The Inattentive Gamer

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Fluxx: my 40th ranked game

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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Fluxx, it's a love - hate game for alot of you. For me, it is a treasure but one man's treasure is another man's trash.

Fluxx, if you don't know, is a card game. It's unlike almost any card game. At the beginning of fluxx each player holds two cards and there are two rules, draw one card then play one card. There is no win condition, there are no guidelines about what to do other than draw one, play one. As the game plays on the rules, the goals and the things to do are revealed from the deck.

Fluxx is not the perfect game. Depending on the situation, the player may have let to no opportunity for strategy, merely tactics. It is possible to get in a situation where a player has no control and must simply draw and play what is drawn. Also, for its myriad of different themed sets, once you get past the theme most sets are close to identical.

I do still enjoy it though. I do enjoy the themes and I do enjoy the minor tweaks from one version to the next. In addition, it's a great game to play as filler with people who won't try and break the game and are willing to mark time while chatting and preparing for the next earnest game or wrapping up for the evening.
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Sat Apr 5, 2014 3:01 am
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Dixit: A Review of my 41st ranked game

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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There was a time when descriptions of Dixit were about asn unanimous and glowing as they come. That time was several years ago now but it was around then that I decided it was time to get another party game and that ended up being Dixit.

In Dixit each player has a handful of cards with rather surreal images on them. One player each turn is the judge, pulls out a card (face-down) and says something to hint at what might be on it. Every other player tries to also secretly play a card that makes what was said. The cards are passed in, randomized and revealed. Then everyone but the judge votes on which one is the one the judge played. If the judge fooled everyone or no one he or she loses points. If the judge fooled some then the judge, the people who guessed right and the people who played the other fooling cards get points. You play until you've circled the scoring track once.

I've had this game out a half dozen to a dozen times with various groups of various sizes. My game plays to, I think, 6 and I've frequently had to figure out how to jerry rig something so that a seventh or eighth player could get in and that has worked out great except for the components. It is the process of this jerry rigging that I finally felt like I understood the game, what was good and what was bad. This game is a triumph of mechanics for a party game. The numbered and colored voting chips are such and easy and elegant design that they immediately fall away as abstractions to newbies and veterans alike. The bit and the paintings on the cards are all well done an alluring.

The part of this game that always nagged at the back of my mind also became clear in these moments. First there is the simplicity of it. Simplicity is both a virtue and a vice. In this game there is so much of it that it trends very much towards vice. This could easily be done with literally and collection of pictures, it could be done with famous quotes or funny website names, it could be done with anything because it contains no substance. The other issue for me is that with all of these judge games (apples to apples, Say Anything) the game is very gameable if a few people know each other better than others. The game is about the subtle communication of relationships and so a strong relationship among players swings the game so dramatically that it's not fun.

Because I can jerry rig this for a variety of players and because it's elegantly designed if a bit too simple, this is my 41st ranked game.
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Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:39 am
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Zombie Dice: a review of my 42nd ranked game

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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This is the first review of my series that I am writing and posting on my BGG blog. This is because I found it was difficult to meaningfully review each game in a way that satisfied the BGG approvers. We'll try this out for a while and see how it goes.

When Zombie Dice came out it was pretty much an automatic purchase for me. I'm not a zombie fan or anything, it just seemed like a really fun, filler game. It lived up to that hype.

In Zombie Dice the players pass around a cup with thirteen dice that are used to play the game. All dice have two pairs of footprint meaning that the dice will be rerolled, all dice have some brains which are points to be scored (you're a zombie eating brains) and all dice have some gun shots that will count against the player. The green dice have more brains that gun shots while the red dice are reversed and the yellow dice have two of each symbol.

Gameplay in Zombie Dice is very simple. The player is passed the cup, draws three dice blindly and rolls them. Brains and gun shots are set to the side and footsteps are left in front of the player. The player may then stop and keep the points of any brains or choose to continue, adding as many dice from the cup as are need to the number of footsteps to make three more dice to roll. If the player ever gets a total of three gun shots in a round, the round ends for that player and not points are scored. If a player scores thirteen or more brains then play continues around until everyone has had an equal number of turns, then scores are tallied and someone wins.

As I said in the opening, this was a great filler game, for a time. Unfortunately after a while everyone was pretty done with this. It's an ok push your luck game but it punishes far more than it rewards and it can be extremely streaky. I also always had a bit of a problem with the theme. I don't really like being the zombie eating the brains. I have heard of a person reengineering the narrative to be a mad scientist where the brains were successful experiments, the explosions are failed experiments and the feet were getting called away from the lab before the experiment was concluded. I think I would gel with this theme a great deal more but the mechanical sameness would remain. As a result this is my 42nd ranked game.
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Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:23 am
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Jenga: a review of my 44th ranked game for Jenga

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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This review is part of a series in which I'm reviewing my top 50 games. This one in particular was especially difficult because I have so little to say that I can barely justify it at all. However, I'm trying to get through all fifty so enjoy the brevity.

If I was to build a template that could be laid over each game to determine if I would like it or not I'm fairly certain that Jenga would fall well outside of the template. There's little planning, little that I can do in the early game that is super meaningful in the late game, it's totally possible for players to virtually sit the game out, it's a game with a loser and not a winner and many more. However, every time this game come out, I simply have fun. I enjoy the stress of trying to pull that block that will make the next person's job that much harder, I enjoy seeing a move that I was sure was impossible, I enjoy the tension as the tower grows higher and higher and less stable, I even enjoy the shift and sudden crash as the game ends.

Jenga is on my list because, despite myself it's just fun. However, it's not higher because it's barely a game. Still, for as available and as accessible as this game is, you should go play...no now, go play.
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Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:09 am
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10 days in the USA: a review of my 48th ranked game in 2013 for 10 Days in the USA

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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This review is a part of a series that I am attempting in which I review my top fifty ranked games from 2013. To see the rankings check out this geeklist.

I've played both, 10 days in the USA and 10 days in Europe. Game play they're about the same so you can probably apply this review to either. When I ranked this, it included 10 days in Europe as a part of the consideration. In truth, I've played Europe more and like it slightly better.

In the 10 days series each player is competing with his or her peers to be the first to put together a valid travel plan that spans the full ten days (hints in the name). You do so by taking a either a face up tile or a face down tile and placing it your rack of tiles before you. You must always replace exactly one tile and once placed a tile can not slide. Valid play is determined by having adjacent tiles that are also adjacent on the map (you walked from a to b), having an appropriately colored plane between two of the same colored tile (you flew from a to b) or a ship between two tiles that share a coast in the sea indicated on the ship (you get the idea right?).

The 10 days games are all very accessible. We've all traveled and understand the idea of going from one place to another and that our choice in transportation may impact that. The rules for adjacent travel make absolute sense, the rules for air travel are a little arbitrary but people understand a restriction that says to must match colors.

The fact that all of the mechanics of 10 days make sense the the newest of newbies is a huge boon. The bane, however, is that this game is not fun in the traditional sense. This game is a lot of work. You will not have a conversation during this game and the game will not go quickly. That is not the kind of game I like to introduce newbies to. Even veterans, depending in their temperament, may be turned of by the sheer effort they must invest in playing this game.

It is because I enjoy this game both in concept and execution and feel that the theme and mechanics are the most accessible I can imagine but feel exhausted after playing and can almost never get anyone to sit down to a second game that this is my number 48.
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Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:05 am
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Impressions of The Agents after 4+ plays

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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I've been trying to decide the right place for this post. I'd kind of like it to be a review but I don't feel comfortable calling it a review quite yet. It's kind of a session report but it'll be a mish mash of multiple experiences. I don't feel like blog posts get any visibility but alas, that's where this will end up.

I've played The Agents a handful of times and I want to like it really bad but I'm struggling.

I've played this game both in it's print and play incarnation and now in its production version. I have not played with all the expansions, primarily the base game. The cards are a nice plastic material. I've heard there has been complaining in the world but these are good cards that could last a very long time. The money markers (intelligence points I believe) are cards and they look nice but honestly, chips would be better.

In this game you play to one of two factions. Each faction is a group of up to six cards and you share each faction with exactly one player (one to the right and one to the left) so as a result you almost don't care what the guy across the table does because he can't directly touch you nor you him. The exception is free agents that can be played out of faction and fire once then leave the game as opposed to standard agents who reside in their factions.

Each agent in a faction has a neighbor to either side (that neighbor may be empty space if he or she is on the end) and facing. The facing of the card determines how it may benefit you. IF you have the bottom of the card (as determined by all text on the card) facing you, you may take that agent's action in your turn. If you have the top there will likely be an arrow pointing at you. If this agent has a neighbor who also has an arrow pointed at you, you will collect money at the end of the round, one for mismatched colors and two for matched. In this way, each agent may be beneficial to both parties involved in this faction

Agent actions sometimes work on their own faction (group of cards) or the other faction. The actions may do things like rotate a card, extract (pull into your hand) a card, kill (flip over) a card and handful of other things. It's these that make up the bread and butter of the game.

Finally, there are missions. These are another deck of cards, you start with one and can buy more throughout the game. You may play or move them for free and they will often give you points for things like having no matched arrows facing you or having dead agents in a faction.

On a player's turn he or she gets two actions which can include buy a new agent for one money or a new mission for three. Playing an agent from the hand to the faction and in the orientation that the player wants. The player may also activate an agent that has the text oriented towards him or her. The game ends when one player has forty money.

I've logged four play session here on BGG and I think I may have a gotten a couple in with the PnP before I started logging last year. My initial reaction was one of extreme dislike however all my fellow players had a nice time so I assumed it was just me, I did lose after all. I pushed to get it to the table and again and we did. I lost a few and won a few. My most recent plays were today where I won one and lost one. The biggest outcome though is that I feel like I have enough plays under my belt to talk coherently about the game.

First, I like the idea of the game. I like that orienting the cards always means giving something away, an action or potentially points. At first I thought that this seeming zero sum game was what bothered me but I've found it does not. This does breakdown some in the early game when there are no other cards to act on.

They did a great job in game design of consistently using reserve words so that you only have so many nouns and verbs to understand the entire game. They did not, however, include a good glossary anywhere for questions that arise. This means that you can make in game calls to keep it consistent but it also means that you realize later that a miscall unbalanced the game. This should be an easy fix and I don't know why they haven't emailed every kickstarter backer already with a fixed set of rules.

I kind of lump this in with the rules as just newbie/inattentive mistake but there are a lot of typos in this game. They seem to be consistent so I'm assuming it was a case where the font they used when sharing withe the printer added confusion but it's pretty bad.

There are a type of cards that I barely touched in the description above and it's because I wanted to reserve them for down here. Free agents are not played in a faction. They are used one time then discarded. They are often very powerful or they let you act on any faction, even those you aren't normally interacting with. They also have the added rule that you can't play them if the action can not be taken. May the gods help you if you get and opening hand of these because you will be crippled until other players get the right cards on the table to use them. To make matters worse, there are a ton of them in the game. Also, their not always intuitive to play which can really derail the game at times.

A small gripe but one that goes with the above, the current ruleset does not have you start with any money. As a result, if you get those free agents I mentioned, you can't buy any agents. So you sit an suffer while others play the game and you don't. After a very slow start to our first game today, I asked for a house rule that we start with two money each for the second game. We got good draws so it became irrelevant but today's first was not the first time that I've seen this issue show up.

Here it is, my final gripe. This is the point that I was finally able to crystallize today - you can play your best possible game and someone else can lose this for you. Since you have almost no control over any faction but the two by you, sloppy play by someone else can allow your opponent to rack up five to ten points per round (remember forty ends the game)and you just have to watch it happen. There are a few tricks that you can use to slow this down or at least manage your own factions well but it sucks to just watch someone win and not get to participate.

That's been my experience with The Agents so far. It's a game that I really want to like but I've seen the same issues creep in game after game and I've decided that they're game breaking for me. A couple house rule, messing with the card distribution in the deck (fewer free agents) and a new rule book would certainly help. However, I think that final point about just watching the game get lost may be insurmountable for me. It's fundamental to gameplay and I can't help but wonder if the designer saw it and kept stuffing free agents in until he hoped it would go away but it's bad enough that I won't ask for this game again. I'm not above playing it when others want to but I know my opening draw and other players' play will almost entirely determine the outcome.
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Tue Feb 25, 2014 3:52 am
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Impressions of Last Will: Getting Sacked after exactly one play

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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As the title indicates, this is not an exhaustive review, simply first impressions. I've played Last Will around a dozen times and really like it. When as friend of mine (who owns Last Will) gave me a Christmas gift of an expansion I already had and wanted to take it back and get me something else, I asked if he'd be cool with buying this expansion and keeping it with his game. He did so and we played it for the first time today.

What's in the box?
There are some cool previews here on the geek that talk about the career cards They are exactly as advertised. You get a job that gives you money. You can take demerits at most one time per turn to make less money, evertually you make no money and lose the job. A job acts like a property in that you can't go into bankruptcy with it in play and you get one final payout at the end of the game for calculating placement.

New action cards related to your wedding. These are pretty cool and have alot of power, specifically the ones that let you discard for more money spent. Also, these cards can be played as a group for a single action, making them potentially very powerful. This adds a new icon that could be used if there are additional expansions in the future.

Two new types of property. There are properties that can be one of two types of houses. These are great for playing the market. There are also properties that if a companion lives there, they double depreciate. They only depreciate for about 2 bucks per turn but with a companion you can wring a lot value out of these.

A new options board. You no longer have the fixed turn order/action/card options board, you can now have a small amount of variety each game. They also added another errand boy. I think tha the new errand boys lend some real weight to these options. I used to be able to say what my choices A, B and C were but the new options really seemed to strike me as there being a best option for me each turn. It really hurt when someone took the one I wanted.

A new sideboard that has a deck with more crown on it. Sorry, i don't have thre rules in front of me so i don't have the names right but you know the deck you build, with the crowns. now there is a second one and it's super powerful too.

Gameplay
As I mentioned above, I looooove Last Will. It's officially number four on my favorites list but when it comes time to do it again, I imagine it will jump up to two or so. Please bear that in mind as you read this. In fact, if you don't like Last Will, stop reading. This is definitely more Last Will and won't be for you. No offense is meant, it just won't be up your alley. If you like Last Will, I think you'll probably like this.

The job gives you one more axis along with you must manage your game. If you're not earning a demerit each turn, you probably won't win. The new cards and extra errand boy, however potentially give you whole new avenues to approach each path of the game.

I've had great success in Last Will just picking a path (like actions only) and sticking to it at all costs. That is harder now. You either have to diversify to get figure out how to lose your job or burn an errand boy each turn to lose demerits and there is only one spot for that so you're easily blocked.

I mentioned above that I like the new options at the start of each turn and that, I think, may be the biggest change. I've only seen one set of tiles and think how they come out may be important, but I feel like the rebalance of the tiles with the third errand boy is pretty great. Cards and actions seemed to be a little harder to come by in our game. With the extra errand boy on the table though, it was hard to get your first and second choice. You could make great strides though if you'd sacrifice your errand boys for one of the other two.

If you like Last Will, this is probably a solid purchase for you. The one exception is, if you felt Last Will was already too tense and the decisions too difficult, this will just amp that up some more.
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Fri Jan 3, 2014 9:31 pm
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Impressions of Eldritch Horror after 1.5 playes

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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I had the pleasure today of attending Arkham Nights at Fantasy Flight Event Center, learning, playing and purchasing Eldritch Horror. I thought I might document a few impressions from my game and half for those folks who won't see this for a couple weeks to think about. Please be aware, these impressions come from 1 and a half games of Eldritch Horror. They are first impressions.



First and foremost, if you ever have the opportunity to attend any Fantasy Flight event, I really recommend it. If you're in the Twin Cities for a couple days, find a reason to get to Fantasy Flight. The facility is great, has lots of great gaming space, a lending library and now a grill.

Today I sat two with four random strangers and was introduced to a neat new game Eldritch Horror. There were four players and one FF employee who did a great job teaching the game. Since this game is new to a a lot of folks I'll go through gameplay. If you don't care about this, skim down to where it says "Impressions" where you'll get my impressions (Spoiler alert, I like it).

Eldritch Horror plays similarly to Arkham Horror but with a few rough edges sanded down. You have a character with seven stats. You have Sanity and Stamina that work exactly like all the other games (Two buckets of hit points) but you also have Strength, Will, Observation, Persuasion and Lore which you will use for tests. Each time you're told to perform a test you role the number of dice equal to the indicated stat and a five or six is a success. You can improve your stats through events by a maximum of two, I didn't see any mechanisms to handicap your stats and you don't get the Arkham style sliders, these a largely static.

On your turn you get an Action Phase, Encounter Phase and Mythose Phase. The action phase allows you to perform two different actions of the following: movement, rest, shop, buy a ticket or anything else on your character cards, item cards or effect cards that say action. Movement is going for one place to an adjacent place, if you have a ticket of the correct type, you may move again as the same action. Resting gives back a stamina and sanity Shopping requires that you perform a persuasion check where each success is a dollar you can spend. Buying a ticket can only be done in a city for either train or boat routes, you can have up to two tickets and can use them as a part of a move action later.

The encounter phase is where all the Arkham stuff happens. In Eldritch Horror, almost everything is an encounter, clue gathering, portals, monsters, even dead investigators. If there is a monster on your space, you fight it but a win allows a second encounter. If there is a gate on your space you may encounter it which is a simple card draw. The Portal cards have a forking path you are faced with a test from which there are pass and fail conditions each having its own test. We found cases where it was actually preferred to fail the first test and succeed at the second. Clues have their own distinct card deck as well, and you have to actually earn them rather than just walk over them.

The Mythos phase is where the game does it's thing, advance the doom track, get a new portal, get some monsters, move monsters, occasionally send thugs around to break your legs for not paying your debts. It's the thing every co-op has to have built into it.

That's all there is to the game. It moves quickly and smoothly, it seems very teachable.

Impressions

First, I like it. I like it on its own merits. I think it has plenty of theme to draw anyone in who has even the slightest desire to read all the flavor text on the cards. It also has enough gam-i-ness that you need to be aware of how it's going to play mechanically otherwise you'll have fun but get taking apart by monsters. This game does ask its players to do both, being unable to sustain those will detract from the experience.

Of course, people will want to know how it compares to the other games in the same universe. I've played Mansions of Madness once, Arkham three or four times and Elder Sign tens of times. Based on those experiences this game belongs in this universe. It has the same flavor that each of those seeks in its own way. It's definitely not as light as Elder Signs but not quite as time consuming and rules heavy as Arkahm. Eldritch has been positioned as a kind of Arkham reboot and I think they have a lot in common. If you like Arkham, you'll probably like this. If you have Arkham and kind of like it, you may not need this as a second game. If you have neither, I think Eldritch might be the right place for you to start.

This game doesn't have much in the way of shortcomings. As I mentioned, you can't keep your head in the game this will fall flat so it's not a gateway game at all. It has stunningly few clue cards so you very quickly reread the same clues. A similar fate befalls the monsters. I feel like the game was released with a card and cardboard expansion already on the boat from China. It will be a better game for those expansions but it does feel like they held back a few things that really should have made it in the box, four great old ones is skimping a bit.

So, that's it. I like the game. I bought a copy and can't wait to teach and play. I recommend this if you feel like you have a Cthulu shaped hole in your collections.


Second Impressions (Will be edited)
I'm adding this section as I'm working with my own copy and sleeving the game. I discovered that my first impression of the number of clue cards is grossly inaccurate. There are quite a few clue cards but they are distinct to each great old one. So if you play the same great old one multiple times (and you probably will) you will likely see repetition however if you change to a new and different great old one, you will get totally different clue cards and challenges to win the game.


Please feel free to comment or hit me with a geekmail for additional details, flames or desires to meet in Minnneapolis for a game.
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Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:12 am
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A year in the making

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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Wow, it's been 364 days since my last post. It's probably good that I called this blog The Inattentive Gamer. I've thought about posting occasionally but I just haven't been internetting as much lately. That said, I've got some things I'd like to think through and typing them out will help so look for some posts on Collection Curation in the future. Later today I will likely post about yesterday's game day.
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Sun Dec 9, 2012 5:09 pm
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Boardgame Madness - Friday Eve - Feeling Trashy

Mike Amos
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
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I headed over to Minneapolis's Boardgame Madness last evening, a great event put on by Binge and other assorted accomplices. It's 3 days of gaming in a local hotel's conference room. I've been twice before but I think this was my favorite trip to date. I didn't expect much but it turned out the room was packed, there had to be 30 - 40 people at least.

I was very fortunate because when I got there a table had just freed up and the refugees of the previous game were kind of milling about. I quickly invited them to join me at the table and play a game, they were kind enough to oblige me and we looked at what I had brought with me: Quarriors!, Alien Frontiers and Betrayal at House on the Hill. Fortunately the two gentlemen with whom I was speaking seemed to like the games I brought. I'm afraid I'm terrible with names so I've forgotten them, which is a shame as I'd like to look them up.

Quarriors!
We opened with a little Quarriors!. We we had four players, one of our players , who's name conveniently started with "quar" was the most familiar. I was a tad embarrassed as I realized I had utterly forgotten the details of the game. I mean, I know it's dice building, but stuff with you quiddity, spend quiddity to summon monsters then try to keep them around for a turn but that's not quite enough to play it. Forntuntately our "quar" player explained it.

The game got rolling and it turned out we had about the lowset power set of card possible. We had a lot of three and four cost cards and a couple sixes. We had one player go for the portals immediately, our newest player got creatures out right away and bought creatures whenever possible, "quar" player just couldn't get anything to summon at all, and I went for the axemen creatures.

It turned out that the quick summons of our newest player took the day. It was agreed that they game may have played differently with some heavier monsters out there but given that no one had much stength we weren't able to kill off his low level monsters to stop the points building. My axemen managed to score me a few token points but I just didn't get enough of them out to matter. The fact that our newest player got a a couple of the eight defense knights out at critical times also helped.

This game leaves me a tad frustrated. I really, really want Quarriors! to be awesome but I'm increasingly convinced that it isn't. I think it flaws can be overlooked once all players are familiar with the game but I think it's flaws are just too great to make it worthwhile for most people to bother playing it enough times to understand the game thoroughly. I had not previously rated this game but I'm going to set it to a six. I like it and am willing to play past the bumps in the road but it will never be a great game to me and I just don't see it hitting the table a bunch.

Panic Station
Panic Station was owned by our winner from Quarriors! and several people wanted to play, enough that a second game started next to us while our game was in play. I've heard of it in a remote way but it wasn't a game I had keyed in on in any way.

As it came out I began to get a bit excited. It seemed like a simple paranoia game, between Werewolf and Battlestar Galactica in complexity, right where I would like to find one. The rules were a little cumbersome and it's clear that the rule book needs another revision but I was still excited. The gist is that you all have some infection cards in your hand and as you move around the base, trying to burn out the parasite infection, you have to trad items whenever you pass someone. The infected will pass their infected blood and the uninfected with not. If you pass a gas can as they pass infected blood, you remain uninfected.

As we played several rules and mechanical issues came to light. We reached a point where we knew who was infected and had isolated them and simply needed to get three gas cans to the hive to win. At that point we just had to wait for the game to end as it took a couple turns to get everything in place. It was honestly a little frustrating and it felt like the designers had built a good kernel of a game but the more rules they added, the worse it got and the worse it got the more rules the added. I'm not above giving this one another go but I can't say I will be looking to play it or that I want to buy it.

Betrayal at House on the Hill
Finally, we got out Betrayal for two plays. Both plays had four players and both plays ended up lopsided, the first was partially due to luck and partially due to the haunt and the second I would say was entirely luck.

In both games we opened with the usual exploring and got some of the stat rooms out immediately which was nice. We had one player find lots of good equipment, armor, and axe, a medallion. So inevitably he became the betrayer, all geared up. The haunt was where the house floods from he basement. There is a row boat on the top floor that must be moved to the tower or another room for the heroes to win.

Unfortunately the boat is placed in the attic which was at the end of an obnoxious dead end we had created. To get there you had to go over the collapsed room which landed me in the basement. Our person who did make it to the boat had to get a luck tile (2/4 chance) to get the right room in a place where he could reach before drowning. It didn't happen. If it had, the fact that two of us were in the basement to begin with and thus drowned before we could get out, causing us to lose, didn't help. This haunt has two issues I find truly frustrating: the water if far too aggressive, making it all but impossible to move and causing damage way too quickly and there is a direct conflict between the traitor tome and survival guide. The survival guide says that the betrayer is effected by the water penalty the traitor tome says he is not.

The second haunt was slightly better. Again, we roamed around. Again, one person was getting over geared. As it turned out the haunt revealer wasn't the betrayer. I was! I was psyched, I think this is my first time. My body was immediately destroyed but I had bats, oh boy did I have bats MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! I got to place some bats immediately, but not a lot, just enough to put those sniveling kids on point. They sent their overgear brute, Ox down to the organ room to beat on the organ. I sent more bats, managed to get several to latch onto the profession, unfortunately none latched onto Ox. Ox then went and took my stuff (right outside the organ room) which had some gear to bump up mental stats. He took my gear and played the organ, driving my beloved bats away. It was then simply a matter of time before they mashed the couple of my beauties that remained. I would have won if it wasn't for those meddling kids.

For five hours of gaming at some random hotel conference room, it was a really good time and I'm really glad to have made the trip. I'm not really good about making these because I've had a mediocore experience or two but this more than made up for it. It also reminded me of where I seem to fit in the gaming world. While I like Euros, I'm clearly not your 18XX player, I like lighter Euros (Stone Age, Alien Frontiers) or slightly heavier Ameritrash. I'm ok with that. That seems like a nice landscape to me.
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Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:39 pm
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