ally Only) (Resolution)

Super: You may place one token on your sheet.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

:Timing Conflicts rule: In most cases, the sequencing of various game effects in Cosmic Encounter is fairly straightforward. Sometimes, however, two (or more) players want to do conflicting things at the same time. In these cases, the Timing Conflicts rule states that priority goes to the offense, then the defense, and then any other players in clockwise order from the offense. Basically, whichever player is earlier in the Timing Conflicts rule sequence can invoke that rule to go before any players who are later in the sequence.

Both want to go second? It can be unclear to what extent this rule applies in cases were nobody actually wants to go first. Sometimes, such as when an effect can undo or override another effect, it may be preferable to go second; the question then becomes, to what extent can the Timing Conflicts rule actually force somebody to go first? Players are required to perform mandatory effects but are not required to perform optional ones, so answering this question can depend upon the nature of the two conflicting effects themselves. Both Mandatory: When both players wish to go second and both of their conflicting effects are mandatory, the "later" player can cite the Timing Conflicts rule in order to go second. This is because both effects are required to happen; both players are forced to initiate them, and if neither wishes to go first then they are essentially forced to initiate them together before the relevant time interval ends. Thus, even if the earlier player doesn't want to go first, the later player can force the Timing Conflicts rule's sequence to be followed; this is the only way to break the logjam. Example: It is the start of Hate's turn. Both Hate and Bandit have mandatory start-of-turn powers that must happen before the Regroup phase begins, and both of these powers can have an impact on Bandit's hand. If neither player cares who goes first, or they both want the same sequence, then the powers can be used in either order. But if they both wish to go first, then Hate (the offense) invokes the rule and gets his way; or if they both wish to go second, then Bandit invokes the rule and gets his way. One Mandatory, one Optional: When one of the conflicting effects is mandatory and the other is optional, the player who has the optional effect can simply wait out the other player. He can (in essence) force the player who has the mandatory effect to go first, regardless of roles and seating order. The Timing Conflicts rule does not apply in this case. Since the mandatory effect must happen, that player will be forced to perform it some time before the appropriate time interval ends. Then, the player who has the optional effect can announce that effect and perform it. In other words, the player who has the optional effect is not required to use it in the first place, nor to even commit to whether or not he's going to use it; thus he is not forced to create a "timing conflict" in the first place (although he could, if he wanted to go first and the sequence supported it). When desiring to go second, the player with the optional effect can simply "wait it out" until the coast is clear. The player with the mandatory effect does not have that luxury. Both Optional: When both effects are optional and neither player wishes to go first, the game simply moves forward without either player declaring an effect. The later player cannot force the earlier player to use an optional effect against her will, nor does he have the authority to "force a decline" or to "lock her out" from playing her effect later in the same time interval just because she chose not to do so earlier. A player cannot say something like "I want to use my effect as the last effect of the phase"; he can only say "I want to use my effect now." If nobody wants to use an effect now, then simply call a two-second warning and move on to the game's next timing interval. Again, a timing conflict never actually arises because nobody is actually initiating any effect; they are both just sitting there waiting to see what happens. If nothing happens, move on. (If somebody then gives in and performs their action, fine. But the other player then still gets a chance, too.)
Summary
• The earlier player can always invoke the Timing Conflicts rule to go first.
• The later player can invoke the rule to go second if both effects are mandatory.
• Players are not forced to perform, or promise not to perform, optional effects.
• A player with an optional effect can wait for mandatory effects before deciding.
• If neither player wants to use their optional effect first, just move on.

Retooled gameplay: The Eon, Mayfair, and Avalon Hill editions of the game all defined the sequence as (1) non-main players, (2) offense, (3) defense. Avalon Hill added "this rule is only in effect if players are unable to determine who played their Power or card first," but fortunately FFG does not use this "slap-jack" rule.

:tokens and markers: There are several different kinds of tokens and markers in Cosmic Encounter. The most common is the basic token found in the base set, Cosmic Incursion, and Cosmic Conflict. The rules sometimes refer to this as a cosmic token, although game components usually call it simply a token. (The reference to "tokens" on Super Gambler is actually a leftover term from previous editions which should have been converted to "ships.") The full list of tokens and markers is as follows:
Cosmic Encounter: 1 Genesis planet, 1 lunar cannon token, 1 Prometheus token, 7 grudge tokens, 42 cosmic tokens, 5 colony markers.
Cosmic Incursion: 30 cosmic tokens, 1 colony marker.
Cosmic Conflict: 24 saboteur tokens (16 decoy tokens and 8 trap tokens), 14 cosmic tokens, 1 colony marker.
Cosmic Alliance: 38 horde tokens, 1 colony marker.
Cosmic Storm: 1 sloth token, 7 swindler tokens, 10 space station markers.
Cosmic Dominion: 1 cruise liner token, 9 joker tokens (4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42, M, N, R), 2 yin-yang tokens, 1 hazard token, 8 ship markers.

:Tourist: Alien power, Cosmic Dominion, designed by Jefferson Krogh, illustrated by Felicia Cano. Special component: Tourist has 1 cruise liner token. Wild Tourist may peek at any card on the top of any deck, as well as a wide variety of cards that are face down in play, such as intimidates, kickers, encounter cards before they are revealed, the extra card used by Cavalry or Deuce, any tech being researched, Schizoid's schizoid card, The Claw's claw card, the encounter card under the Quark Battery, or a card on the sheet of an alien like Miser, Cryo, or Host. It also may peek at a card set aside by Wild Doppelganger, Laser, Wild Laser, or Wild Voyager since those cards are on the table long enough for other actions to take place before the set-aside cards are picked back up again. However, cards that are face down on the table because of Wild Cryo, Gambler, Magician, Wild Magician, Wild Miser, Usurper, Whirligig, or Wild Whirligig cannot be peeked at, since placing them down and pickup them up is all part of a single action that Wild Tourist cannot interrupt. Finally, it appears that Wild Tourist cannot peek at Merchant's hired ships; Merchant's text implies that these are ships and not cards while on the table.
Tourist wrote:
Travels on Cruise Liner (Y) Game Setup: Place the cruise liner token in your system. Now and each time the cruise liner enters your system, you may move up to four of your ships from your home colonies onto it, or vice versa.

You have the power to Sightsee. At the end of the destiny phase, if any hazard warnings were drawn during this encounter, use this power to send one of your ships to the warp from the cruise liner.

If no hazard warnings were drawn, use this power to move the cruise liner one system clockwise or counterclockwise. Then, if the cruise liner is in the defense's system and you do not already have a colony in that system, you may use this power to disembark all of your ships from the cruise liner to any one planet there. If for any reason you do not disembark, you may use this power to send a postcard home. Return one ship from the cruise liner to any of your colonies, and then take a card at random from the hand of that system's player.
(As Any Player) (Varies) (Destiny)

Among the most curious of all the races in the Cosmos, the Tourists have no interest in conquest. They'd rather see everything, though sometimes their visits stretch on for millennia. Their neighbors often mistake these visits for invasions. Rest assured, those really are flashbulbs and loud floral prints, not explosives and camouflage!

Wild: You may look at the top card of any deck, or any facedown card or alien sheet, without showing it to anyone else.
(As Any Player) (Any Phase)

Super: After your cruise liner finishes moving, you may move some of your ships onto it from a colony in the same system, even if it's not your home system.
(As Any Player) (Destiny)

:Trader: Alien power, base set, designed by Future Pastimes, illustrated by Ryan Barger. FAQ ruling: Trader cannot trade a hand that contains no encounter cards to his opponent (he must draw a new hand before trading). Noteworthy interaction: Trader essentially makes Genius a non-power. Retooled gameplay: Eon's Wild Trader was completely different; it allowed the exchange of a ship from the targeted planet with another ship elsewhere (but could not move the flareholder's ships). Edited to implement the FAQ ruling that Trader cannot trade a hand that contains no encounter cards to his opponent. (The FAQ ruling is actually more comprehensive than this; see hands for more discussion.) Links: [Problems with FAQ ruling] [Unofficial classic Eon flare]
Trader wrote:
Trades Hands with Opponent (G) You have the power of Transference. As a main player, before encounter cards are selected, you may use this power to trade hands with your opponent. You each then keep the new hand.

As the defense, if you need to draw a new hand, you must do so before trading hands with your opponent.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Planning)

Originating on a Trojan Cloud in a heavily traveled star system, the crafty Traders learned to use the most valuable debris which drifted their way and discard the rest. As their numbers grew, however, they began to search out markets for their low-grade material. With a wealth of resources always at hand, they became adept merchants and soon were carefully scrutinizing all galactic transactions. Now they have begun to parlay their economic foundation into Cosmic control.

Wild: As a main player, before alliances are formed, you may draw one card at random from your opponent's hand and add it to your hand. You must then give your opponent one card of your choice (even the card you just drew) in return.
(Main Player Only) (Alliance)

Super: You may use your power to trade hands with any player, not just your opponent.
(Main Player Only) (Planning)

:Transdimensional Rift Relay: Space Station, Cosmic Storm, designed by Fantasy Flight Games, illustrated by Henning Ludvigsen.
Transdimensional Rift Relay wrote:
As a main player, after encounter cards are revealed, if you have at least one ship in the encounter, you may send up to four of your ships from this planet and add them to your ships already in the encounter. You may use this ability for encounters in any system.
(Main Player Only) (Reveal)

:Trickster: Alien power, Cosmic Conflict, designed by Kevin Wilson, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Edited for correct terminology and to fix Super Trickster's incorrect timing icon. Link: [Corrected flare]
Trickster wrote:
Wins Encounters 50% of the Time (G) You have the power of Possibilities. As a main player, after alliances are formed, you may use this power to manipulate probability instead of having a normal encounter. If you do so, take a token and conceal it secretly in one of your hands. The other main player then chooses one of your closed fists. You then open both of your fists, revealing which hand held the token. If your opponent chose the hand containing the token, you lose the encounter. If he or she chose your empty hand, you win the encounter. In either case, the resolution phase is then carried out as usual.
(Main Player Only) (Optional) (Alliance)

The Tricksters are a race of incredibly powerful beings, able to manipulate the very fabric of the Cosmos with their minds without ever leaving their homeworld. Fortunately, they have few dreams of conquest, instead preferring to select members of other alien races to toy with. Still, given their power, there's always the chance that they could take over the Cosmos by accident.

Wild: As a main player or ally, after encounter cards are revealed, you may flip a coin. If it lands heads up, add 10 to your side's total. If the coin lands tails up, subtract 10 from your side's total.
(Main Player or Ally Only) (Reveal)

Super: You may use your power after losing an encounter instead of before encounter cards are selected. The outcome of your power replaces the outcome of the encounter.
(Main Player Only) ({Resolution}) (Reveal)

:Tripler: Alien power, base set, designed by Cosmic Encounter Online, illustrated by Ryan Barger. Retooled gameplay: The online version of Tripler included a list of mathematical impossibilities (e.g., 30 = 10) intended to teach people how to round up, but some of its entries incorrectly rounded down (40 = 13, 13 = 4) or were just plain nonsensical (1-1 = -3). FFG wisely did not include this "new math" on the alien sheet. (Rounding down actually would have made this alien simpler; for many people, simply ignoring any remainder is a less complex mental exercise than rounding up.) FFG also performed some much-needed liposuction on the history. Edited to clarify that Super Tripler cannot affect the opponent's attack card. Link: [Corrected flare]
Tripler wrote:
Low Cards Triple, High Cards 1/3 (R) You have the power of Thrice. As a main player, after you reveal an attack card, use this power to adjust its value. If the card's value is 10 or lower, triple its value. If the card's value is higher than 10, divide its value by three (rounded up).
(Main Player Only) (Mandatory) (Reveal)

Millennia of obsessive racing and betting have given the Triplers a knack for making something out of nothing. The unfortunate downside of such flimflammery is that they have become equally prone to making nothing out of something. The Triplers now wish to redefine the Universe as an opportunity for their final race, forcing all other beings to bet everything they have on one final mad dash across the Cosmos.
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