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Subject: Fantasy Card Game with only 6 cards rss

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Brandon Duhon
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Hi, I recently rediscovered a game that I invented a few years ago. My gf and I played it several times and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. I would love to hear feedback on this game idea, it is essentially a quick castle siege game that involves a simple hand of cards. Play is usually about 15 minutes.

This game has only been tested with 2 players so far.

The objective is to either A) overtake the opponent's Stronghold, or B) collect 6 jewels in one's Treasury.

Each player has 3 regions where his play will take place: His Stronghold, his Exploring Party, and his Treasury.

Each player also has 6 cards: 2 Soldiers, 2 Thieves, 1 Captain, and 1 Wizard

In the beginning 1 jewel is placed in each player's treasury, and 6 jewels are placed in a space between the 2 players' Exploring Parties, in an area called the Wilderness.

Each turn consists of 2 phases: Strategy and Action.

In the Strategy phase there is a screen placed between the players, and each player places his 6 cards face down in one of his 3 regions. The cards may be distributed in any manner, regions may even be left empty if the player chooses.

After this stage is complete, the screen is removed so that the players can see the distribution of their opponent's cards. Thematically, this would be the phase where the armies are gathering intelligence about their opponent. They know roughly the size of the armies at each location, but not exactly who is in those armies.

During the Action phase, each player must choose one action to take. The available actions are as follows:

1) Attack opponent's Stronghold
2) Send out Exploring Party
3) Raid opponent's Treasury
4) Reveal
5) Cloak

The player's choice for his Action is concealed, and each selection is revealed simultaneously.

Actions are resolved in this order: 1- Cloak / 2- Reveal / 3- Attack Stronghold / 4- Exploration / 5- Raid Treasury

Attacking the opponent's Stronghold is successful if the number of Soldiers the attacking player has in that region exceeds the number of Soldiers the defending player has in that region. If successful, the opponent’s Stronghold receives one point of damage.

Exploration is successful if the total number of cards (of any kind) in that region exceeds the total number of cards the opponent has in that region. If successful, then a jewel is taken from the Wilderness and placed in that player's treasury. If at least one Thief is in the player's Exploration Party, an additional jewel is taken. Thematically, the party strikes out on an adventure, but if there is also an equal or larger enemy party in the wilderness then they cannot return with any loot. If they do manage to return and a thief is in the party, then his trained eye is able to spot some extra treasure.

Raiding a Treasury is successful if the number of Thieves in that region exceeds the number of Soldiers the opponent has in that region. If successful, all jewels are taken from the opponent's treasury and placed in that player's Treasury. Thematically, the thieves sneak into the treasury and if there are not enough soldiers to guard the treasure then they are robbed.

The Reveal action enlists the Wizard to use his magic in order to try and discover the specific identity of one or more of the opponent's armies. In this action, the player selects one of the opponent's regions. If the cards in that region do not contain the Wizard then all the cards in that group remain face up for the rest of the game. If the Wizard IS in that region, then he is shown to the other player and the group is protected, the cards remain face down.

The Cloak action enlists the Wizard to use his magic once again, this time to conceal a group that contains one or more cards that have been revealed by the enemy Wizard. In this action, the player simply selects the cards in one region and turns them all face down.

The significance of the Captain card is that he is always counted as 2 soldiers. This means that in an Exploring Party, for example, he is counted as 2 cards rather than 1.

Each Stronghold has 3 "hit points". After a Stronghold has been successfully attacked 3 times, it is overtaken.

A game is won if at any point a Stronghold is overtaken or a player's Treasury contains 6 jewels.

There are a few extra minor rules, such as - if both players successfully Raid their opponent's Treasury on the same turn, they simply exchange jewels - but other than that, this is the entirety of the rules.

There is a lot of bluffing and double-bluffing, as well as guessing what the other person is planning. I would really love to hear some thoughts and critiques from the experts on here. I went to school for illustration, so I am considering actually creating a legit version of this game if it sounds like something that other people would be into.
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Matt D
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I think this sounds like a really neat micro game! Given the relative simplicity of it (you essentially would only need to produce 12 cards in total and possible 2 cards as player aids), I would think that if you produce artwork and what not you could easily find a market for it with some of the companies that tend to go for Microgame. TMG might be a good home for this -- they seem to like to have microgames on hand to use as throw ins with their existing KSs.

I could definitely see myself picking this up relatively inexpensively, or printing up a PnP if it was freely available.

These microgames are super popular right now, so I think you just need to get it in front of the right person.
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Kai Scheuer
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Basically some good ideas, you've got there.
Questions:
1.) After emptying the wilderness, what reason do I have to place a soldier or a thief there?
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)

And a random idea thrown in:

How about replacing the captain with a Hero, counting as either one soldier or one thief AND swinging the advantage to the side of the hero's player, if the number of soldiers or thieves are equal on both sides.



Kind regards,
Kai
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Matt D
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A quick thought/suggestion occurred to me - in addition to cards, you have to have a way to declare. If you want to keep costs low, I'd recommend that you suggest using a single die, and have your "actions" each be numbered so players can use a die to do the declaration behind the shield (off to the side now that the lay out is revealed). Anyone who'd be picking up this game will have two six sided die (I'm assuming six counters are also easy -- pennies, chits, cubes, whatever--your market would always have tons of components lying around).

If you go that route, though, I'd suggest coming up with a sixth action for symmetry on the game. Perhaps a "Defense" action for the "Captain" that if selected allows him to move one card from one region to another after the opponent's action is declared. It doesn't accomplish anything for the "Defender", but it can be used to, say, move the wizard over to prevent a group from being revealed, or move a soldier over to equal or exceed to prevent a thieving or successful exploration.

Just a random thought. But I really like this game idea! I'll subscribe to this thread, update us if you decide to produce a PnP and/or sell this to a publisher!
 
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Matt D
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schattentanz wrote:
Basically some good ideas, you've got there.
Questions:
1.) After emptying the wilderness, what reason do I have to place a soldier or a thief there?
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)


Good point on 1. Maybe make draining the wilderness an end-game condition, and put an uneven number of jewels in there? So maybe 7 jewels in wilderness, and then if anyone gets 5 they win. That way when the wilderness is emptied, whoever has the most wins (which should be five, but not necessarily -- someone could be at four and drain the wilderness to get to six with a thief and a success explore).

2. The wizard would help you dictate what you are doing going forward. So for example, if I use my wizard on round 1 and successfully find one or both of my opponent's soldiers, I'll know looking at the board my chances of success in a given region -- if I see both soldiers in Region A, which is where I have two soldiers of my own, I know that won't do anything so I can pick the thieving action, knowing that my thief will be successful in stealing a jewel whereever he is.

I guess in thinking about this, we'd need to replace the shields and then place our action declaration die on top of the region we intend to perform the action from?
 
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Brandon Duhon
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schattentanz wrote:
Basically some good ideas, you've got there.
Questions:
1.) After emptying the wilderness, what reason do I have to place a soldier or a thief there?
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)

And a random idea thrown in:

How about replacing the captain with a Hero, counting as either one soldier or one thief AND swinging the advantage to the side of the hero's player, if the number of soldiers or thieves are equal on both sides.



Kind regards,
Kai


Thanks for the comments

1) The idea behind this was to have the gameplay actually change partway through the game. After the wilderness is emptied, there is no reason to place a card there so now the game changes to just tactics in the other 2 areas. Even utilizing all the Soldiers + Captain, the Treasury can be perfectly guarded or the Stronghold can be perfectly guarded, but not both. Sooner or later one player will out-think the other and get through.

2) Knowing the setup in advance will help in knowing your odds to succeed in one or another action, especially if one or more of the cards have been turned over. First the setup is seen, and *then* the actions are chosen.

Initially I did try using Hypbrid cards who could change into a Soldier as well a Thief, but it led to too many long games and stalemates. My goal was to make the game challenging but still quick, so I kept tinkering until it felt like it had the right length.
 
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Brandon Duhon
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hestiansun wrote:
A quick thought/suggestion occurred to me - in addition to cards, you have to have a way to declare. If you want to keep costs low, I'd recommend that you suggest using a single die, and have your "actions" each be numbered so players can use a die to do the declaration behind the shield (off to the side now that the lay out is revealed). Anyone who'd be picking up this game will have two six sided die (I'm assuming six counters are also easy -- pennies, chits, cubes, whatever--your market would always have tons of components lying around).

If you go that route, though, I'd suggest coming up with a sixth action for symmetry on the game. Perhaps a "Defense" action for the "Captain" that if selected allows him to move one card from one region to another after the opponent's action is declared. It doesn't accomplish anything for the "Defender", but it can be used to, say, move the wizard over to prevent a group from being revealed, or move a soldier over to equal or exceed to prevent a thieving or successful exploration.

Just a random thought. But I really like this game idea! I'll subscribe to this thread, update us if you decide to produce a PnP and/or sell this to a publisher!


Yes, that is actually how my gf and I declare our actions when we play, with one side of a D6. My idea at this point is that if I were to create this game, I would have the 6th side of the die contain the game's logo.

It is funny that you mention the "Defense" because that was initially the 6th choice. Initially the Thieves were called Hybrids and if you played "Defense" they could all Transform into Soldiers. If this Defense was successful, then your Stronghold regained 1 point of damage. But this led to really looooong games. If I included an action or a new card I would want to make sure that it kept the game quick.
 
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Brandon Duhon
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schattentanz wrote:
Basically some good ideas, you've got there.
Questions:
1.) After emptying the wilderness, what reason do I have to place a soldier or a thief there?
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)

And a random idea thrown in:

How about replacing the captain with a Hero, counting as either one soldier or one thief AND swinging the advantage to the side of the hero's player, if the number of soldiers or thieves are equal on both sides.



Kind regards,
Kai


One other thing to mention, in the turn order it can be seen that the Attacking Stronghold action takes place before the Raiding Treasury action. This means that if somehow a winning Attack and winning Raid take place on the same turn, the winner is actually the one who attacked the Stronghold. This affects the strategies a bit.
 
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Brandon Duhon
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BrandonDuhon wrote:
Hi, I recently rediscovered a game that I invented a few years ago. My gf and I played it several times and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. I would love to hear feedback on this game idea, it is essentially a quick castle siege game that involves a simple hand of cards. Play is usually about 15 minutes.


Here is another meta-question that I would like to run by you guys:

So since this is basically a mini-game, if I were to try and create an official version I'd ideally want it to be as small and portable as possible. The only problem with that is the screen between the players, it would need to be maybe around a foot tall and maybe 18" wide (assuming we are using playing-card-sized cards) and I think it would be necessary to include it with the game. That screen would be the main component that would keep this game from being super portable in a tiny little box, but I really don't see any way around it.

Also, in my mind I imagine the Stronghold as a little plastic tower shaped like a rook or the Dice Tower logo. It is composed of 3 stackable pieces, and you remove the topmost piece each time it gets hit.

But of course all those extra things take away from the portability of a mini game. Mainly the screen, because if it was to be a 12" tall cardboard screen this would mean it would need to be 24" long and folded over, right?
 
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Brandon Duhon
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schattentanz wrote:
Basically some good ideas, you've got there.
Questions:
1.) After emptying the wilderness, what reason do I have to place a soldier or a thief there?
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)

And a random idea thrown in:

How about replacing the captain with a Hero, counting as either one soldier or one thief AND swinging the advantage to the side of the hero's player, if the number of soldiers or thieves are equal on both sides.



Kind regards,
Kai


Sorry about the post avalanche, I am realizing that I never addressed your question about the Hero.

I do like that idea, but the reason I went with the Captain as 2 Soldiers is that this is the only way to add a little bit of uncertainty to the number of cards the opponent has in each region. If each card represents exactly 1 character, then if (for example) you have 3 face-down cards in the Exploration region and your opponent has 2, then you can be absolutely certain that you will be successful. Because of the Captain, however, there is still an element of uncertainty.
 
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Matt D
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BrandonDuhon wrote:

But of course all those extra things take away from the portability of a mini game. Mainly the screen, because if it was to be a 12" tall cardboard screen this would mean it would need to be 24" long and folded over, right?


Is the screen absolutely necessary?

I mean, honestly, couldn't you just hold up a small piece of paper to accomplish the same thing?

Frankly, if you want to go micro-micro, made the cards super small so that you can easily hide them behind the average adult's hand. Then even if you have a small hand, you can get a regular piece of paper to do it.

I think the with a micro game people expect a certain degree of DIY, and IMO it's not worth going through the logistical hassle for a screen when really any option the players can come up with to conceal their decision will be sufficient.
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Brandon Duhon
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hestiansun wrote:
BrandonDuhon wrote:

But of course all those extra things take away from the portability of a mini game. Mainly the screen, because if it was to be a 12" tall cardboard screen this would mean it would need to be 24" long and folded over, right?


Is the screen absolutely necessary?

I mean, honestly, couldn't you just hold up a small piece of paper to accomplish the same thing?

Frankly, if you want to go micro-micro, made the cards super small so that you can easily hide them behind the average adult's hand. Then even if you have a small hand, you can get a regular piece of paper to do it.

I think the with a micro game people expect a certain degree of DIY, and IMO it's not worth going through the logistical hassle for a screen when really any option the players can come up with to conceal their decision will be sufficient.


Yea that's definitely worth considering, smaller cards might do the trick. I guess they don't really even need to be cards they could be something like small square tiles.

In that scenario perhaps even if a screen was included it wouldn't need to be nearly as big, maybe just two 5"x 8" trifold cards would do the trick. They could be folded over so that they'd only be like 5"x 3" and each player would have his own so it wouldn't be like a huge one in the middle.
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Matt D
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BrandonDuhon wrote:
hestiansun wrote:
BrandonDuhon wrote:

But of course all those extra things take away from the portability of a mini game. Mainly the screen, because if it was to be a 12" tall cardboard screen this would mean it would need to be 24" long and folded over, right?


Is the screen absolutely necessary?

I mean, honestly, couldn't you just hold up a small piece of paper to accomplish the same thing?

Frankly, if you want to go micro-micro, made the cards super small so that you can easily hide them behind the average adult's hand. Then even if you have a small hand, you can get a regular piece of paper to do it.

I think the with a micro game people expect a certain degree of DIY, and IMO it's not worth going through the logistical hassle for a screen when really any option the players can come up with to conceal their decision will be sufficient.


Yea that's definitely worth considering, smaller cards might do the trick. I guess they don't really even need to be cards they could be something like small square tiles.

In that scenario perhaps even if a screen was included it wouldn't need to be nearly as big, maybe just two 5"x 8" trifold cards would do the trick. They could be folded over so that they'd only be like 5"x 3" and each player would have his own so it wouldn't be like a huge one in the middle.


If size is a concern, what about opaque envelopes?

They slide their chits/cards into one of three opaque envelopes, and then take them out?

Just trying to think of ways to reduce the size...
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Brandon Duhon
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I spent today creating a quick little print-out version of the game so that anyone out there who would like to try it out/playtest it can go ahead and do it. I'd recommend printing at least the cards on cardstock so that you can't see through the back.

I don't have a name for the game yet so I'm tentatively calling it MicroSeige. Hopefully that hasn't been taken yet.

Board: http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y273/OMDuhon/MicroSeigeBoar...

Cards: http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y273/OMDuhon/MicroSiegeCard...
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Brandon Duhon
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hestiansun wrote:
BrandonDuhon wrote:
hestiansun wrote:
BrandonDuhon wrote:

But of course all those extra things take away from the portability of a mini game. Mainly the screen, because if it was to be a 12" tall cardboard screen this would mean it would need to be 24" long and folded over, right?


Is the screen absolutely necessary?

I mean, honestly, couldn't you just hold up a small piece of paper to accomplish the same thing?

Frankly, if you want to go micro-micro, made the cards super small so that you can easily hide them behind the average adult's hand. Then even if you have a small hand, you can get a regular piece of paper to do it.

I think the with a micro game people expect a certain degree of DIY, and IMO it's not worth going through the logistical hassle for a screen when really any option the players can come up with to conceal their decision will be sufficient.


Yea that's definitely worth considering, smaller cards might do the trick. I guess they don't really even need to be cards they could be something like small square tiles.

In that scenario perhaps even if a screen was included it wouldn't need to be nearly as big, maybe just two 5"x 8" trifold cards would do the trick. They could be folded over so that they'd only be like 5"x 3" and each player would have his own so it wouldn't be like a huge one in the middle.


If size is a concern, what about opaque envelopes?

They slide their chits/cards into one of three opaque envelopes, and then take them out?

Just trying to think of ways to reduce the size...


Hm the only problem I would see with that is if a player decides to put a lot of his cards in one region and no cards in another. It seems it would be apparent from the thickness of the envelope that a lot are in one and the other is empty.

For the set of cards that I linked to in the above post I made them 1.5" x 1.5" squares. I haven't printed it out yet but I'm gonna test the size and see what is the minimum size that a screen would need to be to do the trick.
 
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Matt D
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BrandonDuhon wrote:

Hm the only problem I would see with that is if a player decides to put a lot of his cards in one region and no cards in another. It seems it would be apparent from the thickness of the envelope that a lot are in one and the other is empty.


Thinking outside the box here...you could have the screen be the default, if people have it, but if not, use orientation of the card, and place them in a stack, since you're using square cards now.

The cards with their heads pointing up are in the Exploration, with their heads pointing left are in the Stronghold, and pointing right are in the Treasury.

Of course, I don't get to sit and study the arrangement and reconsider it, but if I know what I want, I stack them that way face down, and then people them off one at a time maintaining orientation.

Whatcha think?
 
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Kai Scheuer
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Hi Brandon,

BrandonDuhon wrote:
schattentanz wrote:
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)


2) Knowing the setup in advance will help in knowing your odds to succeed in one or another action, especially if one or more of the cards have been turned over. First the setup is seen, and *then* the actions are chosen.



in that case I don't get the rules:

As much as I get your rules you've got two phases:
1.) Strategy
2.) Action

During Strategy you place your units. During Action, actions are resolved. Also, during Action you no longer get to deploy or move units.
My question remains: What use is the wizard for?
Yes, I do know, whether I will succeed or fail at an action. But techically there isn't anything I can do about it, is there?



Kind regards,
Kai
 
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Matt D
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Or to make things clearly, the obverse of the cards would just be arrows.

So you could make a stack and then reveal it looking like:

NWEWWN

And then put them into the three piles.

Decide your action.

And then flip them over to see what faces are there.

 
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Matt D
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schattentanz wrote:
Hi Brandon,

BrandonDuhon wrote:
schattentanz wrote:
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)


2) Knowing the setup in advance will help in knowing your odds to succeed in one or another action, especially if one or more of the cards have been turned over. First the setup is seen, and *then* the actions are chosen.



in that case I don't get the rules:

As much as I get your rules you've got two phases:
1.) Strategy
2.) Action

During Strategy you place your units. During Action, actions are resolved. Also, during Action you no longer get to deploy or move units.
My question remains: What use is the wizard for?
Yes, I do know, whether I will succeed or fail at an action. But techically there isn't anything I can do about it, is there?



Kind regards,
Kai


Here is how I understand it.

You put 2 soldiers in Stronghold, Two thieves in Treasury, Wizard and Captain in Exploring Party.

I put 1 solder in Stronghold, wizard and one soldier in treasure, captain and two thieves in exploring party.

After seeing the layout, I decide to use my wizard reveal action. You decide to use your stronghold action, which makes sense knowing that I only have one defender there -- unless it's Captain, I'm screwed.

We flip.

You have 2 soldiers to my one, and therefore damage me once. Ouch!

I however have my Wizard revealing, and you have no defense! So now your two thieves are revealed to me for the rest of the game (unless you take an action with your wizard to cloak them).

So I always know where your thieves are, which helps me decide, AFTER you have put them there, whether I want to counter what they are doing or not. If they are in the treasury, darn well sure I'm going to defend it. But if they aren't, I know I can totally ignore the treasury.

So it doesn't let me reallocate people, but it helps me decide which action makes the most sense...
 
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Brandon Duhon
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schattentanz wrote:
Hi Brandon,

BrandonDuhon wrote:
schattentanz wrote:
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)


2) Knowing the setup in advance will help in knowing your odds to succeed in one or another action, especially if one or more of the cards have been turned over. First the setup is seen, and *then* the actions are chosen.



in that case I don't get the rules:

As much as I get your rules you've got two phases:
1.) Strategy
2.) Action

During Strategy you place your units. During Action, actions are resolved. Also, during Action you no longer get to deploy or move units.
My question remains: What use is the wizard for?
Yes, I do know, whether I will succeed or fail at an action. But technically there isn't anything I can do about it, is there?


Kind regards,
Kai


Apart from his ability to protect a group from being revealed, the Wizard is also used as a bluffing device. He is useless for attacking or guarding, but if the cards are face down then there is no way to know for sure where he is located.

It is impossible to protect all the regions, so there is always at least one weak spot. The Wizard is often used to help conceal one of your weak spots.

Much of the skill lies in inferring what your opponent is going to do and then foiling his plan. This is basically what my gf does every time we play. I understand the concept, though I'm not good at it!

 
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Brandon Duhon
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hestiansun wrote:
schattentanz wrote:
Hi Brandon,

BrandonDuhon wrote:
schattentanz wrote:
2.) What use is it to know the setup of an army in advance? (Read: what use is the wizard?)


2) Knowing the setup in advance will help in knowing your odds to succeed in one or another action, especially if one or more of the cards have been turned over. First the setup is seen, and *then* the actions are chosen.



in that case I don't get the rules:

As much as I get your rules you've got two phases:
1.) Strategy
2.) Action

During Strategy you place your units. During Action, actions are resolved. Also, during Action you no longer get to deploy or move units.
My question remains: What use is the wizard for?
Yes, I do know, whether I will succeed or fail at an action. But techically there isn't anything I can do about it, is there?



Kind regards,
Kai


Here is how I understand it.

You put 2 soldiers in Stronghold, Two thieves in Treasury, Wizard and Captain in Exploring Party.

I put 1 solder in Stronghold, wizard and one soldier in treasure, captain and two thieves in exploring party.

After seeing the layout, I decide to use my wizard reveal action. You decide to use your stronghold action, which makes sense knowing that I only have one defender there -- unless it's Captain, I'm screwed.

We flip.

You have 2 soldiers to my one, and therefore damage me once. Ouch!

I however have my Wizard revealing, and you have no defense! So now your two thieves are revealed to me for the rest of the game (unless you take an action with your wizard to cloak them).

So I always know where your thieves are, which helps me decide, AFTER you have put them there, whether I want to counter what they are doing or not. If they are in the treasury, darn well sure I'm going to defend it. But if they aren't, I know I can totally ignore the treasury.

So it doesn't let me reallocate people, but it helps me decide which action makes the most sense...


One other point is that the Wizard can choose to reveal in any of the 3 regions, it does not necessarily have to be the region that he currently occupies. So when you use the Reveal power it is not necessary to reveal your own Wizard at all.
 
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Kai Scheuer
Germany
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Just read the rules again.
More confusion arises:

During Strategy phase I deploy troops. Like, all of them. Ok? Ok.
During action phase, I get 1 action.
Just 1 of the five?
And afterwards there is a new Strategy phase?
In that case, the wizard makes even less sense:
Why should I cloak or reveal units, when they are removed and redeployed afterwards anyways?

Or do players go through all five actions, 1 action at a time, in which case the wizard still doesn't make sense:
I don't get to deploy or to move units anymore. There is no decision making between actions - or did I miss anything?
Example: You deploy 2 soldiers at the stronghold, I deploy 2 thieves at the treasury. My thieves will raid the treasury, no matter whether I reveal the soldiers or not. So, what is the point in revealing them other than knowing a little bit in advance that the raid is going to be successfull, if there is nothing you or I could do about it?



Kind regards,
Kai
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John
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schattentanz wrote:

Why should I cloak or reveal units, when they are removed and redeployed afterwards anyways?

Because when they are redeployed they deployed face up. If I manage to reveal both you soldiers first round then I know where you are deploying them until you cloak them again. So unless you picked cloak in the round I picked reveal then I have at least one round when I know exactly where your soldiers are which seems like it should be a fairly big advantage.
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Kai Scheuer
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zabdiel wrote:
schattentanz wrote:

Why should I cloak or reveal units, when they are removed and redeployed afterwards anyways?

Because when they are redeployed they deployed face up. If I manage to reveal both you soldiers first round then I know where you are deploying them until you cloak them again. So unless you picked cloak in the round I picked reveal then I have at least one round when I know exactly where your soldiers are which seems like it should be a fairly big advantage.


Just checked the rules again. Yepp, it is all there .. details, details - obviously I missed that part ..

And now it totally makes sense!



Thank you very much and kind regards,
Kai
 
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Tim Davidson
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Sounds very cool. I'm also toying with a game that involves "blind bluffing" attackers into different zones. This may be a solution to the bulky screen:

Include 3 'blank' cards for bluffing. Then both players could place 3 face-down cards each in the 3 zones at the same time. After placement is finished, players can reveal and remove the blanks.

This would limit zones to max 3 cards. But you could add more blanks to increase the max. Even allow unevenness in the zones and just take turns placing the last cards. Those last cards could still be blanks, effectively keeping the blindness.
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