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Sleeping Queens» Forums » Rules

Subject: Gamewright's Answers to Some Rules Questions rss

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Lee Valentine
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I contacted Gamewright and got some answers to some questions which I had some doubts on. The answers were checked with one of the people originally assigned to help write the rules.


Q1: On a single turn, does a player get to play either a power card or make a discard, or is it possible to, for example, play a King and discard a pair of sixes on the same turn? The question arises because of a rules formatting issue: it is unclear whether the discarding is one of the "actions"

A1: Discarding is one of the actions, so if you discard, that is the only thing you can do.

Q2. Can you discard a single power card (i.e., a non-number card)? The rules say quite explicitly that you can "[d]iscard a single card of any kind and draw one card," but because the example image is a number card, most people online seem to share the interpretation that when discarding a single card it still must be a number card.

A2: You can discard any card to draw a single card, even a power card.


Q3: Is it ever possible to have more than five cards in your hand? There is a general rule to draw a card after taking any of the listed actions, but some actions themselves let you draw a card, so a number of people online interpret that to mean that it is possible end up with more than five cards in your hand.

A3: After taking an action, you draw until you have five cards in hand. If you already have five, you don’t draw. So it shouldn’t be possible to end up with more.


Q4: When discarding number cards to make a sum, how many numbers can be on the right side of the equation? For example, if you can have multiple numbers on each side of the equation, then you could draw four cards by playing this: "8 + 4 = 9 + 3."

A4: The equation must have only one number on one side of it. So that example is not valid, but 5 + 4 + 1 = 10 would be.

Q5: A thematic question: are the knights intended to be evil? Some marketing text for the game describes the dragons as "over-protective," implying that the dragons are saving the queens from the knights.

A5: Evil is a strong word, but they are the ones stealing the queens and the dragons are protecting them.

Enjoy,
Lee Valentine
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Darin Bolyard
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I realize this game was conceived in the mind of a child. However, I find the official ruling on question #4 unfortunate. It implies that one true equation is less valid than another, e.g. 2 + 4 = 6 is more valid than 2 + 4 = 3 + 3. Both equations are stating the same thing, 6 = 6.

As a teacher of mathematics, I question whether this was a design choice intended to limit the number of possibilities for trade-ins (that is, for balance or something...), or if it was born out of a belief that an equation must appear thus: a + b = c.

Now if the rules had included the word "sum" instead of "equation," then I would have no beef. cool
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