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Links: Voting Opens for the 2013 DSP, Pegasus Moves Matagot's Goods & Playing While Drinking

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• Voting is open for the annual Deutscher Spielepreis, an award run by Spiel convention organizer Friedhelm Merz Verlag that allows gamers from around the world to vote on five titles. Your top title receives five points, your second choice four points, and so on. Games released within the previous twelve months are eligible for voting, and votes will be taken through the end of July 2013. The top ten titles in terms of points received will be ranked, and more than one hundred games will be given away to those who participate in the voting process.

• German publisher Pegasus Spiele has announced a distribution deal with French publisher Matagot in which Pegasus will distribute recent Matagot titles Kemet and Room 25 in Germany and Austria. The press release announcing this deal includes the following line: "As their first game in France Matagot will publish the board game classic Junta." That's a bit of an oddball line given that the rest of the press release is solely about Pegasus distributing titles for Matagot, but in this case I suppose the licensing will flow in the other direction. After all, earlier in 2013 Pegasus released word that it would publish a new edition of Junta, with August being the target publication date. This edition is announced as having rules only in German, so presumably Matagot will have a French edition. Pegasus' Michael Kränzle has solicited advice on a new edition of Junta from BGG users, so perhaps a separate English-language edition will also be making its way to store shelves.

• Ranjita Ganesan in Business Standard, the online version of India's daily newspaper of the same name, profiles Mumbai Board Gamers. An excerpt:

Quote:
Recently, Prashant Maheshwari chanced upon what has turned out to be the secret to a happy marriage. He stores about 50 of these secrets in cupboards and shelves around his Agripada residence now. "Every couple runs out of things to talk about at times. Whenever that happens to us, my wife and I pick out a board game to play," Maheshwari confides...

Maheshwari's wife Radhika was not always thrilled by the recreation but was coaxed into trying it. "Ours was an arranged marriage and board gaming just sounded like a strange hobby. But it grows on you." She is an avid player now and part of the group whose numbers have swelled from 20 to 200 since last March.

(HT: Jason Matthews)

• And in a mainstream publication from the other side of the world, The Gazette in Montreal, Canada profiles Randolph Pub Ludique, "a gaming pub on St-Denis St. in the Quartier Latin" that the article describes as "the only place in Montreal where you can sip a mai tai while playing one of more than 1,000 board games". More from the article:

Quote:
The best part is, you don't have to choose which game to play or read the rules. For a $5 entrance fee, staff members known as "game counsellors" will choose a game tailored to your taste, skill level and party size.

"It's a nice concept," Eva Tracqui said. On a recent Sunday night, the 22-year-old was playing a board game called Catch a Falling Star with her boyfriend, Clarence, and friend Nagehan, who was visiting from Toronto. The last time any of them played board games was when they were kids, but after a friend suggested the idea, Clarence searched online for venues in Montreal. The Randolph pub popped up first.

"It's perfect because I wouldn't say to my friend, 'Hey, let's play board games,'" Tracqui said. "It's not cool. They'll be like, 'Let's just have drinks or do shots.'" Randolph is a good balance, she added.

Because drinking or doing shots is cool, gotcha. (HT: Marie-Ève Lupien, formerly of FoxMind and appearing as a ricochet robot during Randolph's Halloween 2012 activities)

• In mid-2012, Stephen Conway and David Coleson – hosts of the podcast The Spiel – released a 40+-minute documentary titled "Made for Play: Board Games & Modern Industry" that details "every aspect of the manufacturing process: the technology and machines, the many detailed steps, and the hundreds of people that are involved in the production of a single game". The Spiel is now selling DVDs of that documentary with subtitles available in English, French, Polish, Spanish and Swedish. For those who haven't seen the documentary, you can still watch it online at Vimeo.
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Thu May 2, 2013 6:00 pm
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Links: Mensa Mind Games 2013, Game Designer Rights in Germany & The Physical Glory of Board Games

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• The annual Mensa Mind Games event was held April 19-21, 2013, in St. Louis, Missouri and the line-up of Mensa Select winners – that is, the five games rated best by the 300 or so attendees, all of whom played some number of the 54 games being judged – is top-notch compared to the hit-or-miss nature of years past. The 2013 Mensa Select game are:

Forbidden Desert (Gamewright)
Ghooost! (IELLO)
KerFlip! (Creative Foundry Games)
Kulami (Steffen-Spiele/FoxMind)
Suburbia (Bézier Games)

Congrats to all the winners!

• As covered on the ABC television subsidiary in Rochester, New York, U.S. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) is protesting a federal grant for $150,000 received by the National Museum of Play for an exhibit titled "Game Time!" As noted in Coburn's Waste Book 2012:

Quote:
A diverse range of America's games and puzzles will be on display in the new 4,200-squarefoot wing built with taxpayer funds. "[G]uests will become pieces of a giant game board as they move through the exhibit to learn about the history of board games, card games, puzzles, and more public amusements such as electromechanical coin-operated games, pinball machines, and products for home or public game rooms such as foosball and hockey," according to the museum...

"eGameRevolution" is the museum's display of the nation's video games, from Atari's Pong to the Guitar Hero on an Xbox 360. A number of artifacts decorate the exhibit, including "rare and unique artifacts like Computer Space and a Nintendo NES gray cartridge." "Visitors will be able to view notes and drawings from legendary game inventors."

Museum officials do not want to just play with taxpayers' hard-earned dollars. They hope the exhibit will "tell the story of the evolution of play and how it has affected both children and adults."

Wait – is this an advertisement for the "Game Time!" exhibit or a protest of same? Hard to tell from the way it's described in Coburn's report...

Separated at birth?
• Ye olde U.S. magazine Popular Mechanics highlights "10 Alternative Board Games", including King of Tokyo, Elder Sign, and Lords of Waterdeep, about which one player says, "It's like Monopoly, but with swords!"

• Quintin Smith from Shut Up & Sit Down writes at great length on video game site Kotaku about the physical awesomeness of tabletop games, along with their power to inspire more commitment in you as a gamer:

Quote:
Take my Netrunner decks. They represent my first experience getting into a collectible card game, and it didn't take long for these things to begin a kind of emotional osmosis. Technically, Netrunner is a "Living Card Game", meaning Fantasy Flight's new model of not releasing random booster packs but set, monthly expansions.

That's a fitting moniker, because my decks are alive. They're not just picking up scuffs and whatever microscopic flecks of me whenever I touch them. They're absorbing every one of my failures and victories, and all of the time I spend with them.

Quote:
My game nights are powerful things now, and they're getting stronger. And stranger. Last weekend I got six people together to play the epic WW2 swear-a-thon that is Memoir '44: Overlord, but my friend also brought two backpacks of his girlfriend's military equipment. We played wearing wobbly helmets and camo trousers of impossible size. Why? Because it was funny, mostly, but also because when you augment a game's components to such a ridiculous extent, you can't help but share something, and remember that game for the rest of your lives. And as a gamer, I'm not sure there's anything quite that priceless.


Image from the referenced Kotaku article

• The German game designer association SAZ (Spiele-Autoren-Zunft e.V.) is protesting the refusal of the Fachgruppe Spiel e.V. – the federation of the game companies in the Association of the German Toy Industry – to recognize game designers as "originators", that is, as creators of work, and therefore to discuss contract matters with SAZ serving as a representative for game designers. From the press release:

Quote:
The initial point was discussion papers on the subject of Minimum Standards in Contracts and a Code on matters of intellectual property rights regarding games, which the SAZ had presented to the Fachgruppe Spiel, the federation of the game companies in the Association of the German Toy Industry. The SAZ represents more than 400 game designers from Germany and other countries and is their representative organization.

The Fachgruppe Spiel principally puts the game designers' status as originators into question and thus rules out any further objective, factual discussion with the SAZ, within the meaning of § 36 UrhG (German Copyright Act). This is all the more bewildering since the member companies of the Fachgruppe Spiel continuously enter into contracts with game designers regarding the rights of use of their works, thus de facto acknowledging their authorship; and the companies also demand relevant declarations of authorship from the game designers. That shows that the reality looks different.

The legal opinion Games and the Protection of Intellectual Property Rights reduces the argumentation of the Fachgruppe Spiel to absurdity. In the open letter, the board of the SAZ calls on the Fachgruppe and its members to reconsider their position and to return to the negotiating table. It is clear that without the game designers and their works, the companies would have little basis with which to conduct business.

To gain support for its efforts, SAZ has posted a petition that asks the Fachgruppe Spiel to "[a]ccept game designers as authors and the SAZ as a negotiating partner". The petition has gained more than 3,600 supporters since its launch on April 8, 2013. For more background on the protest, and lots of back and forth between German designers about exactly what's going on with German law and SAZ's representation of designers, check out this thread on BGG started by SAZ press representative (and designer) Ulrich Blum.
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Wed Apr 24, 2013 10:00 pm
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Steve Jackson Games Reveals Results from 2012 and Plans for 2013 and Beyond

W. Eric Martin
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Steve Jackson released his annual stakeholder report for Steve Jackson Games in mid-April 2013, with the bottom line coming early in the report: "We were profitable in 2012, on the highest gross ever: just over $7 million, a $2.5 million-dollar increase over 2011!" What's driving sales for SJG? The usual suspect: "The Munchkin line, including the Munchkin Quest boardgame, accounted for about 75% of our sales. Munchkin is now available in 15 languages, with two more licensed." Elsewhere in the report:

-----—"Sales of dice games stayed strong, accounting for 8.35% of total sales. Zombie Dice was our #4 item, ranked by dollars."

-----—"We raised nearly a million dollars with the Ogre Kickstarter (more on that below). That was a dramatic upward tweak to gross sales, but if we hadn't been working on Ogre we would have shipped Castellan and more Munchkin in 2012, so the Kickstarter income was not as huge a distortion as it might first appear." And then this on Ogre: "If it were sold at a normal gaming markup over print costs, it would probably go for around $400, but retail for the base set will be $100. And it will be at least seven months late, and it totally wrecked the 2012 schedule and is impacting 2013, and it just about drove Phil Reed and Sam Mitschke mad as they managed the project, AND we may very well lose money on it when all is said and done."

-----—"In January 2012, our test of Munchkin in Target stores went system-wide. Almost every Target store now stocks Munchkin. And some are testing Munchkin Zombies! Later in the year, Trophy Buck passed its sales trial at Walmart and is now in most Walmart stores.... This re-skin of Zombie Dice was specifically aimed at the mass market, and it is selling well!"

So what will you see from Steve Jackson Games in 2013? This line from SJG's "Priorities for 2013" in the stakeholder report should come as no surprise: "Ship a lot of new Munchkin releases in a variety of formats." This year SJG has already released Munchkin Easter Eggs, the Munchkin Bookmark Collection, and Munchkin Game Changers (a collection of out-of-print boosters that's available exclusively through the Barnes & Noble bookstore chain until 2014); additional Munchkin releases in the works include Munchkin Holiday Surprise (another Barnes & Noble exclusive that will be available at all retailers in June 2013), Munchkin Zombies Decay d6 (June 2013) Munchkin Boxes of Holding 2 (July 2013), Munchkin Apocalypse: Mars Attacks! (Q3 2013), Munchkin Pathfinder (Q4 2013), Munchkin Dragons (2013), Munchkin Level Playing Field (2013) and Munchkin Kobolds Ate My Baby! (Q2 2014). The stakeholder report also mentions an as-yet-unnamed expansion for Munchkin Apocalypse and another expansion (presaumably #4) for Munchkin Zombies.

Aside from the march of Munchkin, which will undoubtedly consist of more than what's summarized above, SJG also plans to release the aforementioned Castellan (June for the U.S. edition, July for the international edition), Chez Guild (Q3 2013), Ogre Pocket Edition (2013) and – last but not least by any measure, including weight and length – Ogre Designer's Edition (2013). Additional items mentioned in passing include a Zombie Dice dice cup and a "school bus" expansion for that same game.

For all the invective directed at Munchkin on BGG, Steve Jackson and company clearly understand and deliver to their market – that market just happens to be present in small quantities on this site. And I had seen Trophy Buck in Walmart a few months ago while looking for something else – naturally I survey the game shelves at whatever stores I visit – and I hadn't thought about its presence as being yet another intrusion of hobby games (however light) into the mainstream market, but indeed it is.
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Sat Apr 20, 2013 5:32 am
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Links: Game-Related Fundraisers, Richard Garfield on Luck in Games & Designing for the Far, Far Future

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• As a tribute to Todd Breitenstein, co-owner of publisher Twilight Creations and designer of Zombies!!! who died on March 24, 2013 due to complications from cancer, U.S. distributor ACD Distribution will, according to a press release from the publisher, "donate all of the profits from sales of all Twilight Creations' games from March 24th through April 12th [2013] to the Todd Breitenstein Benefit Fund. In addition, ACD Distribution will match whatever amount is raised in this way as an additional contribution to the fund."

• And in an unrelated benefit, the Planet Comicon convention being held in Kansas City the weekend of April 6, 2013 is holding a raffle for the Hero Initiative, which benefits comic book creators, and five winners of the raffle will play Stronghold Games' Space Cadets with geek icon Wil Wheaton, who will serve as the spaceship's captain.

• Do game cartons have to be boring? Apparently not – at least not to Steve Jackson Games which posted the image below in its March 27, 2013 Daily Illuminator:

Quote:
Note the festive addition of blood splatter and a decaying head to what would otherwise be a drab and uninteresting cardboard box. Now as lovely as they may be, we didn't do this just to liven up warehouses with the rotting visages of the living dead. It's really just to make our cartons easier to spot at a distance. And that helps us make sure the games you want end up where they're supposed to: your FLGS!

All of our games will be undergoing a similar makeover as new printings ship.


• If you design a game, but no one ever plays it, does the game make a sound? Jason Rohrer won the tenth Game Design Challenge – with the theme "Humanity's Last Game" – at the annual (video) Game Developers Conference (GDC), with an acre of land on the moon serving as his prize. He titled the design A Game for Someone, and he created and tested the game solely on a computer that played against itself. Then, as described in an article on Polygon:

Quote:
[H]e set about manufacturing it. Rattling off a list of board game materials that would be unlikely to last the intended passage of time (wood, cardboard, aluminum, glass), Rohrer ultimately decided to make the game from a resilient metal. He machined the 18-inch by 18-inch game board and the pieces future players will use out of 30 pounds of titanium.

Rohrer laid out the game's rules diagrammatically on three pages of archival, acid-free paper, hermetically sealed them inside a Pyrex glass tube — which were then housed inside a titanium baton — and set about burying them in the earth.

The game is now embedded somewhere in the Nevada desert. Rohrer's not exactly sure where, as he plotted out available public land far enough away from roads and populated areas, hoping to find a suitable, desolate location to hide the game. He buried it in the desert himself, he said, turned around and walked away from the game's indistinguishable resting place.

Attendees at the GDC each received a set of 900 unique GPS coordinates – more than one million unique locations in all – and one set of coordinates marks the true location of the game. (HT: That other Eric Martin)

• Old news, but new to me – and now perhaps new to you as well. On the 2012 Magic: The Gathering Cruise from Seattle, Washington to Alaska, designer Richard Garfield gave a roughly one-hour presentation on the nature of luck and its use in game design. (It's interesting how Garfield seems surprised by what appears on the screen during his talk. "What's this caption down here? Ah, yes, that's where I'm at in this talk...")

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Thu Apr 4, 2013 6:00 am
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Crowdfunding Round-up: BattleBots, Cowboys and Aliens, Guzunganators, 21st Century Idolatry & Today's Obligatory Zombies

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Hey! WTF?! That is NOT the floating earth dice thingie avatar; it's some stupid wiener self-promotional game cover! Imposter! Guards!

Hello there! My name is Matthew D. Riddle, and I put my initial in the MIDDLE like normal people. You may know me from such films as "Fleet" and "being occasionally humorous in Chit Chat". I am taking over (part time) writing of this here crowdfunding round-up space until I either blow it and Eric fires me or... well, most likely that one. I am not nearly as talented or well-informed as Eric (Editor's note: You forgot handsome! —WEM), but I am nearly as snarky. I do tend to get a bit wordy though, so this crowdfunding round-up might be worse, but at least it will be longer!

Now, to the games!

Queen Games is back and is using Kickstarter to give a young, new designer a chance, with Speculation from Hirk Denn. It is nice to see Queen taking a risk with an unknown desi... oh wait, THAT Dirk Henn. NVM. Check it out here: (KS link) Being touted as an overhauled version of one of Dirk's early designs, Speculation appears to be an interesting take on stock and commodities. I, for one, enjoy the intra-Dirk company names used in-game. The golden calf is all grown up into a raging, shiny golden bull (or maybe it is his fahza). Either way, I wonder if there is not a little iconoclasm on modern societies' worship of the almighty dollar...or it might just be a pretty sweet cover and a not-so -ubtle reference to a bullish market. Check out the game description:

Quote:
Speculation is a game by Dirk Henn for 3 to 6 players. Players try to enlarge their fortune in an ever fluctuating market by trading shares at the opportune time to get the biggest possible profit. The player who was skilled and lucky enough to have the most money at the end of the game wins.

Oh, the MOST money wins... Better get the game mechanisms updated on the BGG page as it appears no more dice are to be used in the new edition. Anyone who has played the original have any thoughts on that?

• Guzunganator! From another big time publishing house (or not) comes Weather Wars: Battle for the Guzunganator from first timers Daniele Bergeron and Doug Murphy. (KS link) It is a lighter game aimed at kids and families. The gameplay does not appear to be anything terribly fresh or interesting, BUT it has a Guzunganator, cute kitschy art, and family-friendly humor at a decent price point. Weather Wars just ran a play from KS Funding 101 – the BGG contest – and got a nice response. I enjoyed the KS video as well; it was very sincere and straightforward. Did I mention Guzunganator? I am pulling for this one. Here's an overview of this title:

Quote:
Weather Wars: Battle for the Guzunganator is an original card game for 2-4 people, ages 8 and up, and takes about 20 minutes to play. It's designed to be family-friendly, but with enough strategy for adults to enjoy repeated plays. Each player is trying to recruit 100 power worth of animals to their side to take control of the Guzunganator, a machine that can control the weather. Each turn, players play an animal card to recruit one wacky animal to their side. Stronger animals are better, but finding the right combination is key to capturing the Guzunganator. But watch out! If a player plays a Season Change, all your careful planning could be undone in an instant.

Guzunganator!

• Rookie publisher Five24 Labs is trying the "this thing + that thing" approach with Area 1851. Cowboys and Aliens! (KS link) Five24 Labs has enlisted the aid of KS vets Game Salute to aid in bringing his creation to reality. Last time aliens and cowboys got together, even Han Solo and James Bond couldn't make it any good, let's see if Justin Blaske can do better.

Quote:
It's the 1800s and aliens have landed in the Wild West, interrupting settlers on their way to Oregon. The aliens want genuine human artifacts and willingly trade dangerous technology for common household goods. A curious tribe of Native Americans have camped near the town and joined in the trading as aliens and humans begin tinkering with each other's gadgets, creating amusing contraptions and spectacular failures.

Area 1851 is an exciting new tabletop game in which players roll dice, tinker with your gadget cards, and deal with random events while trying to prove that they are the best tinkerer in town.

FWIW, I do think the title is catchy and the gameplay sounds solid. What two things are going to get melded next? Presidents and goats? Post an idea or two below.

• If you are looking for a project with a fresh and unique theme, check out Protect or Infect from Manual Games. (KS link) At this point, funding is off to a slow start. The zombie gaming market is crowded and the price point of Protect or Infect is daunting considering the stark absence of the obligatory awesome minis – at least there is no evidence of said minis, even though minis are mentioned in the component list. This kind of game is not my thing, so a few of you zombie types take a look and let me know if there is anything new or neat going on here. The KS video is totally worth checking out though. Pretty funny sketch, then (I hope) purposefully ridiculous overreactions during gameplay.

Quote:
Protect or Infect is a turn-based strategy board game set in the early stages of a zombie outbreak. This game takes place several weeks into the infection at a point when the zombies seem to have the upper hand – not only in numbers but also in mutated ability. Four humans surviving together have taken refuge in a countryside manor. On the run, down to just knives and pistols, and being stalked by countless zombies that are leading a monster directly to them, the survivors hold themselves up and wait for rescue within the halls of the zombie manor.

The game pits a team of four survivors against a team of zombies; each team consists of at least one player per side with up to four players on each team. The game takes place on a grid-based game board detailing the basement, first floor, second floor, and grounds of an abandoned manor.

• Now for a game that also does NOT have awesome minis to go with an unwieldy name C.O.A.L.: Combat-Oriented Armored League. (Indiegogo link) It does have cool steampunky art and the theme is BEGGING for awesome robot minis, but in the meantime Dast Work srl did put together a really sharp set of components, but the gameplay does not seem to actually allow for minis per se – too bad! Check it out:

Quote:
In a world where computers have never been invented and coal is the most precious resource, a group of brave pilots board their armored steambots, take their place in the pilot seats of these thirty-feet-tall, steam-powered fighting machines, and drive them into fierce arena battles.

This is C.O.A.L.: Combat-Oriented Armored League, a two- to four-player card game with a steampunk setting. C.O.A.L. uses an original game mechanism that combines resource management, bluffing, and memory to simulate the heat of a real battle. The game includes four steambot models – each with its own features, attacks, and defensive maneuvers – and eight different pilots, which have special piloting abilities of their own.

C.O.A.L.: Combat-Oriented Armored League includes customized rules for two-player games, for battles with three or four players, and for two-vs-two partnership games. Deck-building rules are included for advanced players who want to combine parts to build different steambot models. Duels are quick, typically ending in about ten minutes.

Steampunk BattleBots?

Heads Up!

I trolled BGG to see what might be coming down the pipes and possibly covered in future wrap ups.

Eagle-Gryphon Games recently announced the component heavy Francis Drake and I hear that could be hitting KS soon.

Crash Games (those wily KS vets) are setting to launch Paradise Fallen: The Card Game soon.

Indie Boards and Cards is back with more Flash Point (and minis!) in Flash Point: Fire Rescue – Extreme Danger. (KS link)

5th street Games is running a campaign for Baldrick's Tomb as we speak. (KS link)

Dice Hate Me Games is busy setting up its 2013 releases, and I know I am looking forward to VivaJava: The Coffee Game: The Dice Game. Mmmmmm, colons...

Expedition: Famous Explorers is facing a slow climb (see what I did there) despite being a Wolfgang Kramer design. Will it reach the summit? (KS link)

Zombie House Blitz from Jeremiah Lee is entering its final days, will it make it? (I hope so!) (KS link)

Jolly Roger Games and Philip duBarry have hooked up but so far it is not much fun on this Family Vacation. (KS link) Family games often have a tough go in crowdfunding, but maybe they will have a late surge and end up having so much fun they'll be whistling "Zippity Doo Da" out of their...

Minion Games will be back with new titles soon, but meanwhile James Mathe has a very interesting new kickstarter centric endeavor called Kickin' It Games).

Going, Going, Gone!

In closing, I would like to take a quick look back at a highlight from previous crowdfunding news updates. One of the biggest projects EVER recently hit 0 hours remaining. Dungeon Roll from Tasty Minstrel Games killed it with nearly 11,000 backers. I had a brief exchange with TMG's Michael Mindes about the reason for the project's success:

Quote:
Existing audience and people that trust me. An attractive game with a $15 price point. Awesome backers.

I have always appreciated Michael's openness with the "behind the scenes" goings-on of a rapidly growing publisher.

That is it for now, so thanks for reading! If you have any complaints/compliments/bribes, let me know via Geekmail or comment below.
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 6:00 am
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Links: Gaming While Irish, Designing Small Games & Playing Games from Other Designers

W. Eric Martin
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• Game designer and co-owner of Twilight Creations Todd Breitenstein died on March 24, 2013 as a result of cancer that had spread to his lungs. BGG user Paul DeStefano had led a campaign to raise his iconic game Zombies!!! in the game rankings as a show of support and thanks, and he notes that the game had hit #418 at its peak. In his words, "Todd took comfort from this thread. That's what mattered. If we were able to bring a smile to that family, that's what matters." Pete Ross posted a memorial note about Breitenstein on his Superfly Circus blog.

• On his blog Berlin Game Design, designer Jeffrey D. Allers asks "Should game designers play other designers' games?" Yes, he answers, play as many games as you can as they'll inform your own designs as long as you approach them in a thoughtful way. He also suggests that Reiner Knizia, who has stated numerous times that he doesn't play games from other designers, is hobbling his creativity by dipping into the same well far too often.

• Publisher Eric Hanuise of Flatlined Games is publishing an online book, Board Games Publishing and Marketing, bit by bit on the Flatlined website. Topics covered to date include how to plan for your business before you start one and the different actors in the game industry.

• In a November 2011 blog post, social game designer Elizabeth Sampat writes about an encounter with a Brenda Brathwaite design – and it's not the much commented upon Train, but rather Síochán Leat, which seems to be Irish for "Peace to You" and which is also known as "The Irish Game". As with Train, Síochán Leat seems to play you as much as you might play it:

Quote:
Brenda asked me to help her set up Síochán Leat. She said she needed me "for something", and that it would take fifteen minutes. A gentleman I work with offered to help us with the heavy box and retrieval of the game pieces; she graciously rebuffed him. "I'm sorry, but only Irish people can put this game together."

I guess now is a good time to tell you: I am — my family is — Irish. Completely and fiercely and ridiculously Irish, in the way that only Americans can be. From what I understand, Brenda and I had very similar upbringings, and Síochán Leat is the story of her family's history. Because of this, it is almost the story of my family's history, too.

• In 2013 designer/publisher D. Brad Talton, Jr. released a Minigame Library through his Level 99 Games that contains a half-dozen card games of his own design in various genres and playing styles. He wants to repeat the project for 2014, but this time he's looking for outside submissions. Some details from his guidelines for this project:

Quote:
Minigames are portable card games [with 54 or 108 cards] that fit in one or two tuckboxes and can be played with generic components. Here's what we look for in a Minigame Library Submission:

• Works with generic components and has the proper card count.
• Variable setup OR play variants — lots of replayability.
• Supports different play group sizes.
• Easy enough for non-gamers, deep enough for gamers.
• Significantly fine-tuned already, with well-written and organized rules.
• Involved designer who is excited about the game and willing to work with us to refine and finalize the game.

He's also looking for microgames – that is, games that fit on a double-sided 8.5" x 5.5" postcard – to accompany the Minigame Library, similar to what he did in 2013.

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Thu Mar 28, 2013 3:45 pm
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Links: Ticket to Ride in the News Again, Japan Boardgame Prize 2012 & Are Kickstarted Games Worse on Average?

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• Following appearances in The Wall Street Journal and on the BBC, Alan R. Moon's Ticket to Ride and publisher Days of Wonder now grace Forbes in an article by Caleb Melby titled "Ticket To Ride: How The Internet Fueled A New Board Game Powerhouse". An excerpt:

Quote:
Now 61, the seasoned game author doesn't take cash up front for his board game designs. He drops that fee in exchange for a higher percentage of sales, because if the game is a hit, that's where the money is. And Moon knows a thing or two about hits.

"I'm always working on things," he tells me over the phone from Pennsylvania, where he's on an 11-day game-playing retreat with friends, "If I don't think it has any chance to be a big seller, I put it in the file and move on."

And another:

Quote:
When Apple shipped the first iPads in April 2010, Days of Wonder had already created Small World for the device.

Ticket to Ride for iPad came after, selling 100,000 copies in its first six months. In November 2011, Ticket to Ride for iPhone was released, and sold 100,000 copies in the first 30 days. The company noticed a trend: in the first 30 days of any launch, iPad versions sold 17 times faster than the board game, and iPhone versions 40 times faster.

Both Moon and board game retailers were were initially worried that digital sales would cannibalize hard-copy sales. Bizarrely, the effect was just the opposite.

"Occasionally, we'll run a promo where you can download the digital version for free. Then, six to eight weeks later, we'd see a bump in board game sales," Kaufmann says.

Not an approach that would work for every game, of course, but clearly Days of Wonder is doing just fine with its slow-and-steady approach to game publishing.

• Quintin Smith is back on video game site Kotaku, this time with a round-up of his five favorite team games, including a previously unknown to me team variant for Galaxy Trucker.

• Are games published via Kickstarter crappier (to use the technical term) than games published via other methods? Gary Ray from Black Diamond Comics looked for evidence:

Quote:
Having supported around twenty projects and having been disappointed by the majority, both in production value and game quality, I wondered if BoardGameGeek would show these projects to be below average.

BGG has a Kickstarter list of board games created by Kenny Ven Osdel with nearly 800 board games on it. So I went through the rankings, creating a chart for the lot of them on the BGG user reported scale of 1-10. What did I find? Nothing really. There was nothing in the curve that suggested that Kickstarter board games were any better or worse than non-Kickstarter board games.

His conclusion: "If these games are no better or worse than other games and I have a problem selling them, my hypothesis that Kickstarter has saturated the market, making sales at my retail store difficult or impossible, is more likely. It's not a quality problem; it's a disintermediation problem."

To win, your game's color scheme apparently must match that of the award
• The game industry is a vast beast, and not every game appeals to every gamer – or every family either, of course – and further evidence of the variety to be found among gamers the world over is the result of the 2012 Japan Boardgame Prize. Haim Shafir's Klack! from AMIGO Spiel took top prize in the U-more Award, which is voted on by seven administrators from U-more's own family gaming society. The other nominees for the award were Rüdiger Dorn's Vegas and Dobble/Spot It! from designers Denis Blanchot, Guillaume Gille-Naves and Igor Polouchine.

Seiji Kanai's Love Letter from his own Kanai Factory won the Voters' Selection, with 297 people voting for their top five games available in Japan in 2012, with games being awarded five points for first place, four for second, and so on. The self-published intriguing and apparently not-available-outside-of-Japan Vorpals took second place in the voting, with the much more widely-known Village from Inka and Markus Brand taking third. The other games in the top ten were:

4. K2
5. Vegas
6. Machikoro
7. King of Tokyo
8. Ese Geijutsuka New York e Iku
9. Kingdom Builder
10. Mogel Motte
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Thu Mar 21, 2013 6:30 pm
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Links: Eskridge on The Resistance, Lang on Future Releases, Orbanes on Monopoly and Money & Polar Bears on Shrinking Floes

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The Resistance designer Don Eskridge participated in an "Ask Me Anything" session on Reddit on March 11, 2013, which included this brief comment on possible future releases from him:

Quote:
Future project-wise, can't say definitely but at the moment I'm working on a Resistance follow-up and other social games. I just love games where people spend more time looking at each other than the board.

On the completely other side of that, I love the GIPF series of games and have one similar-type game of my own, though I doubt it will ever see publication since these just don't sell that well.

• The Hamilton, Ontario branch of the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) profiles Nick Shier and Jessica Maurice, who plan to open Gameopolis, the town's first board game café. An excerpt: "They're also aiming to host events for the community from tournaments to singles nights and charity fundraisers. 'Someone mentioned a really cool idea of doing a Hungry Hungry Hippos tournament for donations for the food bank, which we're really excited about,' Maurice says."

• Designer Eric M. Lang launched a personal website in January 2013 to "become more public, especially with so many new games coming out this year", and in addition to highlighting upcoming releases that have already been announced – The Lord of the Rings Dice Building Game, Trains and Stations – he also has a page for "Secret Projects", including a game with "tons of minis, lots of 'factions', crazy special abilities, and bloody confrontational game play" from Cool Mini Or Not that will be revealed in full at the GAMA Trade Show in mid-March 2013.

Philip E. Orbanes – game designer, owner of Winning Moves, and author of The Monopoly Companion – has a new book coming out from McGraw Hill in 2013 titled Monopoly, Money, and You: How to Profit from the Game's Secret of Success, which the publisher describes as "a book on the secrets and strategies of winning the world's most popular board game and the financial principles you learn as you round the board". McGraw Hill has a preview of the book on its website.

• Every new game needs a gimmick, right? Well, not really, but for those who think so, German kids science magazine GEOlino has something innovative and gimmicky for your gaming table and your freezer: Meltdown, the first board game that melts. From the publisher's description:

Quote:
The aim of the game is to take a polar bear family from the permanent ice floes to safety on the mainland. It's a race against time as the way leads across real, slowly melting ice floes, which children can make themselves with the accompanying mold, a bit of water, and a freezer compartment. The chunks of ice are arranged on a blue polar sea sponge to form a small Arctic. The sponge is used as the game board and absorbs the melted ice at the same time. Now you can start saving polar bears.

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Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:10 pm
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Links: New Exclusives in the U.S. from Cryptozoic, Ludonaute and What's Your Game? & Game-Designing Boy Scouts

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• U.S. publisher Cryptozoic Entertainment has entered an exclusive distribution deal for hobby stores with Alliance Game Distributors and Diamond Comic Distributors (Diamond being the parent company of Alliance), with the change in distribution taking effect immediately, according to a press release on Cryptozoic's website. Distribution of the World of Warcraft Trading Card Game and non-sport collectible trading cards will not be affected by this deal. As Cryptozoic's National Hobby Channel Manager Sara Erickson notes in the press release:

Quote:
We are very confident that our new partnership will allow us to focus on creating incredible licensed and original board games with the marketing materials and programs to support them. Alliance will help us reduce product shortages, execute effective promotional programs, and provide exceptional support for every hobby store. We want to ensure that retailers and consumers see a tangible benefit from this change. We have outlined several new programs that are only possible with the outreach and coordination efforts offered by Alliance.

One interesting new program for retailers is something that would be difficult to do when distributing through several companies, that program being a product swap that allows retailers to return unsold Cryptozoic titles in Q4 2013 in exchange for other product. This program will be available for select titles from Cryptozoic, such as any of its Middle-earth themed games.

I particularly love this question from the F.A.Q. in the press release:

Quote:
Q: Cryptozoic has some really exciting new games coming out soon. I've already pre-ordered these games with another distributor. Do I need to re-order these games from Alliance?

Yes, that's how normal people talk.

• In other exclusivity news, French publisher Ludonaute has chosen Game Salute as its exclusive distributor in the U.S., with the first two titles to be distributed being Shitenno and The Little Prince: Make Me a Planet. The press release announcing this deal explains what Ludonaute hopes to achieve: "Game Salute will leverage its network of specialized boutiques and distributors to promote Ludonaute products.... The current U.S. distribution model is quite different from what we know in Europe. Finding a partner that understands our needs and offers suitable solutions has been a long quest but Game Salute offers a comprehensive set of services that addresses all our needs." These games are expected to be available in the U.S. in Q2 2013.

• Also on the exclusive news front, on March 6, 2013, ACD Distribution announced that it had reached an exclusive distribution deal with Italian publisher What's Your Game? for two titles that debuted at Spiel 2012: Carlo Lavezzi's OddVille and Pierluca Zizzi's Asgard. This distribution deal applies solely to the U.S., and ACD expects that both games will be available in that country in April 2013.

• On that same day, the Boy Scouts of America announced that it was introducing a "Game Design" merit badge. From the announcement:

Quote:
To earn this merit badge, a Scout is required to analyze different types of games; describe play value, content, and theme; and understand the significance of intellectual property as it relates to the game industry....

The Scout puts his newfound knowledge to use by designing a game and creating a design notebook for this project. In his notebook, the Scout must demonstrate an initial concept, multiple design iterations based on initial testing, and feedback from blind testing. Once his concept is approved, the Scout can begin to build a prototype of his game. Testing of a Scout's game can be done at Scouting functions such as camp outings. For his game design, he can choose from a wide range of media, from cards to boards, dice, and even designing a smartphone application.
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Tue Mar 12, 2013 6:21 am
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Links: Uwe Rosenberg Is Tops in 2012, Panda Is Hiring & Gettysburg Is Open to Your Donations

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• On The Opinionated Gamers, Larry Levy posted his annual "designer of the year" column, choosing Uwe Rosenberg as the top designer of 2012 based on the breadth and strength of his designs published that year. He gave Simone Luciani second place, based almost entirely on the strength of Tzolk’in: The Mayan Calendar, which he co-designed with Daniele Tascini.

Panda Game Manufacturing is hiring a U.S. account manager, and since BGGers might have the experience and interest needed for such a job, Michael Lee at Panda has asked me to pass along information about the job: "We are interested in hiring a U.S.-based full time account manager to join our management team. Our ideal candidate has a track record of success while working independently, has good industry knowledge, and is located in the proximity of Indianapolis, Columbus, or Las Vegas. (Panda attends conventions in these cities.) Exceptional applicants from other cities will be considered as well." For full details on the skills and experience needed, as well as the responsibilities involved, head to this ow.ly page and download the PDF there.

• Kevin Scott at Torontoist writes about the third-annual Board Game Jam, in which designers are challenged to create an original game in just 48 hours.

• To celebrate the impending release of Bowen Simmons' The Guns of Gettysburg, publisher Mercury Games has worked with BGG to arrange for a fund-raising auction for an advance copy of the game – that is, one delivered several weeks before the game's general release – with all profits from the auction going to the Civil War Trust in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania "and the current campaign to save the 'fishhook' position near the Round Tops". In the description of this auction, Mercury's Richard Diosi notes that "Donations for the 'fishook' campaign are matched at a generous $4.19 to $1 ratio."

• So, real or not real? That's the question I have after watching this seemingly satirical video presentation for the game Pick Me! from Getta1Games, which does indeed have a website as well as a game page for Pick Me! What say you?

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Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:00 am
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