$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 81.39

5,443 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
34.3% of Goal | 27 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
102 
 Thumb up
 Hide
35 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Evolution: Climate» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Mina's Not-So-Mini Review - A Perfect Evolution rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
Mina's Not-So-Mini Review - A Perfect Evolution
Climate - A Standalone Game




The Overview


In Evolution and Evolution Climate, you will control a variety of species you will endow with traits to adapt to the ever-changing environment.

The game is set up by placing the climate marker on the "temperate" space on the climate track, shuffling the cold and hot climate cards and drawing one of each to place on its appropriate spot on the climate track. You will then shuffle the trait deck and split it in half if playing with only 2 players. Only half of the deck is used when playing with 2.




This board is an addition in the Climate version of the game


The goal of the game is to have your species eat as much food as possible and to have the most remaining population when the game ends.

Each turn, you will draw 4 cards plus 1 card for each species you currently control. Each player then must select one card in hand to secretly add to the "watering hole." Because each card features a different food value and may or may not feature climate symbols (suns or snowflakes), each card will determine the amount of plant food that will be available during the feeding phase and may cause the climate marker to shift to a new position on the climate track.



After this, you will play cards. With the cards in your hand, you may:
a) discard a card to start a new species,
b) discard a card to increase the body size or population of one of your species, and/or
c) play a card on one of your species as a trait (initially face down until all players have played cards) for a maximum of 3 traits in a 2-player game and a maximum of 4 traits in games with more players.


Some new, climate-related traits


Once you have played cards, you may discard X cards to the bottom of the trait deck to draw X cards (*this is new in Climate).

Then, the trait cards played to the watering hole are revealed and the environment changes. The climate marker moves to a new climate and the event card in that region resolves. Even cards include things like Wildfires (-1 population to species without the burrowing trait), volcanic eruptions (shift the climate marker between hot and cold after feeding), and heat waves in cold climates and cold snaps in hot climates. After this, your species may lose population based on where the climate marker ends up. Each climate shows a body size and a number of sun or snowflake symbols. Each of your species with a body size in the shown range will lose a number of population equivalent to the number of suns/snowflakes. Now, you will add or remove plant food from the watering hole based on the cards there AND based on the climate. Hot climates add to the amount of available plant food, while hot climates remove plant food.


Cold climate cards


Hot climate cards




Now you will feed your species in turn order. When it is your turn, you will take one plant food from the watering hole for each population, modified by any traits you may have, until all players have fed all their species or until the food supply runs out. If you are unable to provide food equivalent to the population level of a particular species, that species' population will fall to the level that was fed.

The above feeding rules apply to herbivorous/omnivorous species you control. Carnivorous species are only allowed to eat the flesh of other species. They do so by attacking species with a smaller body size, whether your own or other players', thus reducing the population levels of these species by one for each successful attack/feeding.

The game ends when the deck of trait cards is exhausted and the player with the most food in his belly and the greatest remaining population wins!



The Review


Played prior to review 7x






1. The most beautiful artwork ever!
Yes, in my eyes, Evolution in all its incarnations features the most breathtakingly beautiful artwork in any game. I adore nature imagery and the color palate used. The elegance of the artwork perfectly complements the elegance of the game.

2. Card game that tells stories
I cannot overemphasize the beauty of the stories this game tells. Perhaps Ignacy should pick this up to publish in Polish because Evolution tells stories like no other Euro game...except perhaps Robinson Crusoe . And Climate only adds to this sense.

Evolution itself weaves intricate stories of adaptation and survival. To me, Evolution perfectly captures the struggle for survival and the need to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Depending on the availability of various sources of food and the adaptations of other species, herbivores may become carnivores, carnivores may become herbivores, and new species may be created or existing ones may die off throughout the course of the game. Keeping a close watch over the environment (i.e. other players' actions) is key to being successful in this game. And as more and more species are created and plant food becomes more and more scarce, adaptations change in value. For example, fecundity (which allows a player to grow the population of the fecund species if there is plant food in the watering hole prior to new plant food being added for the round) may be a very viable way of increasing population early in the game, but will likely become worthless as time goes on. As such, Evolution feels incredibly thematic. The natural rhythm of the game (i.e. the changing landscape) and the nature of the interaction it engenders between players surely contribute to this. I constantly feel like I have to watch my back and try to predict what my opponent is up to in order to a) protect myself and b) make sure I get as much food as I possibly can.

Each of the specific traits is also well connected to what it would allow an animal to do in the natural environment. Of course, Fat Tissue would allow you to store food from one round to another, allowing you to survive in rounds when food is less abundant. Of course, Intelligence would allow you to circumvent your prey's defenses or allow you to find ways of obtaining extra food from other sources. And when it comes to Climate, of course something like Heavy Fur would help your species stay alive in colder climates and hurt you when heat waves arrive.

Climate adds to the general sense of theme in the game by creating an even more richly detailed and realistic environment for species to navigate. Not only do your species have to adapt to food shortages, but they now also have to adapt to climatic shifts, which were a significant driver of the evolution of certain traits. And events provide explanations for these shifts with volcanoes, meteors, and wildfires, among other things.

One of the things I most enjoy about Evolution and Evolution Climate are the stories of the species that evolved and adapted and survived. And Climate weaves an even more richly detailed and intricate story than base Evolution.

3. Simple rules for a very interesting and deep experience
Evolution features simple rules that veil incredibly deep and rich gameplay. It is a card game and it certainly isn't the heaviest game ever, but it becomes quite demanding as players create multiple species with multiple interactions. Indeed, the interactions between species on my tableau are one of the key points of interest in the game for me. Traits like cooperation (which helps adjacent species work together), warning call (which protect adjacent species in a player's tableau from predators), and scavenger (takes 1 meat whenever a carnivore successfully attacks) demonstrate some of the synergies that can develop between species in your tableau.

Climate adds very few rules to the basic game (adding a new phase at which the effects of climate are evaluated), but increases the number of decision points significantly, as you will need to consider your population size, traits, and food card you add to the food bank not only based on other players' species and actions but also based on the climate.

3. Numerous tension-filled decision points generated by multi-use cards and player interaction. Climate amplifies this
There is an endless stream of decision points in the game that all feed into creating a rich and deep experience. Do you limit or flood the watering hole with plant food? Limiting the availability of plant food might be good for you if you're first player and/or have lots of carnivores and/or have lots of long necked foragers hanging around. But limiting it too far might just bite you in the butt. Discarding a card to start a new species or increase population levels might get you more cards and/or food, but it also might leave you vulnerable to carnivores. And it might not help you at all if there isn't enough plant food in the watering hole! Protecting yourself with traits like Hard Shell or Horns or Warning Call might help protect you from other carnivores, but it also reduces the number of trait slots you have, limiting your ability to gain additional food through other traits like Foraging or Long Neck. Discarding a card to increase body size might help protect you from carnivores…but it might not. And when feeding time comes around, there's always the question of the order in which to feed your species. It might be wise to hit up the watering hole before you start attacking with carnivores in order to try to limit your opponent's access to food. But it might be wiser to feed your foragers first to deplete the watering hole because they take two food at once instead of just one.

The fact that each and every one of your cards can be used to assign food to the watering hole, to add traits to your species, to start new species, and to increase the population and body size of existing species means that you will never be short of things to think about. And Climate only increases the number of decision points over the base game by increasing the number of functions your trait cards have and increasing the number of changes your species have to adapt to. Not only is your opponent your rival for food, but he is also a potential source of climatic shifts. As such, you have to keep in mind not only the nature of his adaptations with respect to food gathering (i.e. if he's evolving carnivores that could threaten your species or traits that allow him to circumvent the watering hole), but you also have to keep a close watch over his climatic adaptations that could give you a clue about his plans for the environment.

In addition to increasing the need to pay attention to your opponent's actions to predict the weather shifts, Climate adds new reasons to grow your species beyond simply the threat of carnivores. Because species of different sizes are vulnerable in different environments, you will have to constantly ensure you are able to respond to everything that comes your way by saving traits in your hand and possibly increasing your species' body size. Smaller species will die out more quickly in cold climates while larger ones will die out more quickly in hot climates and you have to use this knowledge to your advantage, both to try to decimate your opponent's populations and to protect your own using the cards you play to the watering hole and the adaptive traits you add to your species.

4. Every game plays out completely differently
There are 17 unique traits you can add to your species in the base game of Evolution and the order in which you gain these and the relative distribution of the traits you gain will affect the path you choose to take in any given game. Climate adds 6 new traits and modifies existing traits to add new climate-related capabilities. New traits include Cooling Frills, which prevent 3 population loss due to heat and work to increase your body size by 2 when determining whether your species can be attacked. As for modified traits, Burrowing, for example, has been modified to prevent 1 population due to heat or cold in addition to its original function.

Although trait cards can be used for multiple different purposes, their trait functions are central to the game and creating synergies between the traits you acquire is what the game is all about, as species without adaptive traits cannot thrive in any environment. So game-to-game differences in the traits you draw at various times during the game will define the way any given game plays out. Many carnivore cards may encourage you to hoard cards that will allow you to circumvent your opponent's defenses and to grow your animals in size. Synergistic herbivore cards may lead you to try to develop cooperative herbivores with protective traits to keep them safe. Whatever the case, the ecosystem will differ in each game and these differences will be highly influenced by the distribution of trait cards in the game.

Climate also adds to the game-to-game differences by giving players the ability to modify the climatic environment in the game. One game may be very cold with a low availability of plant food, encouraging nocturnal cooperative long necks and carnivores to develop, while another may be quite warm with a high availability of plant food, encouraging larger herbivorous populations. Climate-adaptive traits will also change in value in each game depending on the climate events and the relative warmth of the environment. If it's hot, Cooling Frills will be everywhere and if it's cold, you might want to develop some Heavy Fur...but perhaps not if you see a volcano or a heat wave event!

Ultimately, the order and distribution of the traits players draw and choose to play and the nature of the climatic changes and events will completely change the story that unfolds in each and every game.

5. Rather strategic with two
Evolution is a strategic game with only two players. And because it is full of interaction and requires that you keep a close eye on other players, I wouldn't want to play it with more than 2. I think additional players would just add time and chaos to the game. I have enough trouble trying to out-think Peter and trying to keep track of all his species. If there were more people around the table with species that have even more traits than we are allowed to bestow upon ours in a 2-player game, I would just get frustrated with all the craziness that would unfold. So Evolution is a perfect 2-player game for me.

Climate does not change this because when I'm playing with one other person, I have more confidence over my ability to predict and manipulate not only the food, but also the climatic environment. Of course, I can never be certain that the cards I play will have the exact effect I desire, but I can have more of an influence over the climate and preparing for events and climatic shifts than I would be with more players. Some people may prefer the chaos that would ensue with more players, but for me, the game contains the perfect amount of control with two.

6. Climate introduces a couple of rules that reduce the randomness in the game at any player count
Climate adds a couple of important rules to the base game of Evolution that could easily be implemented in the base game as well to reduce the randomness inherent in games that rely on drawing cards.

First, you draw 1 more trait card each turn. Second, you are allowed to discard any number of trait cards from your hand at the end of each of your turns. This means gives you a lot more control over the types of traits that you add to your animals, particularly after the first round. This also allows you to make longer term strategic plans, holding cards for later points in the game if you foresee the environment shifting in a certain direction.

7. You can use Evolution Climate to play the base game without climate-related events or the base game with the Climate expansion
Evolution Climate is both a standalone version of Evolution that integrates a new expansion-like concept into the base game AND it is the base game of Evolution. This version of the game allows you to play the basic version of Evolution by removing climate-related traits, events, and the climate board. So two games in one!



Final Word


Evolution Climate is Evolution perfected. If you have ever had an interest in Evolution and enjoy a deeper, more challenging game, Climate is the one to get! For me, it is perfect thematically and incredibly satisfying as it forces me to think in ways that no other game does. And it allows me to create a happy menagerie of species that I have evolved to persevere through a variety of events and circumstances. At the end of each game, I feel like I have accomplished something huge and important. And I have! I have created species that thrive and survive!

If you have any interest in evolutionary biology, animals, grand stories, or simply love beautiful, elegant, highly interactive card games, I would urge you to check out Evolution Climate! I'm going to have to adapt one of my shelves to keep Evolution Climate at the front and center of it forever!


MINA'S LOVE METER heart heart heart heart heart ALL LOVE ALL THE TIME








***


Mina's Love Meter


angry Burn it! - I dislike this game so much that it makes me angry. (I rate these 4 or less on the BGG scale)
Dislike - I don't like this game, but I can see why others like it.
(5 on BGG scale)
heart Some like - I find this game somewhat appealing, but it doesn't really grab me. I am glad to have had the opportunity to try this game, but it is unlikely to stay in my collection for very long.
(5.5 to 6.5) on BGG scale)
heart heart Like - I like this game and appreciate the design. I am happy to play this game occasionally when the mood strikes and enjoy doing so.
(7 to 7.5 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart Some love - I love this game. It's not perfect, but it really appeals to me and I will play it frequently.
(7.5 to 8 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart heart Lots of love - I really love this game. The design really speaks to me. I want to play it most of the time.
(8 to 9 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart heart heart All love all the time - I ADORE this game and can see myself playing it many times and for many years. I would go to sleep clutching it in my arms and want to play it all day every day...only not literally because that would be insane.
(9 to 10 on BGG scale)



To see my other reviews, visit this geeklist.


77 
 Thumb up
5.40
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Eldard
United States
Burke
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
An outstanding review, Mina! Thank you for taking the time and care to cover the game so well.
8 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
Eldard wrote:
An outstanding review, Mina! Thank you for taking the time and care to cover the game so well.


Thanks Bill!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
keith romstad
United States
Colorado Springs
Colorado
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review! I love evolution and climate I think will only add to my love. My only question is how do you have this already???
4 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dirk Meijlof
Netherlands
Utrecht
Utrecht
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the great review. Glad to read backing the Kickstarter was a good choice Now I just have to wait for Spiel to be able pick it up.
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francois L-C
Canada
Near Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Mina you are killing me!!!

Can't wait to get my KS copie... every time I read a review it remember me that I have to wait for another month (and maybe a bit more) to get my copy and enjoy it myself. And now I've read again your review and, again, I want E:C now!

Thanks for this great review, as always really well written and always spot on pros and cons (even though this game have no cons in your review). If you have to find one cons thought, what would it be (I always like to see all aspects of the game, even negatives one on game I love).

Thanks again Mina! Keep up the good work!
6 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
Cerberus777 wrote:
Mina you are killing me!!!

Can't wait to get my KS copie... every time I read a review it remember me that I have to wait for another month (and maybe a bit more) to get my copy and enjoy it myself. And now I've read again your review and, again, I want E:C now!

Thanks for this great review, as always really well written and always spot on pros and cons (even though this game have no cons in your review). If you have to find one cons thought, what would it be (I always like to see all aspects of the game, even negatives one on game I love).

Thanks again Mina! Keep up the good work!


Thank you!

I personally don't have any cons. However, I think the meanness of the game may be off-putting for some people. If you aren't ready and going in for a fight, you might be surprised or unhappy at how the game unfolds.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jens Alfke
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for writing! I'm eagerly awaiting the arrival of my Kickstarter copy of the game, and I've recently started reading and enjoying your reviews, so it was good to hear your take.

I've played the base Evolution several times now with 3-5 people and enjoyed it a lot; but I admit I'm not a very strategic player and I don't keep close track of everything other people are doing with their species. I hadn't considered it as a 2-player game, but I'm glad to hear it works well that way.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Pilkus
United States
South Riding
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Mina,

I found this review because of the ad banner...very nice! You're all professional now...keep the Love Meter Alive!

Cheers,
Joe
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Level 3 Tunt
United States
flag msg tools
mb
Well crud...I wish I hadn't just finally bought Evolution since I'm not likely to buy two versions of the same game (those days are in the past). Maybe if we like the base game we can make our own climate board out of macaroni and paint and draw the cards on dried leaves. Elementary school art game!

Thanks for the review!
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francois L-C
Canada
Near Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
@Rococo_Zephyr: You don't have to buy the Standalone game if you already have Evolution 2nd Edition, you can just buy the Expansion (what they call the conversion kit) at a lower price, just to get what you already have.
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Level 3 Tunt
United States
flag msg tools
mb
Cerberus777 wrote:
@Rococo_Zephyr: You don't have to buy the Standalone game if you already have Evolution 2nd Edition, you can just buy the Expansion (what they call the conversion kit) at a lower price, just to get what you already have.


Only if it's $5. That's the difference in price on the NorthStar site between the version I have and Climate. I know it actually costs $30 but I'm not so jealous of the extra features that I need to pay that much for 100 cards. We should probably actually play the game first before I spend $5 or $30 more on it.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
snej wrote:
Thanks for writing! I'm eagerly awaiting the arrival of my Kickstarter copy of the game, and I've recently started reading and enjoying your reviews, so it was good to hear your take.

I've played the base Evolution several times now with 3-5 people and enjoyed it a lot; but I admit I'm not a very strategic player and I don't keep close track of everything other people are doing with their species. I hadn't considered it as a 2-player game, but I'm glad to hear it works well that way.


Thanks for reading! I love it with two!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
The Professor wrote:
Mina,

I found this review because of the ad banner...very nice! You're all professional now...keep the Love Meter Alive!

Cheers,
Joe


Love meter forever! Thanks for the comment!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
Rococo_Zephyr wrote:
Well crud...I wish I hadn't just finally bought Evolution since I'm not likely to buy two versions of the same game (those days are in the past). Maybe if we like the base game we can make our own climate board out of macaroni and paint and draw the cards on dried leaves. Elementary school art game!

Thanks for the review!


Thanks for reading! And yea, as Francois said, you can just buy the upgrade kit. I think it will be relatively cheap. It was cheap to get on the Kickstarter.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Rudolph
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
If I don't own either game, which would be the way to go? Get Evolution version 2.0 or wait for Evolution Climate? Does the climate portion make it that much better?
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ariel
Chile
Viña del Mar
V. Región
flag msg tools
If a game needs it, I feel forced to create and implement some variants.
mbmbmbmbmb
Putzmanrudy1 wrote:
If I don't own either game, which would be the way to go? Get Evolution version 2.0 or wait for Evolution Climate? Does the climate portion make it that much better?

You CAN'T have a Climate experience with the 2.0 edition only but you CAN have a basic Evolution experience with the Climate Edition, so it would be better wait for it (and buy an extra regular base set of cards for good ).
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David
United States
DURHAM
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I am in the same position and I am waiting for Climate (I actively sought out if you could buy it yet, but not till October it seems). Partly due to this review.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Rudolph
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I understand that I can't have a climate experience with the original game. I was just wondering if the climate difference is worth the wait.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ariel
Chile
Viña del Mar
V. Región
flag msg tools
If a game needs it, I feel forced to create and implement some variants.
mbmbmbmbmb
Putzmanrudy1 wrote:
I understand that I can't have a climate experience with the original game. I was just wondering if the climate difference is worth the wait.

Yes, the Climate thematic/mechanic addition is awesome. Think that many people will not play without it anymore, probably because brings a must have variable to the game. So, unless you prefer to have a base box first and add expanions latter (including this one) wait for it. It's a very well designed stand-alone version.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Anthony Fiorino
msg tools
Great review! I'm looking forward to this game and I'm encouraged that you find it enjoyable for just two players, since I most frequently play games just me and my wife. I do have a couple questions about the two player experience as it relates to the base Evolution game.

I had heard mixed opinions on how well the two player game worked in the base Evolution game. Did you ever play that game (base Evolution) with just two players? If so, how did Climate's two-player experience compare for you?

I know the two-player mode rule differences between the games (the most notable, I think, being the 3 trait limit in Climate vs. the 2 trait limit in Evolution), but I'm interested to hear about how different you think the games feel from one another as two player experiences. Basically, I'm interested to know if you were someone who liked the base game with two players or not so I can gauge if Climate's changes improved the experience for that player count.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francois L-C
Canada
Near Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
a4rino wrote:
Great review! I'm looking forward to this game and I'm encouraged that you find it enjoyable for just two players, since I most frequently play games just me and my wife. I do have a couple questions about the two player experience as it relates to the base Evolution game.

I had heard mixed opinions on how well the two player game worked in the base Evolution game. Did you ever play that game (base Evolution) with just two players? If so, how did Climate's two-player experience compare for you?

I know the two-player mode rule differences between the games (the most notable, I think, being the 3 trait limit in Climate vs. the 2 trait limit in Evolution), but I'm interested to hear about how different you think the games feel from one another as two player experiences. Basically, I'm interested to know if you were someone who liked the base game with two players or not so I can gauge if Climate's changes improved the experience for that player count.


I cannot speak for Mina (and I'm also interested in her view of the 2-player game differences) but from her game rating page, base Evolution is a 8 (According to BGG ratings = "Very good. Like to play, will probably suggest it, will never turn it down") and Evolution: Climate is a 10 (According to BGG ratings = "Outstanding. Always want to play, expect this will never change.").
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
Chango wrote:
Putzmanrudy1 wrote:
I understand that I can't have a climate experience with the original game. I was just wondering if the climate difference is worth the wait.

Yes, the Climate thematic/mechanic addition is awesome. Think that many people will not play without it anymore, probably because brings a must have variable to the game. So, unless you prefer to have a base box first and add expanions latter (including this one) wait for it. It's a very well designed stand-alone version.


Thanks for this, Ariel! I agree!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
mbmbmbmbmb
a4rino wrote:
Great review! I'm looking forward to this game and I'm encouraged that you find it enjoyable for just two players, since I most frequently play games just me and my wife. I do have a couple questions about the two player experience as it relates to the base Evolution game.

I had heard mixed opinions on how well the two player game worked in the base Evolution game. Did you ever play that game (base Evolution) with just two players? If so, how did Climate's two-player experience compare for you?

I know the two-player mode rule differences between the games (the most notable, I think, being the 3 trait limit in Climate vs. the 2 trait limit in Evolution), but I'm interested to hear about how different you think the games feel from one another as two player experiences. Basically, I'm interested to know if you were someone who liked the base game with two players or not so I can gauge if Climate's changes improved the experience for that player count.


Thanks Anthony!

I loved the base game of Evolution with 2 players as well, but Climate adds so much more to think about that I don't think I could ever go back to playing with the base game alone. With the base game, you only fear your opponent turning into a carnivore. With Climate, you also have to think about what your opponent is doing to adapt his species to upcoming environments in order to figure out how to adapt your own. Also, Peter did not enjoy the base game of Evolution and he LOVES Climate, so there you go. I hope that helps.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Anthony Fiorino
msg tools
milenaguberinic wrote:
Thanks Anthony!

I loved the base game of Evolution with 2 players as well, but Climate adds so much more to think about that I don't think I could ever go back to playing with the base game alone. With the base game, you only fear your opponent turning into a carnivore. With Climate, you also have to think about what your opponent is doing to adapt his species to upcoming environments in order to figure out how to adapt your own. Also, Peter did not enjoy the base game of Evolution and he LOVES Climate, so there you go. I hope that helps.

That helps a lot, actually! I haven't played either game, but I can see how interaction in base Evolution could occur mostly through developing your own carnivores and/or protecting against your opponent's. In Climate, I suppose even herbivores need to worry about what the other herbivores are doing because, based on body size and traits for your opponent's species, it might be advantageous for you to swing the climate a certain way. I think I will pass on the base game and pick up Climate once it releases. Thanks!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.