Too Many Games!!!

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End of the Month Recap

sean johnson
United States
Edinburgh
Indiana
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Since Gen Con fell across a month break, this is actually August -2 days as I included the Gen Con stats with last month. Typically post Gen Con is a big time for game playing for us, and this year proved no different. I recorded at least one play on all but three days in the month of August.

Game Play Statistics
Number of Recorded Plays: 79
Most Played Game: Dice Masters (12 plays)
Best New to Me Game: Viceroy

New Games to Play
New Games Reviewed in August: 8
New Game Reviews in Progress: 1
Highest Rated Game this Month: Viceroy (combined Rating 9.5)
New Games Left Unplayed: 11`

State of the Collection
New Games Added: 0
Games Removed: 0
Total Number of Games: 197

Nothing came or went after Gen Con. The total number of games is different from last month though because I tracked down some record keeping errors.

10x10 Challenge
Dice MastersCompleted!
Star Realms Completed!
Race for the Galaxy Completed!
Memoir '44 Completed!
Federation Commander Completed!
My First Carcassonne Completed!
Ticket to Ride Completed!
King of Tokyo Completed!
Trains
Among the Stars
Suburbia

Back in January we had high hopes of getting all ten games and the alternate up to ten plays. It is clear at this point that Suburbia is are alternate and unless we purposely make an intense effort, it will not make it. I feel like it is worth noting here that China Moon became our 200th unique game to be played. That does technically put us on a pace of 100 unique games per four months. We could theoretically reach 300 unique games in a year, but I do not think that is going to happen.
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Tue Sep 1, 2015 4:39 am
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Looking to Expand

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
Indiana
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In general I like expansions. After all, if I like a game then more of it can only be better right? When we first really got into games, I was really, really about expansions. If I liked a game, then I immediately wanted to get the expansions. This has cooled considerably, but even today when I talk about possibly getting a game that is not the newest hotness one of the first questions my wife will skeptically ask is "Are there expansions?"

We have a lot of expansions, 92 in fact. That does not count small expansions of living games, such as Warhammer: Invasion battle packs or Star Trek: Attack Wing ships. A lot of those expansions come from game systems that we have heavily invested in such as Federation commander and Memoir '44.

I recently went through all of the games we have and looked at all of the expansions available for those games we do not have. There were surprisingly a lot. There were several expansions that I was not really interested in. A good example of that is Bruges: The City on the Zwin. It did not sound like that expansion added a whole lot to the game, and Bruges is a game I am not sure if I would want to switch up how it plays with expansions.

However, I did find several expansions that look really interesting. Here are the top ten expansions I would like to get in descending order for dramatic effect.

10. Kingdom of Solomon: Chronicles of the King
This is a small expansion for this worker placement game. It does not mess with the game formula, but instead adds random events that increases variability and requires more tactical decisions. The expansion description even recommends adding this for lower player count games. Since we usually play with two players.

9. Dominion: Adventures and Dominion: Guilds

This is very much on the list because of the Pokemon syndrome (gotta catch them all!) We have every other expansion for Dominion except these two. My wife claims she has been burned out on Dominion, but it has been a while since we have played it. At this point we are never going to get all of the possible plays and combinations of Dominion, so even though we do not need more cards I would like these two expansions so we are complete.

8. Last Night on Earth: Blood in the Forest
This is another game that we have a lot for. In fact this is the only major expansion we do not have. Each expansion for Last Night on Earth piles on more stuff. This expansion with the forest tiles adds enough variety, that Last Night on Earth could almost be played in a Left 4 Dead style campaign which would be really awesome.

7. Village Port
This is actually the second expansion for Village. the first adds a 5th player and some other locations. It has been my experience that when a game adds extra players, the other stuff in the box is more geared to larger player counts to take advantage of that new extra player. Since we play with just two, that does not fit with us. However, this expansion looks interesting to me. I like that this expansion adds the port which itself adds multiple ways to score points. The other addition are occupation cards, so that the faceless members in my family will get more personality (and strategic ways to use them).

6. Star Wars: Imperial Assault – Twin Shadows

This is an expansion we really do not need right now because we are still playing through the initial campaign. However, this is more Star Wars and that is mostly and insta-buy for me.

5. Thunder Alley: Expansion Tracks
This one is cheating a little bit since it is not out yet, but this is also the expansion on the list we are for sure getting since we backed it in GMT's P500 program. I like Thunder Alley a lot, but one of the big draws to this expansion is that one of the tracks in it is very clearly inspired by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. It has a nice touch in that they included the road course portion, so the track can be played in both versions.

4. Small World: A Spider's Web
This one is also less of a matter of if and more of a matter of when. This adds more races and racial modifiers to Small World. Other than the separate reference sheets these integrate directly into the base game, and for me this is clearly an example where more is better.

3. King of Tokyo: Power Up!

I have been playing a lot of King of Tokyo recently, and the idea of having something to make my monster unique sounds interesting. I know this expansion is very well regarded, and I think it is one we should seriously consider picking up.

2. Among the Stars: The Ambassadors
This game is on our 10x10 challenge so we have played it several times this year, and I think I am just about ready for some new cards to come in. It sounds like set up might be a bit of a pain with this expansion as players put in sete of cards. However that extra variety and not being able to depend on a certain card even being available would add a lot to this game.

1. Fleet: Arctic Bounty

Of all the expansions we do not have, this one is the most promising to me. I like Fleet, but it seems to be just a touch limited with the exact same fish types being available. This expansion adds more fish types, and that means the licences available change each game. This added change sounds like it has potential to take Fleet from a good game to a great game, and that is something that I think every expansion should be able to do.
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Mon Aug 31, 2015 4:23 am
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Viceroy (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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Indiana
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This was on my shortlist of games to check out at Gen Con this year. On Thursday afternoon my wife and I went around to select booths to check out those games. At the Mayday booth they had just started explaining this game to another couple, and after about 3/4ths of the rule explanation my wife said to get it. Of the two of us, she is the one a lot less inclined to impulse purchases, but I was not going to argue you with her. Now that we have played it do we think this game reaches great heights or should it be left in ruins?

Game Overview
In this game players recruit various characters to build a "pyramid of power" to get the most points.

Each player begins with one card in play and a hand of card that consists of one character card and three law cards. The game is played over twelve rounds and each round has two phases.

The first phase is the auction phase. There will be at least four cards available, and each one corresponds to a color of gemstone. All players will select a gemstone they have to get a card that corresponds with that color. If a player reveals a color no one else revealed then they get the card they wanted. If two players revel the same color and there are two cards for that color available, they might reach an agreement. Otherwise, any people who tied lose their bid and there is a second auction. This can happen for a third time. Also, at any point a player may pass and take three gemstones.

In the next phase players will play cards. Cards are played in a pyramid fashion. This means that cards can be added to the bottom row without issue, but to place a card on an upper row there must be two cards underneath to support it. Character cards have a gemstone cost associated with them that must be paid to play the card. Playing cards in higher rows requires extra gemstones. When a character card is played it provides some sort of reward. The reward given depends on the level played, and generally these get better as the level gets higher. Players can get gemstones, points, tokens that create scoring sets, and score multipliers.

When players play cards in their pyramid, they will also be completing circles. If a circle is all the same color the player gets a free bonus gemstone, and these mono-color circles are worth points at the end of the game.

There are a variety of ways to score in this game, so it has a big point salad feel. At the end of the 12th round the player with the most points is the winner.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 4.5 (like it)
My Thoughts: This game hits in a lot of the right areas for me. It has a great mix of strategy and tactics. It is important to have an idea in mind and keep options open, but the flow of the cards might require changing the strategy from turn to turn. I also love how the cards have multiple uses. It can often be a tense choice to decide not only what card to go for, but what level of the pyramid to play it on. Finally, I know we do not talk about components much but the artwork here is amazing. Seriously, this is one of the best looking games we have.

Her Rating: 5 (love it)
Her Thoughts: This game really impresses me. It is so much fun to play. I love trying to figure out what card I want and I love the challenge of trying to balance the card abilities with where I place them to complete circles. This is one of the rare games that as soon as I play it, I want to play it again. I love this game with two players, but I am a little concerned I will not like it with more.

Verdict
Combined Rating: 9.5
My wife's intuition was right and this was an incredible game for us to get. 2015 continues to be a banner year for us and getting new games. At this rate our problem is going to be having too many great games from this year and not enough time to play them all (over and over).
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Tue Aug 25, 2015 9:16 pm
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Star Wars: Epic Duels (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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I know I have posted this in previous post, but here is the story. Star Wars Epic Duels is one of the games that we had before we really got into gaming. In 2009 when we fell down the boardgamegeek rabbit hole I began discovering all kinds of incredible games. One of the games that I REALLY wanted at that time was Last Night on Earth: The Zombie Game. However, in the spring of that year my wife was in a "no more game buying phase" (I may have gone over board in the first quarter of the year). Around that same time I saw a picture from New York Toy fair (maybe?) that showed the box of a Clone Wars version of Epic Duels. My plan was to trade my copy of Epic Duels for Last Night on Earth, and then just buy the new version. I did make the trade, but then the Clone Wars version never happened. While, I love Last Night on Earth I did regret trading away Epic Duels- especially as the price for the game continued to climb. At Gen Con this year I was able to get a copy of the game for a very good price. The last time we played this game was back before we really big gamers, so does it hold up the way that Empire Strike Back does or this more like the Phantom Menace of Star Wars games?

Game Overview
In this game each player takes a Star Wars hero or villain teams. The teams consist of a character with two minor characters (like Darth Vader with two Storm Troopers) or two more even characters (like Han Solo and Chewbacca). A board is selected to play on, and each character has a pre-selected start to begin on the board.

On a player's turn they will first roll a movement die. Depending on what is rolled will determine what the player can move. They can either move all of their characters a set number of spaces or they can move one character a set number of spaces. Players can not move diagonally and they do not have to move the entire number rolled.

After moving, the player may take two actions. There are three action options. Option #1 is drawing a card. Option #2 is healing. To heal one character must first be knocked out already. To heal cards of the knocked out character can be discarded to heal one life point per card discarded.

The final action option is to play a card. There are two types of cards: special cards and combat cards. Special cards have effects and are resolved as soon as played. Combat cards have an attack and defense value. To attack as an action, a player plays a combat card face down. The target then may play a defense. The attack card is revealed and then the attack value and defense value is compared. The defender loses life equal to the difference if the attack value was higher. If the defense card is higher the attack is successful defended.

Some characters have ranged attacks (blasters!). There is no range limit in this game, the attacking character simply needs line of sight. Other characters only have melee attacks (lightsabers!), and they have to be adjacent.

Once a character's life is depleted they are out and the last person standing wins.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 3.5 (It's OK)
My Thoughts: Way back when this game first game out, it was really the only miniatures game I had played. That is one of the reasons why I liked it so much in the day. Now that I have played a lot more games, this comes across as incredibly simple. That being said as a big Star Wars fan, there is something undeniably fun about this game. I love being able to have Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia fight Darth Maul on the second Death Star. This is also a very accessible game, and it can function really well as a way to introduce tactical combat/miniatures game to new gamers.

Her Rating: 3.5 (It's OK)
Her Thoughts: This game is a lot simpler that I remember it. I am glad this game does have things like facing or a bunch of small nuances, but at the same time missing those extra rules makes the game feel to simplistic. Despite that, I am fine playing it and I am looking forward to playing this game with our son in a year or two. This game will be incredible to play with him!

Verdict
Combined Rating: 7
This game is not quite as incredible as I remembered it, but I am still very happy to finally have it back. I am also happy that I waited for the right price and did not pay more for it. Given how long I waited to get this game back, we will not be parting with it for a very long time.
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Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:50 pm
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The Purge: Wyatt Earp

sean johnson
United States
Edinburgh
Indiana
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We have too many games. There are some games that sit on the shelf unplayed for a while, sometimes years. We plan on playing every game we have not played for two years or more, and that one play will determine if the game stays or if it gets purged to make room for something else.

We traded for this game three years ago because I had read repeatedly that this was one of the best Mystery Rummy games (even if technically is not a mystery rummy game). My wife enjoys that game series so this seemed like a good game to go in for in the 2012 Gen Con math trade. We played the game a handful of times within the first year of having it, but it then sat unplayed for two years. Now that it has been dusted off is this game legendary like its namesake or just OK?

Brief Game Overview
As a rummy style game this follows many of the conventions of rummy. Players begin by drawing a card from the top of the deck or the top of the discard pile. There are several "suits" of outlaws all signified by a color. To play these cards a set of three matching cards of the same color must be played. A special "photo" card can also break the ice. After an initial meld has been played then other cards of the same color can be played by other players on future turns. Each card played as a capture value. When cards are played money might be added to the bounty for that outlaw.

There are several special cards that are signified by a sheriff icon. On their turn, each player may play one of these cards. These cards can allow for extra draws, add capture points to a meld or layoff in play, or even hide cards from another player.

Once one player discards their last card the round ends. Any outlaw that has at least 8 capture points out will pay the bounty on them. If one player has five or more capture points for that outlaw than anyone else they get the entire bounty. Otherwise the bounty is shared.

Once one player collects $25,000 they win the game. This usually takes between 5 and 7 rounds.

What We Previously Thought
I thought the sheriff cards added interesting choices, but I thought the game went on to long and I was not the biggest fan of the base game mechanics. My wife also thought the game might go on a little long, but she found the game a lot of fun to play.

Verdict
My Verdict: Go Either Way
My Rationale: I am not entirely sure why, but I do not like rummy style games. I find playing them equal parts frustrating and boring. With all of its extra trappings and theme, this game is not much different. However, I do not hate playing it and I know my wife likes it. If she wants to keep it I am willing to play it.

Her Verdict: Go Either Way
Her Rationale: I do like the set collection aspect of Rummy Games, and I do feel like this one is unique in how players get points. However, we have one of these games already. I know Sean does not like these kind of games, so I am not sure we need two. If he wants to trade it I am willing to get rid of it.

Final Judgement
Purge

We were both willing to do what the other one wanted. At one point we had three mystery rummy games, and there is a reason all three of them were on the list of games we have not played for two years. We just do not play these games enough. We will keep Bonnie and Clyde as our representative rummy game, because that is the one my wife likes the most.
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Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:16 pm
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One Night Revolution

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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The Resistance is one of my absolute favorite games. In fact when you combined my plays of The Resistance with The Resistance Avalon it comes to 107 and is my fifth most played game ever. While it took me a while to warm up to it, I also enjoy One Night Ultimate Werewolf. When it was announced that the two games were being combined to make a Resistance version of One Night Werewolf I was excited. I did not back it on kickstarter because they had an option to reserve it for Gen Con pick up, which is what I did. On Thursday of Gen Con going to pick this game up was one of my first stops. Now that I have played this game does this rise to the top as the hidden role winner or is it a bad game posing as a good one?

Game Overview
In this game there are rebels and infiltrators (Resistance and Spies if you prefer). At the end of the game the rebels want to assassinate an infiltrator, and the infiltrators want to not be assassinated. Each player is given and I.D. card that identifies them as a rebel or infiltrator. Three I.D. cards are also put face down in the middle of the table.

Players are also given a specialists card. This card determines what kind of ability (or mission if your prefer) that the player will have. These range from the observers who do nothing to things like the Reassigner which can change people's I.Ds. There are also roles like the investigator that can examine other people's I.Ds or the confirmer which allows a player to look at their own. One of the interesting things is that the ability a player has from their specialist card changes depending on their team. So for example a player with a defector specialist card will switch their ID with an HQ informant ID if they are a rebel, but if the player is a informant they will just view their ID card.

Players will close their eyes and the informants will reveal themselves to each other. Then starting with the controller (a start player basically), players will take their turn where they open their eyes, do the action on their specialist card, close their eyes, and then say "mission accomplished."

Once everyone has done this everyone opens their eyes. Then starting with the controller, each player must claim what their specialist role is. After that there is a pre-allotted amount of time for discussion.

At the end of the discussion everyone points their finger at someone and whoever has the most fingers pointed at them is assassinated. Rebels win if an informant is killed and informants win if a rebel is killed.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale. I will mention that my wife absolutely hates social deduction games, so there is no way she is ever playing this. That means that this is just my thoughts this time.

My Rating: 2 (do not care for)
My Thoughts: Gosh darn it, I want to like this game but I just can't. I feel like it should be so much better than it is. On paper, I like the idea of having the player's team affiliation and the player's ability being different. I like that the player's ability changes based on their team affiliation, and I love the way the game deals with the noise issue by having everyone know that the active player will be making noise on their mission. I also think it is neat that different roles are more or less effective based on when in turn order they happen.

On paper, there is a lot that I like but all of these elements thrown together are a mess. It just does not work. It seems either the Informants have all the information and can easily manipulate things, or an informant gets hosed by a reassignment power.

If there is something to this game I am missing it. I have played this game 9 times now with a wide variety of player counts and it falls flat every time. I am done. I can not think of a compelling reason to ever play this game over One Night Ultimate Werewolf or the Resistance.

This game is a big disappointment, and I will be looking to trade it as fast as possible.
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Wed Aug 19, 2015 4:02 am
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The Purge: A Few Acres of Snow

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
Indiana
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We have too many games. There are some games that sit on the shelf unplayed for a while, sometimes years. We plan on playing every game we have not played for two years or more, and that one play will determine if the game stays or if it gets purged to make room for something else.

I only participated in the Wargamer Secret Santa one year, and from that year I got this game. Most of my interest in this game came out of the fact that it too deck building and did something new with the idea. We have not really played the game a huge amount of times. In 2013 as part of our game audit we played it twice to get it up to five plays for both of us. However, since then we have not played the game. Did our feelings on this game thaw out or does this game need to be put on ice?

Brief Game Overview
In A Few Acres of Snow players play either the British or French side as they fight over the American colonies during the 18th century. This is a deck building game where players will be using location cards that provide various resources as well as additional cards that can be bought and added to a deck. Each turn players can take two actions. These actions can involve gaining money, drafting cards, colonizing new settlements, improving settlements, raiding enemy settlements or even laying siege to enemy settlements. To perform nearly all of these actions players will use cards in their deck. If the British player manages to capture Quebec or the French player capture New York or Boston the game automatically ends. Otherwise the game ends when a player scores so many points from raids or places all of their city or settlement discs.

What We Previously Thought
I thought this game offered a lot of depth and had a lot of back and forth between the players. My wife was impressed by the mechanics of the game but consistently had a hard time figuring out exactly what kind of strategy she should use.

Verdict
My Verdict: Keep
My Rationale: This game is like anything else we have. It is a historical game that I think does a good job at capturing the theme. There is a lot of colonization, development and exploration. Fighting happens and when it does it is a big ordeal. Raids are terrifying and powerful. This game also does some very unique things with deck building. I think that Martin Wallace has learned from and built on the lessons of A Few Acres of Snow to make stronger games (looking at you A Study in Emerald), but for the historical flavor and unique mechanisms this is keeper for me.

Her Verdict: Go Either Way
Her Rationale: Mechanically this is a good game. Everything works together so well, and it can be challenging. I feel like I had a better handle on this game during our most recent play. I went into it thinking this would be the last time I would ever play it, but I found myself having a lot of fun. I think that I would kind of get stuck in perfecting one strategy, so I am not sure how replayable this game is. For now though I am OK if we keep it to play some more though.

Final Judgement
Keep


This game may someday leave our collection, but when that happens it will be because we have gotten all of the plays we want to get out of it. If I had to predict, I think this game might top out at around 15 plays or so. If that is true we will probably be holding onto it for a couple more years anyway.
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Tue Aug 18, 2015 4:03 am
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Game Designer Wish List

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
Indiana
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There are a lot of great games out there made by a lot of great designers. I think it is interesting that a lot of designers tend to have a similar style. It seems there are a few designers who purposely go for this and there are others who are very broad in their approach to games.

There are certain kinds of games that I would love to see certain designers make because I think that they have the potential to make a great game of that type. If the designers made the kind of games described, I would almost certainly get them. So guys, if you happen to read this list, could you give it a shot?

The list is descending order for dramatic effect.
5. The Designer: Geoff Engelstein
Known for games like: Space Cadets
The Wishlist Game: A First Person Shooter Conversion
Why This Designer Should Do it: This is the pairing I am least sure about, because I do not know if Mr. Englestein likes shooter video games. However, his The Ares Project shows that he gets how to convert video game concepts to a board game space. I have found a lot of FPS implementations like Frag to be wanting because I do not think a IGO-UGO system works well. I think this particular designer could find an innovative way to make a FPS board game work.

4. The Designer: Richard Garfield
Known for games like: Magic: The Gathering
The Wishlist Game: A self contained drafting game.
Why This Designer Should Do it: Many people think that the draft format is the best way to play Magic, even though it was not originally intended to be played that way. What if the guy who made the game, created a game that was specifically meant to be drafted. I think a game that simulated the fun of a cube draft, but was a self contained game would be great. I think cards would need to have multiple uses to create a ton of depth. I am not sure how it would work, but then again I am not a legendary designer. If anyone could figure out how to make this kind of game it is probably Richard Garfield.

3. The Designer: Eric M. Lang
Known for games like: Dice Masters
The Wishlist Game: A Starship combat game
Why This Designer Should Do it: There is no doubt that right now Eric Lang is the "hot designer." He seems to be very good at making clever, mechanically sound games that are also thematic and fun. For me, he seems to be really good at making two player duel games with tough choices. For that reason, I think his designing style would be well suited for a starship combat game, and I would love to see what he does with that theme.

2. The Designer: Jason C. Hill
Known for games like: A Touch of Evil: The Supernatural Game
The Wishlist Game: A Super Hero Game
Why This Designer Should Do it: I really like Flying Frog Games. I think they do the best job at creating games that are fun, thematic, and deliver a story that captures my imagination. I also really like Super Heroes, and I have not played a super hero game that I really like. I think that Flying Frog Games and Jason Hill are the right people to make the super hero game I have always wanted.

1. The Designer: Richard Borg
Known for games like: Commands & Colors
The Wishlist Game: A naval warfare game
Why This Designer Should Do it: In a recent Ludology podcast Richard Borg was interviewed, and he mentioned the command and colors game system came about by trying to merge miniature gaming with board game mechanics. I think he succeeded brilliantly. Tactical naval games are still very similar to miniatures games. Even the ones that play with chits on hexes act more like a minis game than a board game. I would love to see Richard Borg do for naval battles what he did for land battles. I know the command and colors system would not translate well to water, but I am sure he could find someway to make the miniatures/board game merger work again.

What kind of game do you want to see your favorite designer make?
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Mon Aug 17, 2015 2:04 pm
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China Moon (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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We got this game as part of the Gen Con math trade. Because the math trade is no-ship and because there are tons of games available, I tend to use that trade to get rid of games we do not want for games that at least look interesting. I knew very little about this game. All I knew, which I gathered from the game page, is that this is a racing game with great frogs. The positive comments mentioned it was a good family game. Now that we have played it does this game hop to the front of the pack or does it croak?

Game Overview
In this game each player has three frogs and they are racing to center of a pond. the goal is to collect sets of orchids for points.

On a player's turn they are going to move three frogs each two spaces each. However, frogs can not occupy the same space. This means if a frog is to move onto a space with another frog, the moving frog hops over that space. Of the three frogs move, the active player must move at least one frog belonging to another player.

In addition to the flower spaces, there are a couple of other special spaces that activate if a frog ends their move on them. A silly frog forces players to trade collected flowers. A spring moves a frog another two spaces, and a butterfly forces the frog to drop one of their flowers.

The fourth frog to reach the center will get the more valuable Blue Orchid and end the game. Players add up their points from collected flowers, and the most points wins.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 1 (do not want to play again)
My Thoughts: I really did not like this game. My issue is that sometimes there just is not a good move. There are very flowers available, and often it is just not possible to get one on a player's turn. This means a lot of times it is more about trying to mess someone up than help myself. Since other players can move frogs, it is hard to set up for future turns, and impossible at higher player counts. What really frustrates me about this game is sometimes it is seems no matter what the moves I make are only going to help someone else. That is frustrating, and it can be frustrating to lose just because very few flower getting opportunities presented themselves.

Her Rating: 1.5 (do not want to play again)
Her Thoughts: This game is silly, boring, and not very fun. The only plus is the rules are simple. Our son understood the basics enough to play and he liked the frogs. I will play it with him as long as we have it, but I am fine getting rid of it as soon as possible.

Verdict
Combined Rating: 2.5
We really did not care for this game. We will have it for a few months for sure, but this will be a sweetener in the next math trade we take part in.
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Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:30 am
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The Purge: Ticket to Ride: Marklin

sean johnson
United States
Edinburgh
Indiana
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We have too many games. There are some games that sit on the shelf unplayed for a while, sometimes years. We plan on playing every game we have not played for two years or more, and that one play will determine if the game stays or if it gets purged to make room for something else.

We got this game in 2010 because even though we had been into games for a year at that time we did not have a Ticket to Ride. We decided on a whim to buy one, and the closest game store only had this one in stock. We have played this game several times. However, in the years since 2010 we have gotten the base Ticket to Ride game along with several of the expansion maps. We play Ticket to Ride quite a bit every year, but it had been over three years since we played this particular version. So do we still punch this game's ticket or is it time to ship it out?

Brief Game Overview
This game follows the standard rules of Ticket to Ride. Players will have destination tickets that will give them points if they connect the two cities. On a player's turn they can either take train cards or they can play train cards to claim routes. To claim a route, the player must play a set of matching colored cards equal to the length of the route.

What this game adds to the system are passengers. All of the cities on the board have point chips associated with them. When a player claims a route they can add one of their three passengers. On a future turn instead of taking cards or claiming routes, they can move their passenger. Their passenger moves along the player's track and they can take the top most point chip for each city they pass. For each passenger card a player plays, they can go down another player's route.

When a player gets down to two train pieces or less the game will end. The player with the most completed destination tickets gets +10 bonus points. The player with the most points wins.

What We Previously Thought
We both thought the passengers were a neat addition to the Ticket to Ride formula, and that they added a lot of new strategic considerations.

Verdict
My Verdict: Purge
My Rationale: I do like this game, about as much as I like any other version of Ticket to Ride. The issue though is space. This game takes up the space of a full box game. In our Ticket to Ride box we have multiple expansions. I am fine with all of that Ticket to Ride, I can live without the passengers and I am OK getting rid of this game to free up space for something else.

Her Verdict: Go Either Way
Her Rationale: I like the passengers, and I enjoy playing with them. However, I like Ticket to Ride no matter what. I am not particular about variety of the game I play.

Final Judgement
Purge


Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 5 – United Kingdom & Pennsylvania was just announced, and I know for my wife it will be an auto-buy. While we like this game, it just does not get enough play compared to the rest of the Ticket to Ride system. For that reason, we are ready to part with this game.
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Sun Aug 16, 2015 3:09 am
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