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BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Religion, Sex, and Politics

Subject: Your Rights: How the police must treat you. rss

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Mac Mcleod
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This is a good read.

http://www.policemag.com/channel/patrol/articles/2015/05/adm...

The Beheler Admonition
The Fields Admonition
The JDB Admonition

The Miranda Admonition
Quote:
"You have the right to remain silent. Do you understand that?"

"Anything you say may be used against you in court. Do you understand?"

"You have the right to the presence of an attorney, before and during questioning. Do you understand?"

"If you want an attorney but can't afford to pay, an attorney will be appointed for you free of charge before questioning, if you wish. Do you understand?"


The Montejo Waiver
Vienna Convention Admonition
Your (local) Rules May Vary
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Andre
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Not sure how many times this occurs, but the article seems to indicate that police invite suspects to the station to be questioned, and presumably offered coffee and donuts. They don't need to read them Miranda rights in this case, but let's be real, how many times does this actually occur? I suspect, its use is extremely limited, although I have no data to back up my claim.
 
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J.D. Hall
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abadolato01 wrote:
Not sure how many times this occurs, but the article seems to indicate that police invite suspects to the station to be questioned, and presumably offered coffee and donuts. They don't need to read them Miranda rights in this case, but let's be real, how many times does this actually occur? I suspect, its use is extremely limited, although I have no data to back up my claim.

From my experience as a police reporter, I would say it happens on a regular basis. The frequency, however, isn't what is portrayed in movies or TV shows. And there are many reasons the authorities ask someone to go to the police station -- looking through mug shots, identifying objects found near a crime scene.

Don't think they get doughnuts, however. Really bad coffee, though, they'll hand that out all the time.

Interesting how the courts have addressed this. I think it's a pretty good system.
 
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Mac Mcleod
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abadolato01 wrote:
Not sure how many times this occurs, but the article seems to indicate that police invite suspects to the station to be questioned, and presumably offered coffee and donuts. They don't need to read them Miranda rights in this case, but let's be real, how many times does this actually occur? I suspect, its use is extremely limited, although I have no data to back up my claim.


I believe it was mentioned in the "Don't talk to the police" video.

They say, "We'd like to interview you down at the station". I believe the advice by the lawyer and the police officer was that you were in serious trouble if they do that and you should shut up and get a lawyer.
 
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Robert Wesley
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Maybe, everyday just before they head off out into the "Public"-world, they are MADE to 'recite' these as a constant reminder, since, they tends with "forgets" much too often.
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J.D. Hall
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The cops I dealt with actually carry a card with the Miranda warning printed on it (in Spanish on one side, in English on the other). The cops always told me it was in case they came across a suspect who was deaf, but I knew better: they forgot the wording.
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Boise
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I usually post this every year here and on my FB account. This seem to apply to the article:



I've also told this story, which illustrates the thinking and process of the investigator's mind - About 34 years ago I was a salesman at a motorcycle dealership, Kawasaki and Honda. One morning I cam to work and was informed that a deposit bag had gone missing and two investigators wanted to interview the whole staff. That was about 25 people total. When my turn came and I was given the particulars I told them that one of the sales guys had left early the day before to deliver a dirt bike and that he had walked out of the business office holding his coat over his arm in an awkward manner. He locked the business office behind him after turning off the light.

The next day the investigators talked to me and my sales team mate Lou. They asked us to come to the station and take a lie detector test. I was a little confused and asked why they had singled us out. The detective was cagey and avoided a direct answer which made me suspicious so I told him I'd cheerfully take a test so long as every person working there also agreed to take the test, alphabetically. Then I repeated what I said the day before, which was ignored.

The next day I was fired. I asked the owner why and he said low sales. But I was standing right next to the sales board where I was rated #2 out of seven sales people. I pointed at it and raised my eyebrow and he handed me my paycheck and told me to take a hike. The next week I called the detective because now I was very curious about the reason they focused on me and Lou, who had also declined the lie detector test. He invited me down, just like in the article and I went. He told me he was aware I had financial problems, which I didn't. He told me that I had been followed home and the route I took coincided with where a ditch runner found the empty deposit bag. I had him get a map and pointed out where I lived and indicated that it would triple my transit time from maybe 7 minutes to close to 25 minutes to go that route.

And I repeated what I had originally said - the guy who had the delivery and left early, Tim, lived close to the location of the bag being found and worked part time as a ditch runner. He didn't seem to care. So I took the test. The other investigator was pushy to the point of aggression and insisted I used some sort of mind control or drugs to cause the needle to not fluctuate during the test.

I did point out that it was highly likely I passed because I didn't steal the money and that they needed, really needed, to talk to Tim. The other investigator and I chatted after his partner, who was senior, left. He told me flat out they only investigated who the business owners steered them to in these inside job cases and that 90% of the time they solved it that way. I asked again about Tim and he shrugged. And that was that.

Looking back, I was stupid to go down there. But it was an overall good experience because I learned some things and came away with a far better understanding of how criminal investigation often works and how sometimes innocent people get swept into the system out of curiosity or naivety.
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jeremy cobert
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I just tell the officer that I am a sovereign citizen with diplomatic immunity and they always let me go.
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