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BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Chit Chat

Subject: Seeking advice rss

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I come to you for advice and to find the right questions to ask myself. About my job. It is secure and well-paying. I have nice colleagues and a lot of autonomy when and how exactly I do my work. The bosses are decent and often understanding. But it feels like...stagnation. More of the same every day. No room to grow. At the same time, I feel much is expected of me. Many choices, and nobody to discuss them with. A lot of freedom, and I only need to fight for my ideas...but I am fighting alone.
Sounds contradictory? It is. Because I have two very different jobs at the same company, with a wall built right through my head. Let me explain.

I joined in '99 as software developer, the print on my B.Sc. certificate still wet. A mid-sized niche technology company, working internationally, but focused on Europe. Technology leader in their field, a good company my dad told me. He knew, he worked for one of their large customers.
It's business-to-business, only. Long-lived products. Reliability. Stability. Efficiency. It suited me.

Developing long-lived products has a profound effect on the work within a team. Just as the product doesn't change quickly, the tools don't change quickly. That would only increase the risk of changing product behavior that is guaranteed. Also, the team didn't change much. Half are still the same people as in '99. That also means the mindsets only change slowly. For some, I am still the "youngster" - after 17 years.

I found my role on the team, and became the resident expert on complex UI. The programming language would not have been my first choice, but hey, time to learn something new. Only it didn't stay new, of course. First: A regular language. Then: Dying. Finally, no support, no matter how you beg and how much you pay. But we were stuck with it, and I was stuck with it. I thought about quitting. Switched to part-time. Took care of other areas of life.

In the meantime, the company had been bought, split and sold off. Now part of an international corporation. The business segment was narrower than before, but the whole world was our market. Our products had to change, adapt.

So it came that, while I was too weak to push the eject button, an angel arrived. A new product to develop. With C++. And Qt. The tons of bricks on my soul melted away. I took trainings. I dug into books. I became the resident UI expert again - this time for C++/Qt.

A couple of years went by. I realized that I became more and more interested in people. Perception. Communication. Motivation. Conflict. And here I was, spending 80 % of my work day staring into a screen. Sure, there were always colleagues to talk to. But historically, I had the tasks with the least amount of communication necessary. Requirements. Desired looks and behavior. Interface to the back-end. And because I knew my job, many things were implicitly clear.
I became unhappy again, although I didn't really know why, back then.

Entry Angel #2. New head of global R&D. An "outsider", from another company the corporation had bought. With an idea: A global network within the company. Operation-level employees. There to support innovation locally, and exchange ideas globally. And I was invited.
I went to workshops. Met people from all over the world. Different cultures, different mindsets. Practiced creativity techniques. Learned how to prepare and moderate a workshop. How to get such a network going.
Back "home"? Nodding politely. "Yes, you can keep doing this as a side job, but we don't really want to know the details, thank you very much".

Not happy with my "old" company. No, I don't expect you to change your ways overnight, but aren't you the least bit interested what I could have to offer?
Not very much.

2 1/2 years ago, head of global R&D offers me a position. Part time, that is, splitting time with my software dev job. Why? So I keep a foot in the operative business, and don't lose touch. My boss isn't happy, we have plenty of work for the foreseeable future. But he doesn't want to deny me the opportunity. Big kudos.

What the job is about? Head of global R&D wants to build up a small R&D staff function. Fostering innovation. Supporting R&D strategy development. That kind of things. At the beginning: Lots of administrative, organizational and IT stuff. Creating internal communication platforms. More responsibility. Working with colleagues all over the globe. Organizing workshops with top technology managers. But also: Often working alone. No colleague to talk through the decisions. Not possible to discuss it all with head of R&D - never enough time. And fighting for resources. Not budget - I can get that with good arguments - but resource availability. Need an expert from in-house IT to get something done? They are all busy - for the next few months. Better plan a budget for next year, and we'll talk about it.
Do I see a career path with this job? Not really. Software development is only a small part of what the corporation does, even within the R&D sector. So I am not really a good fit for many potential technology-related positions. Plus, most of those would require me to move to another city. I love traveling now and then, but I have my roots here. My family. My home. My friends. My wife's job.

So here I am, unhappy with two very diverse jobs for very different reasons. Surprisingly, coordinating the two isn't really an issue. I am free to schedule my tasks as I see fit, and my bosses check on the results, not on the process.

What do I want? What do I need? I have given that some thought.
A few months ago, I sat down to identify the personal values I most deeply care about. Here are my top five:
1. Love and caring
2. Growth (personal growth and development, but especially taking part in the growth of others)
3. Quality of what I take part in
4. Work with others (and being in the same room is important!)
5. Pleasure

Based on that, I developed my hypothetical dream job: Being responsible for a small, excellent team. Good relations and interactions with the outside environment. An open-minded management. And a top-notch coffee machine on the desk.

How do I get there? That's the tricky part. I have a pretty unique combination of skills and interests that doesn't really match the job offers I see floating around. Thinking about it cynically, I have to remind that "motivational" poster:
Quote:
Just because you are unique doesn't mean you are useful.

But I feel that I could be useful. I see so many inefficiencies, communication disasters, stumbling from one little crisis to the next one. For many, "that's life". For me, those are learning opportunities. Chances to improve.

I plan seeking professional career counsel. I will talk to friends of different ages and walks of life. And I ask for your advice. Would you stay or go? Do you see potential to improve the current situation? What kind of job might fit my portfolio? Do you have similar experiences?

Please, share your thoughts.
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Warren Fitzpatrick
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First, I'm sorry this has been a struggle for you to get where you want to be, but what I kept noticing throughout was your desire to connect with people. That screamed "being a teacher" to me, and I'm assuming with your skillset, it still needs to be taught.

Worst case scenario - remember the angels & hold the line. Patience often leads to what we want on its own. That doesn't mean refusing to mention it, but it does mean that situations change, and often, they change to a closer version of what we want and need. At least that's been my life experience several times.
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Re: Seeking advice & 'chocolate cake in a bag daily' is the LIE!
surprise "Eating 'chocolate cake' in a 'bag'!" DAILY isn't 'sufficient' enough? Man, we have neither available here, so, consider THAT: "song sung blues"~
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I say self teach yourself Node, Angular, React, ECMAScript 6, Hadoop, and a few of other web tools. Most of them you can stand in minutes.

Get some Java, Groovy, or Scala. A little MySQL. Nothing big, just enough to make your self look like you can handle full stack.

BUT Javascript is key. That is where your focus should be.

Go out and research the NetFlix stack and their software development process. They are becoming the gold standard in web development success stories.

Get on GitHub and create a useful small toolkit that would make the lives of those using the tools mentioned easier. It's doesn't have to be fancy or complex. Just enough to stand up your resume.

You're a developer with ~20 years of experience. It won't take much to bring your skills up to a contemporary level.

THEN, find a small company, a start up. I'm talking a startup that is working in the cloud. EVERYONE is moving to cloud...Even big companies like IBM. Cloud is key. You need to be there, or be left behind.

A small cloud based service company is the key. They don't even have to be successful. Get those skills, and your fresh.

My biggest recommendation. Get out of the same old, same old. It's a dead end in the business.
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warrenfitz45 wrote:
First, I'm sorry this has been a struggle for you to get where you want to be, but what I kept noticing throughout was your desire to connect with people. That screamed "being a teacher" to me, and I'm assuming with your skillset, it still needs to be taught.


I have thought about teaching. And I think I will do that one day, at least as a side job. But I don't feel I'm ready for that yet. The best teachers I remember where those with tons and tons of stories to tell from their work experience. I want to gather some more of that, before I become teacher. But I'll run the thought past a few teachers I know.

warrenfitz45 wrote:
Worst case scenario - remember the angels & hold the line. Patience often leads to what we want on its own. That doesn't mean refusing to mention it, but it does mean that situations change, and often, they change to a closer version of what we want and need. At least that's been my life experience several times.


I feel I have already been patient for very long. I only have maybe 30 years until retirement age.
Also, some of the things that make me unhappy are deeply rooted into corporate culture. (Doesn't mean they are bad in general - a corporate culture is always tuned towards survival of the organization within its environment. Or else the company goes belly-up eventually.)

GROGnads wrote:
surprise "Eating 'chocolate cake' in a 'bag'!" DAILY isn't 'sufficient' enough? Man, we have neither available here, so, consider THAT: "song sung blues"~


Man, I know I am having luxury problems. Doesn't change that I don't feel happy.

MWChapel wrote:
I say self teach yourself Node, Angular, React, ECMAScript 6, Hadoop, and a few of other web tools. Most of them you can stand in minutes.

Get some Java, Groovy, or Scala. A little MySQL. Nothing big, just enough to make your self look like you can handle full stack.

BUT Javascript is key. That is where your focus should be.


I could do that. Like you said, I could update my tech skills to a point that make me interesting for a lot of jobs within half a year. The point is: While I am still good at tech stuff, and still like to solve technical problems, what really fires me up is people stuff.
Now...were you saying "get the tech skills for a new tech job", or were you saying "get the tech skills to pave your way for a new tech+people job"?

MWChapel wrote:
My biggest recommendation. Get out of the same old, same old. It's a dead end in the business.


The business side is solid. The products are good. Never any financial troubles, in all the years. It's the same old, same old that bothers me.
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Asperamanca wrote:


I could do that. Like you said, I could update my tech skills to a point that make me interesting for a lot of jobs within half a year. The point is: While I am still good at tech stuff, and still like to solve technical problems, what really fires me up is people stuff.
Now...were you saying "get the tech skills for a new tech job", or were you saying "get the tech skills to pave your way for a new tech+people job"?



I'm saying go new, go small. It seems like the "people" are more invested in companies that everyone has a stake rather that being a cog in a big company. But to go small, small companies are where the innovation is at, and you have to have those new, innovative skills.
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While we don't have an office in Vienna (we do in Berlin), one of the main gigs of the company I work for is teaching extreme programming to software devs in other teams. It involves a lot of pair programming. So, it is a combo of communication, interaction, and programming. Such jobs do exist, so you might ask around in discussion groups for the fied(s) you are interested in.
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17 years in a single job is crazy long for high tech these days. I've never gone more than 9.

I think it sounds like you're ready for a change. I'd dust off the resume and look around, see what else is available. It's a bit scary to leave a job that is comfortable and secure, but change is good from time to time, and it sounds like you're long past due for a big change.
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I'm not sure Americans can give you advice that accounts properly for the culture of Austrian or Vienna, myself included.

Here, 17 years at one company is considered too long for a software developer. You haven't done enough different things. Still, that's only going to get worse, so if you want to move, you need to do so.

The best thing is to find a job through personal contacts, such as someone who has left your current company, a customer, etc. Or someone you meet professionally.

You might consider taking some courses to teach you new dev skills. While you can probably learn them on your own, the contacts you make may be valuable. I would not go around saying, "I'm looking for a new job," but, "I'm looking for a challenge." But, that may be my culture talking.

You will probably be moving to a company with a different corporate culture than you're used to. But, with the Vienna metro area about 30% of Austria, you probably don't need to move your home.

Big companies tend to be bureaucratic, slow-moving, and loving of pigeon-holing people in job descriptions; I think, like where you are now. But, a big company that does a lot of development may allow you to change jobs within the company and provide room for growth.

Medium size companies can allow more flexibility and responsibility.

Small companies are great, but if they succeed, they have to make the difficult transition to a medium size company; many fail the transition. They can also just completely fail--not that this can't happen to other sizes of companies.

Good luck!
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Chanfan wrote:
While we don't have an office in Vienna (we do in Berlin), one of the main gigs of the company I work for is teaching extreme programming to software devs in other teams.


I was interested in that something like 10 years ago. But my boss decided against adopting it, and with no way to practice, I forgot about it eventually.

I think nowadays, something like scrum master would be more up my alley. But of course, hiring companies not only expect the certificate, but also experience. I cannot get that on my current team.
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Tall_Walt wrote:
I'm not sure Americans can give you advice that accounts properly for the culture of Austrian or Vienna, myself included.


No worries. I'll talk to plenty of people who know the local culture. But sometimes it's refreshing to hear a perspective from someone who "doesn't know what is not possible".

Tall_Walt wrote:
Here, 17 years at one company is considered too long for a software developer. You haven't done enough different things. Still, that's only going to get worse, so if you want to move, you need to do so.


I think it's not considered as "bad" here, but it's still a way-above-average stay. It might be a liability in a job search.

Tall_Walt wrote:
The best thing is to find a job through personal contacts, such as someone who has left your current company, a customer, etc. Or someone you meet professionally.


That's 100% Austrian culture.

Tall_Walt wrote:
You might consider taking some courses to teach you new dev skills. While you can probably learn them on your own, the contacts you make may be valuable.


That's a good thought, but hang on there a second: You imply (and there's nothing wrong about it) that I need to brush up my dev skills. Chapel was quite explicit on that.
Don't you think there is an opportunity for someone with technical background who can understand and work with tech-savvy people? Who can translate requirements between "customer-speak" and "tech-speak", make sure a team runs smoothly? Do you believe I would absolutely need a tech-skill update for that?

Tall_Walt wrote:
You will probably be moving to a company with a different corporate culture than you're used to. But, with the Vienna metro area about 30% of Austria, you probably don't need to move your home.


There are certainly opportunities within reach.

Tall_Walt wrote:
Big companies tend to be bureaucratic, slow-moving, and loving of pigeon-holing people in job descriptions; I think, like where you are now. But, a big company that does a lot of development may allow you to change jobs within the company and provide room for growth.

Medium size companies can allow more flexibility and responsibility.

Small companies are great, but if they succeed, they have to make the difficult transition to a medium size company; many fail the transition. They can also just completely fail--not that this can't happen to other sizes of companies.


I think something between 30 and 500 people would be my sweet spot, but I won't know until I see for myself.
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Asperamanca wrote:
Chanfan wrote:
While we don't have an office in Vienna (we do in Berlin), one of the main gigs of the company I work for is teaching extreme programming to software devs in other teams.


I was interested in that something like 10 years ago. But my boss decided against adopting it, and with no way to practice, I forgot about it eventually.

I think nowadays, something like scrum master would be more up my alley. But of course, hiring companies not only expect the certificate, but also experience. I cannot get that on my current team.
Not to rain on your parade, but scrum master in my experience isn't really a title - in my teams, we usually rotate scrum master, unless we have one engineer who really enjoys doing it. Putting "experienced in agile development" is good on a resume, "experienced scrum master" not so much, even though they mean about the same thing.
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Asperamanca wrote:

Don't you think there is an opportunity for someone with technical background who can understand and work with tech-savvy people? Who can translate requirements between "customer-speak" and "tech-speak", make sure a team runs smoothly? Do you believe I would absolutely need a tech-skill update for that?


I've interviewed probably two dozen people(maybe three) in the last three months for Project management/Program management. And I've interviewed some very tech-savvy people. But I found if they didn't understand the world we live in, the stack, the continuous delivery model, the expectations of deployment and infrastructure, they were not going to be productive members of what we do.

What they did in the past and what we did in a lot of cases just didn't translate.

And from what I experienced, Scrummasters were usually a side job of a senior or staff development engineer, not a stand alone job.
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Asperamanca wrote:
Tall_Walt wrote:
You might consider taking some courses to teach you new dev skills. While you can probably learn them on your own, the contacts you make may be valuable.

That's a good thought, but hang on there a second: You imply (and there's nothing wrong about it) that I need to brush up my dev skills. Chapel was quite explicit on that.
Don't you think there is an opportunity for someone with technical background who can understand and work with tech-savvy people? Who can translate requirements between "customer-speak" and "tech-speak", make sure a team runs smoothly? Do you believe I would absolutely need a tech-skill update for that?

I didn't make it clear, but primarily I suggested classes to broaden your contacts; secondarily, knowing the latest tools can't be a bad thing.

The best companies, in my opinion, will promote managers from within, so you have to get in first. Exceptions are start-ups, but they're likely to want an experienced manager with knowledge of whatever they're doing, or at least the tools they're using.

If you want to shift to Marketing, I've seen people do it, but it's a difficult transition. A tech person in Marketing tends to get stuck with all the tech busy-work.
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Good points, all. Of course, brushing up my tech skills will never hurt for an interview. I think I'll get a bearing what's wanted around here, and see where it intersects with my main interests.

Maybe my issue is that what companies mostly seem to want are specialists. And I am becoming more of a generalist, with specializations in a few fields. I am good at C++/Qt. I wrote part of the build system. I am good at requirement analysis. I can prepare and hold creativity workshops. I have dabbled in marketing and branding. I am a certified knowledge manager. I have written process regulations. I have made budget estimations and project schedules. I have taken part in developing a long-term development road map. I have co-organized events. And more.

Are you telling me the only thing people will look for is whether my tech skills are up-to-date?
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Everything is going to depend on the job you're trying to get. Myself, I can really only comment on the programming side, with a little knowledge on the Marketing side.

But, you probably won't be the only person applying for any position, so you have to be the best candidate in some respect.
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So what is the stack?
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First of all excellent job of trying to face your challenge. If I calculate backwards from the time you joined, you are a at a crucial career step. Basically the age you have now is the moment for either a big change preferably upwards and better or to settle for what you have and make the most of that. Neither decision is perse right or wrong - however too many people look back about ten years later than you are doing now and think: 'if only...'

So whatever you decide to do after thinking, consulting around and listening to BGGers - it is the RIGHT decision. Your timing is right, the opportunities are what they are and you are facing up to your issue. Whatever you do - once you decide - do not waiver and go for it.

Others have made good points above and I totally defer to Chapel and the IT experts on the skill set. You are the best judge there of what you can do and what you can bring. I dont agree with the teacher side - those who can do, those who cant teach (unless they are over 60). You are still young and have the advantage of experience as well as the bagage that comes with it. I do understand what Chapel is saying is that some 'experienced people' simply cant follow any more on the other hand some can AND have been through the wars to get the job done when the going got tough. If that is you - that is valuable - just the one or the other lacks something.


In what you wrote three things jumped out at me:

Quote:
Do I see a career path with this job? Not really. Software development is only a small part of what the corporation does, even within the R&D sector. So I am not really a good fit for many potential technology-related positions. Plus, most of those would require me to move to another city. I love traveling now and then, but I have my roots here. My family. My home. My friends. My wife's job.


This is a quite typical European point of view - my job sucks but it pays the rent and I am comfy. If there is one thing admirable about our american friends it is their willingness to change, move and uproot themselves to do something new. Change is good - change is painful and unsettling - change cannot be reversed ( you cant go home again as they say). As I know Austria quite well and have much sympathy for its many virtues, I also know it as a rigid corporatist country with a tendency to inflexibility and provincialism. This is a generalisation so dont take it personally but if you value your stability and status quo more than the desire to grow and do something else your decision should be clear. Make the most of what you are doing now and ensure that it includes a safe path to that dangerous part of your career when you are over 50. If there is a real risk a long term strategy with your current employer risks getting you fired between 45 and 55 start making contingency plans.

One of my best friends from high school worked all his life as a programmer in a french telecoms company when quite suddenly at age 48 he was told the whole business he was working in would be dissolved. He got a great package and what not but 2.5 years later - no job possibilities at all because unemployable for much the reasons Chapel gave. Dont worry about him - he figured it out after a dozen or so interviews and has got himself on a course as a garden designer and is starting his own company doing that. Not sure whether it will succeed nor is it a path that I would relish had I been in his place but kudos to him for going for it.

Anyway - think carefully - your current job is not THAT bad, perhaps there are strategies to get more where you are. If you are the youngster there are ways to climb up even over the old guard - but you will need to fight for that. Thats not always pleasant but you can choose to be a medium fish in a small pond and have a perfectly great career and life as a result.

Ok that is the conservative POV which I sense your Austrian traditional view might tend to. Again thats not necessarily bad as long as you know what you are giving up.

Quote:
A couple of years went by. I realized that I became more and more interested in people. Perception. Communication. Motivation. Conflict.


This spells out one word: Management. Your argument that the company makes mostly other things than what you do is not convincing. By being an insider you have a huge head start on anyone from outside who might be hired for a position, that person doesnt know squat and you at least know some. When something new is started or even ongoing projects - everyone starts from scratch. Its just the experience that gets you through more efficiently than others. What worries me in your description is that in 17 years with the company they see you as the junior side-kick. This is no good - either you have the cojones you describe above, in which case you must fight to get authority or you dont in which case its back to scenario one.

In today's world you çan not only be 'manager'- in that case you are an overhead. So operational and practical responsibilities such as client contacts/development go hand in hand with that. You dont get into those positions by not actively seeking them out in your company, its direct outside circle or the wider world. You sound like you want to - but sorry - it doesnt sound that convincing to me.

Which brings me to the third point that struck me. You speak of 'angels' and 'working alone' and 'noone to talk to'... Sorry this is the real world - angels do not exist and luck is something that can be forced by placing yourself in the position to get lucky. That the big decisions are lonely - yeah well if you want a friend get a dog. Thats not what the workplace is there for - its great when it does but you can not count on that.

Now I do hear you when you say you are unhappy, that has a simple root cause: you are disatisfied with what you have achieved in the recent years. You think and want to do more, now that kindergarten is over however you will need to fight for that. Honestly your current spot and considering your secondary considerations - doesnt sound so bad and maybe you should just expand your ambitions there. By taking a conscious decision to do that the unhapiness may well be lifted. On the other hand it does sound like you have the skills to do more, dont be shy and get out there. The European start-up environment is quite different from the US one but it is feasible, or look inside your corporation and be ambitious.

Good luck with your ruminations and remember: whatever you decide to do, it is the RIGHT choice.
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Jythier wrote:
So what is the stack?


"The Stack" is the end to end 3rd party tech tree(In gamer terms) that a software company employs to deliver their product.

For instance here is Netflix's "stack". I like to use them as a for examples, as they are an almost complete Javascript shop that uses 30% of ALL the internet traffic on the planet, and their continuous development model is one that a lot web companies have been trying to emulate recently.
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TrustyJules wrote:
Neither decision is perse right or wrong


I am fully aware of that. I will gather information, talk to people, look for opportunities, inside and outside. Then I will make a decision, and stick to it.

TrustyJules wrote:

In what you wrote three things jumped out at me:

Quote:
...I have my roots here...


This is a quite typical European point of view - my job sucks but it pays the rent and I am comfy.


I think it's a valid point of view. I have a lot of colleagues who fit that exactly. At the end it comes down to whether I can be happy that way. Because for me, 'success' isn't money or status or power, but sustained happiness.

TrustyJules wrote:
If there is one thing admirable about our american friends it is their willingness to change, move and uproot themselves to do something new.


What do you do if there are two people living together, and one is happy job-wise, the other is not so happy? Stay or move? Add to that the fact I would have to sell a house that has been in the family for generations...it's just a lot easier to look for opportunities within the area - at least for now.

TrustyJules wrote:
I also know it as a rigid corporatist country with a tendency to inflexibility and provincialism.


Probably true for many companies. But I know there are exceptions even in Austria, especially in younger tech companies.

TrustyJules wrote:
Quote:
A couple of years went by. I realized that I became more and more interested in people. Perception. Communication. Motivation. Conflict.


This spells out one word: Management. Your argument that the company makes mostly other things than what you do is not convincing. By being an insider you have a huge head start on anyone from outside who might be hired for a position, that person doesnt know squat and you at least know some.


Yes, it does spell management. The trouble is this: The culture we have is very technology-centered. So if you don't know your tech, you won't be manager. But most what the business area does involves heavy machinery. I probably know more than average about this machinery by now, I don't stand a chance against someone with a mechanical engineering degree. Which leaves the much narrower segment that works with small devices and software. Here the culture strongly favors seniority.

But reading your comments made the think long and hard about this. Now I do see some potential opportunities. Not to attain an already existing position, but maybe to attain one that does not yet exist, but will emerge within the next years. Technology shifts. New products might be needed. Here my software background might be valuable. It's all very speculative, of course.

TrustyJules wrote:
What worries me in your description is that in 17 years with the company they see you as the junior side-kick. This is no good - either you have the cojones you describe above, in which case you must fight to get authority or you dont in which case its back to scenario one.


First, it isn't as bad as it sounded. It's only a few colleagues now who do that, sometimes half-jokingly, and even those seem to respect me for my know-how. At least they come and ask for advice.

"Fight for authority" is a no-go in our company culture. If you know Austrian culture in general, you also know it's notoriously avoiding conflict. If I climb the steps within a company, I have to do that on the terms of the culture that exists (although I might at the same time work to change that culture - slowly).
That doesn't mean I have to be timid, sit back and wait for things to happen, though. I have a pretty good idea what I would need to do, and I could do more of that.

Thinking about this brings me to a very good question I have to ask myself: Even assuming I succeed and "climb up the ladder". The job would be different, the tasks would be different. Many people would be the same. And the culture would be the same. I will have to think long and hard how I feel about the company culture I am immersed in.

TrustyJules wrote:
Which brings me to the third point that struck me. You speak of 'angels' and 'working alone' and 'noone to talk to'... Sorry this is the real world - angels do not exist and luck is something that can be forced by placing yourself in the position to get lucky. That the big decisions are lonely - yeah well if you want a friend get a dog. Thats not what the workplace is there for - its great when it does but you can not count on that.


Of course it wasn't angels, but it makes for a nice story. In both cases I must have made the impression that I can handle the challenge, so I was given the opportunity.

"If you want a friend get a dog" was a great line in a movie, but sorry, it's so wrong. No really important decision affecting an organization should be made by a lone person on a lone desk. A single mind is simply not capable of seeing and foreseeing all eventualities and potential consequences, in all facets and aspects of the decision. A team can miss things, too. But the probabilities are much lower.
Maybe one person has the "final" word, and that's OK, but information must come from many sources.

TrustyJules wrote:
Honestly your current spot and considering your secondary considerations - doesnt sound so bad and maybe you should just expand your ambitions there. By taking a conscious decision to do that the unhapiness may well be lifted. On the other hand it does sound like you have the skills to do more, dont be shy and get out there. The European start-up environment is quite different from the US one but it is feasible, or look inside your corporation and be ambitious.


I am sure any decision will be good for me. Because I will know why I have taken it.
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Jythier wrote:
So what is the stack?
...of 'pancakes' atop of a 'Rabbit's noggin', of course! Have you never yet SEEN this? Under the 'proverbial GROK'!

For the OP, go over and check out the "Salt Mine Tour" around there, and get a 'group photo' from this too. cool
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