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Star Wars: X-Wing Miniatures Game» Forums » General

Subject: X wing in the classroom??? rss

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Chris Plumlee
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My son and I have just gotten into x-wing, and what a great game. We have already bought a couple of expansions.

I am part of a home school co-op in which parents teach classes to kids every Friday. They are always looking for fun unique classes.

I was thinking about coming up with a class for X-wing. It would be 8-10 weeks. Every kid would be required to buy their own core set.

Question??

How well do you guys think this would work? class size would be 12 kids.

I was thinking that I could have 6 games going on at one time. I would start with a basic game, then add advanced rules, then get into squad building with each kid having access to 4 tie fighters and the opponent having two x-wings.

I could encourage them to buy their own expansions if they chose to.


Any ideas or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Plumbob
 
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JH
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Not sure how well it would work, but core sets are super cheap ($19.99 original, $15.66 TFA) on CoolStuffInc right now if you can get people to sign on quickly.

I've had the thought that building lists might make good math and logic practice for my kids eventually.
 
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Robb Minneman
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Jackasses? You let a whole column get stalled and strafed on account of a couple of jackasses? What the hell's the matter with you?
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My two oldest boys are 8 and 6, and we play a lot of X-Wing. We also homeschool. You're right in our wheelhouse.

What are you trying to get out of the curriculum by bringing X-Wing in? I'm a big fan of using games as teaching tools. We play a lot of interesting stuff to develop logic, math, and history skills and knowledge. I own a bunch of wargames, and I'm slowly using those to teach some history. We use some Eurogames for teaching economic concepts and some historical periods.

So what are you driving at? What skills are they taking away?

Next: How old are the kids? How much supervision will they need? How mature are they? My sons are good players, but need to be watched closely to make sure they're following the rules and being careful with the miniatures. You can break a lot of stuff if you aren't careful, and that gets expensive.

Next: A lot of homeschooling families are on a budget. Let's face it: Most homeschoolers operate on a single income in a dual-income world. Now, X-Wing isn't expensive as miniatures go, but man, you can get in a lot of trouble with it. Is that $20-50 something that could be better spent on some other bit of curriculum?

Yeah, the kids would have a lot of fun, but I question what you'd get out of it. If you want to introduce these kids to X-Wing, then invite them over to your place to play with your kids. Use your sets, put battles together, and manage it a few kids at a time. I think you'll get better results.
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Michael Van Biesbrouck
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If you have the kids play in teams, then half the kids can get other miniatures then you can rotate pairings and play at about 100 points a side. (4 TIEs versus two X-Wings will favour Luke or Poe with regeneration, so higher point values are better.) The four packs with 2-3 ships in them are all reasonable choices.

With pairs, combine the Rebel and Imperial miniatures from two players (possibly with Scum on one or both sides) and have split the players into two teams making lists for both sides. I recommend setting up the partners the previous week so that they can plan and print out lists (so they aren't card constrained). For playing the ships, use the pie rule (one divides, the other picks). Contrary to published rules, team mates should show each other dials.

Don't forget the educational component. Teach lessons on flight path geometry, flying in formation, asteroid placement, rule of 11 and so forth.

Another possibility is to run 2 or 3 Heroes of the Aturi Cluster campaigns. This might decrease the need for kids to purchase stuff and isn't competitive.
 
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Chris Plumlee
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Good questions Rob?

Well, skill wise here are some:

1. Critical thinking
2. spatial reasoning
3. understanding complex ideas(the advanced game can be a little bit complicated)
4. Good sportsman ship

Granted, this game is not power grid.

Our co-op is very light and not geared primarily toward academics. It is mainly a way for kids to take fun classes that they could not get at home.

Cost wise, most of the classes are about 25 dollars, so I believe that it would fall in a good price range, and I can supplement with my ships.

age would be 12-18 years old.

Thanks for the input.



 
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