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iOS Board Games

Among the best things in life is playing printed games in person with family and close friends. When those are not convenient we like iOS Board Games. News, reviews, previews, and opinions about board gaming on iPhones, iPads, iPods and even Android devices. (iPhone board games, iPad board games, iPod board games, Android board games)

Archive for Bradley Cummings, Editor

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Weekly Stream: Battle Academy 2. Join us this Thursday 10/23 at 9pm EDT!

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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Battle Academy 2 is coming to iPad this Thursday, October 23rd! This is a sequel to the hit strategy wargame of 2013. PC gamers have been able to enjoy this one for a few weeks, but now it’s going mobile. I played a bit of BA2 at HOW14 and the reworked UI seems perfect for tablets. The graphics have also been updated with a grittier, less cartoony style. We will be playing this one and will have a review up shortly, but in the mean time, join us as we play through the game live on Twitch.

Join us as we celebrate the launch of this highly anticipated game. We’ll play through a few scenarios and show off many of the new features. This will be a great chance to see if this game is a fit for you. Be sure to watch.


Here are the details:

When: Thursday, October 23rd, 9:00pm EDT
Where: BoardGameGeek on Twitch
Who: Just me!


If you can’t make it live on Twitch, be sure to check out the archive after the fact.
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Wed Oct 22, 2014 1:05 am
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Sentinels of the Multiverse - App Review

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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The Stats:
Compatibility: iPad, Android Tablet
Reviewed On: iPad Air
Current Price: $9.99
Version: 1.0
App Size: 255 MB
Developer/Publisher: Handelabra/Greater Than Games
Multiplayer: Yes, pass and play
AI: NA
Itunes link: Sentinels of the Multiverse
Google Play link: Sentinels of the Multiverse


Few games have taken the tabletop world by storm like Sentinels of the Multiverse. This was the Super Hero card game on the market before the big guys even considered the space. It features a cast of original heroes, some pretty direct copies of existing properties, that face off against a cast of villains, each with their own plots and powers. The game’s popularity has spawned spin offs, actual comics, and more. We now have, on our iOS and Android devices, the chance to play the game that started it all.



Admittedly, this is my first time playing Sentinels of the Multiverse. Super heroes have never really appealed to me. I find most of the stories to be a predictable arms races. Does it matter that you are super when everyone you fight is also super? That foolish prejudice of mine aside, it is a cooperative game I have always wanted to try, and I am excited to have it on my iPad. It is important to now that this review is coming from someone very new to the game (Dave is a huge fan of this game and should be reviewing it on that other publication soon).

Being new to the game, I first hit the big “How To Play” button on the front menu. What I saw was a text rulebook, and my heart dropped. “Another game with no tutorial?” I thought. Luckily, nestled in the top right corner was a “Play Tutorial” button. What followed was an excellent tutorial hosted by an animated version of game designer Christopher Badell. It is a superb tutorial teaching both the rules and basic strategy.

That being said, there is still a lot to learn. Each villain and hero plays differently and has a slew of new cards. The amount of new content for each character can be daunting to new players. While the tutorial was great, I would love more ways to ease into the remaining content. In the game setup screen you can see the special abilities of each character and villain, but it would be great to get a better summary of how each character is meant to play, even a brief overview.



Sentinels of the Multiverse is a cooperative game, and, on mobile, can be played solitaire or pass and play (no online play). Once you’ve selected your heroes, the villain, and the location, it is time to fight! The heroes’ goal is to bring the HP of the villain down to 0. Each villain can win by either defeating all the heroes or, for some villains, by another mechanic, for example Baron Blade wins by getting his discard pile to a certain number. The game is played in turns, one for each hero, one for the villain, and one for the environment. The heroes’ abilities are represented by cards ranging from one-off attacks to powers and on-going effects. Each hero can play one card from their hand and one power each turn. Powers range from dealing damage to drawing cards, it depends on the strategy of each hero. There is a wide variety of strategy and mechanics. On the villain’s turn, they follow a preprogrammed set of moves which could involve playing cards from the villain deck and dealing damage to the heroes. The environment or location also gets a turn, usually playing cards that affect both the heroes and villain, adding another wrinkle to the strategy.

All of this is presented in amazing comic book style. The locations are brought to live with well done 3D backgrounds. The heroes and villains have different artwork as they take damage or become more powerful. If you are fan of the board game’s art style, you are going to love what they have done here. The comic book feeling is carried into to the menus and the gameplay screen. Each character is given their own panel, and these panels shifts as turns change. You can tell the folks at Handelabra have a love for Sentinels of the Multiverse as well as comic books in general. I may be getting greedy, but I would loved to see them take this one step further. Currently there are no combat animations, which I think, if added, would help round out the aesthetic and give your actions more weight. However, what’s there now is excellent.



The lack of combat animations is just one part of a lack of information in some parts of the game. With so many different factors influencing each action in the game, it would be great to understand these more clearly. Admittedly, the game does this well with combat, clearly explaining why you are being hit with a certain amount of damage. These needs to be carried to other areas. For example, I would love to know how many cards the Villain will play next turn, or how close they are to their special victory conditions. This information is all available out of context on the cards themselves, but I would love to see it within the flow of the game. As a new player, there is currently a lot to keep track of. The team has tried to make identifying card abilities easier with a range of icons. This is a great first step, but still a bit overwhelming for new players.

While Sentinels of the Multiverse could give more information in some areas, it also suffers from a case of too much in other areas. Each time damage is dealt, either to your heroes or to the villain, you must decided in what order it is allocated. This is useful on some occasions, but there are many times when the choice is irrelevant. Luckily, there is a choose for me button to automate this, but I do wish it would be automated in cases where the choice truly doesn’t matter. Not only is it a bit clunky and happens often (several times a turn), as a new player I found the choice confusing. I kept picking my brain to figure out why damage order mattered in a given situation.

All of this does not tarnish the fact that Sentinels of the Multiverse is really fun to play. The amount of content available is amazing. The possible combinations of heroes, villains, and locales is staggering. There is nearly endless variety. I am excited to solve the puzzle that is each villain and learn the synergies of the different heroes. This iPad version makes gameplay quick and easy, managing all the book keeping and letting you focus on the real choices



The gameplay that has made this game a cult hit shines bright in this digital version. The tutorial makes the game welcoming to new players and is a great place to enter this renowned series. This is a must have addition to your digital board game collection.


This compelling cooperative game is so close to being super.

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How would you rate Sentinels of the Multiverse?
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Poll created by thequietpunk
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Mon Oct 20, 2014 6:28 pm
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Live Stream: Sentinels of Multiverse

Brad Cummings
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Few games have been anticipated like Sentinels of Multiverse on iPad. This breakout cooperative game is now available on iOS and Android.

Dave has had his hands on this game for a while now, so we will follow his expertise as we play through a few games. Be sure to join us!

Join us:

BoardGameGeek on Twitch


Watch live on Twitch or check out the archive after the fact.
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Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:00 am
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Weekly Stream: Sentinels of Multiverse. Join Us Thursday 10/16 at 9:00pm EDT.

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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Few games have been anticipated like Sentinels of Multiverse on iPad. This breakout cooperative game will finally be released on the App Store this Wednesday.

Dave has had his hands on this game for a while now, so we will follow his expertise as we play through a few games. Be sure to join us!

Here are the details:

When: Thursday, October 16th, 9:00pm EDT
Where: BoardGameGeek on Twitch
Who: Myself and Dave


Join us live on Twitch or check out the archive after the fact.
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:00 pm
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Card Dungeon - iOS Review

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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The Stats:
Compatibility: iOS Universal
Reviewed On: iPad Air, iPhone 6
Current Price: $1.99
Version: 1.1
App Size: 168 MB
Developer/Publisher: Playtap Games
Multiplayer: NA.
AI: Na.
Itunes link: Card Dungeon

Cloning and copying is rampant on the app store. As a part of the mobile games industry, apps like 2048 make me a bit furious. True, all video games and board games copy from one another, but the problem comes in the ease of directly copying mobile games (due to small teams and project scopes). When I first saw screens for Card Dungeon, my initial reaction was that it was an attempt to cash in on the potential success of Card Hunter (an earlier web based game with nearly an identical art style). As development continued, it became clear that Card Dungeon would beat Card Hunter to mobile, and potentially snatch the fans of the original.

Now that the game has launched, it is clear that art-wise, this is 100% the case. Everything from the level headings to the card art is extremely similar to Card Hunter. However, mechanically the game is entirely different. Gone is the brutally difficult TBS gameplay, replaced by an interesting rogue-like mechanic that has conquering a series of challenging dungeons. It really is it’s own unique game, I stand partially corrected.



Card Dungeon hinges on a simple card mechanic. At any given time, you can have three cards in your inventory. These cards each feature an attack or spell that you can use against the monsters you find in the dungeon. The trick is that each card is slowly deteriorating. The more you use it, the closer it gets to being destroyed. This is represented graphically by the card turning more and more ragged. This means you need to constantly be refreshing your available actions by picking up new cards found by slaying monsters and searching chests. Your move set is constantly shifting, which means you have to constantly be learning and perfecting new strategies.

To start a run of Card Dungeon, you select one of several dungeons, each featuring their own boss. You then choose a character as well as a perk and a weakness. With this setup, you head into the dungeon, attempting to pass all the levels of each dungeon and defeat the boss without dying.

Like many games in this genre, you can have good runs and you have bad. The selection of cards that come up as you kill monsters and open chests, will determine how far you can get. Many runs will be awesome, while others will just be frustrating. The randomness of card selection (and a pretty large variety) forces you to innovate and find new ways to solve problems. It is rewarding to discover a new way to take on a room of monsters.

The cards range from basic attacks to powerful spells that can even change the dungeon. The game excels at presenting many possible solutions to any problem. For example, when encountering the first boss, I placed a lava pit in a doorway and lured the boss into it repeatedly until he was defeated. As moving and attacking have to be done on separate turns, positioning is a huge part of the game. Many attacks will send enemies flying, while others can pull them to you. There is quite a variety here and a lot to be discovered. This is, by far, the most compelling thing about Card Dungeon; this is where the game really shines.



Card Dungeon is turn-based. Each turn you move or use a card, and then each monster in your vicinity gets a move. It’s a game about timing and planning. You want to get each monster in the right place at the right time to avoid damage and make use of your cards. The turn-based mechanic is awesome for board gamers, but also creates challenges. In combat the system is great, but once you want to explore, the turn system can really slow things down. The game features neutral monsters that will not attack unless provoked. The problem is, if they are in a room you are trying to cross, they all get a turn, meaning to move one square can take 15 to 30 seconds. It just seems unnecessarily slow in the exploration portions.

The game is presented in portrait, which led me to believe this is a phone-centric game. After trying to play standing on a train, I can tell you, it is a challenge to operate with one hand. The biggest crux is the game’s camera. it is rotated by two fingers and is necessary to really get an idea of what is in the dungeon around you. This is challenging to do even on iPad (the sensitivity it strange), and is a huge challenge while playing on an iPhone. I would love to see a feature added to allow dragging around the map with one finger. Getting a read on a dungeon room is important in the game, I just wish it was easier to execute.

Card Dungeon and I got off on the wrong foot with the art style. However, gameplay, especially combat, proves that this is it’s own game, with some neat ideas. In the end, the turn-based exploration really slows the game down, and, combined with the odd camera controls, makes it a challenge to play. Even with these challenges, it does bring some interesting ideas to the table and is worth a look if you enjoy rogue-like mechanics.

A fun rogue-like that could use a bit of polish.

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How would you rate Card Dungeon?
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Poll created by thequietpunk
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 2:00 pm
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News Flash - Chronicle: RuneScape Legends Announced

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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Wanted to drop a quick news update based on a press release we received late Friday night. JAGEX, the makers of longtime free-to-play MMORPG Runescape have announced Chronicle: RuneScape Legends for Mac/PC, tablets, and mobile devices coming in 2015.

Chronicle is set in the fantasy world of Gelinor and will feature familiar characters and enemies from Runescape. Details are still forthcoming, but here is how they have described it so far:

Quote:
Played out within the pages of a living book the game focuses on quest building, allowing players to craft their own miniature RPGs against enemies, including classic RuneScape boss monsters, before entering into tense PvP combat.




Runescape consumed a summer of my life, back in the old days, when the story was little to existent. My friend and I worked long hours to become some of the best bakers in all the land, making awesome cakes and selling them in the major city. I mention that just to highlight that this will be a great nostalgia trip for me and others.

We'll bring you more details as we get them.
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Sun Oct 12, 2014 1:33 am
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Live Stream: Carcassonne - Come watch now!

Brad Cummings
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Connecticut
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Ok, we are really playing Carcassonne this week, I promise. This is a digital board game classic and one that stands next to Ascension and Hearthstone as one of my most played. Join us on Twitch as we honor this classic Euro as we head into the week of Spiel.

Dave is sick, but I will still be checking out the game solo!

Come Watch on Twitch

We’ll see you on the live stream! Be sure to subscribe on Twitch to be alerted to any stream that we do.
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Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:50 am
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Reflections on the Hearthstone Americas Qualifier

Brad Cummings
United States
Connecticut
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On Monday, I was able to briefly attend the BlizzCon Hearthstone Americas Qualifier. Turns out it was just a few blocks from my work in the Hammerstein Ballroom. I watched a match featuring TidesofTime and Jab and then headed back to the office. This is not a tournament report. In truth I was only able to attend about an hour of the event in person (watched more on Twitch), rather this a reaction to my first live Esports event and my feelings on the concept in general.



Watching VS. Playing

Though we don’t remember it this way, my guess is that many of us watched as many games as we played growing up. I had siblings and that meant taking turns in single player games. One of us would watch, comment, and correct while the other played. Sure, it was not always the most fun, but many games were a blast to watch together.

While my only child is quite young, I’ve seen the kids of friends watch more Minecraft than they actually play, or watch people freak out to Slender Man on YouTube. We live in a world where watching games being played is more prevalent than ever before. Even in my own life I’ve watched my wife torment her sims on Sims 4 and she watched through my entire play-through of BioShock Infinite.

This of course brings us to Esports, a term I am little wary of as I think the fight to have them recognized as sports is a bit silly and demeans us as gamers. That being said, what differentiates an Esport from “The Top Ten Best Minecraft Water Slides) is that competitive factor.

As one who is bored by sporting events (I literally would bring a portable gaming device to every one I attended, because I am just that cool), I thought I would find Esports equally boring. I decided to give it a try watching an IGN hosted Star Craft 2 Tournament a few years ago. I found myself actually enjoying the games and tracking the action.

It is at this moment that I realized why people watch sports: they have a basic understanding of the game because they have or do play it as amateurs and love to see experts play at a higher level. In some cases they even learn from those experts. This is not groundbreaking, I know, but it is the key to any sport’s success.

While this learning aspect is important, there is also the matter of entertainment value. Watching or reading about a game played is often possible while doing another important yet menial task. We love games, and having more options to consume game content is a no-brainer. This is why we watch Hearthstone streams and read session reports here on BGG.

Watching games is here to stay, and the success of Hearhstone as an Esport has got me thinking. Could other digital board games make it as Esports? Could streamed tournaments of board games work? Before we explore this idea further, I think it is helpful to take a look at why Hearthstone is being successful.



Production Values

The Hearthstone event I attended was actually quite amazing. Having a background in live television production, it was fascinating to see an equipment setup I was very familiar with. There were 3 cameras on stage (2 of which were handheld) and a 4th on a jib arm. The set featured players sitting in large leather chairs against a medieval backdrop. Just like many professional sporting events, there was a main host with color commentators to give more specifics on the game. There was even a separate host to interview players between matches.

It was, in a word, professional. While the live audience was small in numbers at noon on a Monday, the online audience featured thousands tuning in. Why all the show and extra cost of the professional setup? Professionalism both lends legitimacy and brings in viewers. That’s right, quality matters.

We sometimes like to think that we are above production values in the board game world, but nothing could be further from the truth. Things are changing with the likes of TableTop, Game Night, and Board With Life. Board games themselves, not just board game media, are also adopting higher production values and losing the “If we build it, they will come” attitude. Rather it is “if we build it, use great artists and components, and market it properly, they will come.”

I am the first to admit, not everything I produce video-wise for this blog is stellar or professional, but I am always trying to improve and get closer to industry standards. And that is my main admonition to us as board game media makers. Hearthstone is setting a standard to aspire to. Sure, we don’t have the same resources, but we can take baby steps in that direction.

As I think our live streams have shown, some board games (certainly not all) are a blast to watch when played digitally and live. They play much faster and the action is clearly shown to all viewers. The beauty of something like Hearthstone or Starcraft over say a Football game is that I know I can watch a full game in 10 to 15 minutes.



The Future of Board Gaming

I see a future where select board game tournaments are broadcast live on Twitch and other services. I see a future where we know the names of the top Summoner Wars, Settlers of Catan and Carcassonne players. I see a future where tournaments are covered more by board game press (already being pioneered by the likes of Team Covenant). I see a future where I learn to talk above a whisper and become an awesome tournament commentator (this may be more of a dream).

Digital board games, I think, are the first piece in this puzzle. Digital games can be played faster and usually make for easier broadcasts. You can avoid worrying about 3 camera setups and rather let the game present the action. Of course, this ability relies on companies designing great versions that will present well.

Beyond this, there are still several technical hurdles to overcome. Understandably, few digital board games feature observer modes. This presents a challenge for streaming games from multiple users. There’s also the matter of getting great equipment for the best sound and video. These are not small undertakings.

Promotion is another challenge. Live events need to be promoted. If you look at Twitter, you will see that the board game world is progressing in this area. We are on social media and the community is very active.

Board game media as it stands today is pretty awesome and is growing and changing constantly. What I am proposing here is a new step forward, a step that offers legitimacy while increasing exposure. It is something I am actively pursuing. We’ve gotten on Twitch, and I would love to host a live-streamed tournament someday soon.

What do you think of all this? Can other digital board games become Esports like Hearthstone? Are you interested in watching top players go head to head in some of your favorite games? Sound off in the comments below.
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Thu Oct 9, 2014 3:00 pm
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Weekly Stream: Carcassonne. Join Us Thursday 10/9 at 9:00pm EDT.

Brad Cummings
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Ok, we are really playing Carcassonne this week, I promise. This is a digital board game classic and one that stands next to Ascension and Hearthstone as one of my most played. Join us on Twitch as we honor this classic Euro as we head into the week of Spiel.

Here are the details:

When: Thursday, October 9th, 9:00pm EDT
Where: BoardGameGeek on Twitch
Who: Myself and Dave


We’ll see you on the live stream! Be sure to subscribe on Twitch to be alerted to any stream that we do.
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Wed Oct 8, 2014 2:00 pm
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Pokemon TCG Online - iPad Review

Brad Cummings
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The Stats:
Compatibility: iPad
Reviewed On: iPad Air
Current Price: Free
Version: 2.23.0
App Size: 504 MB
Developer/Publisher: Pokemon Company
Multiplayer: Yes
AI: Yes
Itunes link: Pokemon TCG Online

Pokemon was one of the first video games I played on our family’s brick of a Game Boy, and consequently, the Pokemon Trading Card Game was the first hobby game I ever player. Of course, I had not comprehension of that at the time. My best friend showed up at my house one summer day with two brightly colored red and blue boxes. My friend was not into video games, but his grandfather thought the game was cool and purchased the cards for him as payment for helping on the farm. This bizarre combination of events can only mean one thing: it was destiny. We played for hours, and I promptly picked up my own set as soon as my funds allowed.

I played this game for a few years, finally moving into Harry Potter, then Magic: the Gathering, and so on until I reach modern board gaming. The Pokemon Trading Card Game holds a special place in my heart. It is a game meant for younger audiences, there is strategy, but it can be swingy. Like many card games, but also more often than others, you can find yourself in no win situations. All that being said, it is an interesting game to experience for several reasons including that it was an entry point for many gamers, and it is a great example of great licensed game.



This new iPad version provides an opportunity for those that may have missed the game to check it out for free. If you are an old fan like me, or have kids, it also is a way to play digitally and on the go. Let’s take a look at what this version has to offer and if it lives up to high expectations.

To start off, Pokemon Trading Card Game is more like Magic Online than Hearthstone (in fact it is always online). You will receive a free deck and cards just for signing up, and the game features no in-app purchases. That is right, you can’t drop real money for cards in the game. So how do you get cards? One way is to buy actual cards in a store, which will provide a code exchangeable for the same product digitally. You can also buy cards with Player Coins which are earned by playing games, logging in daily, watching the Pokemon cartoon in a companion app, and more. It is an interesting system and seems very kid friendly. I do wish I could just give them a bunch of cash, but I do see what they are trying to do. So this app is more about playing with your existing Pokemon Trading Card Game collection, than necessarily quickly building a new one.



Of course, the real focus is playing the game. You can play against AI or Online against real players (constant internet connection required for any mode). The AI is not amazing, but luck can make for some challenging competitions. Online play is actually pretty seamless and game timers keep games tight. I have found many players will quit a game after losing a big Pokemon or a having a bad start. It feels like the community is a little hit or miss. You should check out our stream from last week to see how frustrating this can get.

While I do lament the access to cards (let me give you money!), with just a few packs I felt ready for some minor deck building. The interface is extensive but can be a bit daunting to navigate. It hearkens back again to the PC origins of this game. The filtering options, however, are pretty impressive. There were options there that I didn’t even know what to do with like “retreat cost”. If you are more versed in this game, it looks like there is a lot there for you. It even features an auto-build option where you pick two favorite cards and it builds a deck around them. This great in a game like Pokemon when your deck is usually built around a couple large Pokemon.

Pokemon Trading Card Game started out as a PC and Mac application, and the iPad version suffers for it. The whole thing has been retrofitted for touch controls, but many menus are still a bit clunky. It also has this bizarre art style that seems inspired by avatars from the Yahoo games system. It seems strange that a game world with so much depth can be presented in such a shallow way.



After doing a live stream of the game on Thursday, I proceeded to play another round of matches the following morning. The claws were back in. Admittedly, a bunch of those games ended poorly for me despite my choices, and yet I had a blast the whole time. The interface is burdensome, the gameplay is swingy, and the online community is a little fickle, but it still captures the fun I remember about the game. Evolving a Pokemon is just as satisfying as it ever was. It’s a formula that still works.

I am not saying this game is for every player, it is not genre defining like Hearthstone, but there is a fun experience here. If you are an old fan, this is a fun way to visit and old friend. If you have never tried it, I recommend giving it a quick look. At least you can see what all the fuss was about. As for me, I wanna be the very best, like no one ever was. To catch them is my real test, to train them is my cause. I will travel across the land, searching far and wide. Each Pokemon to understand the power that’s inside.

A nostalgia trip that leaves some things to be desired.

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Please give your user rating for Pokemon TCG Online.
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4 Stars
3 Stars
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1 Star
      44 answers
Poll created by thequietpunk
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Tue Oct 7, 2014 2:00 pm
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