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Dungeon Command: Sting of Lolth» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Our first game of Dungeon Command! (pictures!) rss

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Merric Blackman
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The fine people at Wizards of the Coast have sent me a review copy of their new Dungeon Command miniatures game - a copy of both the Sting of Lolth and the Heart of Cormyr sets, enough for two players to play the game. By adding more sets, a three or four player game can be played, but the game is mainly designed for two players. I'm sure we'll see three- and four-player games shortly when it goes into full release in a couple of weeks.

After receiving the game on a Tuesday (the one day my FLGS is closed), I was able to bring it out the next night and play one game of it with Daniel, who is an experienced miniature gamer (BattleTech, Warhammer, Warmachine and so on) and board gamer. Together, we put it through its paces.

We also got one rule dreadfully wrong, which affected me more than Daniel. I still almost won! Still, this is why I read the rulebook again after a game to see what I missed. Our preconceptions about games, especially when they have mechanics similar to other games, can really trip us up.

Daniel thought it was really good (8/10), while I wasn't so sure after the game; knowing know what we got wrong, my estimation of the game has gone up markedly. This is a very good game, and a worthy addition to both the miniature skirmish library and the D&D-inspired games.

Set-up
The first part of set-up is to place the map boards: each player arranges two large pieces and two small pieces to form their half of the battlefield, then they are placed together. Treasure tokens are randomly assigned face-down to the six treasure locations on the board (each token has a value of 1 to 3 that is only revealed when a figure enters its square).

Then the players draw starting cards according to the commander they have chosen. (Each faction has two possible commanders). The first player places initial figures onto the battlefield in his or her starting area, as does his opponent, choosing from the creature cards in hand; the cards are also placed on their side of the table. Finally, the players draw to replace their creature cards in hand, and they're ready to go.



As you can see in the picture, I've deployed a Giant Spider and a Drow Assassin on my side of the table (lower-left), and Daniel has played a Half-Orc Thug and an Earth Guardian in his starting area.

Morale, Treasure and How To Win
Each commander has a morale value, which indicates the "will to fight" of their force. Whenever a creature is defeated, the morale of the force is lowered by the level of that creature (generally 1-5). Once it reaches zero, you lose the game.

Alternatively, if one player has no figures on the battlefield, the game also ends but with the player with the higher remaining Morale winning the game.

You can gain morale by gathering Treasure: one morale for each piece picked up. This seemed pretty good to me, so I moved my Drow Assassin onto the treasure chest, and revealed a "3". The chest was replaced by three treasure tokens, my Drow Assassin then used his standard action to pick up one of the tokens, increasing my Morale by one. I tapped his card to show he'd performed his standard action for the turn.



I then moved my spider up (hiding it behind a wall), and ended my turn by summoning another creature: a medium Demonweb Spider.

Controlling and Summoning Creatures
Each creature has a level score (in these two sets, the levels range from one to six). The commander also has a Leadership score: that Leadership is the total number of creature levels you can control at one time on the battlefield. So, if I have a Leadership of 13 and control a total of 13 levels of creatures, I can't summon any more.

However, Leadership increases by one at the end of each of your turns, and when monsters die also frees up Leadership.

After increasing my Leadership by one, I was on eight Leadership, with seven levels of creatures on the table (Giant Spider is level 3 and the Drow Assassin is level 4). I played the level 1 Demonweb Spider and ended my turn.



Daniel moved his creatures up, and ended his turn without summoning anything. However, this brought him within range of my creatures, and the battle was about to start properly.

Attacking, Moving, and Order Cards
During your turn, you activate each of your creatures one by one, with each creature completely finishing its activation before the next one begins. During their activation, they can (normally) do one Move, one Standard action, and any number of Minor actions. Performing a Standard action generally 'taps' the creature (you rotate its card to indicate it can't do another Standard action this turn).

Each creature has a Speed, which indicates how many squares it can move (orthogonally or diagonally), although starting to move when next to an opposing creature reduces your Speed to one. You can move before or after your Standard Action, but not before and after. Moving next to an opposing creature means you have to stop, unless you can Shift, Fly or Burrow.

The most basic forms of Standard Action are the attacks: ranged or melee, which deal damage according to the creature card. Not all creatures have ranged attacks, but I believe everyone has a melee attack. Some creatures have other powers as written on their cards, and creatures might also be able to use special actions granted by cards in hand.

Note that attacks just deal damage; there's no attack roll involved. Cards can modify attacks though, and that provides a lot of the unpredictability. And I demonstrated that to Daniel immediately:

I used one of these special order cards on my Giant Spider: Spring Attack. It allowed the Spider to shift 6 squares, attack, then shift 6 more squares - one of the few times I could move before and after attacking. It ran up and inflicted 20 damage (it's basic melee damage) on Daniel's Earth Guardian - a small part of his 90 hit points - then moved back. My Assassin hid using the Stealth card, which removed him from the battlefield. He'd return next turn in any unoccupied space on the battlefield! And my Demonweb Spider ran up and grabbed some more treasure, bringing my Morale score to 15.

Daniel came back strongly, hitting my Giant Spider with the Earth Guardian for 30 damage, and sliding it adjacent to my Demonweb Spider (a special ability of the Earth Guardian). And then the Half-Orc Thug used his Explosive Arrows ability to deal 20 more damage to the Giant Spider and 10 to the adjacent Demonweb Spider - ouch!

Daniel ended his turn by playing a Dwarven Defender, and it was obvious he'd had the best of that exchange.



Immediate Actions, and the Rule We Got Wrong
Apart from Standard, Move and Minor actions, the other major action type is the Immediate Action, which you can play during your opponent's turn. My deck was full of them. Cards like Riposte: "Prevent 20 damage to this creature from 1 source. Make a melee attack that deals 10 damage". Using an Immediate Action taps a creature, like a standard action, so you can't keep saving creatures.

An untapped character with cover from a ranged attack can also tap to prevent the attack dealing damage. That can be really useful - and is a lovely, elegant way of representing cover.

Unfortunately, this is where Daniel and I misread the rules: you untap creatures at the beginning and the end of your turn. We're both really experienced Magic players, so the mistake is understandable. It's still wrong, and it cut out a major part of my deck: I could only use my immediate actions if I didn't attack. I mention this just in case anyone else misreads the rule: don't! It will make the game much better when you get it right.

My Drow Assassin came back; I was very tempted to put him in Daniel's starting area and take out the Dwarven Defender, but I really needed to deal with the creatures that were nearer to me. He appeared next to the Earth Guardian and hit it for 20 - and a further 10 because it was tapped. (It shouldn't have been, so that's the one time the misread rule worked in my favour). And then I moved up the Giant Spider *and didn't attack with it* because I wanted to try an Immediate Action card.

Daniel laughed at this poor attempt to confuse him, and instead just attacked the Drow Assassin with the Earth Guardian. For fifty damage, killing it. He'd found the Invigorating Smite card, which also healed the Earth Guardian. I was sad. Then, for good measure, his thug took out the Demonweb Spider, and I was left with a very damaged Giant Spider with my morale in tatters. Oh, and his Dwarven Defender came up to join the party.



The Drow Fight Back, and Terrain
There was only one thing to do: summon more creatures. My Giant Spider scuttled away out of the action after Spring Attacking the Earth Guardian once more. One lovely thing about my commander was that she increased the speed of my spiders and drow by two.

And then I played an Umber Hulk and a Drow House Guard. Let's see if Daniel could deal with them! Oh, and the Spider put the Earth Guardian in a web, so it couldn't move - it needed to remove the Web with a Standard action.

Incidentally, the Immediate Order cards came in handy now as Daniel attacked - my monsters hadn't attacked and so could dodge!

The Umber Hulk was a brute, and its special power was terrifying: a Confusing Gaze, which allowed it to slide an opposing character up to 3 squares and then the Hulk could make a melee attack. (It occurs to me that perhaps the confused creature should be making the attack, but it isn't clear from the card). In any case, I slid Daniel's Earth Guardian into a fiery brazier, which dealt it 10 damage, then hit it for 30 more damage. That felt good.

There are four basic types of terrain in the game:

Clear - most of the map.
Walls - which block movement, line of sight and provide cover
Difficult - which make movement more difficult: it costs two movement points to move into a square of difficult terrain rather than one
Hazardous - which is Difficult terrain that also damages your figures. The first time a figure moves into hazardous terrain during an activation, it takes 10 damage. At the end of your turn, it takes a further 10 damage if still in hazardous terrain. Sliding other characters into hazardous terrain? Awesome!

Monsters can have special movement modes - Burrow goes underground and ignores walls, difficult, hazardous and opposing creatures, whilst Flight goes above and ignores difficult, hazardous and opposing creatures - but not walls. Strangely, on the outdoors map, flying creatures can't fly over cliffs!

The one other interesting point is that a creature can't move diagonally past a wall: it has to walk around it orthogonally. This can be important!

Daniel summoned a War Wizard and a Halfling Sneak to make up for the loss of his Dwarven Defender and Half-Orc Thug, whilst I brought out my own Drow Wizard. Things were getting tight!



Cowering and Card Requirements
The Drow Wizard and the Umber Hulk were able to account for most of Daniel's forces - but not before the Umber Hulk was almost destroyed by the Earth Guardian. One of the really interesting rules in the game is that of Cowering: if a creature would be destroyed by an attack, you can Cower - instead of taking damage, you lose one Morale per 10 points of the attack. In my case, it made perfect sense: instead of taking 30 damage and losing 5 morale (level 5 Umber Hulk), I'd Cower and lose 3 morale instead... and then take out the Guardian with the Umber Hulk. This worked very well, and so Daniel was left with his War Wizard.

Having the Wizard did allow Daniel to start playing some the cards in his hand. Not every creature can use every card: they require a minimum level, and the creature to have a matching attribute. The cards requiring INT in Daniel's deck needed his Wizard in play - he was happy that he finally got to play them. Mind you, his commander alleviated the pain of drawing the wrong cards, as it could discard one card to draw another, once every turn. A very useful ability.

Another way of playing cards that you have the right attributes for but not the required level is to tap creatures to assist; this adds their level to the level of the creature performing the action. Thus, a Level 2 and a Level 3 could together perform a Level 5 attack. It's a very nice mechanic. Unfortunately, the one time Daniel tried that, I dodged the attack!

Daniel summoned a Dragon Knight, a Dwarven Defender and a Human Ranger whilst using his War Wizard to finally take out my Giant Spider. I was now on three Morale, and Daniel was on four: the game was almost over.



I did what I could: I summoned a Shadow Mastiff adjacent to his War Wizard (its special ability is to appear adjacent to a wall rather than in your starting area), which played merry havoc with his plans, and used my Drow Wizard to take out his Dwarven Defender. This brought Daniel down to two morale.

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to get rid of that last two morale. My best option was to take out the Ranger - a level two creature - but, before I could land the killing blow, Daniel moved his War Wizard onto some treasure and took some, bringing his Morale to three. I could no longer win that way, and was left with an exposed Shadow Mastiff. Daniel attacked it in force, and dropped my Morale to zero. The game was over, and Daniel had won!



Conclusions and Final Thoughts
When I read the rules of Dungeon Command, earlier in the game, I was struck by the elegance and ingenuity of a number of rules: cowering, ranged cover and assistance in particular. The removal of dice from the finished product made the game much more elegant in my regard, and more dependent on skill and good play.

My actual play of the game has confirmed that impression: it is a well thought-out game that plays very well indeed. The one area where I was dissatisfied with the game (the difficulty to play immediate order cards) proved to be a misreading of the rules, and the game becomes even more a game of move and counter-move and of you pitting your wits against your opponent.

As of yet, I've still only played the game once: I don't know yet if it will become predictable with repeated plays. I'm not unfamiliar with skirmish games: in the last few weeks, I've played a number of games of Manoeuvre, Summoner Wars and Heroclix, all of which I think are excellent. There are elements of Dungeon Command that remind me of those games, but it is very much its own beast. It's a game that I'm looking forward to playing more of over the next few days.

Component-wise, the weakest parts of the package are the box it comes in and the rulebook. I would have preferred a thicker box and a glossier paper for the rulebook. The miniatures, tiles and counters are fantastic, and the cards look great (although I do recommend sleeving them).

So, until tomorrow and my report on my next games, a very good night to you all!
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David J
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This looks very solid. Merric, did you get the feeling that creatures were hard to keep alive? It seemed like they were only on the board for one or two rounds. Also, as for your concern with predictablity, I believe that will be alleviated with more factions.
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Bruce Clark
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Shut up and take my money!
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Dungeon Command: Sting of Lolth » Forums » Sessions
Re: Our first game of Dungeon Command! (pictures!)
I haven't played yet (I'll update when I do), but I'm really impressed by the game contents. The miniatures are very nice. Despite having many DDM miniatures and a bunch of drow, I really like the paint scheme for these repaints and how I can use them to make them special boss types or just create a more interesting encounter when playing D&D.

There are a number of cases where I'm pleasantly surprised by the repaints. For example, the shadow mastiff has a smoky translucent blue color instead of the original translucent gray. The Earth Guardian is a surprisingly nice version of the Earth Archon Rumbler, one of my favorite minis. The Dragon Knight (Purple Dragon Knight) is much nicer. In other cases, the repaints are average. The Drow Spiderguard (Drow House Guard) is just about different shades of paint. The copper dragon is barely perceptible compared to the original Capricious Copper Dragon.

In a few cases the quality actually drops. The Drow Blademaster is actually less detailed and less visually appealing.

The minis are a nice complement to existing collections, and also a great way to start with minis at a low cost. The Cormyr set features all the major/typical races, so you can easily use this as an adventuring party (you even have a theme color of purple and gold!).

If all we did was assign a value of $2 to each medium mini and $5 to the large ones, the set would be $33, and that's way below the price for repaints (especially large DDM repaints). The value of the repaint minis in this set is arguably above the cost of the game box, without considering the game! When I did a quick calculation of what the original non-repaint minis cost, I came up with a total of $75.35 (plus one new mini). For the second set it is harder, since there is one new sculpt and 2-3 that are from the Ravenloft/Ashardalon board games and have never before been painted. Even without those I had a total of $47.25 for the minis.

And of course, you get tiles too! The tiles are the same quality as Dungeon Tiles. They feature a combination of flat edges and interlocking tile edges. The interlocking edges can be used with the Ravenloft/Ashardalon/Drizzt adventure board games. You can also take the end/starting pieces and put them together to eliminate any interlocking pieces, creating a small outdoor pool or hill area. And, you can add three end pieces (2 come in each set) to any one large square piece (which as three interlocking sides) to make a T-shaped area with all flat edges. This gives you a variety of ways to use them with Dungeon tiles without showing the interlocking edges. But, you could use them by just overlapping or having the interlocking sides point away from the play surface. Combining with the board games is an interesting way for a DM to get minis and tiles for a reasonable price.

And, you still get a game! I can't wait to try the game itself, but I'm really happy just with the components and how I can put them to use for D&D RPG sessions!
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Merric Blackman
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dorktron2000 wrote:
This looks very solid. Merric, did you get the feeling that creatures were hard to keep alive? It seemed like they were only on the board for one or two rounds. Also, as for your concern with predictablity, I believe that will be alleviated with more factions.


Creatures range from 10-120 HP, so that explains why some stay on the table longer than others; also, our misplaying of the Immediate rule meant that the defensive cards couldn't be used properly.

That said, a monster surrounded by four others probably won't survive long!
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David J
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MerricB wrote:
dorktron2000 wrote:
This looks very solid. Merric, did you get the feeling that creatures were hard to keep alive? It seemed like they were only on the board for one or two rounds. Also, as for your concern with predictablity, I believe that will be alleviated with more factions.


Creatures range from 10-120 HP, so that explains why some stay on the table longer than others; also, our misplaying of the Immediate rule meant that the defensive cards couldn't be used properly.

That said, a monster surrounded by four others probably won't survive long!


Ok, thanks. The bolded part was kinda what I was wondering.
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Thanks for the report Merric. Very much looking forward to this game - appears to be Magic: The Gathering meets skirmish miniatures game with prepainted minis, excellent game board and good rules - game utopia! I predict this could be a big hit.

So, all I want to know is - how do I get a free copy a month before general release! I think you need to go on a road trip to demo the game to repay such a great present. Oh well, I guess I will have to wait for my pre-ordered copy from Milsims along with all the other lesser mortals - very envious.

Regards, Gary
 
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K.Y. Wong
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MerricB wrote:
The Umber Hulk was a brute, and its special power was terrifying: a Confusing Gaze, which allowed it to slide an opposing character up to 3 squares and then the Hulk could make a melee attack. (It occurs to me that perhaps the confused creature should be making the attack, but it isn't clear from the card).

The playtest version had the same power and I'm pretty sure it means that the unit being slid is that one that makes the melee attack, not the Umber Hulk.

Thanks for the great session report. I too like Summoner Wars but find that Dungeon Command has its own unique appeal. The excitement of rolling dice is replaced by the skillful play of cards which can be just as exciting and also adds a very thematic overlay onto the skirmish setting. Love the spider being able to spring attack and shoot webbing.
 
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Merric Blackman
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Here's the Umber Hulk's text:

Confusion Gaze
(Tap) As a standard action, choose 1 enemy creature within 5 squares, and slide that creature 3 squares, then make a melee attack that deals (melee) DAMAGE.

Seems to be the Umber Hulk making the attack based on my reading of the power.

Cheers,
Merric
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K.Y. Wong
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Yeah, can see how it can go both ways. My reasoning is due to the way they specify "deals (melee) damage", which imo is because the damage depends on the unit that got targeted by confusion gaze.

In any case, the designers will probably be active on BGG during the game launch to answer questions.
 
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Eric Ruhland
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MerricB wrote:
Here's the Umber Hulk's text:

Confusion Gaze
(Tap) As a standard action, chose 1 enemy creature within 5 squares, and slide that creature 3 squares, then make a melee attack that deals (melee) DAMAGE.

Seems to be the Umber Hulk making the attack based on my reading of the power.

Cheers,
Merric
That's how I would read it. Not only does the Umber Hulk make the attack but it is not limited to attacking the creature the he slid.
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Merric Blackman
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chromaticdragon wrote:
Yeah, can see how it can go both ways. My reasoning is due to the way they specify "deals (melee) damage", which imo is because the damage depends on the unit that got targeted by confusion gaze.

In any case, the designers will probably be active on BGG during the game launch to answer questions.


Chris Dupuis has confirmed that it's the Umber Hulk that makes the attack.
https://twitter.com/Gameguruchris/status/223252244198457344

Cheers,
Merric
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Bartosz Popow
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Is there any reason for HP to be a multiplication of 10 instead of just 1? Like a creature has 30 HP instead of 3 or something deals 80 damage instead of 8? Are there any cards that deal damage between 0 and 10 then?
 
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BartP wrote:
Is there any reason for HP to be a multiplication of 10 instead of just 1? Like a creature has 30 HP instead of 3 or something deals 80 damage instead of 8? Are there any cards that deal damage between 0 and 10 then?


I think in the articles it said something about the health and damage being in increments of 10. This was to remove some of the calculations involved in dealing damage, such as 40 HP - 15 damage. Often you'll see 'math' being a deterrent for the average person playing a game.

As for why they use multiples of 10 rather than 1, I'm sure it's just an psychological illusion. People want very strong creatures and heroes. A monster seems so much stronger with 100 HP than if it had 10 HP. Even if everything scaled, many people carry a mental bias.

It actually comes down to evolution. Numbers larger than 20 naturally seem larger because we can't count them with our fingers and toes. Rationally, we can scale everything down but it just won't seem as large a difference.

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I played tonight at Guardiand Games in Portland with Ian of the Going Last Podcast. They'll cover it in greater detail (and pictures are on my Twitter feed), but we had a blast.

We played two games, switching sides and using one outdoors and one dungeon game. In the first game I underestimated his Drow commander's ability to move his units very quickly. I happened to start with no immediates, so my seemingly awesome Earth Guardian went down before I had made a single attack. This left me reeling for a bit, but I recovered and almost evened the score. There was a lot of room for tactics. Cowering, where you can take a hit to morale instead of the damage, is especially interesting. It likely get's easier to know when to do this with more experience. I was looking good as I drew a great order card that went well with my copper dragon seemingly able to get some treasure undisturbed... except I forgot my foe's umber hulk could burrow to me. Special order card and the damage took me out.

In the second game I played the drow with the leader that lets treasure become order cards instead of morale. I used that often to good effect, getting some great cards. I also had a really good initial creature hand. The result was domination of my foe.

We had a great time and both agreed we liked the game and wanted to play more. The second game took 45 minutes, and likely could be faster once we know the rules well. Everyone in the store agreed the minis and tiles were a great value. The upcoming gameday should be pretty popular.

We also had fun considering expansion possibilities. For example, once you own a few sets you don't really need more of some of the repeated components (such as treasure). This might open up some potential for smaller packs of 4-6 minis with creature and order cards, plus perhaps some tiles or tile additions (such as additive terrain). Or, perhaps a set using minis from one of the adventure board games like Ashardalon, such that you could have painted minis for use in either game (replacing the unpainted heroes and foes and adding creature cards for Dungeon Command use). There is some good potential here for the future.

(My copy of the game was an advanced copy made available by Wizards of the Coast for review purposes.)
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I think the Umber Hulk makes the attack is weird.It had concentrated on castting 'Confusion Gaze', which should exaust its action.
During D&D PC games,one who began 'Confusion' is not weird to do anything, such as stay in daze,attack his teammate.I think let one enemy attack his teammates is a very cool ability,though it maybe not as powerful as the Umber Hulk makes the attack.
 
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cnmddjb wrote:
I think the Umber Hulk makes the attack is weird.It had concentrated on castting 'Confusion Gaze', which should exaust its action.
During D&D PC games,one who began 'Confusion' is not weird to do anything, such as stay in daze,attack his teammate.I think let one enemy attack his teammates is a very cool ability,though it maybe not as powerful as the Umber Hulk makes the attack.


The benefit here is that you can drag a foe to you, but this is still a melee attack (suitable for powers that affect that). For example, I was able to drag an enemy to me and away from the Dwarven Defender. In another case I dragged the wizard out of the summoning circle where it was gaining Order cards. It makes for better play this way. The rules do mention foes being 'dominated', but in this case I like how it works as the Umber Hulk's attack.
 
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it was sold to any way :-p for the umber hulk mini and the outdoor tiles , but the game looks good to me too
 
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I just got word that my preorders are shipping to me on Monday!
 
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kingjames01 wrote:
As for why they use multiples of 10 rather than 1, I'm sure it's just an psychological illusion. People want very strong creatures and heroes. A monster seems so much stronger with 100 HP than if it had 10 HP. Even if everything scaled, many people carry a mental bias.


This is exactly correct. The scaling is done to make the really big creatures seem really big -- there's 108 "steps" between 10 and 120, but only 9 "steps" between 1 and 12. Even knowing that damage only comes in multiples of 10, making there only truly being the same number of steps in each, the difference between 10 and 120 "feels" much, much larger than the difference between 1 and 12.

In addition, for folks with any D&D background, "12 HP" on the biggest, baddest, scariest monster is, well, frankly silly, so while the values were normalized (i.e., base being 1) for most of the early design, it was always with the knowledge that we'd add a multiplier at some point.
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Ok Merric, I just finished reading the review, thanks for the time you took to do it, it was very interesting and making me want to get my hands on the games even more.

I look forward to your next update.

D.
 
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ktatroe wrote:
In addition, for folks with any D&D background, "12 HP" on the biggest, baddest, scariest monster is, well, frankly silly, so while the values were normalized (i.e., base being 1) for most of the early design, it was always with the knowledge that we'd add a multiplier at some point.

Anyone familiar with the D&D adventure games would swear at meeting a 12HP monster so I think either is ok as long as the system is consistent. I had no problem accepting the 10 step measure used in Dungeon Command since the damage done was proportional and yes, it does give the feeling of an epic scale.
 
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Kevin Outlaw
United Kingdom
Devizes
Wiltshire
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The Wing Warrior - learn more at www.facebook.com/thelegendriders
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Okay - I wasn't interested. Now I am. Great report.

So, is it likely to get boring playing just one faction as there are only 10 different characters in each one? I wouldn't want to keep buying sets just to keep the game fresh every half-dozen plays.

Also, are the sets designed to be mixed together? I know the tiles are, but I mean, can you blend factions together, or are you always supposed to play with the 12 models from a single faction pack?

I guess that also leads to the question - are they planning on releasing "boosters" for the different factions to add variety for your favourite team?
 
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James W
Canada
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chromaticdragon wrote:
ktatroe wrote:
In addition, for folks with any D&D background, "12 HP" on the biggest, baddest, scariest monster is, well, frankly silly, so while the values were normalized (i.e., base being 1) for most of the early design, it was always with the knowledge that we'd add a multiplier at some point.

Anyone familiar with the D&D adventure games would swear at meeting a 12HP monster so I think either is ok as long as the system is consistent. I had no problem accepting the 10 step measure used in Dungeon Command since the damage done was proportional and yes, it does give the feeling of an epic scale.


Did you choose your microbadges on purpose so they would spell out sword?
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James W
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
Okay - I wasn't interested. Now I am. Great report.

So, is it likely to get boring playing just one faction as there are only 10 different characters in each one? I wouldn't want to keep buying sets just to keep the game fresh every half-dozen plays.

Also, are the sets designed to be mixed together? I know the tiles are, but I mean, can you blend factions together, or are you always supposed to play with the 12 models from a single faction pack?

I guess that also leads to the question - are they planning on releasing "boosters" for the different factions to add variety for your favourite team?


You should read the released development articles, especially the 5th one.

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/821081/dungeon-command-desig...

The short answer though is yes. You can mix the faction packs together and there are official rules which govern how you do that.
 
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