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User Rating Comment Status
Thomas B.
Germany
Rheda-Wiedenbrück
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10
Jun 2013
Owned
paul troke
United Kingdom
hove
East Sussex
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10
Dec 2012
o.k. so i initially scored this a 1 having problems understanding the rulebook, and whilst i still have issues
with the rulebook once you've gone through it a few times
it begins to make sense certainly what i would call a high complex game but it is worth persevering with as it is a good game although if you are playing with players who haven't played the game before i would suggest you play a couple of dummy rounds first so they get the gist of it
update after 9 plays
it's got to be a 10 really great game which will
generally be my first choice to play
2012-12-29
Owned
stef po
France
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10
Jan 2013
Very nice game with an original mecanism of guessing what other players will do and will expect you to do
2013-01-15
Owned
Cyril LE BRIS
France
Montpellier
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10
May 2013
Owned
Wolfgang Denecke
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10
May 2013
Owned
Marco Stutzke
Germany
Neumünster
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10
Sep 2013
Owned
Lionel Graveleau
France
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10
Apr 2014
Owned
Leo Leo
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10
Jan 2015
Owned
christophe molon
France
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10
Jan 2014
Owned
CycyX
France
Magny en Vexin
Val d'Oise
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9.5
Feb 2014
Owned
Vincent BONNARD
France
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9
Feb 2012
Number of players: 3
Time: 3h (with explanations)

First game for everybody, so we spent a few minutes to look at the components and the rulebook even though two of us have already read them.

Inventory:
We quickly identified each component. The only surprise was about the building tiles, which are printed on both sides (and we did not see that, at first). Cards could be bigger for an easier reading. Other details were a little bit odd but we were playing on a prototype and the author told us it was to be changed. Last but not least, the iconography is more than effective (and the author said it was the only “definitive” part… great!). Drawings should help the immersion, especially on the boards: a big town illustration will definitely put you under the skin of a Marshal.

Preparation:
Here is the moment we found difficulty with the rulebook: the setup of the starting buildings seemed quite confuse to us. Indeed, some buildings are placed on each player’s board, others are the initial ones and can be built by everybody, and the remaining ones are randomly chosen to be played on their front side or their “Dwelling” side (the back one) and are available from turn 1, 2 or 3. Maybe including these statuses on the boards would clarify this point.

Phases of a turn:
Phases 2 and 3 are not easy to understand because they are truly the original part of the game, and the difference between “first player” and “active player” is very important. Having read it twice, it seems quite clear, finally, but the first view requires attention, in particular about the visualization.

Mechanics:
First of all, once the setup done, you really feel the potential of the game thanks to the numerous buildings and the setup cards: at the beginning of the game, each town is different so each player will have to deal with it using what he has and what is available.

Lincoln cards also contextualize each game. They make Western Town kind of a delivery game in which one has to manage at best to satisfy a demand you know in advance.

During phase 2, the disadvantage of first player –who need to guess everything– is balanced by his rank for phase 3, during which playing first can be decisive. In our 3-player game, phase 2 was quickly done. Each one felt like missing actions, which is a proof that WT is a good game with tension.

The fact that you get in hand the card of a building as soon as you built it is quite similar to a deckbuilding game. I even made this funny mistake during turn 2: I discarded the card to draw it later the next turn instead of… This point made me think of the immediate effect of A few acres of snow, and I do appreciate that.

One building seems unavoidable at the beginning: the woodwork. Indeed, all of us used it during the first turns to get a 5- or 6-card hand, and the more the game goes on, the more difficult it is to play it. However, nobody built a second one. When reading this piece of advice, do not forget it was our first play; I am sure we did not see some “building” combos.

Phase 3 is merely awesome. It gives a tactical finesse which is very pleasant and a guessing aspect which is very original in this kind of game. We also found the option of playing a third action quite surprising , but the author told us we made a mistake with this point: a third action does not oblige you to pass. Knowing that, it now makes sense and I guess there are even more possibilities during this phase.

Indians seem well balanced. All of us played carefully and the threat was never too far. They attacked me twice but the consequences were not too dreadful: it only took me little time in my town’s development.

Final score (quite simple):
1/ Black houses. The idea of earning points thanks to who has the majority and also how many players rank after you is great and really original because differences between possible configurations matter.
2/ Lincoln’s wishes are a good idea, too, because they reward the whole game efforts and let the opportunity to come back during the last turns.
3/ Buildings. A way no one shall forget, especially the ones with Heroes and hanged cow-boys.

Even if everything is perfect, here, I think that buildings’ position should also be taken into account. Julien talked about a “main street”, and it is an interesting thing. In Carson City, for instance, position means points depending on the type of buildings and their place on the board. The immersion would be emphasized with this way to earn points during and/or at the end of the game. The author is working on that point, looking for a solution that would keep the game’s fluidity.

Another discussion to have after next game would be about the loop between Peace Pipe and Development points. Indeed, all my Peace Pipe points turned quite quickly into Development ones, so Development was no more important for me at the end of the game. Even if I was the Indians’ best target, was this a bad idea?

To conclude, I truly enjoyed this game. There are many combos, a good turnover with many different setups, and a very original interaction very well thought.

About the experience itself, I tried what seemed natural to me: Lincoln’s wishes. I finally got all the cards, even if Jokerounet was always close to me.

First, I took a Gold for the Nation strategy whereas Jokerounet was playing the Inhabitants and Tomstille was building a big city prison where one cow-boy out of two was hanged. Then, I developed my town to make it more attractive; Indians were not happy with that so they destroyed some dwellings. In the end, result was predictable: Jokerounet’s city was very polyvalent but this was not what Lincoln wanted so he earned less points (hey, this is a combo game, okay?), and Tomstille finally ranked second thanks to a point generator he was the only one to use.

Last word: to play again ASAP. ^^
2012-02-27
Owned
Alka Zahr
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9
Feb 2012
Owned
gautier dhordain
France
lille
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9
Jan 2014
Owned
Benjamin Schoenheiter
Germany
Friedberg
Hessen
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9
Jun 2012
Had a chance to play this game at this year's Heidelberger Burgevent and it was an absolute blast. Even though it was 1am in the morning when we started - the rules are complex but easy to grasp after two rounds and I can't wait to see it again in Essen.

Thank you Olivier for the wonderful rules explanation

UPDATE: Played the final version now. Just as I remembered it - VERY good game. My first edition had misprinted tile backs - but don't let that discourage you.
2012-10-23
Owned
Henrik Prantl
Germany
Gießen
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9
Dec 2012
Owned
Aurèle Aubert
Switzerland
Vaud
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9
Feb 2015
Owned
silvia eramo
Italy
Milano
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9
Nov 2012
Owned
Klaas Muurling
Netherlands
Leiden
Georgia
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Terra Mystica is one of my top favorites
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9
Nov 2012
Owned
Detlef Dölling
Germany
Nordrhein-Westfalen
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9
Oct 2012
Owned
Christophe Denoize
France
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9
Oct 2012
Owned
First Last
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9
Oct 2012
Excellent, original, strategic and interactive game !
2012-10-30
Owned
Dirk Vahlenkamp
Germany
Huerth
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9
Oct 2012
Owned
Paweł Pietruszewski
Poland
Nowa Sarzyna
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9
Oct 2012
Owned
Marko Salopek
Croatia
Zagreb
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9
Dec 2012
Owned
Matthew Shannon
United States
Mercer Island
WA
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9
Dec 2012
Owned
Alfredo Hernández
Spain
Madrid
Madrid
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9
Dec 2012
Owned
Deorn
Belgium
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9
Oct 2014
Owned
LotoW
Germany
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9
Apr 2013
Best Western-themed game I know, innovative mechanism
2013-04-27
Owned
Fabrice Dubois
France
La Garenne Colombes
Hauts de Seine
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9
May 2013
Western Town is a card game based on 2 aspects : bluff and incitement.

Building are not placed on a common board : each player has a board representing his city where his buildings are constructed. Each constructed building brings a card into the owner's hand, ready to be played straight away. Each card can be played in 2 ways :
- for your own : you play a card to activate a building in your town -- The Gold Mine earns you 1 or 2 gold, the Bank allows you to earn a gold, send a gold to the nation (federal government) but you must roll the indian dice (sending a gold convoy increase their anger).
- in order to exploit other player's same building : you get extra action -- The Gold mine earns you 1 gold, the Bank allows you to send a gold to the nation (without dice rolling) and you opponent won't earn anything at the end of turn (lure in general).

So this mechanic brings interesting choices with strong theme integration :
- what cards to choose for this turn given what you want/plan to do and the buildings of your opponents ?
- what cards to play for your own ?
- what cards to play to exploit other players ?
- will you go for originality -- you are not copied, not exploited and you will earn lure at the end of the turn
- will you copy one's town -- they built a lucrative Saloon, why not you ?

You will have to keep and eye on Lincoln desire :
- population ? focus yourself on Homesteads, Saloon and Hotel. Capitalize your population with the Barber (i love this card !) or the General Store
- gold sent to the nation ? run you Gold Mine, your Bank and your Marshal but beware of indians !
- lure ? be original in order to earn lure at the end of each turn (your buildings won't be exploited) or build and run a Saloon

And defend yourself against indians : after all, the Gunsmith, the Blacksmith and the Church are here for that.

What i liked :
- The bluffing aspect : who will fire (=play a card) the first ? who will play first his third card ?
- The strong theme : building are self explanatory-- the more you send gold convoys, the more you can see an indian attack
- Space exploitation of the city : the more you build near the indian camp, the more you distrupt them and see an indian attack; it is easy to defend a downtown building against indians
- Great combo system
- General concept and mechanism : lure and exploitation system
- Transformation of peace pipes into lure : an elegant, simple and thematic mechanism to bring tension and focusing the game. The more you city is developped and attractive, the more it is a potential target for indians
2013-05-22
Owned
For Trade
Albert Rubrum
Canada
Trois-Rivières
Québec
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9
Jun 2013
15 games played. Interesting and, for me, unusual. The "card game" with its exploitation phase distort the usual approach to the build and produce type of games.
2013-06-28
Owned
Antoine Bocquillon
France
Nantes
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9
Dec 2013
Owned
Timothy Heath
United States
Firestone
Colorado
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9
Jul 2013
Owned
Loïc Vinet
France
Paris
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9
Mar 2015
Owned
Mickaël Rémondière
France
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9
May 2015
Owned
Vincent J
France
Nantes
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9
Jun 2014
Owned
Johan Koitka
France
Lille
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9
Jan 2014
Owned
Silberklinge Warlord
Germany
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9
Feb 2014
Owned
Kévin CIVY
France
Le Pin
IDF
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9
Apr 2015
Owned
Preordered
Christopher CC
Germany
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8.9
Apr 2014
played @ Spiel '12
2012-10-21
Owned
Simon Weinberg
Netherlands
Wassenaar
Z.H.
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8.8
Nov 2012
Surprisingly good...especially in the last couple of rounds. Looking fwd to playing it more!
2012-11-27
Owned
France
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8.8
Jan 2014
Owned
skipper 2206
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8.8
May 2014
Owned
Hank Panethiere
United States
Festus
Missouri
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8.5
Feb 2012
Great game, can't wait for it to be published. Very unique and thematic.
2012-02-24
Owned
jianjun ma
China
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8.5
Aug 2013
Owned
Laurent JEGOUZO
France
LE TEMPLE
PARIS
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8.5
Oct 2012
Owned
CORWYN59 .
France
Unspecified
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8.5
May 2013
Excellent firts impressions, a Caylus-like game but with more fun . The card selection mechanism is innovative as well as the interaction thrown in it (use others buidings & cancel their income)

Happy to have it and expect to rise it to a 9 with a more few plays

Theme is also well implemented, you ARE the major of the town
2013-05-24
Owned
Sylvester Stachovicz
Poland
Warsaw
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8
May 2012
Owned
Diego D'OLIVEIRA GRANJA
France
MONS EN BAROEUL
Nord
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8
Feb 2013
Owned
János Baranyai
Hungary
Monorierdő/Budapest
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8
Dec 2012
Owned
Andreas Lettner
Austria
Linz
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8
May 2013
Owned

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