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Bios: Genesis» Forums » Rules

Subject: Parasites and HGT rss

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Jakub Ukrop
Slovakia
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HGT enables your Biont to "move from one Microorganism to another Microorganism"[E2]. This includes parasites. There are 3 biont spaces on each parasite card (one colored, 2 white).

Now imagine that blue player uses HGT to move 1 blue biont into a yellow parasite (with 1 yellow biont already present).
Later, yellow decides to leave his own parasite via HGT (can he do that?), leaving a yellow parasite card with a single blue biont.

Now the question is, who controls the parasite?
Yellow player is "de iure" owner (per E3.Ownership: "the card color and moniker identifies that the Parasite is always yours and under your control").
However, it is an illusory "control", as all the decisions (i.e. purchases, attacks) are done per biont - by the blue player.
 
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Matt Watkins
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You are finding all the edge cases

1) I pretty sure there are only 2 biont spots on a parasite card. The colored one in the middle is just to mark the color of the card and not intended as a space to put bionts. (I could be wrong, but I don't think so.)

2) I'd say that the Commandeering rule in E6 takes precedence. It seems to say pretty clearly that a parasite would revert to the ownership of the other color. I believe the rule you quoted from E3 is meant to make the distinction that a parasite in another player's tableau is not under their control. But a parasite with only one biont would have to be controlled by the color of that biont.

3) Remember too that in order to move into the parasite in the first place, blue would have to have HGT and (unless they had yellow's permission) more wantonness than yellow. Likewise, for yellow to move out, yellow would have to have HGT as well. (More interesting would be the situation where blue commandeers a parasite on its own microorganism by HGT-ing in and then red queening the parasite's owner's biont out; a hostile commandeer.)
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Dom B.
France
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I concur with Matt: per E6, the parasite would be under player blue's control.
The sentence in E3 could be changed to "[..] that the Parasite is always yours and under your control as long as at least one of your Bionts remain on it."
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Jakub Ukrop
Slovakia
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Yes, I see it now, E6 makes it clear.

Some notes about number of biont spaces on a parasite card
(which I don't think really matter that much anyway )
- seeing a photo of parasite in Matt's session report, I naturally thought there were 2 spaces
- then I looked at the card and reasoned, that there are 2 colored squares to put cubes on, in the same way there is one colored circle to put biont on (+2 neutral circles for foreign genes)
- one more realisation: the rules never mention there is a limit of bionts per parasite(?) - only artwork seems to suggest so
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Rich James
United States
Plano
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Rule E3 isn't worded strongly enough to give a definitive answer, but it does say that when you attach your parasite you can assign one or two of your bionts on it. That doesn't rule out a later HGT though.
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Phil Eklund
Germany
Karlsruhe
Baden Würtenberg
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Dom22 wrote:
I concur with Matt: per E6, the parasite would be under player blue's control.
The sentence in E3 could be changed to "[..] that the Parasite is always yours and under your control as long as at least one of your Bionts remain on it."

I have changed E3 in the living rules to be worded as Dom suggests. This allows a player's parasite to be commandeered in rare instances.


As an aside, this ruling further erodes player identity. I originally designed a player's parasite card as a flag so that others could see what color he was. It still serves this purpose, but since this card migrates all over it a player's color may still not be obvious, and there is even a possibility that a player could get confused on what his own color is. Losing control of your parasite further diminishes the importance of your starting color.
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