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Zimby Mojo» Forums » Rules

Subject: The stack, misunderstood rss

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Jerald Block
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Here is a large section in the rules discussing "the stack." From what I understood, the stack is a collection of spells and dice roll results that operate like a spring loaded pistol magazine -- the last loaded is the first fired off. This confuses me.

Let me give an example:

A column of three Zimbys from the same team face off against a thug, making it 3+1d6 for each. The Zimbys and the thug both roll 5s, making a tie at "8". The roll is pushed into the "stack". The Zimbys then cast "sneaky cheat", which allows for 1d2 wounds on ties. It, too, is placed on the "stack." A "1" is rolled and the thug remains alive. -- he needs two wounds to die. This roll is placed on the stack. Finally, the Zimby casts a "Spikey Bone Claws", adding +1 brutality. That should do it -- there is now an additional wound -- enough to kill the thug. But, using the stack to resolve, when the stack unpops, the Zimby and thug are no longer tied. Thus the 1d2 roll should not have occurred.

I am certain I am overthinking this and either (1) the thug was simply killed and the stack is irrelevant or (2) adding the "spikes bones claws" was not permitted -- it came into play too late. So maybe this is not the best example of the utility of the "stack" concept. I am hoping someone can dissect my example or, more to the point, provide an example of when and where the stack concept is useful and important to resolving conflict in the game. Based on the instructions, it seems to be a key concept which I am just not getting.

Thanks!

Jerald
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Jim Felli
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Let me first say that your metaphor is appropriate with one caveat: while the stack is indeed like a spring loaded pistol magazine -- the last loaded is the first fired off -- it also allows new bullets to be loaded between shots. The key to managing the stack is when you allow things to resolve before adding to the stack...

Let's look at your example, where the zimby column and thug roll equal modified combat rolls (both get an 8). Suppose that your stack looked like this, from bottom to top:

(Bottom)
Resolve and compare combat rolls
Determine equal combat rolls
Cast Sneaky Cheat
Cast Spikey Bone Claws
Resolve stack

Here's what would happen:

The Spikey Bone Claws would resolve and the zimby column would gain +1 brutality. The combat rolls would then be 8+1=9 for the zimbies and 8 for the thug. The Sneaky Cheat would fail to resolve because the two combatants no longer have equal modified combat rolls. The thug would sustain 9-8=1 wound and not die.

Alternatively, suppose things happened this way:

(Bottom)
Resolve and compare combat rolls
Determine equal combat rolls
Cast Sneaky Cheat
Allow Sneaky Cheat to resolve
Cast Spikey Bone Claws
Allow Spikey Bone Claws to resolve

The Sneaky Cheat would resolve with and deliver wounds to the thugs effect because the combat rolls are equal. If Sneaky Cheat does 1 wound, the thug is still alive. If Spikey Bone Claws is then added to the stack before wounds are delivered, the zimbies gain +1 brutality and the combat rolls become 8+1=9 versus 8 and the zimbies do 9-8=1 wound to the thug. Unfortunately, the 1 wound from the Sneaky Cheat (direct wounds) is a different source of wounds than the Spikey Bone Claws (adds to bruality), so the thug does not die because damage is not carried across attacks. (Remember, all wound must be delivered from the same source of wounds to kill a creature.)

Now, suppose the stack looked like this:

(Bottom)
Resolve and compare combat rolls
Determine equal combat rolls
Cast Sneaky Cheat
Allow Sneaky Cheat to resolve
Cast Spikey Bone Claws
Cast Spikey Bone Claws
Allow both Spikey Bone Claws to resolve

As above, the Sneaky Cheat would resolve with and deliver wounds to the thugs effect because the combat rolls are equal. If Sneaky Cheat does 1 wound, the thug is still alive. If two Spikey Bone Claws are then added to the stack and allowed to resolve, the zimbies gain +1+1=+2 brutality and the combat rolls become 8+2=10 versus 8 and the zimbies do 10-8=2 wounds to the thug and kill it.

The primary utility of the stack is three-fold: 1) it allows other players a chance to respond to scrolls used in a turn, 2) it allows the players to use scrolls after the outcome of combat rolls is known but before wounds are delivered. One could certainly cast Spikey Bone Claws before making one's combat roll... but if the scroll wasn't needed, the player would have wasted both the scroll and the mojo to cast it... as opposed to waiting to see if the scroll was needed and useful before using it.

I hope this helps clarify things.
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Jerald Block
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So helpful!! Thanks!
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