$10.00
Judit Szepessy
Canada
London
Canada
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Introduction

Conflicting Kingdoms is a CCG designed by Simon Miles and was published in 2011. There are a lot of CCGs out there, so what is it that makes Conflicting Kingdoms unique and different from other similar games in the market?
This review is going to cover the game play for two players, but the game can be played with three and four players too.

Components

You get fifty cards in a box, and if I understand correctly, these are themed decks. The cards are of good quality, and the artwork is outstanding. Each deck is designed by different artists and it gives an individual flavour to every deck. Conflicting Kingdoms is populated by humorous sometimes scary and energetic characters who love to fight and destroy each other!

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There are four main type of cards in the game: Avatar, Location, Ability (defense and attack), and Conflict cards. Each Avatar uses one or more of the four different elements (Land, Water, Fire and Air), and one of the those elements will be the dominant element recognised by the colour of the card. Your avatar will decide how much life you start with, how much gold you have, and how many deck cards you may start with in your hand. It will also tell you how many Location cards you may start with. There are sixteen different kinds of avatars.
Your avatar will basically give you a direction in what kind of strategy you will pursue during the game.

The Location cards are brought in to play, and construct the game board on which your miniature figure is used. It will also give you elements to play Ability Cards and have various Rewards.


Location and Conflict card from the Dwarf deck

You can use the Conflict cards only if you are attacked, and in this case the Conflict card takes the hit, not the avatar.

Gameplay

Once you figure out the rules, the game flows at a steady pace. The rules are not complex, but there are some nuances that are hard to get down only from the rule book.
In your turn you draw a card, play a location, move and may attack. After the attack you resolve the attack and collect the rewards. During the attack phase you use the abilities that your location cards, avatar and ability cards give you.


phase card

As you place down location cards from your hand, you build up your own board with its various defence and attack abilities. With your miniature, you move along with the help of a dice.


the game in play

There are two kinds of attack: ranged attack and close combat. Most often you will have ranged attack when you are not on the same card as your opponent. In this case, your opponent can use a Conflict card to defend his avatar. (The Conflict card takes the hit instead of the Avatar).
In the case of a close combat, (when you and your opponent are on the same location), your opponent cannot use a Conflict card, and his Avatar has to take the hit. Attacks are decided by a dice roll.
Your aim is to reduce your opponent life points to zero. Other helpers you have along the way is gold that helps you to purchase cards, or gain life points.

What I like about the game

I have to admit that nowadays we do not play a whole lot of card games in this genre, so I still have a lot to explore in this game. However, even in my limited experience I can see that this game is well play tested and has an innovative design. I like how much flexibility you have when putting down Location cards and using their abilities. The game plays fast, and in this short time you have to make meaningful decisions as to how to make the best use of your cards. I like games that pack meaningful decisions in a short time frame. Conflicting Kingdoms is such a game.

There is not much downtime, and the game is highly interactive. You are constantly engaged with the cards and your opponent.
Surely, there is luck in the game, due to the dice and the cards draw, but you can work your way around with clever deck building and carefully played cards. There is lots of room for skillful play. I also appreciate the tension that you feel every time you play the game. Various abilities and powers clash in each turn.
There are sixteen different races (decks) in the game with sixteen different avatars, and the various races can be mixed up as well. This surely gives a lot more replayablity!
I also enjoy the artwork: it is entertaining and also very functional.
If you like this genre, this game is an excellent addition to your collection.


an Avatar card

What I do not like


Honestly, it is really hard to say what I do not like about this game, as it works very well in its category. However, it was a pain to get down to the nitty gritty details of the gameplay, although there are good resources online, but I was not the only one who had difficulty to decipher the gameplay from the sketchy rulebook. User ericaustinlee helped me a lot to figure out how attacks and conflicts work.
Another minor issue I have with the cards is the small print, but hey, our younger buddies will have no problem with that.

Final thoughts

All in all, Conflicting Kingdoms should deserve more spotlight, as it is a challenging and entertaining card game.
For this amount of money, you cannot go wrong, so go ahead, and explore the funny and energetic world of Conflicting Kingdoms!
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Burster of Bubbles, Destroyer of Dreams.
United States
Sunnyvale
California
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Just imagine the red offboard up here. I'll create it Real Soon Now...
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How do the location cards connect? Does one player have to come attack the other on their own turf? How long do people hide in their own corner gaining strength before attacking?

How long do your games usually last?
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Flying Dutchman
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Ontario
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Thanks for this review Judit -- it was well written and informative. Nows, as you know, I love CCG style games -- and deck building is a mechanic that I love as well -- so we are going to have to add this one to the to be played pile as well. (We should actually make a real list one of these days ) I think that Elly might like this game as well -- so we'll have to get it to the table some time!

I like the variety that you get from the different avatars that you can choose -- the asymetrical start conditions intrigue me. So too does laying out the location cards as a map. The artwork also looks great!

Definitely one to try!
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Judit Szepessy
Canada
London
Canada
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Quote:
How do the location cards connect?

Your movement points are located at the top right hand corner of your Location card. You roll the dice and you can move across multiple cards until your move points have been used up.

Quote:
How long do your games usually last?

Thirty minutes average.

Quote:
Does one player have to come attack the other on their own turf?

You can also move to your enemy 's avatar and his territory.

Quote:
How long do people hide in their own corner gaining strength before attacking?

You can come out fairly early, depending on your abilities you get from your Avatar and the location you are on. You need only a few turns to put down Location and Ability cards before you attack.

 
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Eric Lee
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Sacramento
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Andy, you Goonie!!!
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Conflicting Kingdoms » Forums » Reviews
Re: Let's find out more about a hidden treasure and read about this CCG!
Great review, Judit.

To clarify when the attacks happen: they can happen (and often do) on the very first turn. Attacks happen when:

1) A player needs to utilize the elements (air, fire, water, and/or earth) to lay down an attack or defense ability. If they are utilized, that 'triggers' an attack--always. Then it is up to the defending player(s) to choose whether or not they want to defend with a Conflict card, or to 'take the hit' directly to their own Avatar. So if on my first turn I want to lay out some shields, an attack must follow.

2) Or, if the elements are not used, the user can still attack on a location if they want to gain the rewards from that location.
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Niels Peter Q Marstrand
Denmark
Copenhagen Region
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Colour code: #031634. How I enjoy this colour!
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Good review of an interesting game. This is an instance where the photos are truly welcome, because the graphics of those cards are striking & intriguing.
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