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Abstract Games» Forums » General

Subject: Chess Grandmaster Tired Of People Comparing Every Life Situation To Chess Match rss

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Hunga Dunga
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http://www.theonion.com/article/chess-grandmaster-tired-peop...

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suPUR DUEper
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I think his argument is a strong opening move.
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Corey Clark
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I am tired of it and that's no joke. It bothers me when there are so many great games and even something as old and widely known as Go and westerners are still having a circle jerk about how brilliantly enigmantic and subtle Chess is. If everyone forgot about Chess tomorrow I would not lament the fact. afaic only the genre is of any interest at this point. And if anything Chess itself is just giving variant "designers" a lazy method for generating new games by applying various new gimmicks to FIDE rather than actually putting some thought into deriving pieces that can better facillitate new dynamics. Chess is mythological mucus when it comes to abstract games.
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Russ Williams
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It's sometimes amusing to me how often I see chess pieces used as art on business books and business/financial-related advertisements.
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christian freeling
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You can't fight city hall.
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Herodotus Halicarnassus
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CoreyClark wrote:
I am tired of it and that's no joke. It bothers me when there are so many great games and even something as old and widely known as Go and westerners are still having a circle jerk about how brilliantly enigmantic and subtle Chess is. If everyone forgot about Chess tomorrow I would not lament the fact. afaic only the genre is of any interest at this point. And if anything Chess itself is just giving variant "designers" a lazy method for generating new games by applying various new gimmicks to FIDE rather than actually putting some thought into deriving pieces that can better facillitate new dynamics. Chess is mythological mucus when it comes to abstract games.


I can't tell if this is supposed to be a parody of "Katanas are Underpowered in D20" or not.
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Frederic Heath-Renn
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CoreyClark wrote:
I am tired of it and that's no joke. It bothers me when there are so many great games and even something as old and widely known as Go and westerners are still having a circle jerk about how brilliantly enigmantic and subtle Chess is. If everyone forgot about Chess tomorrow I would not lament the fact. afaic only the genre is of any interest at this point. And if anything Chess itself is just giving variant "designers" a lazy method for generating new games by applying various new gimmicks to FIDE rather than actually putting some thought into deriving pieces that can better facillitate new dynamics. Chess is mythological mucus when it comes to abstract games.


This post should really have ended "CHECKMATE."
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marc lecours
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This is a statement that chess is part of common experience of people in the western world. We need common reference points. You get the same thing with memes from movies, songs, video games, etc. Literature used to make tons of subtle references to biblical stories and Greek myths. It is part of communication. Obscure memes are of no use. Chess is a very well known game with may memes: Your just a pawn, check, I think we have a stalemate, checkmate, fools mate, and a few more.

Another game that does this is POKER. There are tons of references to folding, bluffing, having an ace in the hole, raising the stakes, going all in, etc.

I wonder if in Japan they refer to "go"? Do they say that's Joseki in this situation, or these options are miai, or you are down to one eye, etc ?
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John
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rubberchicken wrote:
Another game that does this is POKER.


Cribbage too (but to a less extent I think). "level pegging", "what a turn-up/a turn-up for the books", "streets ahead", and "pegged out" and I know someone who often says "his nibs".
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Russ Williams
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zabdiel wrote:
rubberchicken wrote:
Another game that does this is POKER.


Cribbage too (but to a less extent I think). "level pegging", "what a turn-up/a turn-up for the books", "streets ahead", and "pegged out" and I know someone who often says "his nibs".

The frequency of Cribbage metaphors in popular parlance seems to me to be orders of magnitude smaller than Chess or Poker! I don't honestly remember ever hearing anyone use most of those Cribbage expressions outside of an actual Cribbage game, except for "pegged out" (and I'm guessing most people who use it aren't even consciously alluding to Cribbage or aware that Cribbage is a game with scoring pegs)...

(Or maybe it's more common in UK English? I don't know...)
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Frederic Heath-Renn
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russ wrote:
zabdiel wrote:
rubberchicken wrote:
Another game that does this is POKER.


Cribbage too (but to a less extent I think). "level pegging", "what a turn-up/a turn-up for the books", "streets ahead", and "pegged out" and I know someone who often says "his nibs".

The frequency of Cribbage metaphors in popular parlance seems to me to be orders of magnitude smaller than Chess or Poker! I don't honestly remember ever hearing anyone use most of those Cribbage expressions outside of an actual Cribbage game, except for "pegged out" (and I'm guessing most people who use it aren't even consciously alluding to Cribbage or aware that Cribbage is a game with scoring pegs)...

(Or maybe it's more common in UK English? I don't know...)


I wasn't aware of their origins*, but I can tell you that the first three at least are definitely common idiomatic British English and would be understood by basically anyone in general parlance, even if they were unfamiliar with Cribbage and thus the literal meanings ("streets ahead" has the advantage of being pretty easy to conceptualise literally even if you're thinking of tarmac'd streets rather than wooden ones - and I suppose "level pegging" has the advantage of having the word "level" in it).

"Streets ahead" of course makes some memorable appearances in the sitcom Community :-)



*or rather, I hadn't thought about them enough as phrases to realise their origins - in the same way as it had never occurred to me before that "no-holds-barred" comes from wrestling, even though having been told that it's pretty transparent how it comes
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Clint Pewtress
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russ wrote:
zabdiel wrote:
rubberchicken wrote:
Another game that does this is POKER.


Cribbage too (but to a less extent I think). "level pegging", "what a turn-up/a turn-up for the books", "streets ahead", and "pegged out" and I know someone who often says "his nibs".

The frequency of Cribbage metaphors in popular parlance seems to me to be orders of magnitude smaller than Chess or Poker! I don't honestly remember ever hearing anyone use most of those Cribbage expressions outside of an actual Cribbage game, except for "pegged out" (and I'm guessing most people who use it aren't even consciously alluding to Cribbage or aware that Cribbage is a game with scoring pegs)...

(Or maybe it's more common in UK English? I don't know...)


I've heard "his nibs" (my mother hails from Belfast), but didn't know its origins 'til now...
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O Little Town of
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The Oxford dictionary people say the origin of "his nibs" is unknown.
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Richard Moxham
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Kaffedrake wrote:
The Oxford dictionary people say the origin of "his nibs" is unknown.

Indeed.

At cribbage, I suspect that "one for his nob" is actually the more common usage, and (since "two for his heels" is the companion expression) that it refers to the knave's head - though a cruder interpretation will doubtless cross the modern mind.

"His nibs", on the other hand - which, by the way, I don't think is particularly regional at all - is a term of jocular deference by analogy with "his majesty", "his worship", "his grace", etc etc.

Probably two quite separate things.

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John
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russ wrote:
I don't honestly remember ever hearing anyone use most of those Cribbage expressions outside of an actual Cribbage game, except for "pegged out"

I don't remember anyone using pegged out, but I've certainly heard all the others frequently. I don't think it matters too much whether people are thinking about where the phrases come from when using them. I'm sure people sometimes use chess terms without consciously thinking about chess (though they would almost certainly be able to tell you where the phrase came from) likewise with expressions from Shakespeare, the bible, or Greek myth (though they might be more like Cribbage in that many people aren't don't realise where the expressions come from).

mocko wrote:
At cribbage, I suspect that "one for his nob" is actually the more common usage, and (since "two for his heels" is the companion expression) that it refers to the knave's head - though a cruder interpretation will doubtless cross the modern mind.


I learnt it as "one for his hat" and "two for doing it". Interesting to know that "one for his hat" has pretty much the same meaning (maybe I knew that anyway). Also interesting to know that there's no evidence that "his nibs" comes from cribbage, I've seen it used on line in place of "his nob" but never heard it.

This has got rather off topic for the abstract game forum!
 
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O Little Town of
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zabdiel wrote:
This has got rather off topic for the abstract game forum!


I didn't even read the linked article!

I've taken your malware for the last time, Mr Dunga!

*clicks*
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Alexandre Santos
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The article comes from The Onion, so probably just a satirical or exaggerated piece.

Still it's funny, which is the point
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Russ Williams
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mocko wrote:
Kaffedrake wrote:
The Oxford dictionary people say the origin of "his nibs" is unknown.

Indeed.

At cribbage, I suspect that "one for his nob" is actually the more common usage, and (since "two for his heels" is the companion expression) that it refers to the knave's head - though a cruder interpretation will doubtless cross the modern mind.

"His nibs", on the other hand - which, by the way, I don't think is particularly regional at all - is a term of jocular deference by analogy with "his majesty", "his worship", "his grace", etc etc.

FWIW this cribbage lingo all sounds very UK English to me; I don't recall ever hearing anyone saying this stuff in real life...
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michael dorazio
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The Onion = 100% joke (and funny, at that).

And cribbage chatter does not happen in the United States from what I've experienced. At all. Ever.
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Edward Kendrick
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russ wrote:

FWIW this cribbage lingo all sounds very UK English to me; I don't recall ever hearing anyone saying this stuff in real life...


I recall finding three ladies playing cribbage at lunchtime in a laboratory in Birmingham (sounds like the intro to a joke doesn't it), being invited to join them and finding to my pleased surprise that the game and the associated terminology were identical to what my grandfather taught me.

This was Birmingham Alabama, and I think it was in real life, which of course only happens in America ...
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Russ Williams
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Barbarossa wrote:
russ wrote:

FWIW this cribbage lingo all sounds very UK English to me; I don't recall ever hearing anyone saying this stuff in real life...


I recall finding three ladies playing cribbage at lunchtime in a laboratory in Birmingham (sounds like the intro to a joke doesn't it), being invited to join them and finding to my pleased surprise that the game and the associated terminology were identical to what my grandfather taught me.

This was Birmingham Alabama, and I think it was in real life, which of course only happens in America ...

Sure, but by "real life" I meant outside of a Cribbage game, just in a normal real-life non-gaming context. E.g. addressing someone jocularly as "his nibs" or whatever.

I agree that when playing Cribbage, of course people use Cribbage jargon!
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Tim Parker
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TedW wrote:
I think his argument is a strong opening move.


Perhaps, but it is well worn path with no theoretical novelty.
 
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O Little Town of
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catosulla wrote:
it is well worn path


As a hiker I would have appreciated a trigger warning for this.
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Robert Wesley
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whistle NSFSCG:
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"LIFE is akin too a Chess Grandmaster's Cock; when it's HARD, it's a "real fucker"; and when it's SOFT, then, it's "hard too beat!"
surprise Well, it's TRUE for 'moi'!
 
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Luis Bolaños Mures
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I don't think that chess player is so mad that people compare life to chess. He's just being hypermodern about it.
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