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BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Computer Based Board Gaming

Subject: Worth it? rss

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William Burke
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I made a board game but I am having trouble getting it off the ground so to speak. I am an ok computer programmer. What are peoples thoughts on playing a board game on Javascript for free online. Would being able to try it first against a computer possibly increase interest and create sales? Or do the people of BGG think this would be foolishness. I have it like half programmed already...

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'Bernard Wingrave'
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I think having a playable computer version could help with playtesting. So from that point of view alone I think it's worth it to finish programming it.
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Michael J
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I've bought a few games after trying them online first. I think any publicity is better than no publicity. If the game started selling well, you could always change your mind. Don't get caught up in worrying about losing potential sales of a physical game when you don't have a single sale in the first place.
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William Burke
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I have actually sold one game, lol. But yeah publicity is good.
 
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Richard Urich
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I'd imagine running a Kickstarter with a working electronic version of the game would be a great thing to boost interest if the game is fun.
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Pelle Nilsson
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I made a HTML version of Trenches of Valor about 10 years ago when developing it. It was quite useful for quickly solo-playtesting a few simple scenarios to get them reasonably balanced. Then of course real human playtesters stepped in to fine-tune things, but playing against even a simple AI was a good thing to get a feel for the game without having to find someone else to play all the time (I also had a VASSAL module that worked for early two-player playtesting before recruiting real playtest groups).



Probably the main reason I made it was to play around a bit with JavaScript that I was just seriously trying to learn and also that HTML5 Canvas that was becoming popular around that time. Unfortunately I did not get it to run well on Internet Explorer, and when I tested it today it is really buggy and crashes after a few moves even in browsers that did work 10 years ago, so quite possibly my old crappy code relied on some part of the standard that wasn't quite standard even then.

I think in general it can be a good idea for promotion. It could also be the basis of a later app-version for instance (all mobile platforms I know of can embed HTML these days so it should be reasonably straightforward). But then of course you need some real graphics included and make sure it plays well and is not too buggy. Stupid AI might make the game seem a lot worse than playing the real game with a human opponent actually is. For various reasons like that I never made my version public.
 
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Chris Laudermilk
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mjacobsca wrote:
I've bought a few games after trying them online first. I think any publicity is better than no publicity. If the game started selling well, you could always change your mind. Don't get caught up in worrying about losing potential sales of a physical game when you don't have a single sale in the first place.


This. I'm actually using the digital implementations of a few board games to evaluate whether I want to buy the cardboard version. In most cases the answer is at least a tentative yes.
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Trevor Taylor
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claudermilk wrote:
mjacobsca wrote:
I've bought a few games after trying them online first. I think any publicity is better than no publicity. If the game started selling well, you could always change your mind. Don't get caught up in worrying about losing potential sales of a physical game when you don't have a single sale in the first place.


This. I'm actually using the digital implementations of a few board games to evaluate whether I want to buy the cardboard version. In most cases the answer is at least a tentative yes.


This has happened with me for sure. The online versions of Automobiles and Deus 'forced' me to buy the physical games.

However, it is also possible however, that a digital version could put me off buying a game.

I traded away Ascension: Rise of Vigil and won't buy Star Realms because the digital implementations are so much quicker to play and I can play them on my own when I don't have a real opponent. The same goes (either got rid of or never bought because of digital version) for Carcassonne, Alhambra, Saint Petersburg and Sentinels of the Multiverse.

I also decided against buying Ghost Stories after playing the physical game once and the iPad app half a dozen times.

Now, I'm originally from a video game background before board games, so I might be more likely to move to app, but it can go either way with me.
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Alex Box
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I have bought around 20 games that I first played online, either via http://www.yucata.de/ or https://en.boardgamearena.com/ and I would have bought more if they were still in print. It sounds like it could be worth your while!
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David Corbin
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I recall the Days of Wonder folks saying in article, every time they put the IOS game on sale, there's a noticeable bump in sales a month or two later. That having been said, don't underestimate the difficulty/cost of writing a quality computerized version of a boardgames.
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ackmondual
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negatrev wrote:
claudermilk wrote:
mjacobsca wrote:
I've bought a few games after trying them online first. I think any publicity is better than no publicity. If the game started selling well, you could always change your mind. Don't get caught up in worrying about losing potential sales of a physical game when you don't have a single sale in the first place.


This. I'm actually using the digital implementations of a few board games to evaluate whether I want to buy the cardboard version. In most cases the answer is at least a tentative yes.


This has happened with me for sure. The online versions of Automobiles and Deus 'forced' me to buy the physical games.

However, it is also possible however, that a digital version could put me off buying a game.

I traded away Ascension: Rise of Vigil and won't buy Star Realms because the digital implementations are so much quicker to play and I can play them on my own when I don't have a real opponent. The same goes (either got rid of or never bought because of digital version) for Carcassonne, Alhambra, Saint Petersburg and Sentinels of the Multiverse.

I also decided against buying Ghost Stories after playing the physical game once and the iPad app half a dozen times.

Now, I'm originally from a video game background before board games, so I might be more likely to move to app, but it can go either way with me.


For me and these days, getting most bg on digital will be in lieu of buying the physical version. The games have AI and I play that b/c gaming is so hard for me to get in these days. I understand that many pubs do digital to push more sales of their physical games, but for folks like me, I'd suggest to charge enough to cover costs without having to resort to sales from boxed versions of the game.
 
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