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BoardGameGeek News

To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, please contact BGG News editor W. Eric Martin via email – wericmartin AT gmail.com

Archive for Industry News

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Links: Asmodee Opens in China, Games of the Year in France & Interviews with Hisashi Hayashi and Michael R. Keller

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• French site TricTrac.net has posted the ten nominees for its Tric Trac d'Or 2012 award, and aside from a couple of lighter titles, it's a hefty list of lengthy games:

-----Archipelago, by Christophe Boelinger (Ludically)
-----Eclipse, by Touko Tahkokallio (Lautapelit.fi)
-----Myrmes, by Yoann Levet (Ystari)
-----Noé, by Bruno Cathala and Ludovic Maublanc (Bombyx)
-----Seasons, by Régis Bonnessée (Libellud)
-----Sherlock Holmes Détective Conseil, by Raymond Edwards, Suzanne Goldberg and Gary Grady (Ystari)
-----Takenoko, by Antoine Bauza (Matagot/Bombyx)
-----Tournay, by Sébastien Dujardin, Xavier Georges and Alain Orban (Pearl Games)
-----Trajan, by Stefan Feld (Ammonit Spiele)
-----Village, by Inka and Marcus Brand (Gigamic)

The winner will be announced December 16.

• In late November 2012, Asmodee opened a wholly-owned subsidiary in Shanghai, China. From a press release announcing the founding of Asmodee China: "The goal is to expand into a new market taking advantage of Asmodee's extensive line-up of games and the existing relationships with partners, thus promoting the brand in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The intent is to build an inventory of games in Chinese for this market: party games, family, educational, strategy, hobby, etc." Furthermore:

Quote:
To start, the Asmodee bestsellers will be offered to the Chinese market: Jungle Speed, Dobble, Dixit Journey (Libellud), Takenoko (Bombyx/Matagot), Kemet (Matagot), 7 Wonders (Repos Production), and Eclipse (Ystari/Lautapelit). Subsequently, Asmodee will further extend its product range every year to offer localized versions of new titles as well as a selection of titles in English for the avid player. "After a period of reflection, the decision to open a subsidiary in China was the best option for effectively promoting our games and those of our partners in this market," stated Stephane Carville, Managing Director, Asmodee Group. "The Chinese game market is undergoing a major expansion and Asmodee is looking forward to this adventure. We welcome new editors joining us in this venture."

Christophe Arnoult (Asmodee USA), Zongxiu Yao Charpentier (Asmodee China),
and Jean-Christophe Giraud (Asmodee International) at Spiel 2012

Hisashi Hayashi, designer of String Railway and Trains, is interviewed by MeepleTown's Derek Thompson. An excerpt:

Quote:
I am a great fan of railway games, and have played a large number of them. In most railway games, you place tiles on the board, or place your trains on the railways. In both cases, you’re pretty limited in where you put your rails. I was thinking about and looking for some way in which you could choose more freely, and what I ended up with was String Railway.

• In mid-November 2012, Seth Hiatt stepped down as president of Mayday Games and Ryan Bruns now fulfills that role. Hiatt, who moved to Suzhou, China in 2011, says that he's "stepping aside to focus on manufacturing and game development and pursue some other interests, including teaching some university courses".

• Dennis at Bellwether Games interviews Michael R. Keller, designer of the forthcoming City Hall and Captains of Industry and former assistant designer at Decipher Games. When asked the most important skill for a game designer, Keller answers:

Quote:
Humility. Being a game designer is an inherently egocentric process, as the initial design work is almost entirely alone. You decide what you want in your game. You end up making what you like and liking what you make. The first time you think your game is done, you're wrong. The next hundred times you think that, you're still wrong.
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Links: Awards in Spain, Discounts at Spiel & Obsessions in Editors and Artists

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• Michael Rieneck's Santiago de Cuba from eggertspiele has been named Juego del Año 2012 – board game of the year – by the jury of the Premio JdA, beating out Hanabi, Kingdoms, Survive: Escape from Atlantis! and Village. Twilight Struggle, from designers Ananda Gupta and Jason Matthews and published in Spain by Devir, received a special mention from the jury due to "its perfect integration of history and real events in a board game".

• In his blog, designer Emanuele Ornella points out odd selling habits at Spiel:

Quote:
In Hall 9 the distributor Heidelberger is really making crazy prices. Big box games for 10, 15 or 20 euro. Small and middle box games for 5 or 10 euro. This year, for example, 20th Century was for 10 euro. For 5 euro Magestorm by the out of business Nexus games (actually re-born in Ares games).

Is this really helping the game market? Of course players are attracted there to see what you can find for a very cheap price. And if you are lucky and you didn't already bought the game before, you can have a bargain. On the other hand if you paid the same game 20 euro more you are starting to think: Next time I'll wait before buying a game for a big price...

The title that surprised me in Heidelberger's discount piles was Michael Schacht's Coney Island as the game was only a year old and marked down to €10. Of course perhaps this is a chicken-or-egg problem. Are the huge number of titles hitting the market pushing games from twelve months ago into the discount bins in order to make room for the new stuff? Or are people holding off on buying new games, perhaps overwhelmed by all the choices and perhaps anticipating cheaper prices down the road because they know nearly everything hits the discount bin within 24 months?

• Not specifically game-related, but you'll understand why I'm posting this: In mid-November 2012, Yuka Igarashi, an editor at Granta, wrote about the hazards that come with copy-editing text in advance of an issue being sent to the publisher:

Quote:
You start to read in a different way. You start to see the sentence as machinery. You focus on the gears and levers that connect words to one another; you hunt for the wayward semicolon, the unintentionally ambiguous phrase, the clunky repeated word. You even hope they appear, so you can kill them. You see them when they're not even there, because you relish slashing your pen across the paper. It gets a little twisted.

And elsewhere in the piece:

Quote:
There was talk of ordering some food. I looked down at the sandwich menu: kiln smoked salmon and horseradish chive creme fraiche in toasted wholemeal bread. "Kiln smoked" probably should be hyphenated, I thought – it's acting as an adjective modifying smoked salmon – and "creme" needs the accent. Also, does "in" make sense here? Wouldn't it be better if it was "on"? Was this some kind of innovative sandwich that involved salmon being placed inside the bread?

• And another non-game article, but one that had me curious about your reaction: On Patheos, in an article titled "Artists Behaving Strangely", Daniel A. Siedell writes:

Quote:
Why do so many artists behave so strangely? If their odd-looking work isn't enough to make us scratch our heads, their weird behavior confirms our suspicions that they are charlatans, getting away with artistic murder in a laissez-faire and degenerate art world in which personality and image are more important than the quality of their work. ...

[Perhaps] artists' strange behavior is not due to their creative or marketing genius but a profoundly human response to a serious problem that all artists, in one way or another, face on a daily basis.

A painting is a weak and vulnerable thing because it is just not necessary. Smelly oil paint smeared across a canvas cannot be justified in this conditional, transactional world. Yet vast, complex institutions and networks have emerged to do just that, whether through the auction house (art as priceless luxury item), the museum tour (education), or the local chamber of commerce (art as community service, cultural tourism, or urban revival). That art is ultimately gratuitous, that its existence is a gift to the world, creates anxiety and insecurity in the art world. Everyone involved, from art collectors and dealers to critics and curators have to justify their interest in this seemingly "useless" activity – and justify the money they make or spend on its behalf. Art simply cannot be justified.

While games and paintings differ in their markets – paintings being one-off creations that sell for thousands or millions of dollars while games are reproduced and sold for less than $100 – they are both "not necessary" – that is, a particular game or painting is not necessary despite the human desire to play and to adorn one's surroundings. Yet game authors and artists do their work just the same. Why do it? Why go through the effort? What's driving them to create such works? And why don't we have a bevy of game designers who are comparably strange? Is the games market just not big enough, or is the author misguided in his reasoning?
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Links: Interviews with Naïade and Dominic Crapuchettes, Why Black Friday Is Like Spiel & Khet Zaps Laser Battle

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• Derek Thompson at MeepleTown has posted a two-part interview with designer/publisher Dominic Crapuchettes with the first part focusing on everything related to Wits & Wagers and its spinoff titles – the designer diary Crapuchettes mentions ran in early November 2012 on BGGN – while the second part focuses on Clubs (due out early in 2013), Say Anything, Crappy Birthday, and North Star Games' attempt at a digital transformation. I love this anecdote from Crapuchettes about how mainstream stores make their buying decisions:

Quote:
After [listening to us pitch] Wits & Wagers, the [Target] buyer was very interested – he said, "This was probably the most unique game that has ever been pitched to me. This is something I would like to play. But here's my problem: If I carry it, it won't sell. Here are the only things that have sold, based on my experience: One, a Hollywood license. Two, a 2+ million dollar television advertising campaign. Three, a recognizable brand name, because it's been built up for 3-5 years in other channels, and it's sold at least 100,000 copies previously. Those are the only three types of games that sell at Target."

I've experienced this same reaction, albeit not from a mainstream retailer. In the mid-2000s I pitched article queries related to modern games to dozens of publications, carefully refining which games I'd cover for which publication and in which format. At the time I was a full-time freelance writer, and this was part of my effort to write more about something I love – games – and less about general business or health topics that paid the bills but were less interesting. I had some successes – such as a paid write-up about Primordial Soup for Discover (that never ran, as far as I know), a paid bimonthly column in Coffee Magazine, and an unpaid two-paragraph summary of Reef Encounter for Tropical Fish Hobbyist (no, really!) – but many more rejections, including one from USA Weekend, a weekly general interest publication inserted into U.S. newspapers. Given the audience, I pitched the editor on introductory modern games – all the usual suspects – and he wrote back, "Why would anyone be interested in reading about these games that they know nothing about?"

MeepleTown's Derek Thompson also interviews Xavier Gueniffey Durin, a.k.a. Naïade, illustrator of Seasons, Tokaido and Isla Dorada and one of numerous French artists who create luscious games that suck you into their world whether or not you have any interest in their gameplay.

• An article in The Atlantic about the appeal of "Black Friday" sales in the U.S. can also be viewed as explaining why gamers from around the world love to attend the annual Spiel game convention in Essen, Germany when it would make more economic sense for these people to buy games with the money spent on airfare. An excerpt:

Quote:
Some people delight over the idea of fighting over the last Nintendo Wii, or whatever the item of the year happens to be. This study found that "perceived competition ... creates positive emotions and induces hedonic shopping value." Black Friday creates that kind of "perceived competition" in that it's not just a shopping day with a bunch of people. It's a shopping day with a bunch of people where discounts don't last and discounted products are scarce. "At certain levels, consumers enjoy arousal and challenges during the shopping process," researcher Sang-Eun Byun told The Washington Post's Olga Khazan. "They enjoy something that's harder to get, and it makes them feel playful and excited."

• As reported in The Colorado Springs Business Journal, Innovention Toys, publisher of Khet: The Laser Game, has won its lawsuit against MGA Entertainment over MGA's copycat laser-based strategy game Laser Battle. An excerpt:

Quote:
A Louisiana federal jury has awarded nearly $1.6 million in damages to a game company, owned by UCCS professor Michael Larson, that accused MGA Entertainment of copying its patented laser beam strategy board game.

The David-and-Goliath battle, which played out in district court and a federal court of appeals, ends a five-year battle...

The suit revolved around the board game Khet, which Larson developed with two of his students. He said the strategy game, where players manipulate reflective and non-reflective pieces in conjunction with an on-board laser beam, incorporates U.S. Patent No. 7,264,242, titled, "Light-reflecting board game", which was issued in September 2007, a month before the suit was filed.

According to Innovention, the patent-in-suit was unlawfully co-opted by MGA, which introduced its own competing game, Laser Battle, and sold it through retailers and co-defendants Wal-Mart and Toys 'R' Us.

(HT: ICv2)
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Links: Board Games in Mainstream Media, Giant Letters in a Stadium & Beer in a Lecturer

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• The history of Monopoly might not be a surprise to BGGers, but for those who aren't aware of the game's predecessor – Elizabeth Magie's The Landlord's Game – or how Henry George's philosophical belief that people should pay the state rent for land they owned influenced Magie, check out Christopher Ketcham's article "Monopoly Is Theft" on the Harper's Magazine blog. Ketcham intertwines events at the 25th Annual Corporate Monopoly Tournament in Pittsburgh into the larger story of how the game evolved over time. An excerpt:

Quote:
[Adam] Smith described such monopolist rent-seekers, who in his day were typified by the landed gentry of England, as the great parasites in the capitalist order. They avoided productive labor, innovated nothing, created nothing – the land was already there – and made a great deal of money while bleeding those who had to pay rent. The initial phase of competition in Monopoly, the free-trade phase that happens to be the most exciting part of the game to watch, is really about ending free trade and nixing competition in order to replace it with rent-seeking.

• In early October 2012, Derek Thompson at MeepleTown published an interview with Touko Tahkokallio, designer of the highly-rated Eclipse and its follow-up Eclipse: Rise of the Ancients, who unbeknownst to me designs mobile games for a day job.

• On Nov. 12, 2012, The Los Angeles Times published a general interest "Hey, board games still exist" article from Todd Martens (with the article actually being titled "Board games are growing in popularity again"), and the piece featured the usual suspects of such articles (Ticket to Ride, The Settlers of Catan) while also including quotes from Nathan McNair from Pandasaurus Games, Chris Kirkman from Dice Hate Me Games, and Matt Leacock – who for some reason is quoted about his experience self-publishing Lunatix Loop while not being credited with Pandemic, which is mentioned as one of the titles "having fueled the table-top renaissance". Interesting tidbits from the article: "Days of Wonder spends about $20,000 simply to develop a game" and Ticket to Ride "has worldwide sales of 'several hundred thousand units per year'", according to DoW co-founder Eric Hautemont.

• Trent at The Board Game Family details Out of the Box Publishing's attempt to set a world record for "most people playing a word game" by having thousands of football fans play Word on the Street simultaneously during halftime at a BYU/Idaho football game in Provo, Utah. In the normal game, a player or team is presented with a category, names something in that category, then moves the consonant tiles used in that word toward their side of the board. Unsurprisingly that approach to gameplay doesn't work in a football stadium. Here's what they did instead:

Quote:
Out of the Box created nine-foot square vinyl letters and set them up on the football field. The spectators (now participants) were split into two teams – the north half of the stand versus the south half. The questions were shown on the jumbo screens with three possible answers that the teams were to cheer for their favorite choice. Then the cheerleaders on the field would move the letter tiles according to the word.

And the questions that were used were created specifically for this event with responses being submitted prior to the event from Out of the Box fans around the world. They were all BYU-related such as "Name a BYU Quarterback" or "Favorite Ice Cream Flavor at the BYU Creamery".

• Quinns from Shut Up & Sit Down gave a fun and impassioned forty-minute talk at the UK video game festival GameCity on why modern board games are awesome and why video gamers – in particular video game designers – should be paying attention to what's going on with modern board game design.

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Thu Nov 15, 2012 6:45 am
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Links: Zobmondo Loses in Court, Stone Age Wins in the Netherlands & D20 Dice Tie for Oldest in the World

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• In a Nov. 7, 2012 press release, publisher Spin Master Ltd. notes that "a Los Angeles jury unanimously found yesterday that Zobmondo!! Entertainment LLC and its owner Randall Horn ('Zobmondo') are liable for willfully infringing Spin Master Ltd.'s WOULD YOU RATHER...? trademark". From the release:

Quote:
For years, Zobmondo has sold board games, books, and card games under the WOULD YOU RATHER...? brand, in violation of the trademark rights of Spin Master Ltd. and [its licensors Justin Heimberg and David Gomberg, authors of the Would You Rather...? series of books]. After a two week trial, the jury reached a verdict awarding Spin Master Ltd. $5.1 million in compensatory damages. The jury also awarded an additional $3.5 million in punitive damages after finding that Zobmondo acted with malice, oppression, or fraud. In so doing, the jury affirmed the validity of Spin Master Ltd.'s WOULD YOU RATHER...? trademark.

Hmm, would you rather have an $8.6 million judgment against your company or attempt to gargle a salad of raisins, asbestos and shards of glass? (HT: Purple Pawn)

Mad Men actor (and BGG user) Rich Sommer has added an intriguing and unique prize lot on the 2012 Jack Vasel Memorial Fund Auction: a game night in Los Angeles with him and fellow actors Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory) and Jorge Garcia (Lost). Notes Sommer in the description:

Quote:
The toughest part may be the scheduling. We will work closely with the winner to pin down a time that works for everyone, but we will all need to be a little flexible. Might be easier if you're someone in or near the LA area, but, hey. Go for it. [...]

Let me tell you right now: I know Simon and Jorge, and they like games. Our games. Good games. So this will be a LEGIT GAME NIGHT.

• Following the votes of roughly 11,000 people, the winners of the Speelgoed het van Jaar – the toy of the year award in the Netherlands – have been announced, with Bernd Brunnhofer's Stone Age winning in the 12+ category and Frans Rookmaaker's Boom Boom Balloon winning in the 9+ category.

• Retailer Gary Ray from Black Diamond Games in California notes that he's through carrying Kickstarted games from small and medium-sized publishers:

Quote:
Bigger projects can break out of this market saturation, but for the most part, most Kickstarter products we've brought into the store lately, including games that are highly ranked and reviewed, have failed for us. This includes companies that used to sell direct to us that now use Kickstarter. They've captured all our previous customers. Good for them, but obviously I shouldn't continue participating in that.

Kickstarter on a product now says to me, "Hey, we've done our best to sell this exact product, along with bonuses you can't offer, direct to customers before you. But perhaps you know somebody we missed?" Unlike the PDF market, which sells a different product, or the direct sales competitor, who sells things at the same time as us, the Kickstarter product is sold to customers not only before we can get it, but with added benefits. As I've mentioned, the Kickstarter market is a tiny part of the game trade, but these small companies used to have a place on our shelf. Now I'm pushed to focus on the mainstream, which is unfortunate.

Another retailer chimes in along the same lines in the comment section: "When I have gamers coming in talking about a game on KS, it immediately, in my head, goes to the 'stay away from this' pile..." Something for smaller publishers to keep in mind if they're trying to enter the normal distribution system and not limit themselves to direct sales or sales via Kickstarter (notwithstanding the small detail that, of course, "Kickstarter isn't a store" so no one is actually selling games that way, right?).

• Under the headline "Is this the oldest d20 on Earth?", io9 highlights a twenty-sided die dating from "between 304 and 30 B.C., a timespan also known as Egypt's Ptolemaic Period". Funny thing is that if you click through to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where the die is housed, you'll find another die (shown below) dating from the same time period, which makes the headline question a tad silly since it suggests that only one such die from this time period exists. Ah, well – now we should be looking for a treasure table on a pyramid wall, or perhaps a hieroglyph that looks like a beholder... (HT: Dale Yu)

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Links: David Megarry on Dungeon, Pierô on Why You Shouldn't Illustrate Games & Faidutti on Common Beliefs about Games

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• Wizards of the Coast has posted an interview with the original designer of Dungeon!, David R. Megarry. An excerpt:

Quote:
I assume that the earliest playtests of the game were done with the Blackmoor group. What changes (if any) came about as a result of these playtests?

DM: Well, I think we played it three or four times but then the prototype went to Gary Gygax in Lake Geneva. I invented Dungeon! in October, 1972 and visited Gary (with David Arneson) in December, 1972. Gary liked the game a lot and was willing to try to peddle it to [Don] Lowry [of Guidon Games, the original publisher of Chainmail]. I left the prototype with him at that point. I had not made a copy of anything, so this was a very trusting activity. Ultimately I got the board back and the cards but the hand drawn rule booklet was lost. Anyway, the Lake Geneva crowd did more playtesting than the Blackmoor crowd.

Gary made some changes to the board, insisting that there was an imbalance in the movement on the fourth level, but by and large the game has remained essentially as I designed it. Gary did request player-to-player attack rules which I supplied but I insisted they be optional rules. He added a few more optional rules like wandering monsters, but I viewed these as complications to the basic play: Ma and Pa America was going to have enough work to understand the basic rules let alone learn how to fight each other. Arneson and Gygax were both into complicated, lengthy rules in all their games; it took a lot of effort on my part to keep it simple.

• Derek Thompson at MeepleTown has interviewed artist Pierô, who has illustrated Ghost Stories, Mr. Jack, the 2012 edition of River Dragons, and many other releases from French publishers. An excerpt:

Quote:
When I'm playing a prototype that I have to illustrate, I'm always trying to think how I will dress up the mechanism of the game to give them a visual aspect. Doing a beautiful game is a challenge because it's not necessary to do a good game and because, sometimes, because the game is beautiful, it's less "playable", "readable"... A boardgame illustrator has to always keep in mind "mechanisms come first, beauty after".

• Is Disney looking to buy Hasbro? MTV Geek contemplates the rumors floating just that idea.

• After hearing an aggravating interview in which the manager of the Parisian trade fair Kidexpo presented "facts" about board games that were "appalling, inconsistent, obsolete and malinformed", game designer Bruno Faidutti responded by writing about five truisms that people hold about games and why they're not true. One of those truisms and Faidutti's response:

Quote:
Commonplace #5: Games are not intended to be taken seriously.

Unlike work, which needs some detachment and ought not to be taken too seriously, games need to be played with the utmost seriousness and dedication. Always trying to be a winner in real life is a very bad idea, since it brings disappointment and often makes you look ridiculous. In a game, if all players are not trying to win, the game simply falls flat and becomes pointless and boring. The reason is that victory is its only point, when no one has the slightest idea what the point of real life is.

This doesn't mean games can't be fun. I like fun games, and I think I design fun games, but fun is no more a necessary feature of games than it is of novels or movies. They can be fun, they don't have to. There's not the slightest fun in Chess, Ticket to Ride or Settlers of Catan, but this doesn't mean one can't have fun playing them. That's what Blaise Pascal has explained in his theory of diversion, and that's what Freud later said: the opposite of play is not seriousness, it's reality.

• French publisher Moonster Games has posted a brief interview (in French) with Yoshihisa Itsubaki, designer of Streams, which Asmodee will distribute. I haven't tried Streams yet, so I can't say anything about it other than that it sounds perfect for fans of puzzly games like Take it Easy!, Finito! and 5 vor 12, but I was struck by his favorite movies: Terry Gilliam's Brazil and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's Amélie. Soulmate! Plus, he wore this awesome ninja shirt at Spiel 2012. Click through to the interview to see the ninja revealed...

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Links: Trajan Wins the 2012 IGA, Looney Labs Sells a Lot of Fluxx & How Not to Run a Small Game Business

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• I'm a bit behind the news curve due to my focus on the Spiel 2012 Preview and the attendant addition of games to the BGG database and rewriting of game descriptions, so you might have heard this news already. If not, here we go: The winners of the 2012 International Gamers Awards have been announced, with Stefan Feld's Trajan from Ammonit Spiele winning the multi-player award and Uwe Rosenberg's Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small from Lookout Games winning the two-player award. (You can view the twelve nominees in the former category and the four in the latter in this BGGN post.) Congrats to the winners!

(Note: I'm on the IGA jury for the general strategy category, but for the second year running I have abstained from submitting a nominee list.)

• Alain Ollier's The Boss is now playable in a beta version on Board Game Arena, while Emiliano Venturini's tricky-sounding Carnac has been added to BoardSpace.net.

• UK publisher Reiver Games went out of business in 2011, but in addition to working on new game designs, owner Jackson Pope has been thinking about what went wrong with his business, and his analysis might be of use to all the young guns starting up as publishers these days. An excerpt:

Quote:
I tried to move from being a small hobby publisher with a dedicated, but small, army of fans to being a full-size pro publisher with professionally manufacturer games and sales and distribution channels. And I tried to do it too quickly. If I was a marketing genius, it's conceivable that it could be done, but it was a long shot and I didn't have it in me.

• Designer Andrew Looney and his wife Kristin – co-owners of U.S. publisher Looney Labs – were featured in The Gazette, a newspaper published in Maryland, which is where they live. One detail of note: "The company offers 20 game titles, with numerous playing styles, and generates about $1 million in yearly revenues. They hope to exceed that sales total this year with the entrance of Fluxx into the mainstream market."

• Designer Tony Boydell is up to his usual word play in his BGG blog with a ludic reimagining of a classic number from Queen (and that's not a shortening of Queen Games, mind you). An excerpt:

Quote:
Are these the real dice?
For Fighting Fantasy?
Caught in Wallenstein
No Escape! from Polarity...
Open your Ice, Flow up to Sun-Sand and Sea (!)
I'm just a Troyes boy I need no Sympathie
Take It Easy come, easy go; little high, little low
And Before the Wind blows doesn't really matter Tomy, Tomy...
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Links: Spiel 2012 Previews, Game Design for Korea & Hidden Costs for Game Store Owners

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• In the run-up to Spiel 2012, which opens October 18 in Essen, Germany, designers and publishers have been talking about their upcoming games a fair amount, such as this interview on Opinionated Gamers with Tony Boydell, whose Snowdonia is coming from three publishers: Surprised Stare Games, Lookout Games, and uplay.it edizioni.

• In another interview, Opinionated Gamers' editor Dale Yu also talks with designer/publisher Ted Alspach about Suburbia, a game on which Yu served as developer.

• Also on OG, Andrea Ligabue previews Cranio Creations' 1969 in addition to posting two previews of all the Italian publishers who will have a presence at Spiel 2012.

• Designer Jeffrey D. Allers, who will see his Nieuw Amsterdam debut at Spiel 2012, is hosting his annual "After Essen Party" in Berlin at the Spielwiese game café. Allers writes:

Quote:
Six years ago, Michael Schmitt agreed to help me bring a little bit of Spiel back from Essen and celebrate in his Spielwiese cafe with all the great new games released there – many of them from Berlin designers.

The photo galleries on my After Essen Party page show some of the fun from the past five years. As you can see, it has been a great mix of games and guests from around the world, and we can even claim that Spiel des Jahres (German Game of the Year) award winner Qwirkle was discovered here!

As always, the 6th Annual After Essen Party is open to the public, athough space is limited and it is best to come early. Visiting designers are welcome to show their newly released games as well (please, no prototypes, however). Feel free to contact me or Michael at the Spielwiese in advance (especially if you are a game designer or publisher). The party is on the Tuesday after Spiel (Oct. 23, 2012), beginning at 7 p.m. Hope to see you at Spiel and at the party in Berlin afterwards!

• Publisher Korea Boardgames is hosting a game design competition with a submission deadline of October 10, 2012. Details on the competition are included in this BGG thread.

• Out of the Box Publishing has published a short interview with designer Aaron Weissblum, who teases gamers with a mention of the ever-elusive Spinball. More copies, please, Aaron! It'd be like printing money...

• On GameHead, Michael Bahr from retail store Desert Sky Games details "5 Unseen Costs That Threaten Game Stores". An excerpt:

Quote:
Everybody knows about shrinkage, but few have experienced just how pernicious it can be. Shrinkage is particularly bad in hobby gaming retail, where too many store owners use a "dumb" cash register and manage inventory by pencil and paper and the vagaries of proprietor memory. A game store cannot protect what it cannot measure, and it cannot measure what it cannot track. The necessity for a proper point-of-sale software infrastructure cannot be emphasized enough.

Is this where I add the link to Seinfeld?
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Thu Sep 27, 2012 6:43 am
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Links: Village Wins the 2012 Deutscher Spiele Preis, Quarto Keeps Selling & Award Nominees in Spain

W. Eric Martin
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• Is game design a genetic trait that passes from generation to generation? No, it's not, but you'd be forgiven for thinking so after viewing the winners of the 2012 Deutscher Spiele Preis. The Brand family made off with the top spots, with Inka and Markus Brand taking first place for Village, which won the Kennespiel des Jahres earlier in 2012, and their children Emely and Lukas Brand winning Deutscher Kinderspiele Preis for Mogel Motte! Here's a pic of the champs from Spielbox:


The winner of the DSP is determined through votes by the public, whether game players, retailers, designers, or those who randomly stumble across the site. Voters submit a list of up to five games, with the top game receiving 5 points, the second one 4 points, etc. The top ten vote-getters for the 2012 DSP were:

1. Village, by Inka and Markus Brand (eggertspiele)
2. Trajan, by Stefan Feld (Ammonit Spiele)
3. Hawaii, by Greg Daigle (Hans im Glück)
4. Ora et Labora, by Uwe Rosenberg (Lookout Games)
5. Helvetia, by Matthias Cramer (Kosmos)
6. Targi, by Andreas Steiger (Kosmos)
7. Kingdom Builder, by Donald X. Vaccarino (Queen Games)
8. Vegas, by Rüdiger Dorn (alea)
9. Africana, by Michael Schacht (ABACUSSPIELE)
10. Santa Cruz, by Marcel-André Casasola Merkle (Hans im Glück)

My guess, based on no inside information, is that the heavyweight trio of Trajan, Hawaii and Ora et Labora split the votes of heavyweight game fans, while Village was the solid middleweight choice and threaded the needle to take the prize. That said, I've played Village more than each of those other three games, so perhaps lots of other voters are just like me and Village landed on the top of their lists naturally.

Schmidt Spiele's publication of Hayato Kisaragi's Grimoire won the "Goldenen Feder" for best rules, and designer Wolfgang Kramer won a special prize for lifetime achievement.

• In other award news, the nominees for the Premio Juego del Año – the game of the year award in Spain – have been announced, and they are:

Hanabi, by Antoine Bauza (Cocktail Games – Asmodée Ibérica)
Kingdoms, by Reiner Knizia (Edge)
La Villa, by Inka and Markus Brand (Ludonova)
Santiago de Cuba, by Michael Rieneck (Ludonova)
The Island, by Julian Courtland-Smith (Asmodée Ibérica)

The winner will be announced October 13, 2012. Hope the Brands have more room on the mantle for another trophy...

• French publisher Gigamic reports that Blaise Muller's Quarto! has now sold more than one million copies. That's a lot of wood!

• The Gigamic release Color Pop from Lionel Borg is now playable on Board Game Arena.

• Oliver Kiley blogs on BGG about "modes of thinking" in games – that is, what kind of thoughts, decisions, and considerations players need to make in a game and the associated mental resources needed for those actions – with his three modes of thinking being spatial, economic, and intuitive.

Boing Boing covers Monopoly: Alan Turing Edition, due out late in 2012 from Winning Moves Games. Best comment in the post: "The real question is: Is this version of Monopoly NP-complete?"
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Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:43 pm
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Links: Munchkin Keeps on Selling, Fundex Doesn't Sell Enough & Amateurs Have High Hopes for Sales

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• In its Sept. 5, 2012 Daily Illuminator, Andrew Hackard at U.S. publisher Steve Jackson Games says that the company is blowing through the 23rd printing of Munchkin – 100,000 copies – much faster than it had anticipated thanks to the game's presence on TableTop, in Target, and in the hands of so many pushy fans, so the 24th printing will be boosted to 120,000 copies. In an interview on ICv2, Hackard elaborates further on Munchkin sales: "I don't have the actual year over year percentage increase, but as of the end of July [2012] we have sold almost as many copies as we sold all of last year of Munchkin. The past three or four years particularly have been going up further every year."

• Speaking of TableTop, in a separate interview on ICv2, Days of Wonder's Mark Kaufman goes into some detail as to how Small World's appearance on the first episode of that web series affected sales:

Quote:
We were surprised at the response rate. We had close to five times the sales that month that we would have had normally and the next month it continued to be extremely high as well. So that was the first part of May [2012] when that first ran and now that we're several months past that, we have reached a run rate that is much higher than it was previously with the Small World game...

It's almost 100% higher than what was. It reinvigorated not only new people but it also got the core people going, "That was really cool. Small World, I like playing it." And that's what brings new people into the hobby.

• U.S. publisher Fundex has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. As noted by Rachel Feintzeig in The Wall Street Journal, "The company has $1.5 million in assets and $8.9 million in liabilities to contend with as it works to restructure and is in desperate need of funding, it said in court papers... The company, based in Plainfield, Ind[iana], is seeking court approval to tap cash collateral to keep it afloat as its case plays out. It said it's planning to keep its business operating in the ordinary course but isn't ruling out the idea of selling its assets in bankruptcy."

• On Mechanics & Meeples, blogger Shannon Appelcline examines the core elements of Dominion and whether those elements are part of every deck-building game or something that other deck-building designers and publishers simply lifted due to laziness or false assumptions about what's required in a DBG.

• Designer Lewis Pulsipher tells a horror story in his BGG blog:

Quote:
Here's the kind of really sad story you can hear sometimes from novice designers. At one of the game design/game publishing seminars at Gen Con, right at the end, someone raised his hand and said he and a group of friends had been working on a game for seven years, and it was a great game, and they had spent over seven years and a million dollars developing it including paying Marvel comic artists to do the art; and how could he get to talk to Fantasy Flight Games about it? The three panelists were taken aback – if I wrote in contemporary style I would say they were "stunned" – and said nothing for a moment. Because there's really nothing to say. These "designers" were in cloud-cuckoo land to spend so much time and money, and their game very likely wasn't particularly good, either.
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Thu Sep 13, 2012 6:30 am
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