Recommend
50 
 Thumb up
 Hide
137 Posts
[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [6] | 

Wargames» Forums » General

Subject: Military History Bookshelf for February, 2012 rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Steve Trauth
Australia
Pretty much everywhere
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Army History unit's full publication list (as well)...

http://www.history.army.mil/catalog/browse/title.html

I had a great time testing my ISP bandwidth allotment when I found it - got the official history of the Vietnam War as well.

They also have a couple of Earl Ziemke books on the Eastern Front.

Moscow to Stalingrad & Stalingrad to Berlin --- however those were both written before the end of the Cold War (and subsequent availability of more info)... just an example of what you can find there.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Twin Cities
Minnesota
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
I just finished K Blows Top. "K" being Nikita Khrushchev, Soviet premier, and the book being about Nixon's visit to Moscow in 1959, Khrushchev's famous tour of the US in 1959, and his trip to New York for the UN General Assemly in 1960, when he pounded his shoe.

Not exactly military history, but it is an interesting chapter from the Cold War, and lots of discussion of missiles and nuclear weapons and possibility of war. Entertaining and interesting.

14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon
Canada
flag msg tools
mb
Very unusual title.

Must be a headline?
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Twin Cities
Minnesota
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
Capt_S wrote:
Very unusual title.

Must be a headline?


It was. Lots of newspapers shortened Khrushchev's names in the headlines, frequently using K.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Belli
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Wargames » Forums » General
Re: Military History Bookshelf for February, 2012
Quote:
Lots of newspapers shortened Khrushchev's names in the headlines, frequently using K.


In 2012 it could be:

K? OMG! LOL.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Finke
United States
Des Moines
Iowa
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
jeb123 wrote:
southern_cross_116 wrote:
finke67 wrote:
I'm looking for a book covering the Army's action in the Pacific Theater. Any suggestions?



What Jeb said- plus you can find them in pdf format on the Army History unit's site for download. (Plus loads more as well).


Here is the link

http://www.history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/ww2-ap....

If you've got an iPad, you can save the pdf's to you iBook library.

There is a similar series on the web for WWI if folks are interested in that war as well.


Thank you. I will definately look at this and pass it on to my coworker as well (both his grandfather's served in the Pacific in the Army).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Migliore
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb


Been playing lots of Market Garden games recently... so started reading Cornelius Ryan's excellent account. Highly recommend it. Much easy reading than the stack of East Front books I was slogging through last year.

Also watched the movie which is always good too.



16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon
Canada
flag msg tools
mb
Great book and one of my favourite (guilty pleasure) movies.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Sager
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Capt_S wrote:
Great book and one of my favourite (guilty pleasure) movies.


Yes indeed! Director Richard Attenborough (Big X from "The Great Escape") also directed one of my favorite movies, "Gandhi".
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob
United States
flag msg tools
"Well, my time of not taking you seriously is coming to a middle."
badge
"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ..."
mbmbmbmbmb
landru wrote:


Been playing lots of Market Garden games recently... so started reading Cornelius Ryan's excellent account. Highly recommend it. Much easy reading than the stack of East Front books I was slogging through last year.

Also watched the movie which is always good too.



Funny you should mention this:

Operation Market Garden

Last night I purchased this same book on my Nook Color. Speaking of e-books, would be curious how many of us are using e-books these days?
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Twin Cities
Minnesota
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
Ashitaka wrote:


Last night I purchased this same book on my Nook Color. Speaking of e-books, would be curious how many of us are using e-books these days?


I have a Kindle but the last thing I want to read on it is a military history book that has maps - as any decent military history book should.
16 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Conway
United States
Boonville
Indiana
flag msg tools
For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes... Romans 1:16
mbmbmbmbmb
wifwendell wrote:
Ashitaka wrote:


Last night I purchased this same book on my Nook Color. Speaking of e-books, would be curious how many of us are using e-books these days?


I have a Kindle but the last thing I want to read on it is a military history book that has maps - as any decent military history book should.


Totally agree. I have a Kindle Touch, and it's completely impractical trying to read anything that requires you to jump around, such as nonfiction books with charts or maps. It is certainly outstanding for novels though.

So, that being said, I am currently reading Patrick O'Brian's HMS Surprise on the Kindle.



I am also reading John R. Elting's Swords Around a Throne in paperback.

15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Sager
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
If you like O'Brian, you have to read Alexander Kent's 'Bolitho" stories. They're better than Hornblower.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jovan Bogdanovic
Australia
Brisbane
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb


I've just finished reading Tank Men by Robert Kershaw.

The thought of flipping a tank counter in ASL is making me feel a bit squeamish.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geri
Hungary
Debrecen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Siege of Leningrad 1941-1944-900 Days of Terror by David M. Glantz

9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Ransom
United States
Forest
Virginia
flag msg tools
Yes I am a Wargamer, Jackass.
mbmbmbmbmb
Rockhopper01 wrote:
So, that being said, I am currently reading Patrick O'Brian's HMS Surprise on the Kindle.



thumbsup

POB's Aubrey/Maturin series is the best literature I have ever read. Very satisfying, and a most worthy endeavor!

7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
jpr755 wrote:
POB's Aubrey/Maturin series is the best literature I have ever read. Very satisfying, and a most worthy endeavor!


whereas Douglas Reeman's oeuvre isn't really, nor is the rest, although I note the last books in the Fox series are very hard to obtain:
"This is the novel where Fox turns highwayman and joins his childhood enemies, the Hogans, to administer their own form of justice on Lord Rowe."

Hornblower had his uses, as I suspect he benefitted Gregory Peck's style, whereas Russel Crowe doing Jack Aubrey was an interesting example of a good actor meeting his Waterloo, acting so hard high-pressure steam was coming out of his ears.

C. S. Forester and Cornelius Ryan were authors in poor health, though Ryan was on the way out when he was writing A Bridge Too Far. I suspect it might be best to read this book last, rather than first like so many of us, for its generally exceeded by all the others, being disjointed, unbalanced, long on anecdote and short on understanding -- beginning with the title. Ryan's wife wrote an account of his final illness which was well received.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alfred Wallace
United States
Champaign
IL
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb


Prof. Dan Beaver here at PSU, recommended I read Barbara Donagan's War in England with an eye to providing context for my ACW dissertation. This is sort of the centerpiece of it. One of my favorite books was Carlton's Going to the Wars, a book (basically) about the ways and means of soldiering in the ECW. Donagan surpasses it.

It's in five parts. The first deals with attitudes towards war, from a secular and religious perspective, and also discusses "Military Educations," how the English learned about war, be it from literature or experience.

There follows three chapters on "The Texture of War," which focuses on the world (i.e., the society) that surrounded soldiers during the war. She uses what seems to be a useful concept, "Integrated War," to describe the the porous spheres between the civilian and military world on the one hand, and between the combatants on the other. The divisions weren't as sharp as they might be in other wars. I was planning on looking at spheres, and traveling between them, in my own work; this gives some historiographical background.

Then come four chapters on law, formal and informal, and how they governed what happened on the battlefield. This is a section in my own dissertation I'm struggling with, so I found this useful mostly for "stylistic" inspiration.

The last two sections might be of the most interest to non-professionals. The first, "The Protagonists," is about what one might call the anthropology of soldiers, officers, and the armies they made up. What makes a good officer? What led to cases of cowardice and other "martial failure" in the men? How and why did the armies change over the course of the war? What stayed the same?

The book culminates in the accounts of two sieges, both late in the period. Boarstall House was a minor siege, and Donagan looks a lot at the rhetoric of the surrender negotiations and the besieged Royalist commander's preoccupation with his own honor throughout (he refused to abandon the King, even in the face of an utterly hopeless siege). The siege of Colchester gets a lot more attention, which is reasonable given its much larger size and importance (if not to the war, then to how it was remembered).

Important: You will not get a diagram of the walls and the Parliamentary outworks in this book. The nuts and bolts of the siege are less important than the nature of the siege's destruction, the life of those involved in the siege, and how besieger and besieged dealt with each other. Not to mention the propaganda war that surrounded Colchester--who was committing the atrocities and why?

I liked this book a lot. That said, it may not be for everybody. Oxford has issued the book in paperback and for the Kindle, which means they expect it to reach a reasonably popular audience (if it's just for "us professionals," they charge $110 and only expect libraries to buy them). What kind of popular audience is being addressed here?

1. You need to have a pretty good grasp of the English Civil Wars. This is not, and does not pretend to be, a narrative of the conflict. Donagan assumes that the reader basically knows why the war was being fought in the first place, who the major players are, and the general outline of the battles and campaigns.

2. You're not going to get many battle narratives in here. She doesn't include them, because they "have been extensively studied, and their place in its political and religious as well as its military history is widely recognized." If you want to read about Marston Moor, you are encouraged to get a book on Marston Moor.

3. This book is addressed to fans of what in a previous generation was called "new" military history, which addresses the experience of soldiering--and civilian-ing--in preference to political and "strictly" military history. Basically, if you've read some good texts on the bigger-scale war, this helps bring out soldiers and civilians as individuals and as groups.

I wish it had more on garrisons. If Geoffrey Parker (Military Revolution) is to be believed--and he generally is--for much of the war half the men under arms were pulling garrison duty, not serving in field armies. Garrison duty is kind of my job, so I grasped at the occasional straw. In conversation with Prof. Beaver, the problem is sources; unless there were battles going on the written record is pretty thin. Dr. Beaver did find enough sources to write a chapter on one community in Gloucester, but in general my kind of garrison is usually invisible (in terms of getting a good grip, anyway).

Anyway: Highly recommended to those with an interest in:

1. The English Civil War
2. Soldier, officer, and army life
3. How soldiers and civilians get along
4. Sieges

But again: You need to be pretty clear on your ECW history before diving in.

(EDIT: One ambiguous phrase, one mis-read number, and misspelling the freaking author's name twice.)
18 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Twin Cities
Minnesota
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
jpr755 wrote:
Rockhopper01 wrote:
So, that being said, I am currently reading Patrick O'Brian's HMS Surprise on the Kindle.



thumbsup

POB's Aubrey/Maturin series is the best literature I have ever read. Very satisfying, and a most worthy endeavor!



I blew thru all 20 of those books in about 3 months, they were so damn good. And I can't tell a jib from a sprit (or whatever those naval thingamajigs are)! I admit I tended to skip over POB's loving descriptions of rigging and all that...
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jur dj
Netherlands
Leiden
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
alfredhw wrote:
I wish it had more on garrisons. If Geoffrey Parker (Military Revolution) is to be believed--and he generally is--for much of the war half the men under arms were pulling garrison duty, not serving in field armies. Garrison duty is kind of my job, so I grasped at the occasional straw. In conversation with Prof. Beaver, the problem is sources; unless there were battles going on the written record is pretty thin. Dr. Beaver did find enough sources to write a chapter on one community in Gloucester, but in general my kind of garrison is usually invisible (in terms of getting a good grip, anyway).


Have you tried contemporary newspapers? I could get you in contact with someone who's done extensive transcriptions of ECW newspapers and other sources if you're serious about the research.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Conway
United States
Boonville
Indiana
flag msg tools
For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes... Romans 1:16
mbmbmbmbmb
wifwendell wrote:
jpr755 wrote:
Rockhopper01 wrote:
So, that being said, I am currently reading Patrick O'Brian's HMS Surprise on the Kindle.



thumbsup

POB's Aubrey/Maturin series is the best literature I have ever read. Very satisfying, and a most worthy endeavor!



I blew thru all 20 of those books in about 3 months, they were so damn good. And I can't tell a jib from a sprit (or whatever those naval thingamajigs are)! I admit I tended to skip over POB's loving descriptions of rigging and all that...


Then I can also heartily recommend A Sea of Words to go along with the series.

6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob
United States
flag msg tools
"Well, my time of not taking you seriously is coming to a middle."
badge
"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ..."
mbmbmbmbmb
wifwendell wrote:
Ashitaka wrote:


Last night I purchased this same book on my Nook Color. Speaking of e-books, would be curious how many of us are using e-books these days?


I have a Kindle but the last thing I want to read on it is a military history book that has maps - as any decent military history book should.



Granted I'm new at using the Nook for war books, but I haven't found the maps to be an issue as of yet. I can bookmark the map pages and reference them whenever desired and I can scroll/zoom on the map however I like. So far so good...

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim O'Neill (Established 1949)
Scotland
Motherwell
I aten't dead yet...
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb

Acquired February, 2012 and just finished it. It is an engrossing treatise on the theory and practice of wargame design by Professor Philip Sabin, the chappie who wrote both Lost Battles and Lost Battles: Reconstructing the Great Clashes of the Ancient World.


Jim
Est. 1949

16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alfred Wallace
United States
Champaign
IL
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
jurdj wrote:
alfredhw wrote:
I wish it had more on garrisons. If Geoffrey Parker (Military Revolution) is to be believed--and he generally is--for much of the war half the men under arms were pulling garrison duty, not serving in field armies. Garrison duty is kind of my job, so I grasped at the occasional straw. In conversation with Prof. Beaver, the problem is sources; unless there were battles going on the written record is pretty thin. Dr. Beaver did find enough sources to write a chapter on one community in Gloucester, but in general my kind of garrison is usually invisible (in terms of getting a good grip, anyway).


Have you tried contemporary newspapers? I could get you in contact with someone who's done extensive transcriptions of ECW newspapers and other sources if you're serious about the research.



We've thought of newspapers, they're just not enormously common for very many of these garrisoned communities, which often may not have a population of more than 1000--and less, when the first army showed up.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe R

Ohio
msg tools
mbmb
Another one I just finished is The Greatest Battle by Andrew Nagorski.

The subtitle sort of says it all here – Stalin, Hitler and the Desperate Struggle for Moscow that Changed the Course of WW2. This purports to be a history of the battle, well campaign, in 1941, but the author is not a historian, but rather a journalist and it shows through and through. The book is thus a battle book or battle history that leaves most of the battle outside the scope of the book. Being no great expert on military matters (at one point he apparently confuses divisions with brigades), the author focuses his attention on the things that any journalist would focus on – the people story and interesting vignettes along the way.

To be clear, this is not necessarily a “bad thing” in any way, it is just something to be aware of before delving into the book. Because if you come to this book looking for details of the fighting, you are going to be completely dismayed and frustrated. On the other hand, if you want to hear the “rest of the story” so to speak, then this book has something to say. To be sure, there is military stuff going on, and some of that makes its way to the foreground, at least in relatively cursory fashion, but the author tells a bunch of other stories. Such as the story of the internal conflicts inside the German high command, not in specialist fashion but in general history format), the story of some of the conflicts inside the Soviet high command, the story of how the relationships between the Soviets and the Western Allies got started and a bunch of very interesting stories about the human side of things. One thing the author weaves in that is particularly interesting is a journalist’s view of the historiography of the battle after the battle and especially after the war. There are a couple of stories about the author and a bunch of guys wandering around in the woods picking up relics and bones. The “guys” are Russians dedicated to trying to find remains of soldiers and give them a proper burial. The fact that these are modern era (like now) people doing this tells a lot about the Soviet regime and Putin’s goons.

So what does this book add? I think it has a role if you want an introduction to the non-military context of the battle. I am hoping to find something stronger on the military side of things and have Rodric Braithwaite’s Moscow 1941 and Seaton’s Battle of Moscow on my shelf at the moment, so I am hoping for good things there. But the author here makes the point that no one really has a political interest in telling the story of this pivotal battle. You would think the story of the Nazi’s first defeat would be a big deal, but there are so many minefields and pitfalls in this story, from all sides, that no one really wants to dredge this up politically. The Soviet side has Stalin’s obvious stupidity (both in the purge trials and in 1941) to worry about, the obvious stupidity of their forces’ conduct in Barbarossa and the civilian panic in October to avoid. P{lus almost unimaginable casualties, far beyond what the Soviet regime could admit (and the admitted casualties were horrific). The Germans obviously lost this one, so no biggie there. And it can’t all be blamed on Hitler – wasn’t him who said leave most of the German Army’s winter clothes in Warsaw. And the Western Allies’ craven kowtowing to Stalin started right there before the final apocalypse before Moscow. So, yeah, not a whole lot of political interest beyond what Seaton has contributed and the three volume history of Paul Carrell way back in the 60s.

Which, incidentally, is still the case. Aside from this book and the other two cited above, even Amazon doesn’t list a lot of stuff on this battle. Which, when you think about it, is pretty amazing. 7 million men involved, casualties as high as anything in WW1, much less WW2 and nobody talks about it much. Of course, a lot of this is due to the destruction of German records in WW2 and the closing of the Russian archives by the Soviets and their imitators in Putin’s regime of thugs, but still a shame and a disservice to all the brave men and women who turned back the Nazi tide for the first time.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [6] | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.