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Launch Pad » Forums » Reviews
A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview: Didn't Mama always want you to be a rocket scientist?
Introducing Launch Pad!



Tired of explaining your immersion in the board-gaming hobby to your family? This Christmas you can go home filled with pride, and tell Mama that you've become a rocket scientist! With Launch Pad, you'll coordinate engineers, quality control inspectors and mission controllers, as well as supervise the construction and launch of the very latest rocket technology. Sound like fun? In this game, you can do all that and more, and make Mama proud! Just don't tell her that it's only a game!

Launch Pad is the second family game to be released by Stratus Games this year – their first being Gold Mine. In something of an ironic twist, whereas in Gold Mine players tunnelled beneath the earth’s surface in a quest for riches, in Launch Pad players venture beyond the safe confines of Earth’s atmosphere in order to explore the far reaches of the galaxy! In the game, you try to construct as many rocket ships as you can over the course of the game. It’s not just quantity that’s important, however, but also quality – so you will work to build rockets of different sizes (and point values) and to equip those rockets with a number of special features that will make them more valuable at the end of the game. And you thought rocket science was for the whiz kids? In this game, rocket science comes down to earth, so that we all get a chance to compete at this high level activity. Won't the family be proud? In fact, why not get them to join you in this adventure! So without further ado, let's launch into the game!




COMPONENTS

Game box

The box for Launch Pad is solidly made, and features simple rocket artwork on the box-cover that will reappear throughout the game. The plain artwork and bold primary colours here might not win over the average eurogamer with an appetite for distinguished and dull looking medieval personages on the front cover, but the brightly coloured design is an immediate indicator of the primary target audience of the game: boys in particular are going to love this!



The back of the box tells us what the game is about: You are battling to build the biggest, baddest rockets possible and send them soaring into space. Each rocket requires metal, fuel, and the expertise needed for liftoff. As you build your rockets, beware of your opponents, who are eager to steal your goods and sabotage your work--you may even have some tricks of your own to thwart their progress. All the while, the launch pad is being constructed--as soon as it’s ready, the rockets that are "go" for launch will blast off into space, leaving all others behind! Do you have what it takes to make your rockets soar before it’s too late?



The box is perhaps rather larger than it needed to be - however, this is likely a reflection of the decision to produce the game instructions as a nicely sized, full colour, glossy booklet rather than an under-sized, folded paper creation. In the world of rocket science, there's no room for an inferiority complex, even when it comes to the size of the rulebook and the game box! And wouldn't we rather have well written instructions and an oversized box - as is the case here - rather than poor instructions or an overly small box? The box insert is basic cardboard, but functions sufficiently to house all the cards.



Component list

So, here’s what you’ll find when you crack open the box:
● 140 game cards
● Rulebook



Yes lots of cards - 140 of them in fact! Good rocket science requires lots of research, so don't be surprised at the amount of paperwork! The game cards have been printed on good quality linen card stock, and should prove very durable, even in the hands of foolhardy boy or teen rocket pilots. As such, they should (and indeed need to) stand up to repeated play and shuffling. The artwork on the cards is clear, colourful and cartoonish in character, and matches the style of the artwork on the box cover.

These 140 cards will form the deck from which all players will draw cards in order to construct rockets which in turn will be scored for points at the end of the game. Although all of the game cards will ultimately be shuffled together to form a single draw deck there are several different types of cards that you will encounter over the course of the game, as pictured here:



Let's give you an overview of the different cards in the deck, and how they work. Ready for take-off? Did you take the blue pill or the red pill? Here we go!

Rocket cards

The rocket cards represent the heart of the game, since you'll score points according to the number of rockets you construct and successfully move into the Launch Zone. There are four different kinds of rockets, each of which requires a different number of resources to construct and will be worth a varying number of points at the end of the game: Observer (6 points), Explorer (8 points), Intrepid (10 points), Galactic (12 points).



Component cards

In order to construct the various rockets in the game, you will need to collect two different resources: Metal and Fuel. These resources are represented by component cards for each, and there are exactly enough resources in the game to construct all of the rockets in the deck.



Forget the technological wizardry for a moment - isn't building a rocket really as simply as slapping together some bits of metal and adding some fuel? It's simple enough, and it works, and it's enough to get these boys into orbit! Once you have placed a rocket card in your Construction Zone, you will need to collect a certain numberof these two types of resources before that rocket is considered to be constructed and is able to be advanced to the Quality Control Zone, and then later to the Launch Zone. Even your Mama can tell you that a rocket without fuel isn't going anywhere! The amount of each component that's needed is listed on the rocket cards.

Expert cards

There are three main kinds of expert cards in the game: Engineers, Inspectors, and Mission Controllers. There is also a fourth type of expert, the Jack-of-all-Trades which can be employed as a kind of wild card, and can be played in the place of any other regular expert. Each one of these experts corresponds to one of the three game play zones (Construction, Quality Control, and Launch Zone), because you'll need an expert in each zone to be able to advance the rocket from that zone, and get it toward the final point scoring zone. Mission Controllers are particularly important - because if you don't have one at game end, you'll suffer a ten point penalty, after all, who is going to oversee the successful launch of your rockets? We don't want Mama getting burned on take-off now, do we!



Bonus cards

There are four kinds of bonus cards in the game: Quality Certificates, Maximum Security Cards, as well as Astronaut and Oxygen cards. The bonus cards are cards which can be played with constructed rockets in order to gain extra points in the final scoring phase. Attaching the bonus cards to the rockets is optional and each rocket may only have a maximum of one of each type of bonus card.



Action cards

The action cards provide players the with ability to execute a variety of rule-bending special actions that are either personally beneficial (such Parts Supplier, which lets you draw additional cards) or which interfere in dastardly ways with the best laid plans of your opponents (the most brutal example being the Abort Mission card which allows you to destroy one of your opponents rocket’s by moving it, along with any bonus cards that were attached to it, into the discard pile).



There's quite a variety of different action cards - much more than what you see here - and these in particular make the game a lot of fun!

Specialty cards

Specialty cards provide players with a unique additional ability, or with an added level of protection during the game. There are only four of them, although there are multiple copies of each in the deck: Warehouse, Security System, Overtime, and Employee Contract. Each player may have only have one specialty card in play at a time, although players may discard and replace the specialty card during their turn at will.



Launch Pad cards

The final kind of cards in the deck are the Launch Pad cards. There are only four Launch Pad cards in the game and these cards are shuffled into the bottom half of the draw deck during the setup phase of the game. These cards must be played immediately when they are drawn and they will serve as a kind of game clock. When all four cards have been drawn, played, and advanced through the various game zones into the Launch Pad area then the game has entered into its final round.



Reference cards

Finally there are also four reference cards that provide an overview of the flow of play. These reference cards are double-sided and prove surprisingly helpful. On the one side, the various game zones are depicted (Construction Zone, Quality Control Zone, and Launch Zone), along with the various cards that can be played in a particular zone. On the reverse side there are instructions for setup as well as details about the turn phases, scoring, and a list of card types. These reference cards have been very well laid out and are very helpful for help first time rocket scientists learn and play the game.



Rule book

The eleven page, full colour rule book has been clearly written and well laid out. The rule book provides a clear description of all of the various types of cards, along with a clear description of how each type of card is used. The various game zones are described and the specific kinds of cards that can be played in those game zones have also been clearly illustrated. The rule book contains many examples which help clarify the various rules and explain the flow of play. You'll be left with few or no questions after reading it: job well done here by the designer and publisher. If only rocket science was always this easy!



If you want to preview the complete rules, you can download the rule book from the publisher's website here.

GAME-PLAY

So how does all this come together in game-play for rocket scientist wannabes?

Objective

Be warned that you will need a fair bit of table space to play this game! Each player will need enough space in front of them to be able to lay out three rows of cards, which represent the following three zones, from top to bottom being:
● Launch Zone (corresponding expert: Mission Controller)
● Quality Control Zone (corresponding expert: Inspector)
● Construction Zone (corresponding expert: Engineer)

The reference card sums up this layout nicely:



The bottom row is known as the Construction zone and this is the zone in which you will initially place the rockets that you hope to build. The second row is the Quality Control Zone, while the final row in the play area is the point-scoring Launch Zone. So the rockets that you build will initially be placed in the Construction zone, where you'll equip them with the Metal and Fuel that they need. Once they've got the required components, if you have the required Construction expert (Engineer) you can advance them into the Quality Control Zone. If you have the Quality Control expert (Inspector), you can then make them progress to the Launch Zone, where they'll score points - as long as you have the Launch Zone expert (Mission Controller)! In the process, there will be opportunity to add some of the blue Bonus cards to your rockets for extra points. As well as your experts and rockets (with the yellow component and the blue bonus cards attached), you can also have a single green Specialty card in play, that will give you special benefits.

Here's a shot from midway a game, where a player has managed to get all three required experts in play, and has rockets in all three stages of construction, quality control, and launch-ready.



As well as the cards pictured, you can also play the red Action cards to mess with your opponents ... or help your own rocket scientist operation progress even faster!

Set-up

To set-up the game, first take out the four Launch Pad cards, and thoroughly shuffle all of the remaining cards in order to form a common draw deck. Next, deal a starting hand of six cards to each player (along with a reference card). After this, divide the draw deck in half and shuffle the four Launch Pad cards into the bottom half of the deck, and then place the entire shuffled deck in the centre of the playing area. Let's blast off!



Flow of Play

Plays take turns, which consist of several phases:
1. Advance Launch Pad cards. Players must advance all Launch Pad cards in their play zones one zone ahead, placing them into the Launch Pad Area if those cards had reached the Launch Zone of their play area. This only happens in the closing stages of the game, and there are only four cards that this applies to, as a way of triggering the end game.
2. Advance completed rockets. In the second phase, players may advance completed rockets in their play area ahead one zone. There are several important details that need to be noted about this phase. In the first place, rockets may only be advanced to a higher play zone if the requisite expert has previously been placed in that zone. As an example, a rocket may only be advanced from the Construction Zone to the Quality Control zone if an Engineer card is already in play in the Construction zone. Only one rocket per game zone can be advanced on a given turn.
3. Draw cards. In the next phase players may draw cards up to their hand limit (which is generally six, but that number can be increased through the play of some specialty cards); one of those cards may be the top card from the discard pile.
4. Play cards. Players may then proceed to play as many cards as they are able to legally play. If a player is able to play all of the cards in their hand on a given turn, they may refill their hand up to their hand limit and continue to play – this can only occur once per turn.
5. Discard cards. In the final phase of a player’s turn they have the option of discarding from their hand as many cards as they wish. Remember this phrase well, because it will return later in this review: strategic discarding!

Most of the time you'll be trying to get a situation so that on your turn you have completed rockets that you can advance to the next zone. So for much of the game you'll be trying to manage your hand to ensure that you have the three required experts in play, and you'll be playing rockets and component cards, advancing completed rockets towards your Launch Zone, and occasionally adding bonus cards to your rockets.



Most of the phases are played very quickly - the most important phase where the action really happens is during the fourth phase when you Play cards on your turn. This is when you play your experts, your rockets and components, and your bonus cards. Here's a well equipped rocket that has advanced to the Launch Zone and has all four possible bonus cards!



But the fun really starts happening when you start messing with your opponent with the Action cards. Abort Mission is particularly painful - it can be used to send a completed rocket (even with bonus cards!) - straight to the discard pile! Fortunately there are ways to protect yourself against this, such as the specialty card offering a Security System, or the bonus card that gives you Maximum Security.



One of your first priorities will be getting experts into play - otherwise even if you do build rockets you can't advance them! The "Recruitment" action card can be a real nuisance, because it allows you to steal an expert from an opponent: brutal! As the game progresses, players will get experts into play, build and advance rockets, and do some other cool things with the specialty and action cards. Eventually the Launch Pad cards will emerge from the deck, and at this point the end is near!

Game End

As noted already concerning the set-up, the four Launch Pad cards are shuffled into the bottom half of the draw deck. As players draw these cards they are required to play them into their play area (on the left hand side of the Expert column) and to advance the cards one zone at a time in each subsequent turn. The turn after these cards reach the Launch Zone, they are placed into the Launch Pad Area - and when all four cards have been placed together to make up a single picture of the Launch Pad, the game enters its final round. Each player takes one final turn, including the player who placed the final Launch Pad card into the Launch Pad Area and then the game is over. Final scoring takes place and a winner is declared!

Here the end of a two player game is approaching, as the final Launch Pad cards are being assembled:



Be warned, because the end can be hastened unexpectedly if a player presses the Big Red Button pictured here - an action card that has the potential to move the last Launch Pad card directly to the Launch Pad area, and so trigger the game end before anyone expects it!



Scoring

In terms of end game scoring here is how the final scores are calculated, as summarized in the rulebook reference chart:



Sound complicated? It's not really. Rockets in the Launch Zone score full points, while rockets in the Quality Control Zone score no points and rockets in the Construction Zone score minus points. Quality Control certificates give a bonus of 3 points each, while Astronauts give a bonus of 4 points each - as long as they also have Oxygen, otherwise they score 4 minus points (and you incur lifelong guilt for having sent a brave space explorer to his doom!). You also score minus 10 points if you don't have a Mission Controller at the end of the game to ensure the successful launch of your rockets. Total up the points and the individual with the highest score is the winner!

Here a player had a final score of 20 points:



On some occasions, if you don't quite get your rocket science right - or for that matter find your rockets being sabotaged and your experts being recruited by your opponents - you may even end up with minus points! On other occasions, you may end the game with a huge amount of rockets, as seen here where a player had a score of more than 80 points at the game end!



CONCLUSIONS

What do we think?

Great Theme: Is there anyone out there who hasn’t imagined being an astronaut or who hasn’t dreamed of travelling amongst the stars? Now while it's true that the game is not a substitute for taking a university course in elementary space robotics, it’s also true that if the game involved the construction of hot dog carts or some other less exciting piece of technology it wouldn’t be nearly as engaging. The fact is this is a theme that anybody can get behind and enjoy – which is exactly what you want in good family game. And particularly the Action cards and Specialty cards support the theme well. For example a Warehouse gives you extra cards, a Security System protects you against Sabotage and Aborted Missions played by your opponents, Overtime lets you advance twice as many rockets as normal, Employee Contract protects your experts from Recruitment by other players, Budget Cuts can cause you to lose a Specialty card, Parts Supplier lets you draw extra cards, Quality Check lets you move an opponent's rocket from the Launch Zone back to the Quality Control Zone - and much more! In most cases, there are ways to avoid the nasty cards by playing other cards that protect you from their effects. In that regard the game has the potential to improve with repeated play, as you learn what all the cards can do, and find ways to anticipate potentially harmful plays that your opponents might do. Not all the cards are equally powerful, but overall they offer different advantages, and create a different flavour. All in all it's surprisingly thematic, and older children will especially enjoy this aspect of the game.

Lucky Rocket Science: Does true rocket science leave room for luck? I don't know about the real world, but I know that in this game there are decisions to make - at least, enough of them to make the game enjoyable, as long as its played quickly and lightly, and over and done with in a half hour time frame. For example, which specialty cards should you play, how many rockets should you start building, which cards should you keep or discard? But luck of the draw does play a large role, and some cards can be quite brutal at key stages of the game (e.g. Abort Mission, Recruitment, Salvage), and effectively determine the winner. Be prepared to see precious missions get aborted, valuable experts get recruited, and useful warehouses closed down as a result of budget cuts. While the decisions that are to be made are about rocket science, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to make it, and there's enough there to make it interesting, but more often than not your rocket science will need a healthy dose of luck to succeed. Does that matter? Not really, because even when disaster strikes, the theme and story will emerge ("Remember that time when you used a Vacuum on my rocket to steal my Oxygen and my Astronaut died, and then you recruited my Engineer and I was stuck with all those half built Rockets, and then you Sabotaged my best rocket and used Salvage to do it again?") Extremely painful from a gameplay perspective, but the story helps make the bitter pill easier to swallow. It also means that the first time player has a chance of winning against people who have played the game before - and this will actually make it a good choice for older children to play with their friends.

Strategic Discarding: My mother always warned me to practice safe discarding and with Launch Pad her advice is finally paying off. One of the keys to playing this game competitively is knowing when to discard, how many cards to discard, and what card to leave on top of the pile. The ability to discard as many cards as you wish at the end of turn is particularly helpful in that it not only allows you cycle through the deck for the cards that you need, but it also speeds the game along. The risk, however, is that it does speed the game along and if your efforts to dig for the card you need produce Launch Pad cards you may not have the time that you need to complete your rockets. Further, you need to think carefully about the order that you place the cards into the discard pile or you may be helping your opponents find what they need! But the aspect of Hand Management is an important element in the game. Rather than hang on to cards in your hand that might be useful later in the game, you are often better to discard your entire hand in the hope that you'll increase the chances of drawing what you need in the short term at the beginning of the next round. On the other hand, in the late game you may just want to keep a Jack-of-all-Trades in your hand in case you lose one of your experts at a critical moment! Sometimes it's worth taking a risk to set yourself up with a hand where you can play all your cards, and so get the rare bonus of drawing an extra hand. Strategic discarding and careful hand management helps keep your choices interesting, and decisions are not always obvious.

Specialty Cards: Choosing the right specialty cards for the right stage of the game is an important element of the game. As an example, the Employee Contract card that protects your experts against being recruited by other players is a good choice for the early game - as is the Warehouse which increases your hand size from 6 to 8 cards. For the midgame, you might want to think about employing the Overtime card which allows you to advance two rockets per zone on your turn. As the game nears its end, you might opt for a Security System to protect your precious rockets from malicious sabotage. There are many risks in the world of rocket science, but these cards give you options to avoid certain perils, or maximize your benefits, and choosing which cards to use will be one of the fun choices of the game.

Shooting Down the Opposition: The `take that' factor in this game is quite strong, and at times the level of interaction is such that it borders on becoming vicious and brutal. In 2 player games, you know that you run the risk of being sucker-punched by your opponent, but in a 3-4 player game, there's real potential that everyone could gang up on you and play nasty. In many cases, this is actually a good thing, because players will tend to pick on the leader - so from that perspective it functions as a good balancing mechanism. In one four player game our scores were 9, 12, 14, and 19 - while two player games are less nasty, the scores can also be much more lopsided. While the competitive and confrontational elements have the advantage of keeping scores close, it has to be admitted that it can be quite painful to be on the receiving end of certain cards, especially when you see your precious rockets being sabotaged, your experts being recruited, or your astronauts deprived of oxygen by other players - especially at key moments of the game. And who do you pick on? There is potential for grudges to develop! The level of nastiness is higher in a game with 3 or 4 players, because you'll be going through the draw deck for the second and third time, and since at this point most rocket and component cards will already be in play, what remains will primarily be useless experts, or lots of action cards. Cards like Recruitment, Sabotage, Abort Mission, Salvage etc in the hands of an evil opponent can quickly put you from first to last in a single turn near the game end - as happened to me when I lost 28 points in a single swoop. Not every child will be able to handle a disaster of this nature, but when played with a right spirit, it can lead to friendly rivalries and good-natured game-play. You can always play another game, and your disastrous showing in one game might quickly be overshadowed by a glorious victory in the next! The positive aspect of the strong take-that element is that it means that even those who are behind in the middle of the game do have ways of clawing back, if the cards are right, so you never feel that you're completely out of the game! And if the take-that elements do prove too harsh, there are always ways of toning them down by removing certain cards or finding ways to end the game before cycling through the deck the second or third time. Younger children might best enjoy the two player game, since it is less cut-throat.

Game Clock Factor: Shuffling the Launch Pad cards into the bottom half of the deck provides the game with an internal and variably ending game clock. This proves to be a particularly interesting and fun design choice in so far as it results in the incorporation of a push-your-luck quality to the game. That’s because any rockets which remain in the construction zone when the game ends will score minus points at the end of the game. So will you have enough time to complete that last rocket before the game ends? Should you begin building another rocket, yes or no? What about if someone pushes the Big Red Button and the game ends quicker than you expect? These kinds of questions add to the fun as the game draws to a conclusion. Additionally, if you really wanted to play a quicker game you could opt to play the Launch Pad cards directly into the Launch Pad Area rather than advancing them through the various game zones as per normal.

Quick Blast Off: This game plays relatively quickly and individual player turns generally move along very smoothly. A two player game can be finished in under half an hour, and games with 3-4 players don't really take much longer since the end of the game is triggered in a similar way. This makes Launch Pad an excellent choice for families that are often looking to slip a game in before bed time.

Don't judge the game too quickly after just one or two plays - it takes time to get to know some of the cards and see how they interact. Also don't take it too seriously - be prepared for bad luck and cut-throat opponents to combine in order to turn your first forays into the world of space into a perilous exercise. No it's not as difficult as real rocket science, let's be honest, and it's not Glory to Rome either. If you're expecting a Race for the Galaxy type experience, you won't find it here, despite the fact that both games shoot for the stars and are themed in space. But to be fair, Launch Pad is also light years away from Uno, and it needs to be judged in that context rather than trying to make it pale beside more serious and more strategic games. When played casually and quickly as a light game, then it can be reasonable fun, especially for those who have grown up on a Uno diet - they in particularly will really enjoy the different action cards and the theme. The fact that luck will sometimes trump the outcome won't deter them - in their view, they're having a blast. I'm speaking from firsthand experience here - one of my children's friends is a Uno regular, and was absolutely stunned by this game and wanted to play it over and over, and get a copy for herself. To me, that means that the game is a success, even if it isn't a success when measured by the popularity charts which favour BGG heavyweights - many of which will never get off the ground in a regular family, let alone make it as high as your gaming table, or soar into space with non-gamers or children. In a crowded market of well designed card games, Launch Pad might not have credentials to make it stand out above most, but at least it is guaranteed to get some flight time with families and kids. Even the hardcore eurogaming parent will have to concede that the well-themed design offers a refreshing change from medieval trading and cube pushing, even if your visits to space prove brief before returning to the Middle Ages.



Recommendation

Is Launch Pad for you? Launch Pad is a game which has proven to be something of a surprise for us, despite its unassuming packaging. As a family game it is easy to learn and fun to play. The strong `take that' factor won't suit everyone, but it provides a level of excitement as well as some good-natured competition that keeps things interesting, and even helps keep the game balanced. So is this a game that might be of interest to you? Well if you are looking for a good family game to play with children ages eight and up then Launch Pad might be a good game for you. As a bonus it plays reasonably well as a two-player game, and although it won't satisfy the average eurogamer's thirst for the ultimate two player filler, there is a chance you'll have 30 minutes of fun out of a quick quick game at the end of a long day - although as a rule it's probably not the ideal choice for an adult-only session with gamers who have any form of serious eurogaming credentials. But if you enjoy casual and light card games like Archaeology then Launch Pad might also be of interest to you - and there's a good chance it will be of interest to your children or perhaps their friends. Let's face it, most of your kids' friends aren't going to play Race for the Galaxy any time soon, but there's a real good chance they'll be happy to crack this open multiple times over the winter holidays. Will they still be playing it in 5 years time? Maybe not, but they'll have enjoyed the ride into space while it lasted. All in all, this is light, fun, quick card game that's excels particularly when it's enjoyed as a family game for older children. Mama, let the Countdown to Take-off begin!



Credits: This review is a collaborative effort between EndersGame and jtemple.

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mb The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596

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Eric Etkin
United States
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Designer - AstroMiner & TactDecks: Reign of Heroes
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Wow. Those are some graphically beautiful cards!
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Jason Tucker
United States
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Im definitely buying this game
 
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Andy Andersen
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Great review.. I love that retro look of the cards.
 
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Redmond
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I'm going to be a party pooper. As a girl who grew up in the "girls aren't astronauts" era I'm sad to be reminded of that. Couldn't they have thrown in a female for one of the cards? And maybe somebody who isn't 100% rockjawed white?
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Laughing Cow Cheese wrote:
Couldn't they have thrown in a female for one of the cards? And maybe somebody who isn't 100% rockjawed white?

I take your point, but you also see that the face is the exact same clip art on each, right?
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Freelance Police
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Laughing Cow Cheese wrote:
I'm going to be a party pooper. As a girl who grew up in the "girls aren't astronauts" era I'm sad to be reminded of that. Couldn't they have thrown in a female for one of the cards? And maybe somebody who isn't 100% rockjawed white?


Were this a non-family game, I'd write something otherwise, but I'm gonna poop, too! Girls should be told that, they too, can have the same careers as the boys. Why should only men have jobs threatened by lack of government funding?

Also, here's where I would have said, "Well, if you want a gender-neutral family game, why don't you publish one?" -- except the good folks at Gamewright Games and Out of the Box Games *have* published such games. Many party games are also gender-neutral. (Unfortunately, many times "gender neutral" means making no references to either sex. Can't win them all.)

And, speaking of marketing, I think there's an opportunity here. Stratus Games can certainly have BGG carry promotional cards featuring female characters as alternative card art for their games! (Tanto Curare should have promotional alternative art bishie butler cards to replaced the Private Maids deck, but let's not go there.)

Anyway, thanks for the review! Your hard illustrative work is much appreciated!
 
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Blake Stetson
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I really dislike this game. A friend of mine picked it up at Barnes and Noble for $5 and we've played it around 4 or 5 times. The game plays itself. The only interesting decision is what to discard ( but usually that's even quite obvious).

Meh.
 
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