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Subject: Scientists: Proxima Centauri may have a habitable planet rss

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J.D. Hall
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Mr. Spock wrote:
Fascinating


http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/24/health/proxima-b-centauri-rock...

Amazing, in a way, if this is true. An earth-habitable planet orbiting the nearest solar system to our own. I can't do the math, but I would guess you could win the lottery 10 times before you find the odds of a habitable world that close to ours.
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Londo!
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Moshe Callen
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No, the results only say it might be habitable.
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Isaac Citrom
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It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
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Christopher Yaure
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remorseless1 wrote:
Mr. Spock wrote:
Fascinating


http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/24/health/proxima-b-centauri-rock...

Amazing, in a way, if this is true. An earth-habitable planet orbiting the nearest solar system to our own. I can't do the math, but I would guess you could win the lottery 10 times before you find the odds of a habitable world that close to ours.


I'm not sure why you think the odds are so long. In any event, they did not determine this is a habitable planet, only that it is in the Goldilocks zone, which means the temperature may be where water is a liquid.
 
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Sam I am
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Kolob? or is that where the Annunaki come from?
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Eric "Shippy McShipperson" Mowrer
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isaacc wrote:

It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
.


I have it on good authority that we can get there in about 80,000 years, you pessimist, you.
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Christopher Yaure
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isaacc wrote:

It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
.


Really? You think the speed of light is the issue here? If we could approximate the speed of light, the journey would take 4.25 years, compared to the almost 3 years of the Magellan-Elcano circumnavigation of the globe in 1519-1522.

The real problem is developing an engineering solution to traveling 25 trillion miles. There are a number of possible solutions - one involves light sails, a 100-gigawatt light beam, and 1,000 ultra-lightweight nanocraft that would be accelerated to 20% of the speed of light. Travel time would be 20 years.

http://earthsky.org/space/alpha-centauri-travel-time





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Isaac Citrom
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actuaryesquire wrote:
isaacc wrote:

It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
.


Really? You think the speed of light is the issue here? If we could approximate the speed of light, the journey would take 4.25 years, compared to the almost 3 years of the Magellan-Elcano circumnavigation of the globe in 1519-1522.

The real problem is developing an engineering solution to traveling 25 trillion miles. There are a number of possible solutions - one involves light sails, a 100-gigawatt light beam, and 1,000 ultra-lightweight nanocraft that would be accelerated to 20% of the speed of light. Travel time would be 20 years.

http://earthsky.org/space/alpha-centauri-travel-time


I see what you're saying but your analogy is flawed. Getting to alpha-centauri is not like circumnavigating the globe. It's like going from France to England. I'm thinking also of the exoplanets that are 10, 25, 100 and 1000 light years away, and for people to go there in a reasonable amount of time.
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J.D. Hall
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isaacc wrote:

It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
.

Dude, you're harshing my buzz.

We can argue the parameters of habitable. True, it might not be habitable for oxygen breathers such as ourselves, but something might be alive up there. Hell, I got excited when someone suggested there might be microscopic life living under the frozen shell of one of Jupiter's (or Saturn's) moons. Jesus Christ, does anyone else understand how monumental it would be to discover any type of life on another planet or moon?

You people are depressing sometimes.
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Send down a scanner and look for biological, duh.

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You know that this will breathe new life into hard science fiction. I'm looking forward.
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J.D. Hall
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Something has to. Current sci fi sucks donkey balls.
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remorseless1 wrote:
Something has to. Current sci fi sucks donkey balls.

Sure does. I think it has to do with a loss of the driving optimism of the genre, the attitude that just as science and technology have created problems they can be used to fix them. I've a huge collection of Golden Age and other classic science fiction. It dwarfs my games collection.
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J.D. Hall
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Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, etc. Yeah, I haven't bought a new writer's efforts in 20 years. I think Joe Haldeman is the newest author I read, and hell, that's 20 years old at least.
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Jon Badolato
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isaacc wrote:

It might as well be a million light years away. Unless physicists discover some new aspect of reality that will allow us to get from A to B effectively faster than the speed of causality (speed of light), we're stuck here.
.


Where's Zephraim Cochran when you need him ?
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Erik Henry
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From the article I read:

Quote:
And while 4.25 light-years might seem like an impossibly vast distance, that's practically next door in the eyes of astronomers who are used to thinking on a cosmic scale.

"You can get to a tenth of the speed of light with present technology," Guinan [an astronomer at Villanova University] notes, pointing out that a trip to this planet would take less than half a century.

"And that's not bad," he says. "That's feasible."


This planet just outside our solar system is 'potentially habitable'


(The "just outside our solar system" in the title is a little inaccurate, though)
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remorseless1 wrote:
Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, etc. Yeah, I haven't bought a new writer's efforts in 20 years. I think Joe Haldeman is the newest author I read, and hell, that's 20 years old at least.

Stephen Baxter had some really good stuff at first back in the 90's. Then he hit and slump and now he's hit and miss.

Still though For later SF I like H. Beam Piper, Frank Herbert*, Gordon R. Dickson, etc.

*I loved Dune but wasn't thrilled about the rest of the series when I read it years ago. I wonder now if it was a case of the first being so good that any sequels would be a let-down no matter how good and so wondering if I should go back to them. Still his non-Dune stuff is amazing The Santaroga Barrier and The Dosadi Experiment are my favorites. Still I see them as developing idea which were present in Dune. I think The Green Brain probably veers away from it the most but no question that Dune brought together his best ideas into a magnum opus.
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J.D. Hall
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I consider Herbert, Dickson and the like to be more of the Golden Agers.

But yes indeedy! Dune was beyond science fiction -- it was great literature. The rest of the series? I got the feeling he was just doing it for the money. Hard to blame him, but still. I liked Dosadi as well. And what was that series he had about the multi-generational ship where the computer literally became God? Great one. Been a long, long time since I've had time to read them.
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Moshe Callen
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remorseless1 wrote:
…And what was that series he had about the multi-generational ship where the computer literally became God?…

It was a single novel not divided into chapters, Destination:Void. I have it. It wasn't one I got through but maybe I wasn't in the right mood for it.
 
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Tom McVey
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whac3 wrote:
You know that this will breathe new life into hard science fiction. I'm looking forward.


Don't know why you're so sanguine - they'll send us a sophon to muck up our particle physics experiments.
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remorseless1 wrote:
Something has to. Current sci fi sucks donkey balls.


(The Late) Iain Banks for space opera, Cixin Liu (especially considering the OP), Charlie Stross (Saturn's Children and Neptune's Brood) come to mind.
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tmcvey wrote:
whac3 wrote:
You know that this will breathe new life into hard science fiction. I'm looking forward.


Don't know why you're so sanguine - they'll send us a sophon to muck up our particle physics experiments.

The only definition of sophon I know is someone who loves fruit. What do you mean here?
 
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whac3 wrote:
tmcvey wrote:
whac3 wrote:
You know that this will breathe new life into hard science fiction. I'm looking forward.


Don't know why you're so sanguine - they'll send us a sophon to muck up our particle physics experiments.

The only definition of sophon I know is someone who loves fruit. What do you mean here?


Read the "The Three Body Problem".
 
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