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Subject: Straight line art, is there a name for that? rss

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Eric Pietrocupo
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Mark of The ninja and Invisible inc use a special kind of art mostly made of straigth lines, there is simply no curves (or almost). I thought that this kind of art could be easier to draw, and I want to give it a try. But I wonder if it has a specific naming, or if I could find tutorials about it. Searching on google for straight line art/drawing does not give me anything.

Here are some examples:



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George Monnat Jr
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I've seen a lot of that lately, but for some reason it seems retro to me sort of like communist propaganda of the 50's and 60's. I'm an engineer which is almost opposite of an artist, so I have no idea what it's called. I look forward to the answer.
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Richard Keiser

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Do some research on Clone Wars show... this might give you an idea of its origins and/or influences.
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George Monnat Jr
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darthhugo wrote:
Do some research on Clone Wars show... this might give you an idea of its origins and/or influences.


Clone Wars was my first thought, so I looked it up. It's not as straight line as I was thinking.



I was thinking of stuff like this:



The woman isn't all straight line, but the rest is.
 
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K S
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This isn't the "Clone Wars" you're looking for:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars:_The_Clone_Wars_(2008_TV_series)

This is:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars:_Clone_Wars_(2003_TV_series)
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John
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I'm not sure. It's presumably influenced by Cubism. Some pop art has this kind of feel too. It also has a graphic novel or comic type feel to it. Not sure how helpful this is. Whether it's easier to draw I don't know.
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Robin Gibson
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The reason it's hard to nail this down is because it's a very modern cartoon style, that's drawing from the TV cartoon styles from the 50s-70s, but not copying them.

It's popular because it's fairly easy to pull of, yeah.

Art Deco, Constructivism and Cubism are big inspirations behind this. I'd peruse this list.

It's a little bit more on the cartoony side, but Chris Hart's Cartoon Cool book might be a good jumping-off point. Or just watch a lot of Kim Possible.

OOH! The old Dick Tracy comics are basically this exact style. If you don't mind casual 40s racism, might be worth a gander.
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Tim Davidson
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Reading the thread title I thought you were asking about ligne claire, "clear lines". A influential cartoon style pioneered by Herge (Tintin) and deconstructed by Jean Giraud.

The examples you gave don't quite fit ligne claire because they lack the detail and flattened realism.

I suspect the minimal curves you are talking about is primarily influenced by computer vector art. Making several lines in Illustrator is faster if you don't need to curve much.
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Eric Pietrocupo
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Yes it's very cartoon style, Good to know if it's easier to draw. I will make some test by tracing manually object or people with straight lines and see what it does.

Vectorial art should be the right name, as it is made of vectors, but google associate it with vectorial software like Inkscape and Illustrator. So it's not related to straight lines.

Dick Tracy has a little amount of straight line, Kim POssible does not, in fact is seems the opposite, only curves. It does have some inspiration from retro comics.

Constructivism is very similar. Cubism has similarities, but is generally way much more abstract.

Thanks Again for the input.
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John "Omega" Williams
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Its a style that goes way back.

Sometimes its taken to nearly abstract levels. Sometimes its more natural.

Closest approximation of a term is Art Deco. But stuff like in the example images doesnt have a particular name.

Its not necessarily easier. It is ABSOLUTELY dependant on the artist. Some will find that style very hard to near impossible to replicate. others will be fine and the rest will be some degree of so-so to ununterested.

I know I can duplicate that style. But have little interest in doing so. I cant think of anyone else off the bat who can. But theres probably a few on DA.

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Tony Go
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definitely flat-shaded or cel-shaded

originally referred to as vector based art but many modern illustrators have been able to achieve a similar look using raster

I use the descriptor, 2D with heavy line work

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Tony Go
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By the way, the "propaganda" style artwork with angular bodies and heavy fonts originate from a Russian art collective known as TASS during the early 1900s. They developed the technique to lay art quickly and safely using multiple stencil sheets and spray paint.
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George Monnat Jr
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Horror Leader wrote:
By the way, the "propaganda" style artwork with angular bodies and heavy fonts originate from a Russian art collective known as TASS during the early 1900s. They developed the technique to lay art quickly and safely using multiple stencil sheets and spray paint.


Cool to know, thanks.
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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Horror Leader wrote:
definitely flat-shaded or cel-shaded

originally referred to as vector based art but many modern illustrators have been able to achieve a similar look using raster

I use the descriptor, 2D with heavy line work



The style is older than flash animation. It just tends to look more angular in flash sometimes and sometimes not.

Nelvana had a simmilar style way back in the 80s. Just not as full on angular.

It also shares some elements with the classic Hollywood caricature style.

Like alot of styles it comes into use and then drifts out again and then back once more as someone rediscovers or self invents it anew.
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Quote:
If you don't mind casual 40s racism, might be worth a gander.


Yeh, I have bunch of those... Not only a little bit of racism, lol...It hides more...surprises... Still, I did enjoy the narrative despite being repetitive and with not as much underneath as other authors by the time were providing, even if not loving so much the drawing, though have to admit that he got a solid style, good visual narrative at certain moments. Probably is just that I had already consumed all which I could find of my loved Will Eisner by the time, (totally different style,(and a genius control of light/shadows, film noir a bit toon)) is just that I relate both authors maybe for the theme of 'The Spirit' comics... some how). Luckily you had by the times, too, authors like Eisner or that rarity (politically opposite to Chester Gould's Dick Tracy), Al Capp with his great Lil'Abner, I totally loved his drawings in a similar way while I too dig Uderzo's and some of the latest (mentioned here) Giraud in what were his Blueberry series. Is that careful detailed and perfectionist drawing. Today I see a lot more push for the OP's mentioned style everywhere than things in these other lines... (my perception, though)

I think the OP mentioned style has been already been a bit overused specially in movies (Disney, etc) and illustration. At some point it was to different degrees embraced by most... I have never seen the need... I like it more when there's more variety in style. Still, I can see this style as very effective, and convenient for many board games. IMO would be a pity though if people keep seeing it as the best option... IMO, is just one of the many, every style depends on its execution, too. And surely not every theme would see the benefits.

I remember studying in Fine Arts that Russian political/heroic propaganda poster style. Is super sad how in just a bit less than 20 years one erases so much data from the brain...I only remembered what I just mentioned (not the name, exact years, etc). Luckily the visual info is what seems to stay for ever, at least...Is something.

I do believe this style has been used, in a different form and aesthetic in very old ads (even much before than that 50s - 60s wave), (as I think has been mentioned already).




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Santiago
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I wouldn't agree...I think... with it being made by straight lines. You find some, but most what you would think of a straight line (our mind does a lot of tricky things in the perception process) is just a very slight curve. Usually forcing sharp exaggerated peaks, aggressive angles. Also bases in a consistent stylizing of volumes, shapes, proportions, perspective (like in any style, you only have to care on its "language elements" and system to replicate it. No big deal.). I'd say cubism does a lot more than that and plays a lot more with 3D volumes in a conceptual way, still this style takes several elements of it, I'd agree with that. I'd say Art Deco is closer, but it had some organic variants, closer to very different curves(inspired in very different stuff), so I'd say is inspired in a part of Art Deco. IMO, it also takes the hard light/shadows contrast, the light used dramatically (although yep, not all instances of this style use lighting this way) as you would see in a lot of comics inspired by film noire (Eisner's Spirit(imo, one of the many who got heavily inspired by Eisner is Frank Miller) and several others (The Phantom(Falk & Moore), not film noire, but at times you can almost view it as shots from a movie of those times, same shots, even same aesthetics produced by the film tech of those times. IMO they were heavily inspired by films (surely adventure/war ones, mostly)). I just personally think that in general, it was very handy to go for hard lights and shadows, not only helps bazillions in getting a dramatic shot, telling a story, putting emphasis in a character personality, drive composition focus/reader's glance, etc... It also was one of the best things to do when what you were allowed to use is just black ink (ie, for a daily strip), the paper's white, and some pattern / dots to get some grays, often not used for speed's sake (so, more dramatic contrasts.)

PD: Not needed to say, but those two OP's examples are great illustrations.


 
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Eric Pietrocupo
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The "invisible inc" picture I posted above unfortunately does not give the game's art designer justice. So here is a picture of the title screen which is way much better:



I talked to my girl friend about it and she said that this company's artwork is always very special. We talked about Artdeco, but she said that there were an overuse of Pastel Turquoise, orange and yellow in that kind of art which is not the case in the picture above.

I finally took a look at the clone wars art, It is semi-streight, like a poster said before, there are curves but the edges are very spiky. While in the picture above, the only curves I can see is the special effects around the hands. In starwars, they eventually fill up the shapes with gradient shades while in the picture above, the shades are actually straight line shapes.
 
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Kevin D.
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I would call it polygonal.
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Eric Pietrocupo
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According to Wikipedia

Quote:
a polygon /ˈpɒlɪɡɒn/ is a plane figure that is bounded by a finite chain of straight line segments closing in a loop to form a closed chain or circuit.


Since it only implies straight lines, I think it would be the right way to name it: Polygonal Art.
 
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larienna wrote:
The "invisible inc" picture I posted above unfortunately does not give the game's art designer justice. So here is a picture of the title screen which is way much better:



I talked to my girl friend about it and she said that this company's artwork is always very special. We talked about Artdeco, but she said that there were an overuse of Pastel Turquoise, orange and yellow in that kind of art which is not the case in the picture above.

I finally took a look at the clone wars art, It is semi-streight, like a poster said before, there are curves but the edges are very spiky. While in the picture above, the only curves I can see is the special effects around the hands. In starwars, they eventually fill up the shapes with gradient shades while in the picture above, the shades are actually straight line shapes.


Actually, Art Deco can have influence in art only by its shapes aesthetics, (I've read a lot of times that this influence exists in many of the depictions of Gotham City, and the pallete there tends to be mostly a cold one, greys, cold browns, non saturated purple, etc. Still, I have not fully checked if there's really that influence) it does not need to affect also in color to declare there is some influence... imho. I'd say though, that in the formal aspect of things, maybe Art Deco had a tendency for simplification, and seems is not the case of this studio's style. I was indeed mostly speaking of the other Studio's sample (the man with a cup of wine), it seems. In this sample yep, I can see more straight lines. I can relate it more to a painting technique using planks of color to build (volume, light, etc). Yep, they might have been influenced by a recent (starting to be a bit old news, design moves way too fast, trends come and go so freakin' fast...) tendency of using polygons everywhere; "low pol" called in some occasions, which for me is even charming: It reminds me of a very long time in my life when I brought the food to the plate by 3D modeling in low polygon count (I call it the pixel art of 3D)... A lot of web designers have been using low pol backgrounds and stuff, there are even quite some resources for it... These planes here are quite polygonal shapes, these color planks, but imo is a -good- mix of two concepts. Painting by planes is something a lot of us do often while staring a painting, just like when you sketch and you start with general shapes, main flow lines, etc. There are several artistic trends that have used this painting-modeling as a final result aesthetic. But I sort of see as well that below all that there's modern american comic style maybe as well influenced with that other thing mentioned previously, the exaggerated shapes, proportions, extreme angled stuff and perspective that illustration and film animation has so much embraced lately, and that shows quite in pure state in the other studio example. And to me, that (to me, the comic style touch) is what defines it the most, more than the polygonal touch. Is refreshing though this twist over it. Again, just an opinion, like all above... I might be wrong in every bit.

Is a great style and amazing illustration. But... I would love it if people wouldn't start like reproducing other artists' styles... Is a bit poor... Would be much more interesting if each one paints differently. (and I would agree in that most every possible twist has been already invented, lol) I'm since long not personally that worried about style, but mostly other matters, though. I value a lot more someone just painting in their own mood and without much focusing on if they have a style or not, than seeing a lot of people doing mostly the same... Anyway, this mixtures are very refreshing. Not sure if has been done before extensively or not, but I like it.

PD: Actually, the second one in the original post, the one with the three people at the door, that one is quite much more Art Deco than anything in this thread. I keep seeing that I was mostly talking about the first picture(man with a beard) in my initial comments. Indeed, they are very different styles, those two. Even more, that of the door is made with quite a different style than this last one above, also.



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Eric Pietrocupo
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Thanks for your comments. Low poly art in google does seems to yield similar results. Still from what I see, I think there could be a software filter to generate low poly art from a picture.
 
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Tim Davidson
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larienna wrote:
Thanks for your comments. Low poly art in google does seems to yield similar results. Still from what I see, I think there could be a software filter to generate low poly art from a picture.
"Low poly" refers to 3d graphics. A low polygon model is made from a minimal number of 3-point flat triangles. Think N64 or mobile 3d games (although mobile now does higher poly). Photoshop has a couple ways of creating something like this in 2D using meshes and filters.

The examples you gave were created in vector, a completely different method.
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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As said. It has no term other than what someone arbitrarily slaps on it.

Art Decco
Caricature
Nelvana (They were one of the first to use that style extensively and the Clone Wars cartoons are stated to be paying homage to the older Nelvana series.)
 
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John James
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The basis for drawing objects is to break them down to simple shapes. You can do this with just circle, triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix. The less you hide it the more stylized it is. Nothing special about it.
 
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Eric Pietrocupo
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I am currently giving it a try by tracing shape around a picture and filling up colors. I was to see how hard/easy it is, how much time it takes and how it looks. I'll post the picture once finished.
 
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