$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 88.48

5,794 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
36.5% of Goal | 26 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Bios: Genesis» Forums » General

Subject: Autotroph animals? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Kevin Reyes
msg tools
I've already seen the cube-cost of macroorganisms, and I find a very good mecanism the fact that the cheaper organisms are plants and fungi (even though fungi are heterotrophs), so they can be purchased earlier and so they can occupy the lowest level in the Trophic Chain.

But I want to know what stops me from saving my cubes for purchasing, for example, a sea star as the first macroorganism in the game and creating a plant-starfish? What could be a good thematic explanation for these cases?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phil Eklund
Germany
Karlsruhe
Baden Würtenberg
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
KevinFRE wrote:
I've already seen the cube-cost of macroorganisms, and I find a very good mecanism the fact that the cheaper organisms are plants and fungi (even though fungi are heterotrophs), so they can be purchased earlier and so they can occupy the lowest level in the Trophic Chain.

But I want to know what stops me from saving my cubes for purchasing, for example, a sea star as the first macroorganism in the game and creating a plant-starfish? What could be a good thematic explanation for these cases?


You make a good point that fungus are heterotrophs, and therefore cannot be at the base of the classic trophic pyramid. I think that for a couple of billion years continents would have fielded bacteria, archaea, and stromatolites, possibly making them garishly colorful in wet places. Furthermore, winds, tides, hypercanes, and tidal waves would have loaded the continents with some amount of organic debris. Therefore, the first macroscopic invader of the land was likely fungus, and toadstools and not plants made the first multicellular beachhead (counting green algae as protists instead of plantae, this is a controversy).

I don't know of any "green sea stars" in nature, but there are green corals, anemones, sponges, flatworms, giant clams, and other animals that are endosymbiotic with algae. Green flatworms, for instance, have done away with mouths and anuses, and flourish on photosynthesis alone while swimming around. This is what you must imagine if you create a "plant-animal" in Bios:Genesis.

So called "plant-animals" (autotroph animals) are being grossly expanded in the sequel game "Bios: Megafauna 3", currently in playtest. The vision is to have three trophic levels (plants, herbivores, carnivores) that the players can inhabit. If you end up with such a plant-animal with a cytoskeleton in Bios: Genesis, in the next game of the Bios trilogy your creation might be able to slither into sunlight if shaded, or become an herbivorous tree able to chew and digest the plants it kills by overshadowing. You might develop high metabolism seeds able to run or defend themselves. Warm-bloodedness is also possible, as the skunk cabbage appears to be evolving in this direction. Write to me at phileklund@gmail.com if you are interested in playtesting Bios: Megafauna 3.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Reyes
msg tools
phileklund wrote:
You make a good point that fungus are heterotrophs, and therefore cannot be at the base of the classic trophic pyramid. I think that for a couple of billion years continents would have fielded bacteria, archaea, and stromatolites, possibly making them garishly colorful in wet places. Furthermore, winds, tides, hypercanes, and tidal waves would have loaded the continents with some amount of organic debris. Therefore, the first macroscopic invader of the land was likely fungus, and toadstools and not plants made the first multicellular beachhead (counting green algae as protists instead of plantae, this is a controversy).


Yes, I rembember we discussed this on my Mycology course the last semester. I find the hypothesis of fungi being the first land pioneers a very strong one, as they could have eroded substrates allowing macroscopic plants to fill those new niches, and I agree with it.

Quote:
I don't know of any "green sea stars" in nature, but there are green corals, anemones, sponges, flatworms, giant clams, and other animals that are endosymbiotic with algae. Green flatworms, for instance, have done away with mouths and anuses, and flourish on photosynthesis alone while swimming around. This is what you must imagine if you create a "plant-animal" in Bios:Genesis.


Ha! I had forgotten of those! In fact, just a few weeks ago, I read about jellyfishes living in endosymbiosis with algae, so I can believe that all those "green animals" that you mentioned do exist. It just fits perfectly!

Quote:
So called "plant-animals" (autotroph animals) are being grossly expanded in the sequel game "Bios: Megafauna 3", currently in playtest. The vision is to have three trophic levels (plants, herbivores, carnivores) that the players can inhabit. If you end up with such a plant-animal with a cytoskeleton in Bios: Genesis, in the next game of the Bios trilogy your creation might be able to slither into sunlight if shaded, or become an herbivorous tree able to chew and digest the plants it kills by overshadowing. You might develop high metabolism seeds able to run or defend themselves. Warm-bloodedness is also possible, as the skunk cabbage appears to be evolving in this direction. Write to me at phileklund@gmail.com if you are interested in playtesting Bios: Megafauna 3.


All of these ideas thrill me. I can't wait to play a game of Bios: Genesis and then flowing to Megafauna 3, the whole experience sounds amazing. And yeah, I just saw your answer to an old e-mail I sent you,blush I'll continue the conversation there. Thank you.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.