$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 97.74

6,236 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
39.3% of Goal | left

Support:

Recommend
40 
 Thumb up
 Hide
70 Posts
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 

Wargames» Forums » General

Subject: Military History Bookshelf - November 2016 rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
John Robinson
United Kingdom
Barrow in Furness
Cumbria
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hello everyone,

The start of another month. Let everyone know what you are currently reading or if you have just finished then tell us what you thought of it.
Military fiction is also welcome here too,

My current book;



"RAF 617 Squadron’s destruction of the dams at the heart of the Ruhr made them heroes and celebrities of their time. But this elite squadron was also called upon for a hundred more of the most secret and dangerous specialist precision attacks. As bestselling author John Nichol discovers, 617 would drop the largest bombs ever built on battleships, railway bridges, secret weapon establishments, rockets sites and U-boat construction pens"

13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Irish not Kraut!
Germany
Berlin
flag msg tools
jon7167 wrote:
Hello everyone,

The start of another month. Let everyone know what you are currently reading or if you have just finished then tell us what you thought of it.
Military fiction is also welcome here too,

My current book;



"RAF 617 Squadron’s destruction of the dams at the heart of the Ruhr made them heroes and celebrities of their time. But this elite squadron was also called upon for a hundred more of the most secret and dangerous specialist precision attacks. As bestselling author John Nichol discovers, 617 would drop the largest bombs ever built on battleships, railway bridges, secret weapon establishments, rockets sites and U-boat construction pens"



How did I guess you were British or English? laugh
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
flag msg tools
mb


Between reading this and playing Case Blue (Scenario 7.11, which focuses on Uranus and its aftermath) at the same time, I may have reached "peak Stalingrad." If that's possible for a WWII wargamer.


7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean McCormick
United States
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Currently reading Andrew Roberts' Napoleon biography. On the one hand, I don't think much of Roberts as a historian, and he clearly is smitten with Napoleon in a way that colors his reporting. On the other hand, he's a fine writer, and the story is a gripping one.

6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb

It is more of an British sexual history, showing how this influenced Louis XIV's military ambitions in the Low Countries, although there are a few domestic battles, plus dashing cavaliers throughout. I was reminded of Tom Brokaw's about Tony Blair, in that Charles II of England wasn't too bothered about questions of governance or state, and said as much, though he demonstrated bravery on the battlefield when necessary, and was occasionally forced to hang, draw & quarter for political reasons. I gained the impression of an even happier and more pleasant man than portrayed by Messrs. Sewell, Malkovich, and Neill, doubtless for good reason. Only £3 at The Works.




A useful new view of the British involvement of the Seven Years War, featuring Sweet William, Duke of Cumberland, definitely a good tactical commander whose finest moment was Culloden, and the frustrated Wolfe, who found his final path led equally definitely to outright military glory.


7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Iain K
United States
Arvada
Colorado
flag msg tools
Picked this up last weekend.



It's a decent, though not stellar, read so far. Like Foote and other pioneers of the narrative history genre during the '50's Miller's work is more a story than history. The prose are easy to read: characters scratch their beards, look worried, all manner of detail no modern author could know are presented with nary a footnote to be found. Miller's account is based upon interviews with dozens of Native American witnesses over half a century after the fact, but by necessity has little to no corroborating evidence.

Again, it's a style of narrative history that's more like fiction than is accepted today. Modern readers will find the book an interesting take on the battle from a Native American perspective, but they may often find themselves muttering "citation needed."

I am particularly worried by portions of the text that do cover documented events. For example, Miller puts forward Sheridan's famous "the only good Indian is a dead Indian" quote as fact, which any modern reader knows is at best a distortion and may never have been said.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tankboy
United States
Haslet
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Arcology wrote:


Between reading this and playing Case Blue (Scenario 7.11, which focuses on Uranus and its aftermath) at the same time, I may have reached "peak Stalingrad." If that's possible for a WWII wargamer.




You took it one step further with playing Case Blue. Nicely donethumbsup
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
All the little chicks with crimson lips, go...
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
mbmbmbmbmb
I've read a lot of Keegan, but hadn't read The Mask of Command. I found a cheap copy in a used bookstore recently and now I'm reading it.

Hey, that Alexander guy was pretty great!

16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean McCormick
United States
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
wifwendell wrote:
I've read a lot of Keegan, but hadn't read The Mask of Command. I found a cheap copy in a used bookstore recently and now I'm reading it.

Hey, that Alexander guy was pretty great!



Very good book. The section on Hitler is particularly interesting.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve D
msg tools


This is a decent account of the actions of the British forces in Italy. There's quite a lot about the
politics of getting them there and deciding what they were supposed to be doing. The coverage of anything
anyone else is doing (the Italians, the French, the Austrians except when they're fighting the British -
and even then the focus is on the British perspective) is pretty cursory. Given the aim of the book
that's fair enough but it is frustrating that there seems to be no good English language military
history of the Italian theatre in WW1.

There's an interesting but brief account of how the war was spun in the inter-war years, with the
importance of the Italian contribution being more exaggerated within Italy as time went on. To be fair,
some post-war British accounts exaggerated the active role of the British in stopping the enemy advance
after Caporetto (i.e. they claimed there was one).

The actual British actions were opposing the Austrian attack around Asiago and the advance across the
Piave as part of the battle of Vittorio Veneto. Generally these are OK and there is a good number of useful
maps. The accounts have a bit of a tendency to jump around though, repeating material on the political
context from other chapters and even shifting backwards and forwards in time in the descriptions of the battles.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matthew Banner
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Starting on this book as I look into several Winter War and Continuation War games.

8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Belli
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
citizen k wrote:
Picked this up last weekend.



It's a decent, though not stellar, read so far. Like Foote and other pioneers of the narrative history genre during the '50's Miller's work is more a story than history. The prose are easy to read: characters scratch their beards, look worried, all manner of detail no modern author could know are presented with nary a footnote to be found. Miller's account is based upon interviews with dozens of Native American witnesses over half a century after the fact, but by necessity has little to no corroborating evidence.

Again, it's a style of narrative history that's more like fiction than is accepted today. Modern readers will find the book an interesting take on the battle from a Native American perspective, but they may often find themselves muttering "citation needed."

I am particularly worried by portions of the text that do cover documented events. For example, Miller puts forward Sheridan's famous "the only good Indian is a dead Indian" quote as fact, which any modern reader knows is at best a distortion and may never have been said.


As an alternative I could suggest Lakota Noon: The Indian Narrative of Custer's Defeat by Gregory Michno.

The author weaves the often confusing and contradictory descriptions of the battle by tribal warriors or Native American non-combatants into a useful format. The resulting timeline does not create an easy-to-read history of the Little Bighorn fight but the book examines many of the Custer myths.

Here is a quote from Sheridan which has received less attention:

We took away their country and their means of support, broke up their mode of living and their habits of life, introduced disease and decay among them and it was for this and against this they made war. Could anyone expect less?

Phil Sheridan, 1878
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Rush
United States
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
These literally arrived from my dad within the last hour:
and
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matthew Banner
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I recently watched Marco's review of Zones of Control and then ordered it myself. It shipped yesterday. Would love to hear your thoughts on what you read.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul
Switzerland
Basel
flag msg tools
designer
"Capitaine Conan," by Roger Vercel (1934).
mbmbmbmbmb
I just finished the excellent "1776," by David McCullough and now I'm moving on to "The Men Who Lost America," by Andrew O'Shaughnessy.

The ARW is a subject that is new to me, and "1776" was a good place to start. O'Shaughnessy's book is a bit more in-depth, but very well written and enjoyable. Covers ten of the most important British political and military figures who influenced the course of the war. Fascinating reading.

12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Sommers
United States
Clinton
New Jersey
flag msg tools
hedererp wrote:
I just finished the excellent "1776," by David McCullough ...

Better than that book is Fischer's Washington's Crossing, which covers much of the same ground.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Belli
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
The Civil War Dictionary, by Lieutenant Colonel Mark M. Boatner III, US Army



This massive volume contains 950+ pages of fine print and dozens of maps. Owned this book when I was a teenager and read it until the binding fell apart.

Here is a little background for those BGG wargame forum contributors who grew up after the age of the internet:

In those primitive times reference books like this were a valuable resource. When a quick fact-check was required or an obscure tidbit of information was needed this masterpiece was the 1960s and 1970s version of Civil War Google.

I found this copy at Goodwill for just two dollars. The book looks like it was never read. Beautiful condition. It will have a place of honor in my library.
16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tuomas Takala
Finland
Lahti
flag msg tools
Silk for Calde!
mbmbmbmbmb
pete belli wrote:
The Civil War Dictionary, by Lieutenant Colonel Mark M. Boatner III, US Army





Awesome book. I bought the paperback version a while ago, to support my ACW reading. Yeah, of course one can find everything in the net, but sometimes it is just nicer to open a book. Even if you are not looking for anything specific, just plunge in a sea of interesting facts. And, that preface alone is great reading! Absolutely recommended for anyone interested in ACW.
8 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Parker
United States
Richmond
Virginia
flag msg tools
Three greatest chess players ever: Bobby Fischer, Mikhail Tal, and Victor Korchnoi.
mbmbmbmbmb
About halfway through:

The Rise of Germany 1939-41 by James Holland.


Slowly but surely moving ahead. Having a baby will do that
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Parker
United States
Richmond
Virginia
flag msg tools
Three greatest chess players ever: Bobby Fischer, Mikhail Tal, and Victor Korchnoi.
mbmbmbmbmb
wifwendell wrote:
I've read a lot of Keegan, but hadn't read The Mask of Command. I found a cheap copy in a used bookstore recently and now I'm reading it.

Hey, that Alexander guy was pretty great!



No, that Alexander guy was awesome!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Johannsen

Virginia
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
pete belli wrote:
The Civil War Dictionary, by Lieutenant Colonel Mark M. Boatner III, US Army




After the recommendations of Mr. Belli and Mr. Takala, I couldn't resist ordering a copy, as well. Thank you, gentlemen. (While I was at Amazon, I also ordered a copy of Col. Boatner's "Landmarks of the American Revolution.")
1 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick Williams
United States
Middle River
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I've been enjoying, "Victory Rode the Rails", which has been great for me since I like trains and I like the Civil War. Very well written and very detailed, but suffers from the common, "needs more maps", complaint.

5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CJ
United Kingdom
Gosport
flag msg tools
mb
hedererp wrote:
I just finished the excellent "1776," by David McCullough and now I'm moving on to "The Men Who Lost America," by Andrew O'Shaughnessy.

The ARW is a subject that is new to me, and "1776" was a good place to start. O'Shaughnessy's book is a bit more in-depth, but very well written and enjoyable. Covers ten of the most important British political and military figures who influenced the course of the war. Fascinating reading.


Very good book and an interesting approach.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Colin Parkin
United Kingdom
Sunderland
Tyne and Wear
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
two new ones:





This Aethelred book is well researched, scholarly yet accessible. To my mind the author is fairly sympathetic to this greatest of duds amongst English kings (and there is a lot of competition there), but one does wonder whether anyone other than the most exceptional individual could have coped with what came his way. Even given reasonably understanding treatment, Aethelred comes across as pretty unlikeable and, from the military perspective, completely hopeless.
Bates' study of Willam the Conqueror is big (600+ pages) but looks to be a definitive study - looking forward to getting into that one.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Lynch
United States
Boston
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
hedererp wrote:
I just finished the excellent "1776," by David McCullough and now I'm moving on to "The Men Who Lost America," by Andrew O'Shaughnessy.

The ARW is a subject that is new to me, and "1776" was a good place to start. O'Shaughnessy's book is a bit more in-depth, but very well written and enjoyable. Covers ten of the most important British political and military figures who influenced the course of the war. Fascinating reading.



Found this a tough read. I thought that "The War for America, 1775-1783" by Piers Mackesy was a much better read from the British point of view.

.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.