Warhammer Quest and its Kin
Joe Flesch
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Illinois
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As a fan of Games Workshop games I’ll always be biased. I give the company much love, but also much hate for their bountifully large amount of what their fans see as poor business choices. That said I have to laud them for their many successes. Few companies produce miniatures at such a high quality (or price) and even fewer manage to run so many different game systems that have been or are in some way shape and form still successful. Over the years GW has produced lots of great miniature games that have garnered tons of followers. From their flagship Warhammer Fantasy and Warhammer 40,000 games to the off shoots of Mordheim and Necromunda respectively and many others: Blood Bowl, Gorka Morka, Warmaster, Epic 40,000, Battlefleet Gothic, Man ‘O War and more. Today however, I’m here to talk about one of my favorites of their many abandoned lines though.
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1. Board Game: Warhammer Quest [Average Rating:7.40 Overall Rank:469]
Joe Flesch
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The game was released in 1995 and produced through 1998. The base game was unheard of in its size and scope. It came with 91 plastic miniatures (Spiders, Rats, Bats, Snotlings, Orcs, Goblins, Minotaurs, Skaven and Heroes’) along with 10 plastic doorway pieces with which to connect its map pieces which were also at the time a newer concept. With Milton Bradley GW had aided in the production of Heroquest and learned quite a bit along the way. One of the big points that came from Advanced Heroquest was the introduction of random map/room tiles so that the dungeons in which you adventured would differ from game to game. Speaking of which there were 24 large full color thick cardstock map tiles, over 100 full color cards more than 40 cardboard counters/chits. It also game with three books, 2 of which were quite small and used to play the basic game. The third however was roughly 190 pages and contained rules not only to play the more advanced game but to basically turn it into a full blown roleplaying game in the Warhammer world and this is what was considered to really make the game an exceptional product. It gave you the rules to advance your characters and have them learn new skills. Go to town and buy new weapons and armor, even purchase boats or castles! The book also contained a 5th player type, the Dwarf Trollslayer as well as a 3 level roleplay dungeon Death Below Karak Azgal for you to play through from levels 1-2 or perhaps 3 depending on your thrift and the amount of gold your lucky enough to find.

The game was quite basic when played in it’s out of the box form and easy to get going. You would roll an adventure from the Adventure book which would give you your mission/plot points. Then you and your friends would each pick a character Barbarian, Dwarf, Elf and Wizard and you would head down into the dungeon smashing faces, taking treasure and eventually achieving your mission goal before doing it all again. The Roleplay book really let you expound upon that as much or as little as you wanted with extra rules, but was not necessary to the basic game. The game was known for being unusually hard on a starting group of adventurers who were as likely to die in the first couple of encounters as opposed to actually finishing their quest. This however did not diminish most players’ love of the game. The basic 4 heroes are exactly as you’d expect for a dungeon crawl game. The Barbarian is the clear hand to hand fighter and the Dwarf is his fighting companion, somewhat weaker but tougher; they provide the heavy killing power in the basic game. The Elf is the quick and agile shooter allowing him to get into and out of tight spaces and fire at enemies even while stuck behind the fighters while the Wizard at low levels is really relegated to a healing role unless the spell he starts with sucks.

It was a classic dungeon crawl game which had been done before, but GW managed to put so much production value into the box that it quickly became a favorite amongst miniature gamers. I first played the game at the age of 14 and was hooked for life. My 1st copy was stolen from my car around 1998 while I was in high school and I didn’t replace it until years later much to my own chagrin and detrimental cost. The game was so popular and is also so rare that to obtain a complete set off of sites like eBay you may well be paying upwards of $200+ USD. GW went on through the games 3 year run to produce a lot of extra content for it. Among their support articles from their own publication White Dwarf they produced 3 issues of a special publication called Deathblow which collected articles from White Dwarf, user submitted extras, adventure ideas and even modeling tips for building 3D terrain to use. They produced 9 other small box add-ons in the way of extra character types for you to play and two regular expansions. The game was truly phenomenal although it suffered a number of issues. Namely surviving the first couple of adventures at which point your warriors would star to become so powerful as to not be bothered at all about dying until near their level cap at which time it was possible a greater demon would come in and manage to kill you all while you hardly posed a threat.
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2. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Lair of the Orc Lord [Average Rating:7.52 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.52 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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The regular size expansion was designed to go right alongside the base game. In the back of the roleplay book was a 3 level dungeon called Death Below Karak Azgul. At the end of that dungeon the warriors were presented with a choice to either continue deeper into the unknown or head back out of the dungeon to adventure again somewhere else. This expansion was the continuation of that adventure. A dungeon filled with Orcs and Goblins. The game included 36 new card, 6 new counters, 3 new map tiles, 2 plastic doorways and an additional 8 models for use in the adventure as well as the 40+ page book with which to play the adventure. The book included plenty of new content for the basic games, such as events, simple adventures such as those from the adventure book and special events for a Orc & Goblin dungeon, but it also contained new rules and content for the roleplay game.

The Doom of Grishnak was another 3 level dungeon completely written out and prepared for your adventurers to take them from level’s 2/3 up to 4/5. The game added a number of special and now highly sought after models which were not available from the regular GW range such as a snotling carrying the lantern which was an event you may run across where he steels the lamp from the warriors. There was a goblin who is wearing a jester’s outfit and a squig whom although he was available via the regular line has since been taken OOP in the 2000’s. It also introduced the Night Goblins into the game in the form of netters, squig hunters, squig hoppers and fanatics who could deliver a truly gruesome death onto the warriors. One of the favorite additions to the rules were the special ‘orc’ themed treasures available on a treasure table contained in the big such as the Frowin Knife, Dead ‘Ard Weapon, or Gluvvs of Def. Let’s face it, orc talk is just fun.

Obtaining this expansion anymore is nearly impossible. In fact I’d say it’s actually harder to get a copy of the two expansions than the base set and its certainly harder than the extra characters that I’ll be going over later. I’ve seen full copies of the expansions rumble around in the $100-150 USD price range so if your looking for one I wish you luck.
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3. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Catacombs of Terror [Average Rating:7.50 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.50 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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The Catacombs of Terror was the second regular expansion for the board game and ran along the same veins as Orc Lord. It added 4 new map tiles, 6 counters, 36 cards, and 9 more miniatures including the 1st piece of scenery not counting the doorways. The Grimoir Necris was simply a spell book that was planted on a pedastal which was used in conjunction with the Dread King which was the eventual boss who was also sitting on a large and ominously impressive looking throne. Again these miniatures are highly sought after as they have long been out of production and are prized by Quest collectors.

The roleplay campaign in this expansion was called Dark Necropolis and takes place in the lands of Khemri. The adventure was designed for level 7 adventurers which mean that it does not follow directly from the Orc Lord adventure. In fact instead of just dropping the adventurers for no reason into Khemri there is actually a fairly simple set of plot line choices at the beginning of the adventure proper which can help a storyteller get the players from one place to the next so that the players are not at a complete loss as to how or why they have ventured to the place at which they will find themselves. It does however have some bits that will kick back to previous games though. One of the primary villains is related to a previous evil doer that the adventurers killed back in Karak Azgal which I thought was a nice touch.

All that said, it contains the same basics in information and additional material as the Orc Lord. Some basic adventure hooks, events, and treasures. The new map tiles are cool, this set introduced a new dungeon room called the hall of death which is a 4 exit room. It also added another hallway that was a bridge. There aren’t any rules for falling off as there were on the fire chasm, it does force the heroes into a single file line like the collapsed corridor from the Orc Lord set. While this represents yet another $100-150 eBay purchase I find I want it less than the Orc Lord expansion although clearly the completionist will want to obtain it at some point during their collecting.
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4. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Pits & Traps [Average Rating:8.20 Unranked] [Average Rating:8.20 Unranked]
 
Joe Flesch
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The pits and traps supplement represents a very small expansion for the Quest game system. While this wasn’t a large box or anything of such a nature it was a commercially (albeit mail order only) available add on that wasn’t something you had to get out of a White Dwarf magazine. It contained only a rules set (about 2-3pages) and the new map tiles. There was The Crossroads of Doom which we’re a T-Junction with a rotating piece in the intersection which would forcefully separate the warriors as only two could access it at any one time to turn to the next area. Also The Bridge of Despair which was an objective sized room with a large pit in the middle that gave the warriors either the option of jumping over gaps (and possibly falling to their death) or riding this bridge which moved randomly sideways or straight across the pit. Monsters would populate the sides and be able to pepper the warriors in relative safety until the bridge rotated (which was random).

The bridge represented the usual of issues of separating warriors and forcing them to split attacks, which was the easiest way to bring down a party of leveled players. The map sections were of course nice cardstock the like of what came in the base game and expansions although, neither room was given a dungeon card to be shuffled in, instead the rules simply gave you ways to interject them into the game. In any dungeon room while searching for secret alcoves you may find the crossroads and the bridge was simply placed before the objective room when you ran across it in the dungeon deck. Honestly the set was more of a novelty to tide people over when they got bored. I rarely see this on eBay and the assumption is that it either was not popular enough to purchase or simply went out of print too quickly.
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5. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Treasure Cards Pack #1 [Average Rating:6.75 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.75 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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Chatham
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There were 3 of these specific releases. Each set contained an additional 54 cards for the treasure deck of the base game. A big highlight was the special 'objective room' treasure cards which were built form the special objective room treasure tables out of the roleplay book. These were extremely powerful items which when gained at an early level in the game would very quickly unbalance it. That said, they were a fantastic addition just to avoid having to look up the charts in the book when getting treasure from events and objective rooms.
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6. Board Game: Warhammer Quest [Average Rating:7.40 Overall Rank:469]
Joe Flesch
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Chatham
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To my knowledge there we’re a total of 19 White Dwarf articles which added various things to the Warhammer Quest system. While not all of them did so in the same way there were a number which came with new treasure, map and event cards. Some came with new counters and a few came with new dungeon rooms or objective areas. They were all very thematic as far as their content. Some were used to introduce Lizardmen into the game by traveling over the ocean (a very dangerous prospect) to Lustria. Others introduced Skaven lairs and other material from their backgrounds. The biggest problems with these additions to the game is that having been contained in White Dwarf magazines they presented little value to people who did not play the game and as such were usually thrown out with the magazines. I keep an eye out at conventions for old White Dwarfs and comb through them meticulously to find such products. While I do see original articles come across eBay now and then they are very few and far between.
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7. Board Game: Warhammer Quest [Average Rating:7.40 Overall Rank:469]
 
Joe Flesch
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The Deathblow magazine was really a last ditch effort to hold the Quest game system together I think. In fact they didn’t come out until 1999 at which point the system had already fallen out of production. They provided a way for some of the more popular White Dwarf articles to be reprinted for those who did not obtain them originally (although without the pieces/parts/cards). They also contained rules for new types of characters who would never have official materials produced. Quite a bit of fan production was used in these magazines presenting campaigns, characters and hobby articles written by players as opposed to GW staff members.

Some of the most exciting pieces to come out of Deathblow were the mail order characters that actually did get produced by GW; the Kislevite Shaman and Halfling Thief, which we’ll discuss later in this list. Also provided through Deathblow were some expansive ideas from the GW team to help make the roleplay aspect of going to town more fun. The most valuable article came in issue 2 in which they brought up some simple instructions and ideas for creating your own 3D dungeon terrain for use with the system. While far out of date with today’s standards in hobby building they were helpful and certainly inspiring. Sadly the Deathblow project faltered and faded after only 3 issues. These also hit eBay but vary rarely.
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8. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Pit Fighter [Average Rating:6.99 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.99 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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As I’m starting this whole shin-dig off with the Pit Fighter I’ll go over the contents only once here and than you’ll all know that the contents of each box is exactly the same but obviously with different words and appropriate models. Each of the warrior packs contains obviously 1 appropriately themed GW miniature. Each pack also contains a piece of cardstock with punch out pieces. There is a circle counter for the character in question, an item of equipment, a card containing special rules and or another piece of equipment and then a character card describing the character, there starting abilities and special rules as well as the To Hit table. Finally each pack contains a small black and white rulebook that covers even more detail about the character such as background information, level up skills, level up charts, special items that are obtainable, any special rules dealing with the character in a settlement and usually more.

For the packs I’m going to basically follow a format. I’ll discuss the model, the items and then the character itself.

The model for the Pit Fighter was pretty bad I thought. He's posed awkwardly with his legs apart and his hands rather straight up. The face was pretty bad. Overall, the model is serviceable but it was pretty ugly. The pit fighter came with 2 items, 1 potion which was significant for the fact that it was essentially a bottomless potion unless you rolled a 1 at which point it would run out. This could be a huge deal if the game is going poorly for the players. His weapon is the pit flail. The weapon can at a starting level do a significant amount of damage because it grants a +2 bonus to the roll making it 1D6+5 total damage per hit instead of 1D6+3 which is what it would be. Those extra 2 points can really help push through the enemies toughness. However the flail came with a downside. On a 1 you hit yourself in the face. He also had a fist spike which would do the regular 1D6+3 but without the downside of possibly hitting yourself. Finally he comes with special rule allowing him to counteract the usual movement order. Any time an event causes monsters to attack he can roll a dice and on a 5-6 he can immediately take his turn. Sadly on a 1 he becomes stupid and loses his turn.

The pit fighter is a pretty powerful warrior. He comes with an average stat line honestly, and his weapons are nothing spectacular. He wears light armor at the beginning and is great just for his healing potion unless you botch the roll early in the game. The pit fighter comes with some of what are considered the most busted rules of all the extra warriors. He’s the only character who can actually use his level up abilities to completely change his stat line to make him the perfect warrior. He also has access to pit armor and weapons which are some of the most brutal items available outside of the dungeon. At early levels these weapons can cause a serious extra amount of damage given that they all increase damage output. The skills available to the fighter are pretty unimpressive. The big deal with this guy is all about the stat line. Being able to increase your strength and attacks are crucial.
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9. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Warrior Priest [Average Rating:6.94 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.94 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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The Priest was an average model, and retained the look of the usual warrior priests form the Empire army of the time. While not overly impressive in stature or design he was functional and a pretty decent model. The warrior priest starts with a magical ring of jade which has the crucial ability to heal wounds and thus augment the group when running with the wizard sometimes freeing up his power to cast damage spells. He also has a holy book which gives him access to 3 different prayers which are basically spells. All the spells augment a warriors attack by either giving him +1 to hit, re-roll a miss or get an extra attack. He can however only cast a single prayer a turn. Treasures that aid a wizard in casting can also aid the wizard which means if he replaces a wizard he can still use the wizard items. He also comes with the unique ability for force another warrior to trade treasures with him so that he may get something he wants. This skill can often cause internal strife among the party. Finally his Warhammer causes an extra D6 wounds on a roll of 6 to hit.

The priest is a fantastic addition to the party. Like I said above he can really help out by helping out the wizard in the task of healing the party. His prayers while nice are not game breaking and his Warhammer is great as you do roll a 6 more often than you’d think and 2D6 is a huge bonus for a starting characters damage output. The priest has his own set of events for being in town which in general are pretty ho-hum. The big deal for him is while leveling up he learns new prayers. Some of these are extremely powerful at later levels in the game as the bonuses given by the prayers are based on the priests level. For example at level 5 he can give a warrior +5 toughness with the Steadfast blessing. While he will never be able to pray more than 3 times a turn and that’s not until level 6 the prayers are still extremely helpful for knocking down that one tough monster who may otherwise seem impossible.
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10. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Imperial Noble [Average Rating:7.11 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.11 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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The Noble model was okay. He definitely upheld the pomp and fancy dress of a noble, the sword over the shoulder and for whatever reason a cape. He looked okay but wasn't fantastic. The Imperial Noble, or as my group affectionately called him ‘Sir Papercut’ is a personal favorite. His starting items were pretty good, the ancient heirloom causing fear in a randomly determined group of monsters. The dueling pistol while only being able to be used once per combat essentially as the reload condition is a bit harsh can cause a significant amount of damage at level 1. Finally his last item and skill go together to make him what he truly is; a papercut. When the noble hits an enemy he gets to attack again, even if he causes no damage, but only with his rapier. The point of import here is no damage. His fencing blade (rapier) only causes D6+1 wounds which means that in general he’s going to do maybe 1 or 2 wounds on successful hit. This can also have a downside of making the nobles turn run ridiculously long.

The noble also has a special table for uneventful days in a settlement which can cause him trouble but tend to be pretty silly in general. A bonus and detriment of the noble is Luigi & Salvatore’s, specialty arms/armorer store just for nobles. This comes with a downfall as before going the noble will automatically abandon any equipment he’s purchased from the regular shops literally just throwing it away before entering. This shop provides the most powerful ballistic weapons in the game including special hunting rifles and repeater pistols as well as special kegs of gunpowder which add strength to shots from guns. The skills for the noble are mostly average giving him some decent bonuses overall. He has two extremely standout skills that are always hoped for. You hope for death lunch early as it lets you add your full strength to the papercut swords damage. The other skill which is great no matter when you get it but really shows its power at later levels is Find Weakness. You may give up all your attacks for 1 massive attack. On a 1-2 you freakishly lose your sword until the monster you swung at is dead, but on 3-5 you literally cut the monsters wounds in half and on a 6 you flat out kill it. This results in some truly fantastic stories for a group when they tell the tale of how the noble once killed something amazing like a giant in a single shot.
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11. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Elf Ranger [Average Rating:7.05 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.05 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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I have a bias against elves. I don't think even 1/2 the models for them look any good and the Ranger was no exception. The dress/skirtt hing, cape and hair just bother me. He was an okay model, but not overly impressive. The ranger begins the game with one of the most powerful pieces of treasure in the game and something that is very coveted in later levels. The War Crown of Tiranoc (aka time freeze ring) which lets the warriors take another entire turn before the monsters ever get to attack. While the wizard misses out due to not rolling another power phase and thus not having the ability to have 2 rounds of spellcasting it does give the warriors 2 whole sets of attacks which is very powerful. The ranger has the distinction of picking his role in the group from the start. He can either be a 2nd wizard or a warrior of lethal capability. The wizards rules and beginning spells are contained on his 2nd piece of card in the set. The spells are nice for low level and not particularly powerful. The knight class gives him a good, though not amazing skill letting him gain a 2nd attack as long as his first hits. This option also begins him with a bow and allows him to wear magical armor while the wizard choice does not.

The ranger is a fairly average character. His most standout attributes are that even as a knight class he may eventually gain access to cast spells making him a duel class character. Most of the skills the character gains are good but nothing is amazing and his spells generally seem to be the same way. He definitely seems to suffer the same fate as many duel class characters from old D&D which is, he has okay abilities in both but doesn’t excel at either. He’s a fun character but lacks the shine and grandeur that so many of the other characters have being a single role fighter.
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12. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Dwarf Trollslayer [Average Rating:7.11 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.11 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
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The Trollslayer represents an oddity. He was included in the base games roleplay book as an extra character, yet GW decided to give him his own box set as well which I thought was odd. That said, he’s a pretty impressive character. The model was straight out of the Dwarf line from the army, you could buy him out of blister packs for your units. He wasn’t overly grandiose but serviceable and average looking. It was good model overall. He comes with stone bread, which while only Dwarfs can eat it is a nice bit of healing at a starting level. He has a limited supply but can get more from the guild masters in town. His rune axe doesn’t start off impressive but as he levels he can have runes added to it that can make it more powerful and the slayers starting skill means on a 6 to hit his strength is counted as 7 instead of 3 which is pretty amazing.

The slayer had two detriments; he could never use armor of any kind and as the background of slayers is to seek a glorious death to atone for an unforgiveable sin he could not retreat from a dungeon. This had a benefit of really aiding other players in escape while he stayed behind to pin the monsters but still for the player it sucked. The slayer is above all else a fighter and his skills represent that. Every skill basically gives him the ability to get extra attacks, do extra damage or reduce incoming damage. The higher level he gets the higher the strength bonus when rolling 6 to hit gets as well. He was a bit tough to level because of the lack of armor to absorb things but once going he could get pretty strong overall. I’m a big fan of the slayer.
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13. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Chaos Warrior [Average Rating:7.35 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.35 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The warrior of chaos was another model represented straight from the GW model line. You could buy him as a hero for your chaos armies and he fit well, looking like most chaos warriors. He didn’t stand out as a particularly impressive model but was okay. His items were different, he started with basic armor and axe, but also starts the game with the mark of chaos which lets him have a re-roll per game basically giving him the earliest access to a lucky charm. His other items weren’t items per say but a random amount of chaos mutations, artifacts or attributes. He could this way start out with some pretty impressive weapons or special abilities that made him a very valuable player at early levels of the game really being able to put out some damage or strike enemies from a distance. Some of the attributes/mutations had the ability to give him extra attacks, spells, or as chaos is want to do make you completely stupid.

The wearrior had his own chart for settlements, being a warrior of the chaos gods would often get you booted from a settlement early which could become a detriment if you were trying to level up. One of the nice things you could do though was visit the chaos temple. Generally whatever happened here was pretty indifferent, but the amazing part was the merging. You could sacrifice two artifacts or magic items and most times nothing would happen. A poor roll resulted in both items disappearing but a 5-6 would result in the items fusing together. Thus you could combine the power of two weapons into one which would make you a pretty nice super weapon. When leveling up, the warrior would gain access to more powerful artifacts and mutations. These were generally good although there were a few that you’d hope to avoid. Stat line increases came few and far for the warrior, but his armory and mutations made up for it. The worst thing is the higher level you became after leveling the more likely you were to be called off to war by the chaos gods resulting in your characters end game. Yup, you could lose your guy just on a single cruddy dice roll. Bummer. Still, the warrior represented a very powerful warrior and addition to a group.
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14. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Wardancer [Average Rating:7.24 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.24 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The wardancer represents another ugly model in the elf line that I do not like. In fact, while most elves of today are okay looking I still think that wardancers and witch elves are some of the ugliest looking ones. This model was just ugly. The hair was too big (even thought it was supposed to be) and the arms and legs to spindly. Ugly. He starts the game with the belt of ariel which could augment him in combat by giving extra toughness or letting him ignore a single blow thus giving him a little survivability as he couldn’t wear armor and only had a tough of 3. His swords and wardancer skills though present a pretty impressive set of abilities. If the wardancer kills a monster he may continue moving (even though normally remaining movement is lost once you enter combat) and carry his deathblows on into monsters that were not adjacent to him making him quite the killer. This was very helpful in situations where perhaps a player is struggling as the wardancer is often able to move and aid other players after dispatching his own foes.

The wardancer didn’t level in town like the normal warriors but had to find a wood elf troupe along the travel to town. The other warriors could go with him to visit the troupe but may well be ostracized and not allowed to do anything. The troupe had a lot of different tables and items available to the wardancer giving him a myriad of choices and things to do. Most of these were unimpressive except for the sword masters. He had a number of swords the dancer could use which were almost all extremely nice. The skills that are available upon leveling up all focus around damage, movement and ignoring wounds much as the trollslayer making him an eventual combat powerhouse. He was a solid addition to a group and a good choice to bring along.
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15. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Witch Hunter [Average Rating:7.30 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.30 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The hunter had a great model. It wasn’t of particularly superb quality but it just evoked exactly what a witch hunter was and a lot of these models have made their way into many a player’s Warhammer armies. The hunter is the only other class to start the game with a pistol, a nice bonus. His saber caused the usual damage although on a 6 it would cause an extra wound (mostly negligible). He did however start with a random number of once per adventure magic amulets which were pretty great. They could do anything from healing to damaging enemies to augmenting a characters fighting ability. Finally he had what may be the 2nd most broken effect in the game next to the pit fighter. The hunter had faith. He could use his faith to literally move a D6 roll up or down 1 pip per point of faith expanded. This meant he could literally turn a 1 into a 6 given enough faith points to burn. His faith would restore after each full adventure.

The hunter had as many others his own settlement events to add to the already tumultuous ones in the roleplay book. These would in general just give him a little boost in gold, or ability gain items. Although now and then he could get into trouble this way it wasn’t often. When leveling up the priest you gained access to some pretty good skills but the real power came in the way of faith. Freakishly there’s no rule stopping you from using faith on your training itself to modify dice and thus gain more faith giving your warrior near impunity to always be adjusting his dice one way or the other. This made him an extremely powerful character. He would also eventually gain access to curses (spells) which could help the party out and a handful of other items that were of pretty fair use although nothing stands out in memory. The hunter was a powerful character always getting that hit when you needed either by nature or by modification but make no mistake, if he wanted something to happen he would make it so.
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16. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Bretonnian Knight [Average Rating:7.06 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.06 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The Knight is one of the latest releases of the warrior packs not having been made until 97 which was nearing the end of the Quest line in general. Most of the characters came out in 95 along with the base game. The Knight had a couple of really nice perks to start the game with. The Questing Favor was an item that granted a 1 turn once per game ability that was always good. A re-roll or +1T for example were some of the 6 possibilities. He also started on a quest which was to retrieve a piece of magical treasure. Any time the party gets a treasure and the Knight rolls a 6 he immediately gets it and having fulfilled his quest he is given a bonus of more wounds or more (one time) attacks. The biggest bonus for the Knight though is that he replaces the Barbarian and is WAY superior for tanking. His full plate gives him a +2T bringing him to starting T of 5 which is huge and his broad sword (while not as good at deathblow because of its weight) gains +3 strength because of its weight brining him to starting strength of 6!

The real problem with the Knight is in the continued play of him over many games. He has a number of confusing rules in his honor points and a rather convoluted set of requirements every time he goes to town or levels up. He has to visit the barons, half the time fight in a tournament, chase the lady of the lake and more. It’s really kind of a long time investment to do it and can quickly get on the nerves of other players. He has a fairly decent set of skills to gain as he levels and his stats are pretty good throughout. He makes a very strong single game player and an average one in long game. I like him a lot personally, but only in single off games where you don’t have to deal with the constant events and after game things that he comes with.
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17. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Halfling Thief [Average Rating:7.60 Unranked] [Average Rating:7.60 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The Thief is a really great character in my opinion. He is one of only two characters that were released thorough the GW mail order and not released as actually character pack box sets. Firstly everyone who is a fan of Tolkien has wanted to play there own Bilbo character. The thief is exactly that and more! He starts with a couple great skills, one letting you scout out of lantern range and discover rooms and events before having to actually go and complete them and he also has a good chance of constantly finding extra treasure that doesn’t count towards his share of the loot and belongs solely to him. His items are fun and thematic. Halflings have a lunchbox full of food which are rations healing 1D6 wounds, but they have to keep track because at some point the Halfling will become stingy and no longer share.

The Thief falls to the same problems in town as the Knight which is to say he has WAY too much stuff to do and can really bog down the whole game if everyone is sitting around waiting for him. He goes to the kitchens, gets abilities, food, etc… Gods stealing goods from people, has to find a fencer to sell the stolen goods. This is entertaining just because he can get caught and hung, not often but it can happen. The Halfling does have some great skills though, they mostly revolve around keeping him out of combat or avoiding wounds, but he has some fantastic stab skills to that are along the lines of assassination attacks or attacks of opportunity. He can be a pretty solid character although I don’t prefer him much and he can be a bit of a challenge to play because you have to know how to avoid getting killed.
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18. Board Game: Warhammer Quest: Kislevite Shaman [Average Rating:6.90 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.90 Unranked]
Joe Flesch
United States
Chatham
Illinois
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The Shaman represents the 2nd of the characters to be released through GW mail order services. The Shaman was an okay character. He introduced a new mechanic called mana which was his power to cast spells like the wizards power and I think they probably could’ve gone with just letting him use the power die as well, but the mechanic isn’t hard to deal with but it is something extra and new that the player will have to learn. He starts with a staff which can add to his mana once per dungeon. He also gets to choose a spirit totem which will modify a couple of starting stats making him either more of a combat piece or more of a move and avoid piece like a regular wizard.

Most of the Shamans spells are quite offensive and can do a lot of damage to enemy models. His spell choice is more open than the wizard in general allowing him to choose from a large number of spells not necessarily from his battle level. He doesn’t have much in the way of healing spells which is unfortunate as we thought he might be a nice replacement for a wizard but that didn’t hold true. He’s strong in helping you clear monsters but that’s about it. I like him, but there are better and easier choices to make for group players than the Shaman.
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