$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 51.31

3,810 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
24% of Goal | 30 Days Left

Support:

Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
http://bit.ly/2dEid3h
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Turner
Australia
Melbourne
VIC
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Had presumed you were talking about the KS delivery schedule
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Groo
United States
Leesburg
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Phantomwhale wrote:
Had presumed you were talking about the KS delivery schedule


Ha! Beat me to it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Agapow
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
Huh. The more informed can correct me but I thought that asteroid mining was largely a fantasy: the costs associated and the unlikelihood of concentrations of elements mean that its uneconomical.

(With the possible caveat of mining for propellant for use out there: what's mined in space stays in space.)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Simon Skov
Denmark
Copenhagen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm pretty sure the attraction of asteroid mining is mostly to get resources and materials in space without having to lift them from Earth.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Initially mining will consist of sucking up surface dust.

Our planet has differentiated its component ores thermally, so that we have a crust, mantle and outer & inner cores. Asteroids are composed of a more homogenous mix, and this means they are rich in platinum group metals. The platinum would be worth recovery to Earth.

It is suggested that future historians will see this as the beginning of the paramount industrial revolution.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bwian, just
United States
Longmont
Colorado
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
aforandy wrote:
It is suggested that future historians will see this as the beginning of the paramount industrial revolution.

I see. It's not enough to have the rights to all the Star Trek movies, now Paramount is expecting to take over all space industry.
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeffery Bass
United States
San Carlos
California
flag msg tools
What's this? Why, it's the Hiller Flying Platform! It flew in 1955.
mbmbmbmbmb
It seems to me that asteroid mining is the only space activity (beyond satellite communications) with even a remote chance of a return on investment. Exploration of Mars, on the other hand, is a financial black hole. Dreams of humans becoming a space faring civilization will come true far faster by mining asteroids than trips to Mars.

I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paweł Bedz
Poland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The key here is that US now included in their law celestial bosies... So mining is allowd, and what counts is "who gets first there". It is bad because US is like owner of whole space... It is good, because now a LOT of private space projects can go live without any law issues. Race to space - here we go! Who gets forst there will have full rights to it (according to US law)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.