BoardGameGeek News

To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, please contact BGG News editor W. Eric Martin via email – wericmartin AT gmail.com

[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [168]

Recommend
66 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Links: Planning Your Game Design, Surviving in Pandemic & Settling in Brooklyn

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• I haven't played Magic: The Gathering in a long time, but I still read head designer Mark Rosewater's "Making Magic" column each week because I enjoy reading about Magic design and because Rosewater often talks about game design in general — or at least about Magic design in a way that can be translated to game design in general. His March 30, 2015 column "Nuts & Bolts: The Three Stages of Design" is one such piece, explaining how Magic sets go through "three distinctly different yet equal-sized stages — what we have since named the vision stage, the integration stage, and the refinement stage". An excerpt:

Quote:
The Vision Stage

This first stage is about creating a vision for the set. What exactly is the set about? What are its themes? What are its mechanics? What emotional impact is the set supposed to create? What story does the set have to reinforce? This first stage is about defining what the set is up to, crafting its structure, and building its foundation.

Now, before design begins, we have something we call exploratory design... The role of exploratory design is not about finding answers but rather asking questions. It is important for us to walk into a design with a good understanding of all the constraints being put before us. Exploratory design allows us the luxury of scoping out problems we're going to have to solve before we have to actually solve those problems. The exploratory design team also comes up with a lot of ideas of mechanical directions we could explore. Thus, when we start design we're not starting from ground zero...

Pandemic and POX: Save the People show up in a MindShift article by Matthew Farber titled "Three Games About Viruses That Teach Interconnectedness".

• Speaking of Pandemic, publisher Z-Man Games has announced hosting sites for "Pandemic Survival" events on TableTop Day as well as the location of some national events. If you win a preliminary round, you make it through to the National Championship and the winners of those events can participate in the World Championship at Spiel 2015 in October. The prize? "The winning team will be able to use the ability of the Airlift card and fly to the city of their choice – that appears on the Pandemic board – limit of $ 5,000 per winner, 1 week vacation. The city chosen by each winner may be different."

When I spoke with Z-Man owner Sophie Gravel about this competition, she noted that visa clearance, valid passports, and other details are the responsibility of the winners — and she seemed hesitant about the idea of signing off on a trip to Baghdad, but I'd assume the winners would probably head to another location.



• On Slate, Chris Berdik writes about MIT Education Arcade director, Eric Klopfer and creative director Scot Osterweil and why they promote the use of games — but not gamification — in schools.

• Can you get ants to solve a knight's tour on a chessboard? How about ant-based algorithms? Now you're talking! (HT: Graham Kendall)

• Are you ready to play — no, live — The Settlers of Brooklyn, courtesy of Above Average?

Twitter Facebook
4 Comments
Thu Apr 2, 2015 7:08 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
97 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Crowdfunding Round-up: No Pranks Included — Only Honest-to-Goodness Projects That You Still Might Not Believe Are Real

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
We've barely cleared the edge of March, but the crowdfunding projects announced during that month have nearly clogged the internet pipes leading to my house. Time to clear them out before the next wave of enthusiastic publishers and would-be publishers, and once again I'll be zipping through these games as quickly as I can. Let's see how minimalist I can get!

• You already know whether or not you want Car Wars Arenas, yes? (KS link)

• Gordon Calleja's Posthuman from Mr. B Games is not about a lone mail carrier in an apocalyptic wasteland, but rather about other types of humans in a sort of non-apocalyptic wasteland. (KS link)

• Stephen Finn's Cosmic Run from his own Dr. Finn's Games is, as the title suggests, a race through space. It has dice and artwork. (KS link)

Among Nobles from Danish publisher Among Meeples and a team of five designers is the first Kickstarter that I'm aware of from a publisher in Denmark. Not sure whether that should affect your decision to look into this game one way or 'tother, but now I've directed the conversation in that direction. Hmm. (KS link)

Mangaka: The Fast & Furious Game of Drawing Comics! from Jason Thompson and Mock Man Press tells you what it is in the subtitle. (KS link)

• The best thing about Mark McLaughlin's Holy Roman Empire: The Thirty-Years War from One Small Step being on Kickstarter is the huge label near the top of the page that reads "Holy Roman Empire is EU-friendly". Some might argue with that statement. Some might also argue that it's not the best thing. (KS link)

• I was not aware that Poland had its own crowdfunding site, but why not? Perhaps it has several even. I know little about Poland. The game being focused on here is Warsaw Rising Up 1945-1980 from Piotr Grzymisławski, Łukasz Szopka and Fabryka Gier Historycznych, with players working to rebuild Warsaw in the aftermath of World War II. (Wspieram link)

• Teale Fristoe's Birds of a Feather from Nothing Sacred Games has you trying to spot birds in various habitats, but the birds that show up are determined by and your fellow players. (KS link)

• Let's pair birds with bears and follow that listing with Pandánte: Light & Dark from David Sirlin at Sirlin Games is an expansion for the gambling game Pandánte, coming out in a second edition at the same time, that adds new powers to the game, casinos that each have a different effect on play, panda champions, and other items. (KS link)

Ninja All-Stars is from Soda Pop Miniatures and features chibi ninja characters and the possibility of lots of add-on purchases. (KS link)

• Shire Post Mint has been making metal coins under license from George R.R. Martin since 2003, and it's currently featuring a KS campaign for replacement coins that can be used in board and card games featuring A Game of Thrones. (KS link)

Mahou Shojo: Fight Like a Girl! from DeerFox Games needs to have a publisher listing in the BGG database. Also, a designer listing. As for the game, it's a two-player fighting game. Is that enough to let you know whether to look at it further or not? I hope so because I'm moving on to the next thing. (KS link)

• Simon McGregor's Ancient Terrible Things: The Lost Charter from Pleasant Company Games feels like it should be released by a different publisher — unless PCG is going for irony, I suppose. This expansion expands the game with expansive items. (KS link)

Calliope Games has launched The Titan Series, which features nine — no, twelve — no, possibly even more games delivered to you in batches all the way to 2019. Not much detail about the games, but that's sometimes one of the attractions of Kickstarter, yes? Low price point now vs. perfect information later? (KS link)



• John Clowdus of Small Box Games is pitching Soulfall on KS, with fantastic (in the literal sense) art by Sandro Rybak. I've enjoyed the few games that I've played from Clowdus, and it's nice to see him plugging along with his designs. (KS link)

• Tim Fowers' self-published "cooperative heist" game Burgle Bros. looks swanky as all get-out. (KS link)

• For April Fool's Day, instead of pranking people Dice Hate Me Games has put out a quick run KS that takes a meta apporoach to gaming with two small card games: Deck Building: The Deck Building Game from Christopher Badell and Unpub: The Unpublished Card Game from JR Honeycutt and Doug Levandowski. Mo' meta. (KS link)

Ares Games is offering many "giants of the sky" for Wings of Glory, and every time I see that game, I wish that we had a more organized system for putting together all of the Wings of Glory material, but I'm not sure what that might be — most likely because I know jack all about air combat, so I have no clue how to organize such a thing. (KS link)

Wake up, Cthulhu! from Miguel Bruque and GDM Games is the obligatory Cthulhu title for this post. (Verkami link)

• In addition to being on Kickstarter (link) Dirk Knemeyer's Tesla vs. Edison: War of Currents from Artana is being funded on both Giochistarter in Italy (link) and Spieleschmiede in Germany (link). Poland probably feels left out.

• Giochistarter also has an Italian version of Tiny Epic Galaxies (GS link), while Spieleschmiede is featuring campaigns for a new version of Heike Risthaus' bluffing game Blindes Huhn (SS link) and Krzysztof Wolicki's Der Herr des Eisgartens (SS link), which is the German version of the second edition of The Lord of the Ice Garden from REDIMP GAMES, the first of which debuted at Spiel 2014 and the second edition of which is on Kickstarter. (KS link) Oh my, I'm going to go lie down now...

Editor's note: Please don't post links to other Kickstarter projects in the comments section. Write to me via the email address in the header, and I'll consider them for inclusion in a future crowdfunding round-up. Thanks! —WEM
Twitter Facebook
43 Comments
Wed Apr 1, 2015 7:06 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
95 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

BGG Roundtable: Women & Gaming

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
I'm hosting a livestream roundtable on the topic of women and gaming tonight, Tuesday, March 31, 2015, with guests Anne-Marie De Witt (Fireside Games), Brittanie Boe (GameWire/GTS Distribution), Stephanie Straw (personal account/Red Pants Games), Phoebe Wild (Cardboard Vault), and Andrew Christopher Enriquez (The Nerd Nighters).

The link for this BGG Roundtable will go live shortly before the broadcast time of 10:00 p.m. EDT / 7:00 p.m. PDT / GMT+4, and I'll embed the broadcast in this post once it's complete. This is my first time trying something like this, so ideally things will all work out and no one will end up with egg on their face — unless they like an egged face, of course, but let's allow everyone to egg themselves or not as desired and oh, dear, this might already be going off the rails...

Come join us!

Updated: All done now! You can watch the video below, and since I accidentally left it marked private on YouTube until a fair distance through the presentation — newwwwwwwwb! — you might have missed some of the discussion. Sorry about that!

Twitter Facebook
59 Comments
Tue Mar 31, 2015 7:22 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
86 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Links: Hippodice 2015, How to Shuffle & Eggert and Allers on Design and Publication

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Man, it's been a while since I last ran a links round-up since I started posting most of them on BGG's Twitter feed, but here are several that either don't work well in that format or are otherwise hanging out in an open tab on my browser.

• The results of the 2015 Hippodice game design competition were announced in late March 2015 with the three standout titles being:

Lancelotto Malocello, by Martin Schlegel, DE
Das geht schief, by Timo Diegel, DE
Kallipolis, by Bjoern Ebeling, DE

Descriptions and prototype images of these three games, along with other recommended games, are available on the Hippodice website, and with contest winners having a somewhat decent chance of advancing to publication, you might even see them on game tables in the years ahead.

• On his Failnaut blog, in response to the logo of the digital game TAPHOBOS Christos Reid explains that "Greek is not a font".

• Do you want to see coverage of modern games on a Norwegian television program? Now you can.

• F2Z Entertainment, owner of Filosofia Édition and Z-Man Games, is looking for an English-to-Dutch translator. Notes communications contact Kalinda Patton, "We are looking for someone who would accept a mix of money and games as remuneration for their work. People can send their information over to communications@f2zentertainment.com."

• On March 5, 2015, Leuphana University of Lüneburg in Germany held a board game workshop in its Gamification Lab that included talks from Peter Eggert of eggertspiele, (HT: Sebastian Wenzel at Spielbox) and designers Christoph Cantzler, Jeffrey D. Allers, Bruce Whitehill and Uwe Rosenberg. The video starts in German with Cantzler, then Eggert presents in English starting at 46:00, followed by Allers, then the video cuts off. Sorry, Uwe fans!

Persi Diaconis, Professor of Statistics and Mathematics at Stanford University, is also a former magician, and in this video from Numberphile, he explains the best and worst ways to shuffle cards. He has a very professorial style that works great on video in my opinion.

Twitter Facebook
43 Comments
Mon Mar 30, 2015 7:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
86 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Roll in an Expanded Galaxy, Mogul in an Expanded Setting & Rule in the Same Old Egypt

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Rio Grande Games owner Jay Tummelson has stated that "Roll for the Galaxy: Ambition, the first expansion to Roll for the Galaxy, will be coming this fall [i.e., Q4 2015]. New factions, new dice, new tiles, and more! Further details to be revealed this summer [Q3 2015]." Speculation on its contents has already commenced!

• Rio Grande Games has also announced reprints of Caylus, TransAmerica, TransEuropa and Temporum listed as future releases on its website, with Temporum designer Donald X. Vaccarino noting that the second printing of that game will include larger arrows in a neutral color to make them more visible on the game board.

• Designer Michael Schacht has posted English and German rules for Mogul, a revised and (somewhat) expanded version of his self-published Mogul from 2002. Here's a rundown of the gameplay, which adds a network scoring system to the design, something you definitely expect to find in a Schacht design!

Quote:
In the 1920s, the U.S. stock exchange experienced a period of growth previously unknown. Everyone speculated, and many become millionaires overnight.

In Mogul — a revised and expanded version of the 2002 game of the same name — players buy and sell railway stock, trying to outsmart both the opponents and the market. Each of the five railroad companies has five to eight shares, and in addition to being a share of the company, each share card has a box on it that indicates another company. Players start with particular stock holdings based on the number of players in the game and their position in turn order.

Each turn, one stock card is revealed from the deck. Players earn $1 for each share of this color that they own, then an auction ensues. Turn by turn, players must drop one of their bidding chips into a bowl in order to stay in the auction. When a player passes, whether by necessity or choice, they take all of the chips from the bowl, thereby earning bidding power for future auctions.

When all but one player has passed, this last player wins the auction and has the right to either keep the share or sell stock matching the color of the company depicted on the bottom of the share; the player who dropped out of the auction last takes the action that the winner didn't take. If a player sells stock, they either sell all shares of this color that they own, earning as much for each share as the number of those stock cards face up on the table or they sell none of them; in the latter case, the player places a station depot in their color on an empty space of the appropriate color on the game board. This game board has multiple networks in the five colors of the game, and at game's end each depot has a dollar value equal to the number of that player's depots in the same network.

When the crash card is revealed from the deck, the game ends. Players earn $1 for each share still in front of them and each five bidding chips they hold, in addition to the value of their depots. Whoever has the most money wins!

• I'd previously noted that French publisher Super Meeple will be reprinting Reiner Knizia's Amun-Re in Q3 2015. I've now confirmed with the publisher that its game license is only for publication in French, but it will be partnering with a "well-known American publisher" — but not its Mexica partner IELLO — on an English-language version of Amun-Re that will be released at the same time.

• For the end of 2015, Super Meeple will release a new version of Le Gang des Traction-Avant, a design from Serge Laget and Alain Munoz first released in 1984 and only ever publisher in French. The publisher describes the game as "made of alliance and treason" with no random elements.

• Following the 2015 GAMA Trade Show, U.S. retailer Uncle's Games tweeted the following:



I asked Steve Jackson Games for details on this, and SJG's Rhea Friesen said, "There is nothing we are ready to release at the moment." So expect to learn something about this in a future moment...
Twitter Facebook
27 Comments
Mon Mar 30, 2015 3:09 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
64 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Crowdfunding Round-up: Zombies a Cookin', Dice a Tumblin', Treehouses a Buildin', and A Few Other Games That Do Not Fit This Pattern

Matt Riddle
United States
Oxford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
So EVERY month is big on Kickstarter, but February and March 2015 seemed to have a million projects that caught my attention. I backed more than I intended and steadfastly ignored a few I might have otherwise considered. One of the biggest I did not back was Thunderbirds because I don't even know what the heck that is.

• I love the art style on Best Treehouse Ever from Green Couch Games and designer Scott Almes. (KS link) Artist Adam Mciver killed it. It's cartoony and "young" in a good way. I love the Euro send-up with the kids holding the plans looking up at the tree, an approach that made it eligible for this amazing GeekList. Gamewise, it is a filler-ish family game that can be enjoyed by adults as well. I trust Jason and Scott, two of the best dudes in gaming, so I assume that the drafting isn't too much for younger gamers. I love anything with spatial analysis, so I am in.

Quote:
Best Treehouse Ever is a small box card game that appeals to a wide audience. This game will satisfy gamers and families looking for a quick, easy-to-teach experience that provides player interaction on every turn.

Have you ever dreamed of building a super awesome treehouse? Now it's time to live that dream! In Best Treehouse Ever, players compete to build the best treehouse in the neighborhood. Players will outfit their treehouse with the coolest rooms, all while making sure their tree doesn't tip over and that their rooms are the most impressive at the end of the game.

Building takes place over three weeks/rounds, and at the end of the third week the winner will be the player with the best treehouse ever!

Scott Almes is EVERYWHERE. Great dude. He has taken over as the king of Kickstarter.

Tumblin’ Dice from Eagle-Gryphon Games is gigantic. Like super big. (KS link) Some games are just fun and Tumblin' Dice is one of them. I have played it only a few times, but it was always a blast. Seriously though, it is soooo big. Where do you store it? If I bought this, it would end up on the kitchen table after we played it, then I wouldn't want to take it down to the basement to the island of misfit toys because it would get forgotten about or stomped on by box trolls, so I would end up shifting around the kitchen and living room with it constantly being in the way until one day my wife sets fire to it after the umpteenth time she asks me to take it to the basement with me saying I will but not actually doing it. Needless to say I won't be backing it, but hopefully someone I know does because it's fun.

Quote:
Tumbln' Dice is a dexterity dice board game consisting of a multi-colored playing field with four sets of colored dice that a player can slide, roll, and flick down its stepped surface. After each person or team has thrown their four dice, points are tallied and totaled.

A player can score a multiplier with each die roll, gaining up to 1x, 2x, 3x, or 4x depending on which area of the board the dice rest in. (Dice which land in the 0x region are immediately removed from play.)

Just like shuffleboard or curling, high-scoring rolls can become targets for opponents who may hope to knock the die out of the game. After four rounds, and the player with the most points wins!

This box is so big that when I accidentally set it on an iPhone, it turned into an iPad.

Cheapass Games is back with Lord of the Fries from owner James Ernest. (KS link) I am always down for a humorous theme, and this one sure is. This one looks interesting even though I am not inherently a zombie guy. It's only cheapass-ish at $30 for 100 cards or so, but it looks like they have some cool plans if it blows up like Pairs did.

Likely no one else cares or notices, but Cheapass is the 12th entry in the BGG publisher database; Green Couch Games above is the 27,497th. Even before Kickstarter there have been a TON of companies coming and going in our little hobby. I mean, there are like forty game companies that have "Green" in them.

Quote:
In Lord of the Fries, you're a zombie working in a fast food joint, and you must build combo meals from a hand of random ingredients.

That's the deal in Lord of the Fries, one of Cheapass Games' most beloved games, which was introduced in 1998 as the sequel to Give Me the Brain. It has had several versions since then, and now it's out of print. We want to make the new edition better in many ways, including a second complete restaurant deck: McFrye's Coffee Shop.

I do love fast food. Too much probably.

Bad Decisions is being self-published by Ian Price. (KS link) This game is "a new storytelling twist on card-matching party games for teens and up [that] focuses on the humor in the questionable life choices which some people make when the going gets tough". That is pretty good copy IMO. It cuts to the chase in a good way. Frankly, though, I hate these types of games, so I have no idea whether Bad Decisions is different than the current crop of "read cards and trick your friends into thinking you are actually funny" games. Maybe someone with more experience can let us know in the comments.

Quote:
Bad Decisions can be played for a few minutes by 3-4 people on break, or for an entire evening by a dozen or more friends. The bare-bones (no art, half the final deck size) original prototype has been very popular with players at sci-fi, anime and furry conventions as well as at Gen Con 2014.

Because of the storytelling character of this game, each story card can set up literally hundreds of different situations. All players have hands with five of each player card category. The bard plays cards for whichever of the categories (Fool, Crisis or Bad Decision) come up as the first two blanks on that story card. The other players complete the story by anonymously playing a card for the remaining blank from their own hands to fill the final blank. The bard chooses the winning ending to complete the story, then passes the role of bard to the player on the left.

Well, if furries love it, then you'd better go back it.

• Now for something completely different, Hylaria from Fablesmith. (KS link) Honestly, I got nothing. I glanced through the page but couldn't really figure out what was going on. It looks like there is a memory-ish version, then another harder one with a code you devise? I was even lazier than normal, so W. Eric spoonfed me a few links. I think he purposely chose games that would make my brain go numb out of spite.

I like the kitschy art style as the game looks like Dixit on acid. I don't have anything else to add, BUT the crew over at "A roll of the dice" LOVED Hylaria: "A clean sweep for us. I have never rated a game a ten, and that is just because I do not believe any game to be perfect. This one is darn close though. The fun of fooling your friends, while secretly conversing with your team is awesome. Some of the codes we came up with made no sense, at all, to anyone, and we couldn't help but laugh the night away trying to decipher our own code, let alone the other team's."

Quote:
Hylaria is designed with one thing in mind: creating the perfect game to have a wonderfully hilarious time with friends and family. And this is what you will find in this box. A game that is a breeze to learn, quick to set up and a joy to play. Hylaria uses a very powerful tool at its core: the limitless creativity of human beings. When this is combined with cartoony art and unavoidable miscommunication, hilarity is guaranteed. But it gets even better!

With all the components you will find in the box, you'll be able to play Hylaria Quest, a fun and colorful game for everyone aged 6 and up. No matter what type of company you find yourself in, it's always a good idea to put Hylaria on the table.

See, it wasn't merely ineptitude; there just isn't any actual gameplay info on the page. There is a link to the rules but ain't nobody got time for that. (Actually the rules are short, so I probably have the time, if not the desire.)

Quick Hits

• The super awesome Richard Ham (Rhado) is seeking funding for season four of Rhado Runs Through. There is a lot of good board game media these days, but Richard remains one of the best. His channel is both prolific and well done. Check it out. (KS link)

Going, Going, Gone

Its closed now, but I backed Bottom of the 9th and not just because I am a character in it...though I am. And it rules. Feel free to get a copy and desecrate my likeness as you see fit. That is it for now. W. Eric is going to cover the other 748 projects that are live right now soon enough and I have Hearthstone to play.

Editor's note: Please don't post links to other Kickstarter projects in the comments section. Write to me via the email address in the header, and I'll consider them for inclusion in a future crowdfunding round-up. Thanks! —WEM
Twitter Facebook
24 Comments
Mon Mar 30, 2015 3:32 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
86 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Game Preview: Thunderbirds, or It's Another Matt Leacock Cooperative Game Go!

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
It's hard to think about co-operative games without designer Matt Leacock coming to mind. His game Pandemic ran through multiple print runs in 2007 as quickly as Z-Man Games could get copies from the manufacturer. Later he released the simplified (but far from easy) Forbidden Island and Forbidden Desert with Gamewright. Now 2015 will see the release of his co-op games Pandemic Legacy, co-designed with Rob Daviau and previewed on BGG News, and Thunderbirds, the first board game from UK publisher Modiphius Entertainment.

I'll confess to never having watched Thunderbirds, so I have no nostalgic connection to the show and can consider this design only from the gameplay elements. I did get a preview of the Thunderbirds prototype at Spiel 2014, though, and the UK gamers who played then were practically giddy as each newly revealed disaster card allowed them to relive yet another episode.

Gameplay in Thunderbirds recalls that of Pandemic and the Forbidden games in that one of the players takes a number of actions associated with their character, then bad stuff happens. Where the game differs from those designs is in two ways: First, as with Leacock's Pandemic: The Cure, Thunderbirds forces players to roll dice to see whether they resolve a situation during the game, and as in Pandemic: The Cure, the dice rolls in Thunderbirds can allow the game — that is, the players' AI opponent — to take a step closer to victory, which means that the more players roll, the more likely they are to take themselves down the path to loserville. Sure, in Thunderbirds you can use bonus tokens to mitigate bad rolls, adding two to the sum you rolled or rerolling one die to try to keep the enemy from advancing, but you often need those tokens to actually win the game, so you don't want to throw them away foolishly.

The other main difference in Thunderbirds compared to other Leacock designs is the amount of fiddly detail hidden in the larger parts, all in the service of thematic fidelity. Each character has a special power or two unique to themselves, which is in line with Pandemic and the Forbidden series, but in addition to that the bonus tokens that you collect to take out the enemy's schemes can also be spent for small special actions. On top of that, each disaster card has one or more modifiers on it, with those modifiers (1) aiding your chance of avoiding the disaster and (2) recalling details of a particular Thunderbirds episode. As you see more and more disasters laid out on the board, your head starts spinning with the possibilities on everyone's turn. How can you best move each character, each vehicle, and each pod? What percentage for success do you want to give yourself on each die roll? Do you really need to move FAB 1 again?!

As with almost any other game, the more you play, the better you'll do as you learn how to string together moves and plan ahead. (I've heard near mythical tales of Pandemic players who can string together multiple turns and plan ahead for nearly any turn of the cards.) In my two games of Thunderbirds, though, I found myself behind the curve again and again, trying to play catch up and only finding more disasters crashing on top of us. You hate to let the world burn, but sometimes things just get out of hand...

Twitter Facebook
19 Comments
Sun Mar 29, 2015 5:02 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
235 
 Thumb up
3.87
 tip
 Hide

Star Wars: Armada — Unboxing and Playtime

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
The long-awaited and (thanks to a cargo-unloading wage dispute on the U.S. west coast) somewhat delayed Star Wars: Armada from James Kniffen and Fantasy Flight Games CEO Christian T. Petersen has reached retail outlets in the U.S., and to celebrate I purchased a copy, opened it up, and played.

Well, played with it. You'll see...

Twitter Facebook
40 Comments
Fri Mar 27, 2015 7:31 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
65 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Fireside Games Incites Panic over The Dark Titan, Adds Chaos to Bears & Encourages Witchcraft in The Village Crone

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
In 2015 U.S. publisher Fireside Games plans to release two expansions for existing titles and one new title, starting with Castle Panic: The Dark Titan on April 1, 2015. This expansion adds new monsters, new castle deck cards, plague tokens, support tokens, and The Dark Titan Agranok, a huge monster that has five different difficulty levels so that you can start easy and work your way up to full strength. Designer Justin De Witt shows off everything in the box in this demo video:



Bears! Trail Mix'd is an expansion for Anne-Marie De Witt's dice game Bears! that adds a new die which is rolled at the start of each round and puts a new rule into effect. One round you're scoring double for runners, the next your rerolls are limited — or maybe you're trying for bonus points by shooting the most bears. Watch it, bears.

• Anne-Marie De Witt is also the designer of The Village Crone, a 1-6 player game with a $50 MSRP that's due out Q4 2015. Here's a short rundown of the gameplay:

Quote:
Become a witch and enter the medieval world of Wickersby in this worker placement, resource management game with spellcasting! Make villagers fall in love, turn them into frogs, or teleport them to different locations. Use your familiars to gather ingredients and cast spells on the villagers to achieve goals and score victory points as you vie to be named the village crone.

The Village Crone includes a modular game board as well as rules for solitaire play.

Twitter Facebook
9 Comments
Thu Mar 26, 2015 8:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
55 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Cryptozoic to Add Watchmen to DC Comics DBG, Batman to Fluxx & Cake to Portal

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Following the 2015 GAMA Trade Show, Cryptozoic Entertainment posted a recap of its activities at the show, noting that mere days after shipping out DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Crossover Pack 1, which features characters from the Justice Society of America, and having just recently announced DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Crossover Pack 3 – Legion of Super-Heroes, in 2015 it also plans to release DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Crossover Pack 4 – Watchmen. No details on characters or art yet, but I'd hope none of the new stuff will show up in it.

• Cryptozoic also notes that it's partnering with "Looney Labs to release a Batman edition of the game Fluxx". I expect riots on the streets; I also expect the combination to be a dose of 1960s silliness and fun. (An article on ICv2 notes that Adventure Time Fluxx is also in the works, along with Fluxx Dice, an expansion that can be used with any standalone Fluxx game. I contacted Looney Labs for more details, and LL's Amber Cook confirmed that the title are in the works, but the publisher needs approval for artwork and is focused on getting out Just Desserts first in April 2015 before moving on to these releases.)

• Cryptozoic showed off components from Portal: The Uncooperative Cake Acquisition Game, which from the most recent reports I've heard has a Q3 2015 release date.

Twitter Facebook
29 Comments
Thu Mar 26, 2015 6:41 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [168]

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.