$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 126.41

7,510 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
47.3% of Goal | left

Support:

Recommend
16 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Chit Chat

Subject: Flights over the North Atlantic ocean rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
There are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: Those who do, and those who don't.
mbmbmbmbmb
This is a pretty cool video explaining air traffic and the challenges of crossing the North Atlantic ocean.
The first third to half of the video is general info that you may already know about, but it is well presented. I had a few moments of surprise while watching.
Did you know that there is no radar, once you leave a certain distance past Newfoundland? The middle part of the video tells us just how important Gander Newfoundland is, in air traffic control.
You don't get radar back until the same distance outside of western Ireland (Shannon), near Limerick.
If your screen shot of the video is the same as mine, those red lines represent air travel without radar tracking.

The last half of the video has some really neat info about "waypoints" and their names.

Enjoy!

17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Lewis
United States
Thornton
Colorado
flag msg tools
NFHS Football & Basketball
badge
Dread Our Coming, Suffer Our Presence, Embrace Our Glory (Solonavi War Cry)
mbmbmbmbmb
Very interesting video. A lot of information I didn't know.

However, I think he got one city mixed up. While it's possible Boston may have "KUBBS" and "BEARS" waypoints, since he said they were named after local teams I suspect they are more likely near Chicago (unless Boston is just being silly).
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
There are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: Those who do, and those who don't.
mbmbmbmbmb
I noticed the Boston thing too, and thought it was off when he didn't mention Sox.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David K.
United States
Pflugerville
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The video is annotated that those two way points are actually over Chicago, with apologies to Boston!
4 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
sigmazero13 wrote:
Very interesting video. A lot of information I didn't know.

However, I think he got one city mixed up. While it's possible Boston may have "KUBBS" and "BEARS" waypoints, since he said they were named after local teams I suspect they are more likely near Chicago (unless Boston is just being silly).


Maybe they're Boston Bruins fans?

edit: I see the correction, but I still like my theory!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mystery McMysteryface
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks, Mabby!

I learned something today!!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff
United States
Pensacola
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
For those of you who may be curious, in the days before satcom radio was prevalent, the crossings were accomplished purely via speed control and timing. You'd fly the NAT tracks as described in the video, but make a position report to Gander over HF radio every 5 degrees of latitude. Gander (or Shanwick on the other side) will track these position reports to make sure we're not getting too close to the planes around us, but the timing is controlled by the aircrafts being assigned a speed to make sure they're keeping up with the flow. Eventually, you're picked back up by radar at the exit point and can discontinue position reporting (which was kind of a pain, and therefore assigned to the junior copilots traditionally on the crews I flew with... )

It's been many years, but I've flown crossings in my old tanker aircraft. Originally I was at Fairchild (Washington state, just outside of Spokane), meaning our great circle route to England took us WAAAAY up north, but the route from McConnel (my later assignment) was closer to what is described.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Isaac Citrom
Canada
Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
jeffreyac wrote:
For those of you who may be curious, in the days before satcom radio was prevalent, the crossings were accomplished purely via speed control and timing. You'd fly the NAT tracks as described in the video, but make a position report to Gander over HF radio every 5 degrees of latitude. Gander (or Shanwick on the other side) will track these position reports to make sure we're not getting too close to the planes around us, but the timing is controlled by the aircrafts being assigned a speed to make sure they're keeping up with the flow. Eventually, you're picked back up by radar at the exit point and can discontinue position reporting (which was kind of a pain, and therefore assigned to the junior copilots traditionally on the crews I flew with... )

It's been many years, but I've flown crossings in my old tanker aircraft. Originally I was at Fairchild (Washington state, just outside of Spokane), meaning our great circle route to England took us WAAAAY up north, but the route from McConnel (my later assignment) was closer to what is described.


If I'm not mistaken, don't all trans-Atlantic flights still have to make at least one HF call to Gander/Shanwick?
.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff
United States
Pensacola
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
isaacc wrote:
jeffreyac wrote:
For those of you who may be curious, in the days before satcom radio was prevalent, the crossings were accomplished purely via speed control and timing. You'd fly the NAT tracks as described in the video, but make a position report to Gander over HF radio every 5 degrees of latitude. Gander (or Shanwick on the other side) will track these position reports to make sure we're not getting too close to the planes around us, but the timing is controlled by the aircrafts being assigned a speed to make sure they're keeping up with the flow. Eventually, you're picked back up by radar at the exit point and can discontinue position reporting (which was kind of a pain, and therefore assigned to the junior copilots traditionally on the crews I flew with... )

It's been many years, but I've flown crossings in my old tanker aircraft. Originally I was at Fairchild (Washington state, just outside of Spokane), meaning our great circle route to England took us WAAAAY up north, but the route from McConnel (my later assignment) was closer to what is described.


If I'm not mistaken, don't all trans-Atlantic flights still have to make at least one HF call to Gander/Shanwick?
.


Well, I'm woefully out of date, as my last crossing was nearly 15 years ago, but we were HF only so had to maintain HF contact. I believe the selcal equipped aircraft would make one HF call to check in, then verify/test the selcal equipment and stay in touch that way after the test.

I'd imagine you're right, and today it's similar - a quick check in via HF, verify the equipment (sitcom, datalink, or whatever is being used as primary) is working properly, then stay there.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Isaac Citrom
Canada
Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
By the way,

MABBY 43-20-04.3200N 095-09-33.6900W in Iowa. It's an RNAV waypoint.


.

5 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Morris
United States
Raytown
Missouri
flag msg tools
2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin, 19th Indiana, 24th Michigan
badge
24th Michigan Monument Gettysburg Pa
mbmbmbmbmb
I love the KC way points. The way points for Boston are HAVRD YAARD, BGDIG, CELTS, BOSOX and DRUNK.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Berg
United States
Medford
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
You can count on me!
mbmbmbmbmb
mrbeankc wrote:
I love the KC way points. The way points for Boston are HAVRD YAARD, BGDIG, CELTS, BOSOX and DRUNK.


The DRUNK way point is supposedly right above Ted Kennedy's house, named in reference to his car accident. It does not appear to be active, I'm not sure if it was removed/renamed or just a tall tale.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.