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My random blatherings about game related topics

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Funny, I don't remember getting on this roller coaster...

William McCarroll
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Bel Air
Maryland
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One thing I have learned about life is that it can be unpredictable. Well, except for the fact that when it rains, it pours. And, of course, that when life closes a door, it opens a window; but since it's pouring, the deluge dumps into your house through the unexpectedly open window, soaking your clothes and making your underwear do that annoying clingy wedgie thing - or something like that. I'm not exactly sure, I've been spending the past few months as a neurotic mess, so I haven't really been paying too much attention.

I found out a couple of months ago that the contract at my current job was ending. I was thankful to be given enough warning to be proactive about finding a new job. But, fate being the laugh riot it is, decided that my current employment should end at the end of May - which just happens to be the EXACT time my baby girl is due to make her triumphant entrance onto this little blue-green earth of ours.

Needless to say, that with such a burden of responsibility, I have been frantically touring the country one interview at a time trying to find a new place to call home, always paranoid that I will be fumbling with a package of airplane peanuts 30,000 feet in the air as my 8 month pregnant wife goes into emergency labor. Luckily none of that has happened, and everyone is safe and sound (and I don't particularly like peanuts, anyway).

Now, don't worry about me, this isn't one of those sympathy posts: I have several great job offers on the table, and a new child coming into my life after 9 years of thinking that we couldn't have any more. By all standards, I am extremely lucky - But that doesn't mean that my blood pressure isn't going through the roof right now!

So, to everyone who reads my reviews, and to those publishers who's games have been sitting on my "to review" stack for the past few weeks, I'm sorry for the radio silence, but I expect to hit the ground running with new reviews over the next couple of weeks.

In fact, I've already started! This intro was so long that while you were reading it, I wrote the following:



Titans of Industry Kickstarter:


I had a chance to preview Gozer Games kickstarter project Titans of Industry, a fun economic worker placement game with a unique 1920s flair. I think it's a solid game, and definitely worth supporting if you enjoy surprisingly social worker placement games.

Titans of Industry - A Nerdbloggers Preview



Geek Chic Emissary:


As you may have read in this blog, or at my main blog at www.nerdbloggers.com, about a year ago I was in the process of ordering an Emissary gaming table from Geek Chic. Well, now that I've had it for a little over 9 months, I decided to finally write a follow up like I promised. Give it a read if you'd like to hear what living with a gaming table in your dining room is like.

My Experience with Geek Chic - Part 2



Rook City:


Although I haven't written this review yet (it's in the pipe), I was able to get in some plays of Greater Than Games sequel to Sentinels of the Multiverse, Rook City. The more I play this game, the more I appreciate the roller coaster tension, creative characters, and entertaining environments. Playing Sentinels is like diving directly into a comic book universe MULTIVERSE. Rook City even addresses one of my criticisms of the base game by adding a nifty mechanism to scale difficulty with the number of players.

It's worth mentioning too, that Greater than games is running a kickstarter for a second expansion - Sentinels of the Multiverse: Infernal Relics, which looks to add a whole lot of new, exciting content to the game, as well as welcoming Richard Launius as co-designer on the project. The kickstarter project also introduces an enhanced version of the base game with some balance tweaks, as well as a new box built to hold and organize the cards from all of the expansions.



Nightfall: The Coldest War


Another title that should be seeing a review from me in the next week is Nightfall: The Coldest War. Both an expansion to Nightfall, and a stand alone game, it really shakes up the Nightfall formula, in what I think is a good way. A new mechanism has been included that adds global modifiers to the game based on phases of the moon, as well as new cards that can be played directly from the hand without the need to be chained. On top of that, new wound effects with large, colorful artwork have been added, and the game shifts locations from a tru-blood like southern setting to the cradle of vampire lore: Slavic Europe. This breathes new life into the game, and may become my favorite thematic installment of the series.


Other Stuff:

My copy of Mage Knight finally arrived, and I can't wait to get it to the table. I was all prepared to punch out the components, but when I opened it I was surprised to find that the pieces were all prepunched at the factory. I thought it was a really nice level of polish... although part of me missed the "new game punching ceremony" that I silently perform.

My 9 year old son also came home the other day with a book report project that requires him to design and build a board game. I am so excited about this. Not only do I get to use the opportunity to teach my son game design, but I get to teach him how to make a slick looking print and play. He'll be the only kid at school with a mounted board, linen cards, and a wrapped box. Muahahahaha!!!

If you'd like to follow my reviews and articles, they can be found at www.nerdbloggers.com, or if you prefer, you can subscribe to my reviews geeklist here on BGG (HeZkeZl's Game Review Spectacular!). It's always nice when someone other than my mother reads them (and let's face it, even my mom doesn't read them)
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Thu May 10, 2012 7:24 am
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How to Kick More Ass in 10 Easy Questions.

William McCarroll
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Last August, I had the exciting opportunity to play and review Greater Than Game's first published card game: Sentinels of the Multiverse, a non-collectible, cooperative card game based in a vibrant comic book universe. Sentinels of the Multiverse is fun, has awesome pacing, and really captures the feel of the superhero genre.

Now, hot on the heels of the Sentinels release, Greater Than Games is offering the next installment in the Sentinels' story: Sentinels of the Multiverse: Rook City. Rook City comes packaged with new villains, new heroes, and new locations themed around the gritty, urban, Rook City.

As Rook City is entering the last week of its Kickstarter Campaign, Design Director Christopher Badell agreed to an interview with www.nerdbloggers.com about his project - and dispatches our crafty questions with true superhuman skill.

What is Rook City? What secrets are hiding under its urban exterior? And what happens when we play a game of "What If"?

Discover the answers to these, and more exiting questions, in the interview!
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Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:12 pm
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D-Day Dice Kickstarter - An Interview with Designer Emmanuel Aquin

William McCarroll
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The entirety of this article can be found at www.nerdbloggers.com.

I have been keeping tabs on a few of the new board game projects utilizing Kickstarter as a platform to springboard publication. One such title is D-Day Dice, designed by Emmanuel Aquin, and scheduled for publication by Valley Games. The D-Day Dice Kickstarter hit the ground running with incredible momentum, achieving its target funding within 24 hours - but there are still a lot of great goodies to be unlocked within the next few weeks if the stretch goals are reached.

D-Day Dice is a dice based multi-player co-op WWII themed game focused around the organization of resources at hand to build and direct a unit of Allied forces against a German machine gun nest. In it's simultaneous play model, players must effectively manage the resources that are rolled on the dice, and work together to choose how best to utilize their resources.

Game designer Emmanuel Aquin was kind enough to speak with nerdbloggers.com about himself, his game, and the design process of D-Day Dice.

For the complete interview, please visit: http://www.nerdbloggers.com/nerdbloggers/2011/11/6/d-day-dic....
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Mon Nov 7, 2011 3:42 pm
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Learning to Crawl, Before I Can March

William McCarroll
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Furthering the adventure into wargames that I introduced in my last post, I've written a review of the Victory Point Games reprint of Strike Force One.

Instead of reposting the entire review here, I'm supplying links to it below, and giving a little taste of it here:

Quote:
It is important to remember that Strike Force One, first and foremost, serves as a game to introduce the basic mechanics of wargames to new players. The basic game plays with 10 units, on a 9x8 hex based map. The game takes place during a fictional encounter between the United states and the Soviet Union in West Germany during the mid 1970's. One player assumes the role of the United States, defending the cities pictured on the map, while the other player controls the Soviets, attempting to seize control of at least two of the cities. The game consists of only 4 rounds, so each game only takes 15 minutes or so, but the simplicity of the game allows players to focus on the core mechanics that the game teaches. There are two distinct games in the Strike Force One package, the basic game, and the advanced game, and each one of these games focuses on teaching a distinct toolset.

The basic game focuses on teaching movement, zone of control, basic combat, retreat, and advancement of units. These mechanics interact in ways that may not be immediately apparent to the uninitiated, and when playing the game, manifest in some interesting, chess-like ways.

The first, and probably most important concept taught is "zone of control". The map in Strike Force One is made up of a grid of hexes. Each hex is a space where a player unit can be placed. Every unit on the map exerts "control" over the 6 hexes that surround it. This zone of control not only dictates what spaces the unit can attack, but also effects movement of other units in some very fundamental ways.

In Strike Force One, all units are of equal strength, and have a fixed amount of movement. When units move, they can travel through up to four hex spaces. However, if at any time a unit moves adjacent to an enemy unit (into it's zone of control), it must immediately stop movement. This means that even if a unit has 4 movement points, if his first move brings him into the zone of control of an enemy, he must forfeit the rest of his movement. A unit who starts his turn in an enemies zone of control, cannot move directly into another space that is in an enemy zone of control, either. His first move must always be into a space that is not under enemy control. This has strategic implications. Players can block off sections of the map, and impede their opponent's movement by placing units in a way that manipulates the zone of control to immobilize, or make forward progress impossible for the opponent.


The review can be found at www.nerdbloggers.com

or for those who prefer to stay on BGG: Strike Force One - A Nerdbloggers Review

Stay tuned for the next stop on our adventure, when we play and review Battle for Moscow (second edition)
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Tue Oct 18, 2011 5:24 pm
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Greetings Professor Faulken - My Experiences with Wargames.

William McCarroll
United States
Bel Air
Maryland
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This article was originally published at www.nerdbloggers.com.

As I've mentioned before in my reviews and editorials, I tend to be a regular fixture at thrift stores. Throughout the years I have found and collected a small pile of unpunched wargames. These have remained unpunched all of these years despite a definite curiosity on my part to learn what has driven such a passionate segment of the gaming hobby for so many decades. However, whenever I open up one of these large-scale games, and entertain the idea of playing one, I get roughly one third of the way through the rulebook before my brain begins to shut down.

I'm not exactly sure why this happens; I enjoy many complex games, and usually have no problem embracing new rulesets. Perhaps it is because wargames have a storied history, and just like eurogames have a vocabulary of mechanics that are intrinsically understood by the players of that genre. Where Euros have understood mechanics such as worker placement and hidden role selection, wargames also have their own set of mechanics and ideas; concepts like: zone of control, stacking, and supply lines. Without really understanding how these these mechanics worked and interacted with each other, I had a hard time visualizing how the game would play out, especially when confronting them all at the same time, and I found myself a bit intimidated.

Recently, I decided to take the plunge, and really learn what wargaming is all about. Alan Emrich of Victory Point Games was very gracious to facilitate this process by selecting a few games for me that he thought a beginner should start out with. I hope to chronicle my exploration of wargaming through a series of game reviews of these titles. My reviews will be from the viewpoint of a total wargame beginner, so may not have the depth of experience found in a similar review from a hardened grognard, but since these games are meant to serve as an introduction to the genre, I hope that my experiences will resonate with others in my position.

I am also bringing along for the ride, my 15 year old daughter - who, at first, was abject with the thought of having to play with armies and tanks. She is definitely not a stranger to complex strategy games, and can mow through heavy hitting euros like Dominant Species. But, she is new to wargames, and has the unique perspective of someone who really doesn't think that she will find anything interesting in the genre. Although, I was very surprised at the direction her opinion turned when we began to play these games.

As of this writing I have played a few of the games, and I am really starting to understand why people enjoy this genre of games. I consider myself to be very open minded, and try very hard not to generate any preconceived bias in my thought process, but I was surprised at how much I really misunderstood about wargames. I lived my childhood as a boy growing up in the 80's, and as a result, my view of games was strongly molded by the “Ameritrash” games of that era. Often military in nature, and usually requiring a handful of dice, the typical "Ameritrash" didn't have a whole lot of deep strategy in it, instead focusing on a more narrative, luck based experience. I had assumed that because wargames consisted of dice, and strive to simulate the events that occurred during historic battles, that they would share this “dicefest” type of randomness. I was very wrong in this assumption, and wonder how many others like me may share this misconception.

What I discovered was that the dice in the hex and counter type wargames that I played did not generate a random experience, but instead were used to add a very limited amount of randomness to the game - more of a vehicle to simulate calculated risk. This risk, and uncertainty played a huge part in driving strategic decisions. Like the WOPR computer from the movie Wargames surmised when playing simulations of Global Thermonuclear War, “The only winning move is not to play”; it is often strategically critical to hold off on even making an attack roll unless you are assured that any number to come up on the die will either further your strategy, or at worst, result in a draw. This completely changed my understanding of how dice could be used to simulate randomness in games - in a limited, controlled manner that did not detract from the strategy of the games.

Over the next few weeks I will post my reviews and musings about the games I have played, starting with the 2007 Victory Point Games reprint of the 1975 tutorial game Strike Force One.
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Mon Oct 17, 2011 2:13 pm
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Of Birthdays, Superheroes, and Baby Pictures...

William McCarroll
United States
Bel Air
Maryland
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Summertime.

It's inevitable that this is the time that all of the exciting stuff seems to happen. The kids are out of school, and all the nifty new games are revealed at GENCON and Origins. Unfortunately, year after year, I find myself chained to my desk (figuratively.. for the most part), with bloodshot eyes and a bushy neckbeard that has somehow become speckled with grey.

But the winter holiday season is an important time for video games, and in order to get them out on time, they have to be wrapped up by the end of summer. This usually takes sacrifice, but it's totally worth it! It just melts my heart to think of those wide excited eyes... the crinkling paper... and the excited squeal of pure delight that the accountants will give when the balance sheet opens, and they discover that they can report the sales in the Q4 earnings report.

Birthday Stuff

Summer is also when my birthday rolls around. Even though I always answer "Games" when I am asked what I would like, everyone seems to shy away from getting them as gifts. I suppose it's understandable, as this can be quite a confusing hobby, and I can seem fairly picky. This year, however, I actually got games, and I even got to choose them.

I have to admit, I've been a bit behind on some of last year's hotness, so I picked the following:

Dungeons & Dragons: Wrath of Ashardalon Board Game
Haven't had a chance to play this one yet.

For Sale
I finally broke down after hearing about this one for years. It went down really well, even with my younger kids.

Dominant Species
Played this one 1 1/2 times. I had to shut down the first game early, because starting a first game at 9:00PM probably wasn't the best idea. I was able to play through a whole game, and what seemed complex at first, really became second nature - and a lot of fun.

I do want to take a moment to praise GMT Games. I managed to give my Dominant Species manual a bath, and it wrinkled up like a prune. I sent GMT an email to purchase a new one, and despite my own clumsiness, they sent me a replacement for free. That was extremely kind of them, and amazing customer service. Even though this is the first GMT game i have owned, I know it won't be my last.

Innovation
This one went over really well too. I'm enjoying it so far, but I don't think any of us really have a handle on the best strategy yet. The first game we were avoiding the achievements just to see what all of the different cards did. I think the splaying mechanic is very creative though.


Baby Pictures

A few months back I wrote about the Emissary table I purchased from Geek Chic. I've been waiting VERY patiently, which is not easy; I think my card table has gotten more sneers in the past few months than it deserves. I finally received an email with an expected delivery window, and it looks like it will be ALL MINE at the end of August. They even sent me baby pictures. Aww, isn't it CUTE?!?!




Superheroes

Despite my busy work schedule, I had a chance to check out a copy of Sentinels of the Multiverse published by Greater Than Games. I was pleasantly surprised with the game, and it went over well with my teenagers. I wrote a review about it at www.nerdbloggers.com, and also re-posted it here on BGG Sentinels of the Multiverse - a Superpowered Nerdbloggers Review. It's definitely worth taking a closer look at!
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Mon Aug 15, 2011 11:36 pm
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Games as art, and the sinister side of Forbidden Island.

William McCarroll
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Over the past few months, since I've started writing reviews and editorials for www.nerdbloggers.com, I've gained a new respect for those prolific review writers who can produce such a high volume of reviews. I tend to take hours editing, reworking my reviews, and taking photos - and even then I'm never 100% happy with them.

This week I decided to take a slightly different approach than usual, though. I wanted to review Forbidden Island due to its Spiel des Jahres nomination, but Forbidden Island has been reviewed a million times, and the community doesn't really need another vanilla review.

I'm a video game programmer by trade, and a hot topic in the industry has been whether or not video games can be considered art. The flames of this debate have been stoked by Roger Ebert several times over the past few years. Recently, however, video games have had a bit of redemption in the debate, with the National Endowment for the Arts announcing that they are now awarding grants for video game projects.

It made me contemplate whether board games could be considered art as well. I found inspiration in a game that I would not normally have perceived as art. While preparing my Forbidden Island review, I discovered that perhaps there is more interpretation in board games than is outwardly obvious, and that things that seem benign, can have sinister undertones.

If you care to take a look, the review is on BGG at: Forbidden Island - A Nerdbloggers review about global destruction., or if you feel the inclination, we always love new visitors to www.nerdbloggers.com.
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Fri Jun 3, 2011 8:32 pm
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Playing the Tables – My First Experience with Geek Chic

William McCarroll
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This article was originally posted on nerdbloggers.com.

Being a gamer dad with four kids can be a blessing and a curse. It's nice to have gaming slaves a built in gaming group, but at times my children seem to have more in common with devastating natural disasters than human beings. When you add three insane cats into the mix, any game on the table teeters on the brink of destruction if you step away for even a moment.

Last February I decided to take steps to rectify the situation. I embarked on a quest to find a gaming table that would allow me to play those epic, marathon length games that I've always longed to play, but still be
The Sultan table.
able to put my adventures on hold and take care of real life whenever it beckoned. After sifting through the glut of pool tables, poker tables, and ping pong tables which didn't really address my needs, I started to feel a bit defeated. I even entertained the notion of learning carpentry to build my own table, but the childhood memories of the misshapen birdhouse deathtraps I built during arts and crafts brought me back to reality. Thankfully for me (and my limbs), I discovered Geek Chic, a company that builds heirloom quality, made to order furniture specifically for tabletop gamers.

I originally learned about Geek Chic when reading an article about their "Sultan" table, the game table equivalent of a Rolls Royce. It is made of solid hardwood, sports a dropped gaming surface, and has desks, drawers, and all sorts of hidden compartments. I flirted with the fantasy of owning one, but with the cost of the table easily reaching the $10,000 mark, the idea was exactly that: a fantasy. My daydreams led me to www.geekchichq.com, the company's website, where I discovered a whole line of tables that were much friendlier on the wallet.

All of the tables that Geek Chic makes are what they call "Heirloom Quality". This is a term that seems to be used a lot in the furniture business, but seems to have no definitive meaning. Geek Chic is not happy standing behind a vague term, so they define what Heirloom Quality means for their products: quality joinery, solid hardwood, no veneers over plywood or particle board - furniture that will outlive you. Geek Chic stands behind this quality, not just because it makes for better furniture, but because it is better for the environment as well. While a good majority of furniture is built to be thrown away in a few years, Geek Chic hopes that future generations of Geeks will be playing games on the same furniture that is handcrafted today.

I ordered the "Emissary" table,
The Emissary table.
one of Geek Chic's middle-of-the-road tables. It maintains the same hardwood heirloom quality construction as the sultan, but comes in the guise of a stylish dining table that transforms into a gaming table. The gaming surface is recessed into the table, and a set of hardwood leaves can be placed over the recessed surface, turning it into a normal looking dining table. Geek Chic calls this feature the "Game Keeper", because you can keep a game in progress safe under the leaves, while still using the table for other activities such as dinner, or playing other games. For me, the game keeper feature will mean that I will be able to play those long, epic games that have never been practical for me.

Parts of the LayerCake.
Geek Chic has put a lot of thought into the game surface as well. Called the "LayerCake", it is designed to support many different types of tabletop gaming. The bottom of the play surface is constructed from a neutral colored base, white by default, although I chose a light colored bamboo play surface for my table. On top of the play surface, one can put their own maps or other printed game components, and Geek Chic also has a library of different maps and graphics that they can custom print for this layer of the table. On top of the map, a transparent Lexan grid can be added. This is a really neat feature, especially for wargamers or miniature gamers, because it allows you to use any printed map, and turn it into a grid. Grids can be ordered in different scales and as squares or hexes as well. Topping off the LayerCake is a sheet of clear Acrylic whiteboard. This whiteboard material lets you draw with wet or dry erase marker on top of your maps, which are kept safe below the Acrylic. This is a cool feature for Role Playing Games, as it lets the gamemaster draw and annotate the maps as the game progresses.

There are many other inserts that can be purchased from Geek Chic
that rest on top of the layercake, ranging from plush surfaces for card games, to a LEGO brick surface. I chose to add a plush "lid" on my table for card playing. This lid rests on the top of the table, above the play area, so that I can get in a few card games as filler before continuing a bigger game in progress.

Geek Chic tables also support a large variety of drawers that can be ordered. These drawers can be customized to the needs of a particular customer. The most intricate of the drawers is the GM Drawer, which not only acts as a drawer, but pulls open to reveal a fold out desk, with a built in GM screen. Player Drawers can be ordered as well, which act as both a drawer and a desk, without all of the bells and whistles in the GM Drawer.

I chose not to put any drawers in my table, instead opting for the “rail system” that Geek Chic offers. The rail system utilizes a groove across the side of the table, which accessories can be latched onto, and removed at will. Geek Chic offers all sorts of accessories that can be attached to the rails: cup holders, wine glass holders, counter holders, bins, desks, even dice towers. You name it, and Geek Chic probably offers it, and if they don’t, may be willing to make it for you.

GM Drawer.
Since tables are all made to order, there are plenty of areas to customize, from the height of the table, to the depth of the play area, to the dimensions of the play surface itself. I chose a 4’x6’ play surface for my table, but the Emissary supports sizes anywhere from 2’x3’ to 4’x7.5’.

Aside from the Sultan and Emissary, Geek Chic offers a variety of different styles of tables from coffee tables with the game keeper feature to dedicated gaming tables. Not content to just make tables, Geek Chic also makes chairs, barstools, dice towers, and storage cabinets for miniatures and comic books.

There is currently a waiting list for new furniture. I ordered my table in February, it is scheduled to go into manufacturing in May, and I expect final delivery by August. Geek Chic recently moved to a larger facility to help decrease the lead time for their furniture, but due to the handcrafted nature of the furniture, a bit of a wait is understandable.

So far the process of ordering my table has been a delight. The people at Geek Chic are kind, and very attentive to my needs, offering advice for areas I hadn’t even considered. They asked me questions about where my furniture would go, my family, and what games we played to help me decide of the perfect configuration for my needs. All in all, my table cost around $3,500, including shipping and in-home assembly, which I consider a great deal considering the handcrafted nature of the furniture.

Ordering and designing the table was a breeze, the hardest part now, is waiting for it to be built. In a few months I’ll be able to follow up with pictures and my thoughts on the ordering process. Right now, I’m very excited! Although the furniture and pricing on the website isn't current (Geek Chic isn't updating the website until they can decrease the lead time on the tables), you can take a look at some of their offerings at www.geekchichq.com.

Images are from the Geek Chic website.
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Sun May 1, 2011 5:23 pm
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