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Subject: My Custom Box Project rss

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Luke Matthews
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About four months ago, I posted this instructional article about building custom graphics-wrapped chipboard boxes for card games. Since then, I’ve been putting my own knowledge to good use, replacing the boxes for 27 of my own card games. I thought you guys might like to see the results.

My custom Guillotine box was the first box I ever created using this method. I’ve re-built it for this new set because I slightly altered, and standardized, the form factor across all the new boxes.

If you aren’t interested in the nitty-gritty details, feel free to just scroll through these pretty pictures.

Otherwise, read on for more details.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


The impetus behind making these boxes was entirely form-factor. One of the things that annoys me about the board game industry is the utter lack of box-size standardization. For larger games, most companies at least try to keep to only a few variations, but even among those they’re not entirely standardized, so boxes vary a lot.

It’s even worse with card games and smaller games. I’ve been thankful that companies like Z-Man, Kosmos, and Mayfair have the same size for a lot of their smaller games (Trambahn, Targi, and Patchwork are all in the same size box, for example), but so many other games are just crammed into whatever box they can find.

So, I created a standard face-print for card games, regardless of the number of cards or components. The boxes all vary in length, but they’re all the same dimensions for height and width, so they look really nice on the shelf together.

The first set I created were for any card games I owned that only included cards and a rulebook, the exceptions (technically) being Innovation and Innovation: Echoes of the Past. I had to create custom player “boards” the same size as a standard card, which I just sleeved and tossed in with the cards.

Here’s the imgur gallery of the simple boxes.

You'll notice that many of these games have different sized cards, yet the boxes are all the same footprint. The basic design is centered on standard American TCG-sized cards (like Star Realms). I added spacers into the riser inside the boxes to accommodate thinner cards. Two spacers (one on each side) are added for Euro Board Game sized cards (like Targi), and four spacers are added for American Board Game sized cards (like Fluxx). This way, the cards don't rattle around in the box, but the box stays the same size across all the card games.

I feel I have to comment on the one part of this project that might set some people’s teeth to grinding: rulebooks. Most standard rulebooks won’t fit in these boxes as designed. In almost all cases, I’ve simply folded up the rulebook to fit in with the cards. I know some will see that as “destroying” the rulebooks, but that doesn’t really bother me in the grand scheme of things. In some cases, such as Lanterns: The Harvest Festival and Honor of the Samurai, I’ll have to create custom rulebooks, because they’re just too big even to fold up.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Once I’d finished all the basic games, I started work on card games that also came with other components like tokens or player boards. In some cases, I was able to simply create a bit-box to hold the components. For others – like Splendor and Celestia - I had to get more creative, as you’ll see below.

MOTTAINAI DELUXE

Mottainai required the from-scratch creation of a new player board, which I designed to be an accordion-fold board that would fit right in with the cards. I’m not 100% happy with the boards just yet, but they’re pretty and mostly functional. The box itself is simply divided into sections, one for each deck and one in the middle for the custom player boards.





CITADELS

Citadels was pretty straightforward, just requiring a bit-box for the money, chits, and first player marker. Creating the bit boxes is identical to creating the card boxes, just on a smaller scale, and designed to fit inside each card box.





TARGI

Another simple bit box. This is actually a re-creation of one of my prototype card boxes, which I posted about on r/Boardgames back in November of last year. The original Targi box was my second custom box, and the first one to implement a bit box.





CASTLES OF BURGUNDY: THE CARD GAME

This was my first attempt at a box that maintained the same form factor as my other boxes, but was designed for smaller cards. I built a platform inside the box to raise the cards up to appropriate height, and turned them sideways to fit two rows of cards in a much smaller space. That insert that allowed for the smaller cards was my test case, leading to different implementations in some of the boxes you’ll see later.




THE GRIZZLED

This one was pretty easy. Just a bit box in the middle, and a separate space specifically for the first player marker.






HONOR OF THE SAMURAI

This was my first box incorporating a dice well. I built a platform for the dice to sit on, then carved a sized well out of foamcore to hold them in place.






BIBLIOS

Rather than create a new board for Biblios, I just took the original board that came with the game and cut it, turning it into a dual-fold board. It worked out way better than I thought it would. As a backup, I printed the board face on the top of the box. I used the same method for the dice well here that I used for Honor of the Samurai[b].






[b]LANTERNS: THE HARVEST FESTIVAL


All the work I’d done earlier on accommodating smaller cards helped here for both the cards and the tiles. A bit box, of course, and a custom shaped well for the boat token. Foamcore would’ve been too thick for this particular custom part, so I cut the well for the boat out of chipboard.








SAN JUAN

For something so conceptually simple, the tile well in this box was a bitch to assemble. It turned out well, though.







JAIPUR

I could’ve just made a bit-box to hold the Jaipur tokens and made a much smaller box, but I decided to go all-out and create poker-chip tokens for the game, [url= https://www.reddit.com/r/boardgames/comments/4lrbca/poker_ch...)]just like I did for the Soldier Tokens in Kingsburg.[/url] So, by extension, I had to make a bigger box.








SPLENDOR

This is probably my favorite box for functionality as well as aesthetics. The retail Splendor box is ridiculous, so compacting everything down for this one was a treat. I’m not 100% fond of how the chip rack turned out aesthetically, but it’s functional and that’s really what matters. I’ll probably tinker with a way to improve it going forward.




CELESTIA

This is, by a wide margin, the longest of the boxes I created. I was frustrated with how everything sort of crammed back into the Celestia box, especially after sleeving the cards. So, I dreamed this up and built it off-the-cuff. It’s probably my funkiest design by necessity, but I love the way it turned out.





* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


WHY DO IT?

Well, first off, I did it for fun. I really enjoy building custom stuff for my games, be it foamcore inserts or new boxes.

But really, it’s all about the aesthetics. These boxes, in some cases, are technically larger than their original counterparts, so it’s not always technically efficient to make them. But with the wide variety of box sizes for small games, I like the way the games look better on the shelf in the new boxes.

For example, here’s what twelve of the game boxes looked like before…



…and here’s what those same twelve games look like now.



The boxes stack very nicely, and the shelves just look cleaner and less cluttered now. I can even stack them alongside the boxes for the Ascension Year One and Year Two boxes, as well as Paperback (which, incidentally, was the inspiration for this box design).

Here’s two shelves of custom boxes:



And here’s the final result:



Jaipur, Star Realms, and Targi sit among our 2-player specific games. The rest take up two full shelves, and are spilling onto a third. I’m sure, over time, I’ll manage to fill up that third shelf with custom boxes.

Anyway, I hope you guys enjoyed looking through my custom work. If anyone out there has created any boxes using my tutorial I’d love to see your final results. Thanks, and happy gaming!
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maf man
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Andrew J.
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I'm floored. I will be shelving (no pun intended) my previous plan and immediately learning how to make these little suckers. I could easily see a large chunk of my small games with this sort of box, especially Star Realms and similar.

Thanks much for sharing!
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Jim Parkin
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I... I... I...


This changes everything.
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Iken Owens
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wow Again I am frustrated that BGG only let's me give one thumb.
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Don Beck
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Excellent work. You, my friend, are one creative creature!
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Inappropriate Andy
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These look absolutely fantastic - really, really attractive thumbsup
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Ghislain LEVEQUE
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OMG, awesome !
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Chris Laudermilk
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I'll add another "awesome!" compliment. Then I'm going to head over to your tutorial thread & study that. I have a few PnP card games in need of boxes and this looks to resolve that omission nicely.
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Andrew J.
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claudermilk wrote:
I'll add another "awesome!" compliment. Then I'm going to head over to your tutorial thread & study that. I have a few PnP card games in need of boxes and this looks to resolve that omission nicely.


I too am looking to craft some of these as soon as I can order the supplies from Amazon. Star Realms, Pit, Rook, a lot of my small box games could use this technique.
 
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Jim Parkin
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aaj94 wrote:
claudermilk wrote:
I'll add another "awesome!" compliment. Then I'm going to head over to your tutorial thread & study that. I have a few PnP card games in need of boxes and this looks to resolve that omission nicely.


I too am looking to craft some of these as soon as I can order the supplies from Amazon. Star Realms, Pit, Rook, a lot of my small box games could use this technique.

Word.
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Luke Matthews
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It's really awesome to see people excited about making some new boxes based on my tutorial. The original tutorial got a little attention, but kind of faded into the background really quick. I'm glad this post brought it some more attention.

I'd love to see your final results whenever any of you make some new boxes for your games!
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Jesse Daniels
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GeekElite wrote:
It's really awesome to see people excited about making some new boxes based on my tutorial. The original tutorial got a little attention, but kind of faded into the background really quick. I'm glad this post brought it some more attention.

I'd love to see your final results whenever any of you make some new boxes for your games!


So amazing!
They look so great in matching box sizes on the shelf.

Def gonna look into this as soon as I'm done crowdfunding my current game (I'm spending a lot of time designing that box and cards and promoting)
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Andrew J.
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GeekElite wrote:
It's really awesome to see people excited about making some new boxes based on my tutorial. The original tutorial got a little attention, but kind of faded into the background really quick. I'm glad this post brought it some more attention.

I'd love to see your final results whenever any of you make some new boxes for your games!


I've already planned out a star realms box (with room for expansions), and I'm working on a standard rectangular box for my smaller games as well.
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David Debien
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Seeing this makes me mad that I cant buy these games in this format!
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Ok, so I've come back with questions, Luke. I finally completed my first box in this format, and I can just say I have even more respect for your entire shelf because these things are tricky for sure!

I had a lot of trouble getting exact measurements, leading to me scrapping my first attempt and wasting a sheet of chipboard. On my second try, I finally got three elements that all fit together: riser, bottom, top. I've also worked out a template for an exactly square 77x77 mm box that I plan on using for most of my card games so that they are all the same and I can get better at the same cuts:


(man I miss my old phone camera)

Star Realms needed a bigger box, though, and this has been my first attempt. Here are my questions:

1) How do you make the linen wrap in the riser line up when you have to use more than one sheet? 11" was too short to go all the way around my star realms box, so I had to use two pieces. The inside part of the linen is uneven, and it bugs me. A possible solution would be to glue a full linen sheet on the inside of each riser piece, then when you wrap around at least it would be uneven on a white background. Thoughts?

2) Holy cow measurements are hard. Even measuring very exactly I had issues because of the tolerance in my pencil lines and my ruler would often be just a bit off leading to some 1mm gaps. Once wrapped in paper, I guess I can't see them, so maybe this resolves itself.

3) "I'm done! Now to just put the lid on and...well crap."


I swear these were aligned in Photoshop, though I did have to adjust my template on the fly and that's probably the culprit here. I'm going to leave it as is to remind me of my own mortality.

I found the best way to do the faces was to create a single 740x960 (my box face) document, mock up my cover design, and then split it in two for applying to the box. Is there any way to mitigate the drift from the flap folding over, did any of your boxes turn out this way?

4) My flaps to fold over the edges were far too flimsy to hold. But then, any bigger and it wouldn't have fit on 8.5x11. Spray Adhesive worked worse than plain Elmer's glue, which I was able to apply directly where I needed to. But for both the top and bottom, I needed to tape down the folded over flaps, which doesn't look very clean.

--

Overall though, this is a great-looking box (better than any of my previous attempts!) and I'm looking forward to getting better as I try to move through the rest of my collection.
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Luke Matthews
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aaj94 wrote:
Ok, so I've come back with questions, Luke. I finally completed my first box in this format, and I can just say I have even more respect for your entire shelf because these things are tricky for sure!

I had a lot of trouble getting exact measurements, leading to me scrapping my first attempt and wasting a sheet of chipboard. On my second try, I finally got three elements that all fit together: riser, bottom, top. I've also worked out a template for an exactly square 77x77 mm box that I plan on using for most of my card games so that they are all the same and I can get better at the same cuts:


(man I miss my old phone camera)

So, there are two big pieces of advice I have for cutting based on your post. First: you might need a new ruler? You mention the "tolerances" of your ruler earlier and I feel like maybe whatever ruler you're using just isn't quite precise enough? I might be misinterpreting, but that's how it sounds.

Second: Don't lay out all of your measurements on a piece of chipboard and then do cutting, like you illustrate in the picture. Part of the problem with that is that there will always be slight (fractions of a millimeter)variances in your cuts and widths depending on your pencil marks and where you place your straight-edge for cutting. When you lay out all your marks and then do the cuts, you end up compounding some of those variances, which might be what's leading to you having full-millimeter differences in your cuts.

Here's how I do it: For example, if I need several pieces that are all 75mm wide, but a couple of different lengths/heights, I'll measure and cut a 75mm strip off of the chipboard, then individually measure and cut each piece from that strip. It sounds a little tedious, maybe, but measuring each cut new from the edge of a piece of chipboard ensures that you're not compounding the slight variances that arise from cutting.

aaj94 wrote:
Star Realms needed a bigger box, though, and this has been my first attempt. Here are my questions:

1) How do you make the linen wrap in the riser line up when you have to use more than one sheet? 11" was too short to go all the way around my star realms box, so I had to use two pieces. The inside part of the linen is uneven, and it bugs me. A possible solution would be to glue a full linen sheet on the inside of each riser piece, then when you wrap around at least it would be uneven on a white background. Thoughts?


Before I started buying larger linen sheets (the ones I use now are 12"x18"), I had to do the same thing. Here's how I do it: Cut a strip off of the long edge of your linen paper however wide you want. Mine are 45mm wide, so I'll discuss using that size.

Measure 25mm from the top of your riser, and make marks at that spot at all of the corners, on all 4 sides of the riser. Then, when you're gluing the linen strip around the top of your riser, use those markings to keep the paper parallel to the top. What you should end up with is 25mm on the outside and roughly 19mm on the inside (taking roughly 1mm into account for the thickness of the chipboard).

As far as using two pieces is concerned, you need each piece to be the right length to cover two sides of your riser, with some overlap. For example: If your riser is 71mm on all four sides, each of your two pieces should be roughly 162mm long. A 162mm long strip would cover two sides (71+71=142) with a 10mm overlap on either end.

Note: You can conceivably have one of your two pieces be shorter, without the extra overlap. Since one strip will cover two sides, then an extra 10mm overlap on either end, you can cut the second strip to be (in this example) just 142mm long, since it will then overlap with the excess from the first strip.

Using the measured markings on the outside should make it possible to keep them even. Hopefully this makes sense.

aaj94 wrote:
2) Holy cow measurements are hard. Even measuring very exactly I had issues because of the tolerance in my pencil lines and my ruler would often be just a bit off leading to some 1mm gaps. Once wrapped in paper, I guess I can't see them, so maybe this resolves itself.

See my earlier comment. You might consider getting a good .5mm mechanical pencil so you can keep your lines pretty thin and consistent, in addition to the cutting advice above.

aaj94 wrote:
3) "I'm done! Now to just put the lid on and...well crap."


I swear these were aligned in Photoshop, though I did have to adjust my template on the fly and that's probably the culprit here. I'm going to leave it as is to remind me of my own mortality.

I found the best way to do the faces was to create a single 740x960 (my box face) document, mock up my cover design, and then split it in two for applying to the box. Is there any way to mitigate the drift from the flap folding over, did any of your boxes turn out this way?


So, this is the hardest part for me to describe, but I'll do my best. The fact that you're using Photoshop might make it easier for me.

You have it right as far as how to create the images for the box sides. Say the total side of your closed box, bottom and lid, is 100mm tall by 150mm wide (just random numbers). You create a 100x150 image whole, then split it for the final wrap. But you have to get these measurements the final, constructed box. I might be wrong, but it looks like perhaps your star realms box is off because you took the measurements from just the side pieces as they were cut, and didn't account for the extra 3 to 4mm that are added by the chipboard on the top and bottom of the box.

How you split it properly is what's hard to describe, but here goes:

First and foremost, in Photoshop, guides are your savior. Spend the time and energy to set up guides for your template and ensure the measurements on them are correct before continuing. You'll thank yourself later.

Generally, your template for the wrap of one half of your box - say, your lid - will look like a cross, with the top image in the middle and the images for all 4 sides arrayed around each side of the top image. When you're laying out this template, use the full box-side image you created at the start - don't worry about chopping it up, because that part will take care of itself.

So, when you're making the lid, you take your box-side image and align the very top edge of that image with the side of the box-top image. If you've set up your template and measurements right, that should be all you need to do, because once you cut your wrap out you'll automatically trim away the bottom half of the image, and if you're trimming it correctly it'll align at the end.

When you're making the bottom, you do the opposite. You still use the whole image, but instead you align the bottom edge with the side of your box-bottom image.

You always want to be measuring from the box-top image away (toward where the box will be split). DO NOT try to figure out the split first, then figure out where the image will connect with your box-top image, that way lies madness.

Man, I hope I'm describing this well, because I feel like I'm making zero sense. I'll see if I can put together some images to help.

aaj94 wrote:
4) My flaps to fold over the edges were far too flimsy to hold. But then, any bigger and it wouldn't have fit on 8.5x11. Spray Adhesive worked worse than plain Elmer's glue, which I was able to apply directly where I needed to. But for both the top and bottom, I needed to tape down the folded over flaps, which doesn't look very clean.

Yeah, this is definitely an issue I understand. You need to have at least 15mm of paper to fold over inside the box, or else the tension on the paper's just going to pull it loose. There are three things that can help solve this problem:

1. As I said above, make sure there's plenty of extra paper to fold over, at least 15mm, but it's better if you can fit 20mm.

2. Don't be stingy with the spray adhesive. When you think you've sprayed enough on, give it another pass. It doesn't hurt anything to have extra adhesive.

3. This last one entirely comes with experience: You want to get that wrap onto that box as fast as you can. If you dawdle while you're working on it, the spray adhesive will start to dry and lose adhesion. Since the flaps are both the part with the most tension and the last part you tamp down, they tend to be the part that goes dry easiest and causes the most problems. I wish I had a better piece of advice than "get faster", but it'll come with a few tries.

You can combine glues, too, if that helps. Use spray adhesive to get the majority of the wrap in place, but then before you fold over the flaps, you can paint them with Elmer's or another glue to ensure they'll stay in place. I did that for a few of my earlier boxes, before I got faster at doing the wraps.

aaj94 wrote:
Overall though, this is a great-looking box (better than any of my previous attempts!) and I'm looking forward to getting better as I try to move through the rest of my collection.


It does look really good. A few minor tweaks and you'll be churning out great boxes in no time.

I hope my answers make sense. It's confusing for me to try and describe making box wraps without pictures to illustrate, because I've been using Photoshop for so long that a lot of it just comes naturally to me. Plus, I did a lot of fiddling and trial-and-error to figure it out, so trying to describe the final process is a bit of a bear for me.

Hopefully this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.
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Andrew J.
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Luke, thanks for a really helpful and detailed post!

GeekElite wrote:
aaj94 wrote:
...I had a lot of trouble getting exact measurements...

So, there are two big pieces of advice I have for cutting based on your post. First: you might need a new ruler? You mention the "tolerances" of your ruler earlier and I feel like maybe whatever ruler you're using just isn't quite precise enough? I might be misinterpreting, but that's how it sounds.


The ruler is precise -- it's difficult to explain, but when I measure a distance, first I'll measure out the distance and make three dots, then I'll draw a line through the three dots and that's my cut line. That's where I'm getting some drift as sometimes the dots aren't right on or the line is on the wrong side of the dot, which can lead to a 1mm drift. I think using a better mechanical pencil (I have 0.7) or a fine-tip pen will help.

GeekElite wrote:
Second: Don't lay out all of your measurements on a piece of chipboard and then do cutting, like you illustrate in the picture. Part of the problem with that is that there will always be slight (fractions of a millimeter)variances in your cuts and widths depending on your pencil marks and where you place your straight-edge for cutting. When you lay out all your marks and then do the cuts, you end up compounding some of those variances, which might be what's leading to you having full-millimeter differences in your cuts.

Here's how I do it: For example, if I need several pieces that are all 75mm wide, but a couple of different lengths/heights, I'll measure and cut a 75mm strip off of the chipboard, then individually measure and cut each piece from that strip. It sounds a little tedious, maybe, but measuring each cut new from the edge of a piece of chipboard ensures that you're not compounding the slight variances that arise from cutting.


This is good stuff, and how I plan to do it in the future. I just wanted to lay it out for this one both as a guide to myself, and to make sure I could fit everything on one sheet of chipboard. This is really helpful advice though. Have you had good success with using your just-cut piece as a guide for the next cut?

GeekElite wrote:
Using the measured markings on the outside should make it possible to keep them even. Hopefully this makes sense.


Perfect, this is super helpful. I didn't even think of measuring and marking the riser itself, that totally solves this problem. I was trying to eye it with little success!

GeekElite wrote:
How you split it properly is what's hard to describe

No, you got it exactly right. I totally forgot about the extra layer of chipboard in there and it looks like I was off by just a little more than that amount. I'm convinced some more fine-tuning of my photoshop template will make this work out better. From what you described it sounds like we have a pretty similar setup, here's a screenshot of how I've done mine:



GeekElite wrote:
1. As I said above, make sure there's plenty of extra paper to fold over, at least 15mm, but it's better if you can fit 20mm.

This is where I ran into the limit of 8.5x11. Hopefully it will be less of an issue on smaller boxes, though. I would love 12x18 linen paper but I just bought this box of 8.5x11 so at least for now this is what I have.

GeekElite wrote:
2. Don't be stingy with the spray adhesive. When you think you've sprayed enough on, give it another pass. It doesn't hurt anything to have extra adhesive.

I've run into trouble with 'soaking' before where the paper just gets wet and doesn't stick at all, but I am probably over-compensating. The hybrid you described (spray for the flat parts, brushed glue for the folds) sounds good to me).

Thanks so much for taking the time for a quick answer. I'm going to be printing off my square box wrap at work today and assembling it when I get home -- fingers crossed!

A
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Jesse Daniels
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casualgod wrote:
Seeing this makes me mad that I cant buy these games in this format!


agreed

there should be some more universal sizing with board games
like 4 styles, that's it!

Large box (for big board games)
Medium box (munchkin size)
Tall box (like the awesome ones pictured here)
Tuck box (for small games/only cards)

boom - done
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Luke Matthews
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aaj94 wrote:
Luke, thanks for a really helpful and detailed post!

No problem at all. Glad I could help.

aaj94 wrote:
The ruler is precise -- it's difficult to explain, but when I measure a distance, first I'll measure out the distance and make three dots, then I'll draw a line through the three dots and that's my cut line. That's where I'm getting some drift as sometimes the dots aren't right on or the line is on the wrong side of the dot, which can lead to a 1mm drift. I think using a better mechanical pencil (I have 0.7) or a fine-tip pen will help.

Yeah, without being able to see how you're doing it in person, I don't really have any advice other than your precision will get better the more you do. There are definitely parts of this process that are more art than science, and the more you get to know the quirks of the physical tools you're using, the better able to compensate for them you'll get.

aaj94 wrote:
This is good stuff, and how I plan to do it in the future. I just wanted to lay it out for this one both as a guide to myself, and to make sure I could fit everything on one sheet of chipboard. This is really helpful advice though. Have you had good success with using your just-cut piece as a guide for the next cut?

No, don't do this. Measure each one individually. Using a previous piece as a guide invariably ends up with about (at least) a 1/2mm drift. If you were, say, to use each new cut piece as a guide for the next, by the time you cut 5 or 6 pieces, you'd be off by as much as 2mm+. Even if you used the very first one you cut as a guide for the rest, that first one would end up just slightly off from the rest. You could learn to compensate for that problem, but it's far easier to just measure each one on it's own.

aaj94 wrote:
Perfect, this is super helpful. I didn't even think of measuring and marking the riser itself, that totally solves this problem. I was trying to eye it with little success!

Awesome. Glad I was able to describe that one okay.

aaj94 wrote:
GeekElite wrote:
How you split it properly is what's hard to describe

No, you got it exactly right. I totally forgot about the extra layer of chipboard in there and it looks like I was off by just a little more than that amount. I'm convinced some more fine-tuning of my photoshop template will make this work out better. From what you described it sounds like we have a pretty similar setup, here's a screenshot of how I've done mine:


Yep, your template looks nearly exactly like mine. This is what mine looks like (in my old-ass copy of Photoshop CS3):


Glad to see someone else understands how to create the "wings" properly without me having to describe it.

One of these days I'm going to tackle the wrap tutorial, but my brain locks up every time I try to think of how to write it out.

aaj94 wrote:
GeekElite wrote:
1. As I said above, make sure there's plenty of extra paper to fold over, at least 15mm, but it's better if you can fit 20mm.

This is where I ran into the limit of 8.5x11. Hopefully it will be less of an issue on smaller boxes, though. I would love 12x18 linen paper but I just bought this box of 8.5x11 so at least for now this is what I have.

Yeah, that makes sense. My template in that image above is 9"x12", and I could see how dropping it to 8.5"x11" would be cutting it pretty close. Something to keep in mind, though: There's no real reason to cut off the extra white-space at the edges of that image. That white strip will just be folded into the inside of the box and hidden, so if you need that little extra bit of paper, just leave it attached.

aaj94 wrote:
GeekElite wrote:
2. Don't be stingy with the spray adhesive. When you think you've sprayed enough on, give it another pass. It doesn't hurt anything to have extra adhesive.

I've run into trouble with 'soaking' before where the paper just gets wet and doesn't stick at all, but I am probably over-compensating. The hybrid you described (spray for the flat parts, brushed glue for the folds) sounds good to me).

This might sound like remedial advice, so please don't take offense, but if you're having problems with "soaking", you might be holding your spray adhesive can too close to your paper when spraying. You want the adhesive to lay down in a pretty fine mist that you build up over several passes, so try just pulling the can farther away from the paper.

Also, use strong spray adhesive. I use 3M Super 77.

aaj94 wrote:
Thanks so much for taking the time for a quick answer. I'm going to be printing off my square box wrap at work today and assembling it when I get home -- fingers crossed!

A

Anytime! I look forward to seeing the results!
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Brennan Sheremeto
Canada
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Very awesome and inspiring. I think I will fail at creating the graphics but I will give this a try for fun. However I'll work at developing it in CAD and using a laser to cut/score the chipboard and see how that goes...
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Chris Laudermilk
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Orange County
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amish_rabbi wrote:
However I'll work at developing it in CAD and using a laser to cut/score the chipboard and see how that goes...


CHEATER!!!






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Brennan Sheremeto
Canada
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claudermilk wrote:
amish_rabbi wrote:
However I'll work at developing it in CAD and using a laser to cut/score the chipboard and see how that goes...


CHEATER!!!








I just work with the tools I am given lol.
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Andrew J.
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All right, got another one going and I'm (slowly) improving!



I'm doing a standard square size for all my small card games, so rook is swimming in this box, but it still looks really good. I improved on the tolerances for the printing (there's still some drift, but it's workable) and the cutting as well, though I am still working on making the graphics wrap tight (linen has a weird whitening problem so I always err on the side of caution). You can see the bottom edge is just a little bubbly, but I'm OK with it.

Slowly getting better -- and they look great on my shelf! I'm going to do my favorite solo game, The Shooting Party next, and then keep working on other square boxes: Mil Milhas, 7 Noyabrya, Pit, Hanabi, etc.



Next to my mismatched (though good-looking) Star Realms box.
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Martin DeOlden
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Chino
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3D board game prints: https://www.3dhubs.com/los-angeles/hubs/martin-chino
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Could I get a copy of one of those photoshop templates. I would love to have a starting base to work on.
Even the Rook one would be great as I have mine currently in a small cardstock tuckbox.
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