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Mansions of Madness: Second Edition» Forums » General

Subject: Is the app required to play? rss

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Chris Cantrell
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Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.
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Chris
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Yep, the app is required. See also:

Can it be played without the app?

Game now tied to app obsolescence

Oh crap, another app drive board game
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Chris Lawson
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chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.

It also is going to be released on Steam so that means your PC option has to be out of whack as well.
 
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Matt D
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The third edition of Mansions of Madness will be out before being able to run the app becomes a problem.
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Chris Brua
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xris wrote:
chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.

It also is going to be released on Steam so that means your PC option has to be out of whack as well.


Will the app just be released on Steam? So this means the PC will run the app?
Or the whole game will be released on Steam?
 
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Lee Fisher
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Boogus wrote:
xris wrote:
chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.

It also is going to be released on Steam so that means your PC option has to be out of whack as well.


Will the app just be released on Steam? So this means the PC will run the app?
Or the whole game will be released on Steam?


PC runs the app.
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Jeffrey Speer
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chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.


I love how everyone likes to live in this mystical decade from now instead of now when they actually are.
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J P
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Kaworu17 wrote:
chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.


I love how everyone likes to live in this mystical decade from now instead of now when they actually are.


Yeah, while they're spending the next ten years upset that a game exists that may or may not be obsolete in the far future, we'll all be spending the intervening 10 years having fun actually playing the game (and others like it).
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Driss
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One of the benefits of board games is they are physical objects which will always be there when you need them. You can take them anywhere, you can play them when the power goes out and you can pack them away for your grandchildren. Many of us like having something that isn't reliant on a power grid or technology. I personally am thrilled with 2nd ed but I understand where peoples apprehension comes from and they shouldn't be dismissed so quickly. They do raise valid points.
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J P
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Sindriss wrote:
One of the benefits of board games is they are physical objects which will always be there when you need them. You can take them anywhere, you can play them when the power goes out and you can pack them away for your grandchildren. Many of us like having something that isn't reliant on a power grid or technology. I personally am thrilled with 2nd ed but I understand where peoples apprehension comes from and they shouldn't be dismissed so quickly. They do raise valid points.


Yes, and you still have those games. All the companies will keep producing them.

I have to disagree with you on some other points, though. It's just as likely your regular board games will be destroyed in a fire or if the basement floods as it is this game will be unplayable in 10 years. I have had several basement floods that have destroyed a lot of my precious collections. Perhaps that's why I don't care about this kind of thing anymore.

Also, there are many games I own that I can't easily take anywhere. It's a hassle trying to take all my Imperial Assault or Cthulhu Wars stuff anywhere. Heck, it's a hassle taking the original MoM anywhere (not to mention the setup).

I understand people's apprehension, too, but sometimes it gets so hyperbolic to just seem like tilting at windmills.
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Dean Love
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DancingFool wrote:
Kaworu17 wrote:
chriscantrell07 wrote:
Like the title says, is the app required? I don't want to pull this off the shelf 10 years from now and not be able to play it because the app no longer exists or works.


I love how everyone likes to live in this mystical decade from now instead of now when they actually are.


Yeah, while they're spending the next ten years upset that a game exists that may or may not be obsolete in the far future, we'll all be spending the intervening 10 years having fun actually playing the game (and others like it).


It's because they probably won't play it. We know BGG is full of hoarders, we've all seen the threads by people who love the hobby but hardly ever get to play, yet still buy loads of games. For a lot of people, a game like this might get one or two plays and then get consigned to the back of a cupboard. And for $100, that's not worth it. They know that. But if the game can theoretically be played in the future by their grandkids, the potential is there for it to have been worth buying at some point. And that makes them feel better. It's often the same people that have issues with Legacy games: because they have a limited lifespan in a different way.

If you value your games based on how much play they could theoretically get, every game has near infinite value, so you can justify spending loads of money on them. If you value your games on how much play they're likely to get, you suddenly face uncomfortable truths about how much you're actually spending. Games with a potentially limited lifespan remove that comfort blanket.
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Dean Love
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Sindriss wrote:
One of the benefits of board games is they are physical objects which will always be there when you need them. You can take them anywhere, you can play them when the power goes out and you can pack them away for your grandchildren. Many of us like having something that isn't reliant on a power grid or technology. I personally am thrilled with 2nd ed but I understand where peoples apprehension comes from and they shouldn't be dismissed so quickly. They do raise valid points.


Which would be an issue if the industry as a whole declared that all games would be app-required in the future. But I've got loads of games, enough to keep me busy if the electricity ever goes out, at least until I die of starvation.
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Chris J Davis
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Sindriss wrote:
One of the benefits of board games is they are physical objects which will always be there when you need them. You can take them anywhere,


I recently took my copy of XCOM to Barcelona. Guess what? The tablet fit in the box quite easily.

Quote:
you can play them when the power goes out


Don't know about you, but I've suffered precisely one power failure in my life and that was over 25 years ago. So these people are complaining about a hypothetical *single day* (or very, very small number of days) that *might* occur. And even then, if your tablet is already charged, you can still play. And if not, is MoM the only game you own? Are you sure that when the power goes out the people you're with at the time will be inclined to play Mansions of Madness? The issue is so ridiculously hypothetical it's laughable.

Quote:
and you can pack them away for your grandchildren.


My impression of children is that, for the most part, they're not interested in relics from 50 years ago.

Quote:
Many of us like having something that isn't reliant on a power grid or technology. I personally am thrilled with 2nd ed but I understand where peoples apprehension comes from and they shouldn't be dismissed so quickly. They do raise valid points.


That's the thing - I don't consider them valid points. Most of them are just ridiculous. I've been playing XCOM for months now, and more recently Descent. I've already got a lot of play out of these games and have not encountered a single issue in using their related apps. Certainly least of which is the electricity not being reliable.
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Brian C
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For me, it's simple. If I want to be plugged in, I'll play a video game. I can play online with thousands of people, and end up having a much more rich and diverse gaming experience across the board (a physical rulebook has nothing on limitless lines of code).

On the other hand if I don't want to be plugged in, I'll play a board game. One without an app.

I'm sure there's a happy middle ground in there for some people, just not for me.
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Chris J Davis
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Exo Desta wrote:
For me, it's simple. If I want to be plugged in, I'll play a video game. I can play online with thousands of people, and end up having a much more rich and diverse gaming experience across the board (a physical rulebook has nothing on limitless lines of code).

On the other hand if I don't want to be plugged in, I'll play a board game. One without an app.

I'm sure there's a happy middle ground in there for some people, just not for me.


Which I'd say is (more) fair enough. If people would just say "I just don't like the idea of playing board games that have apps" that would be much better than inventing a plethora of ridiculous and hypothetical reasons as to why apps in board games are "bad".
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Flavio Santos
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bleached_lizard wrote:
Exo Desta wrote:
For me, it's simple. If I want to be plugged in, I'll play a video game. I can play online with thousands of people, and end up having a much more rich and diverse gaming experience across the board (a physical rulebook has nothing on limitless lines of code).

On the other hand if I don't want to be plugged in, I'll play a board game. One without an app.

I'm sure there's a happy middle ground in there for some people, just not for me.


Which I'd say is (more) fair enough. If people would just say "I just don't like the idea of playing board games that have apps" that would be much better than inventing a plethora of ridiculous and hypothetical reasons as to why apps in board games are "bad".


Exactly. There is not a single good reason to say they are bad. Taste, on the other hand, is a good reason to simply not use them, but that does not make them bad.
 
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Chris J Davis
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Flaviorbs wrote:
bleached_lizard wrote:
Exo Desta wrote:
For me, it's simple. If I want to be plugged in, I'll play a video game. I can play online with thousands of people, and end up having a much more rich and diverse gaming experience across the board (a physical rulebook has nothing on limitless lines of code).

On the other hand if I don't want to be plugged in, I'll play a board game. One without an app.

I'm sure there's a happy middle ground in there for some people, just not for me.


Which I'd say is (more) fair enough. If people would just say "I just don't like the idea of playing board games that have apps" that would be much better than inventing a plethora of ridiculous and hypothetical reasons as to why apps in board games are "bad".


Exactly. There is not a single good reason to say they are bad. Taste, on the other hand, is a good reason to simply not use them, but that does not make them bad.


The problem is (or at least part of the problem) is that there seem to be a contingent of people who have a very strong opinion on the subject, and for their opinion to have any validity they need to justify it, so they come up with these insane reasons to prop up their argument.

When the thing is that the best argument they could possibly offer is "I played one once and it just wasn't to my taste", but the vast majority seem to be completely unwilling to do that.
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Dean Love
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Exo Desta wrote:
For me, it's simple. If I want to be plugged in, I'll play a video game. I can play online with thousands of people, and end up having a much more rich and diverse gaming experience across the board (a physical rulebook has nothing on limitless lines of code).

On the other hand if I don't want to be plugged in, I'll play a board game. One without an app.


Really? Is that really how you make the choice of what you're going to do on an evening? On if you want to be plugged in or not? Honestly?

For me, if I want to have social, face to face interactions with people, (and they're available) I'll play board games. If I want a more solitary or anonymous experience, I'll play video games.
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Brian C
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Deano2099 wrote:
Really? Is that really how you make the choice of what you're going to do on an evening? On if you want to be plugged in or not? Honestly?

Yep. If I want to play a game, the first question that enters my mind: do I feel like sitting in front of my PC, tossing on some headphones, and fragging some noobs? Or would I rather chill, nice and quiet like, maybe listen to the rain outside while playing a game of Robinson Crusoe.

It's either hardcore noob-a-geddon, or the gentle relaxation of board ga-meditation. Depends on the mood.
 
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David Hoffman
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The only question which needs to be answered in cases of app-enabled games is this: is the game fun?

If the app makes the game fun then it's a good thing. Some folks seem to get pissy over these apps; I don't get it. Did people used to complain about games coming with plastic bits instead of wooden ones? Did they complain about games coming with bound rules instead of stapled photocopies?

I don't get it. Tablets and smart-phones have certainly reached a saturation point in our world. If a designer can make a fun game with this "new" technology, where's the harm in that?
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Dean Love
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Exo Desta wrote:
Deano2099 wrote:
Really? Is that really how you make the choice of what you're going to do on an evening? On if you want to be plugged in or not? Honestly?

Yep. If I want to play a game, the first question that enters my mind: do I feel like sitting in front of my PC, tossing on some headphones, and fragging some noobs? Or would I rather chill, nice and quiet like, maybe listen to the rain outside while playing a game of Robinson Crusoe.

It's either hardcore noob-a-geddon, or the gentle relaxation of board ga-meditation. Depends on the mood.


If you just play solo that's fair enough.

(Although I'd far more easily relax to a nice game of Kentucky Route Zero over the spirit-crushing starvation and inevitable death of Robinson Crusoe but each to their own...)
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Chris J Davis
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Exo Desta wrote:
Deano2099 wrote:
Really? Is that really how you make the choice of what you're going to do on an evening? On if you want to be plugged in or not? Honestly?

Yep. If I want to play a game, the first question that enters my mind: do I feel like sitting in front of my PC, tossing on some headphones, and fragging some noobs? Or would I rather chill, nice and quiet like, maybe listen to the rain outside while playing a game of Robinson Crusoe.

It's either hardcore noob-a-geddon, or the gentle relaxation of board ga-meditation. Depends on the mood.


Playing an app-enabled board game is pretty much identical to playing a normal board game, and almost nothing like playing a video game.

I really wonder why so many people seem to associate playing an app-enabled board game with playing video games so strongly, despite it not being the case at all.
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Jan Tuijp
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ohbalto wrote:
Did people used to complain about games coming with plastic bits instead of wooden ones? Did they complain about games coming with bound rules instead of stapled photocopies?


They probably did.

 
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Brian C
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bleached_lizard wrote:
Playing an app-enabled board game is pretty much identical to playing a normal board game, and almost nothing like playing a video game.

I really wonder why so many people seem to associate playing an app-enabled board game with playing video games so strongly, despite it not being the case at all.

What's a good analogy..

Sometimes you're in the mood for something spicy. Sometimes, maybe you're not hungry, you just want something sweet.

But don't put peppers in my ice cream -- I'm never in the mood for both.
 
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Dean Love
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It's not peppers though. It's marshmallows that just happen to be played on a platform you most often associate with peppers.

I have a friend who primarily uses his tablet for DJing, I do wonder if he gets frustrated at all these app-required games bringing DJing into his board games....
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