$18.00
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters: 81.37

5,442 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
34.3% of Goal | 27 Days Left

Support:

Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I have most of the expansions and hero and monster collections for Descent. None of the minis are painted because I'm 1) lazy and 2) untalented. I'm happy playing with them as is, but after receiving Mechs vs. Minions recently, I like how the minions look; you can see the details despite them not being fully painted. The creatures in Kemet have the same look.

Minions:


Kemet scorpion:



From what I've read, this effect is achieved by priming the minis, then applying a wash. Is this accurate? This is something even someone as lazy and untalented as me could do!

Any suggestions for how to make the master monsters look distinct from the minion monsters?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Campo
United Kingdom
Manchester
lancashire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Master give a red base.. or add a red tint to the wash
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryce K. Nielsen
United States
Elk Ridge
Utah
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
It's called the "Dipping Technique". Look it up, there are quite a few different examples of how it works, and for mass painting of lots of minis, or even for new painters, it's a great way to go.

-shnar
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Beighel
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Ink washing can be used to really bring out the details in the sculpture. The washed paint settles into the crevices and grooves which gives them the appearance of deep shadows and makes them really stand out.

I don't know what the mechs vs minions stuff looks like, but this is the sort of look I'm talking about.

You can achieve this pretty easily, it does require a bit of skill and practice but orders of magnitude less than fully painting them.

Get some Krylon or Rustoleum matte primer and spray it on in a low humidity area. If it's humid your primer won't go on smoothly and things will continue downhill. If you don't have a low humidity area that you can use spray paint in, then Reaper Mini has some brush on primer you can use. Another option I've had some success with is Liquitex Gesso. Regardless you want a thin even coat of primer that you let thoroughly dry.

Then get a dark color to use for the wash. I like Reaper Mini paints myself, but I'm sure there's lots of options. Thin the paint with a flow improver or water, you'll need to check what works with the paint you choose, until it's the consistency of milk. Then get it all over your mini. If its think enough it should pool in the crevices and run over the raised parts. If it's coating too much you might be able to pull some back of with an absolutely dry brush.

No precision stuff needed for this. If you don't mind wasting a ton of paint you can mix a cupful of the super runny paint dip the minis in and shake them a bit them to fling off the excess.

For descent though you might want to have some colors to repaint the bases of the minis. Spray paint will likely coat them and you'll want to keep the red/gray for master/minion indications.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Riley
United States
Glendale
Arizona
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I dont consider myself to have an artistic bone in my body, but I got tired of bland looking monsters (especially since they are my go to resource for D&D games)

Believe it or not, it is not as hard as you might think.

Yes, you prime the minis, so that the paint will stick to them, then paint them (feels more like paint by numbers on a small scale) then you use a wash (1 part paint, 8-9 parts water) to fill in the cracks.

As far as Master vs Minion, I will change the color of their clothes to red, I will use a different color for their skin (for things like kobolds)
and I will paint their bases a solid red color to clearly identify them from a distance

I find the more time I put into painting them the better they look but go with what you are comfortable with

Good Luck!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
shnar wrote:
It's called the "Dipping Technique". Look it up, there are quite a few different examples of how it works, and for mass painting of lots of minis, or even for new painters, it's a great way to go.

-shnar


I've come across this before, but this seems to be a quick way to "finish" minis after painting them using varnish. I haven't come across any references to using unpainted (but primed) minis with this technique. Do you know of any specific examples of this?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
JBeighel wrote:
Ink washing can be used to really bring out the details in the sculpture. The washed paint settles into the crevices and grooves which gives them the appearance of deep shadows and makes them really stand out.

I don't know what the mechs vs minions stuff looks like, but this is the sort of look I'm talking about.


Yes, that's the look! (I've edited my post to add images of the minions and Kemet creatures.)

Thanks for the detailed advice and specific recommendations for products to use. I'll try it out soon.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Frank La Terra
Australia
flag msg tools
Are people sure the MvM minis are primed? I think they have just put a wash straight on the figure.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O Sync
Australia
flag msg tools
Tikatoy wrote:
...... I'm happy playing with them as is, but after receiving Mechs vs. Minions recently, I like how the minions look......


A friend of mine is exactly like you: He loves my painted miniatures, but he does not want to spend many evenings with size 0 brush and feeling of inadequacy. He rather plays his board games.shakeHowever, he just wanted to have some enhanced details on miniatures to improve the overall play experience. Trouble with his collection is that we are talking about 500+ miniatures (Descent + all exp/ Zombicide BP + all exp/ B-Sieged etc..)

We decided to develop “ Blitz Painting for Idiots ™ ” system with an aim to reduce the painting time of a single miniature down to 10 minutes.

We, however, agreed that the cost of the materials & building a setup is not an important consideration – but the speed is.We are in planning/ purchasing stage at this minute, so I decided to share with you, what we have come up with so far:

1. WASH in soap & prepare using green putty;
2. PRIME: Use different colour primers depending on a chosen major colour of the figure;
Spoiler (click to reveal)
For example green primer for goblins; elves; dragons; zombies; skin colour primer for heroes; khaki for army miniatures; red for vampires, dragons; black for spiders, etc.
Army painters have an exceptional colour range:
http://shop.thearmypainter.com/products.php?ProductGroupId=1...
We are planning doing step 1 and 2 in large batches of 50 miniatures during the weekend(s);

3. Simple BASE colour painting - 5 min max work on each figure;
Painting of only selected large easily recognisable areas (trousers/coat/horns/tail/ sword etc.) - perhaps 2/3 areas at most.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
We decided on using basic Jo Sonja's Acrylics colours (white, black, metallic + bright colours: yellow, red, green, blue, light brown) and Jo Sonja's Flow Medium in pre-mixed jars in 2: 1 (colour to medium). This hopefully will reduce the time and you don’t need to use a palette.
http://www.chromaonline.com/products/au/chroma_s_jo_sonja_s/...
We opted for the best quality brushes and went for sizes 1 & 0 Series 33 Pure Kolinsky Pointed from Rosemary & Co.

4. SHADE:
Using Army Painters Strong Quickshade dipping technique with attached miniature to a drill as in below video & matt spray.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
This will also make the miniatures virtually indestructible, as the Quickshade is a polymer based. Based on the report by others the Quickshade is not darkening the edges as typical ink so it may reduce the need for highlighting/dry brushing. Optionally we could also use secondary ink to change/alternate the prime paint.

5. DRY brush
Applying dry brush only to the primer sprayed areas or to the prominent features (helmet, armor, hairs, fur, etc.) by using contrasting colours.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Here we decided to use Citadel pre-made dry paint to save time on wiping/dry brush preparation.
https://www.games-workshop.com/en-BE/Citadel-Dry-Paint-Set-2...

6. Small DETAIL & rims for bosses:
Some fun touches and only if adding significantly to overall look: blood, mud, metal highlights, fangs, bones, scars, vomit, and jewellery glaze.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
using Citadel technical and bone colour paints ( Screaming Skull and Ushabti Bone) .
https://www.games-workshop.com/en-WW/Citadel-Technical

7. Secondary MATT spray (optional)
We aiming for something similar as in this Armer Painters Zombie Guide:

http://www.thearmypainter.com/gallery_presentation.php?Galle...

You could just reduce Our Blitz System even further to WASH/PRIME/QUICKSHADE/MATT/DRY. Hope it helps.

I may report back how it goeswhistle

Wence Out

EDIT: Fixed links
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryce K. Nielsen
United States
Elk Ridge
Utah
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Tikatoy wrote:
shnar wrote:
It's called the "Dipping Technique". Look it up, there are quite a few different examples of how it works, and for mass painting of lots of minis, or even for new painters, it's a great way to go.

-shnar


I've come across this before, but this seems to be a quick way to "finish" minis after painting them using varnish. I haven't come across any references to using unpainted (but primed) minis with this technique. Do you know of any specific examples of this?

A lot of painters that are doing a "wash" are effectively doing the same thing as the dipping technique, just with a little more control, and a lot more time spent on it. Dipping will work just fine for the effect you're looking to achieve.

-shnar
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alexander Hristov
Bulgaria
flag msg tools
Well, despite being lazy/untalented, I also have most of the Descent content and it really bugged me to have the minuatures blank (white/red/gray).

Painting them is a bit like filling out a colouring book, only a bit more tedious due to the small models of some. Unbend if needed, prime, base+layer colours, shade(or wash) and on a few of them I even did drybrush. Not as hard as you think, just a bit time-consuming. I got every expansion short of Manor of Ravens and 3 heroes & monsters collections. Currently I have all the heroes and master monsters painted, minion monsters are as white as ever.
I'd have uploaded some pictures, but my phone makes awful photos.
Still, if takes me about 20 minutes per hero to paint them (decently), but after a few I was able to paint 3-4 heroes simultaneously. Roughly the same with monsters.
Prime + wash seems to be an easy gateaway, but I'd say if you go that far, why not throw in some colour in between the prime and the wash?


If I manage to get some NORMAL pictures for the minis, I'll upload to show you what a noob managed to pull off
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Santi Velasco
Spain
San Juan de Aznalfarache
Seville
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Dipping is a great technique for newbies, but instead of painting a single color, I'd try a few basic colours instead, for instance, painting a character in a base color, then flesh paint for hands and face, and metal for weapons. I don't think it's going to be significantly harder, and the end result will be way better.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Gardner
United States
LA
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Once I decide that a game is a keeper, I do a quick paint job that starts with just different colored primers. I'll use dark on the bottom and lighter colors on the top of the mini. At this point, the minis look 100x better than plain plastic. The next thing I will do is wash/shade the lighter colored minis. I do this with Vallejo dark gray wash (watered down a bit first) or simply watered down black paint. This wash will bring out the details AND makes it much easier to see those details when painting. Eventually I'll fully paint the models, which is base coat, wash/shade, highlight and seal with clear coat. However, this may take me a couple months to complete, so I often play my games with the primed minis.

It is amazing what you can achieve by using different colored spray paints on the minis. It's a bit like a poor man's airbrush. I use the krylon camo ultra-flat primers and they come in two shades of green, black, two shades of brown, and a khaki (looks like medium gray). For that, I use Krylon colormaster primer (white, gray and red oxide). To achieve highlights with the spray paint, after spraying on the dark color, just lightly spray the lighter color from the top at a roughly 45 degree angle. Great combinations are the dark brown/light brown, dark green/light green, black/red oxide, and really black with anything else as highlight looks good. Because I'm sometimes using this as my base coat, I will try to achieve full coverage with the first color of primer and typically with two thin coats.

If you are going to apply wash directly to the primer, it will leave a muddier look than when applying wash to paint. That's because the primer leaves a rough surface that has "tooth" to improve paint adherence. You can avoid this with a quick coat of either clear coat (spray or brush on) or a coat of medium (matte, satin or gloss). If there's any interest in a few photos of the results, let me know and I"ll upload some.

tl;dr summary - Use colored primers as quick method to give your minis some flair.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Riley
United States
Glendale
Arizona
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Currently I use Citadel primer spray paint for my minis but I find I miss a lot of places when spraying and I don't want to mask details.

What primer paints do you use?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O Sync
Australia
flag msg tools
az933k wrote:
Currently I use Citadel primer spray paint for my minis but I find I miss a lot of places when spraying and I don't want to mask details.

What primer paints do you use?


I recently changed from the Citadel primers to Army Painters primers. In my humble opinion the Army primers have more “finished”/”smooth” look. I also found that they are sealing better, so I don’t need to “load” the brush for basing that much. This is reducing my basing mistakes and application of subsequent touch-up works.

I also had a problem with my prime coverage in the past. After few different techniques this is the one I am using nowadays:

1. Lay the miniature on its front in a spray tray
2. Spray miniature at 30 degrees spraying from base to head
3. Turn miniature twice at 120 degrees - repeat 2.
4. Stand miniature on the spray tray
5. Spray miniature in 45 degrees from head to toe; again turning miniature twice at 120 degrees
6. Check if horizontal spraying is required and if so give it a light pass with two turns.

I can’t remember when was the last time I had use brush-on primer or missed an area. Hope it helps.

brewgeek wrote:
....

It is amazing what you can achieve by using different colored spray paints on the minis. It's a bit like a poor man's airbrush....


What a great idea ! I have to try this . Thank you sir !

Wence Out
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dean Love
United Kingdom
Coventry
West Midlands
flag msg tools
shnar wrote:
Tikatoy wrote:
shnar wrote:
It's called the "Dipping Technique". Look it up, there are quite a few different examples of how it works, and for mass painting of lots of minis, or even for new painters, it's a great way to go.

-shnar


I've come across this before, but this seems to be a quick way to "finish" minis after painting them using varnish. I haven't come across any references to using unpainted (but primed) minis with this technique. Do you know of any specific examples of this?

A lot of painters that are doing a "wash" are effectively doing the same thing as the dipping technique, just with a little more control, and a lot more time spent on it. Dipping will work just fine for the effect you're looking to achieve.

-shnar


Yeah but if all you'd be doing is splashing the wash over, without attention to detail, it's actually a bit quicker as you don't have to mess about with shaking all the excess dip off.

But what you don't get from the wash is the varnish which makes the work you've done a lot less likely to flake off.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O Sync
Australia
flag msg tools
Deano2099 wrote:
shnar wrote:
Tikatoy wrote:
shnar wrote:
It's called the "Dipping Technique". Look it up, there are quite a few different examples of how it works, and for mass painting of lots of minis, or even for new painters, it's a great way to go.

-shnar


I've come across this before, but this seems to be a quick way to "finish" minis after painting them using varnish. I haven't come across any references to using unpainted (but primed) minis with this technique. Do you know of any specific examples of this?

A lot of painters that are doing a "wash" are effectively doing the same thing as the dipping technique, just with a little more control, and a lot more time spent on it. Dipping will work just fine for the effect you're looking to achieve.

-shnar


Yeah but if all you'd be doing is splashing the wash over, without attention to detail, it's actually a bit quicker as you don't have to mess about with shaking all the excess dip off.

But what you don't get from the wash is the varnish which makes the work you've done a lot less likely to flake off.


The Army Painters Quickshade in combination with matt spray claims to give also a protection layer:

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bucho Bucho
msg tools
mb
Tikatoy wrote:
None of the minis are painted because I'm 1) lazy and 2) untalented.


I used to put a lot of effort into mini painting, then I got the dungeon command sets. They're hideously painted. But on the table by and far it makes no difference, I've yet to have someone even notice the difference.

So with the vast amount of new mini's I've been painting as I've bought into Descent I've been trying to lower my game. No more 4 layers of paint for me. Instead it's base coat, maybe some wash or drybrushing and if and only if it's a really cool mini does it get a wash AND drybrushing.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Off The Shelf Board Game Reviews
United States
Anchorage
Alaska
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I can get pretty lazy when it comes to painting for board games myself (oddly enough only for board games, my 40k stuff still gets dozens of hours of my life). Games like Arcadia Quest I do a great job on the heroes and then all the bad guys get a base in their dominant color (I love trolls and orcs for this reason) clothing painted, and then a quick lazy wash to call it done.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Victor Hark
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I attempted to paint my Space Hulk set and after 6-7 pieces paid a clerk at my FLGS to do it for me. This thread has helped me lower my expectations down to a level I ordered a mega selection from armypainters and consider it my winter project. It is going to be cold and damp the whole winter here in the Pacific Northwest and I am not sure how to prime using spray paint indoors. If I am lucky the set comes with a bottle of brush on primer. However Descent will painted.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Mr Skeletor wrote:
Are people sure the MvM minis are primed? I think they have just put a wash straight on the figure.


I just assumed they were because I thought washes wouldn't stick to unprimed plastic minis. Does it work to just apply a wash to them?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Wenceslaus wrote:
You could just reduce Our Blitz System even further to WASH/PRIME/QUICKSHADE/MATT/DRY. Hope it helps.

I may report back how it goeswhistle


That is really awesome-looking! I am aiming for something like step 1 of the Zombie guide hehe!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marlene Thornstrom
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
brewgeek wrote:
If there's any interest in a few photos of the results, let me know and I"ll upload some.


I'd be interested in seeing the results! And thank you for the tips on the colored primers and also on how to spray the primer.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Victor Hark
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
brewgeek wrote:
Once I decide that a game is a keeper, I do a quick paint job that starts with just different colored primers. I'll use dark on the bottom and lighter colors on the top of the mini. At this point, the minis look 100x better than plain plastic. The next thing I will do is wash/shade the lighter colored minis. I do this with Vallejo dark gray wash (watered down a bit first) or simply watered down black paint. This wash will bring out the details AND makes it much easier to see those details when painting. Eventually I'll fully paint the models, which is base coat, wash/shade, highlight and seal with clear coat. However, this may take me a couple months to complete, so I often play my games with the primed minis.

It is amazing what you can achieve by using different colored spray paints on the minis. It's a bit like a poor man's airbrush. I use the krylon camo ultra-flat primers and they come in two shades of green, black, two shades of brown, and a khaki (looks like medium gray). For that, I use Krylon colormaster primer (white, gray and red oxide). To achieve highlights with the spray paint, after spraying on the dark color, just lightly spray the lighter color from the top at a roughly 45 degree angle. Great combinations are the dark brown/light brown, dark green/light green, black/red oxide, and really black with anything else as highlight looks good. Because I'm sometimes using this as my base coat, I will try to achieve full coverage with the first color of primer and typically with two thin coats.

If you are going to apply wash directly to the primer, it will leave a muddier look than when applying wash to paint. That's because the primer leaves a rough surface that has "tooth" to improve paint adherence. You can avoid this with a quick coat of either clear coat (spray or brush on) or a coat of medium (matte, satin or gloss). If there's any interest in a few photos of the results, let me know and I"ll upload some.

tl;dr summary - Use colored primers as quick method to give your minis some flair.



I also would like to see any pics posted, and more advice. Could not understand why the washes were coming out so poor, nobody else mentioned about the primer not taking it well. Thank you very much.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Beighel
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Just dawned on me that I actually did some of this over the weekend.



The figures on the left (called Gynoids in the game) I didn't wash at all just tried to paint the details. Not really interesting for this discussion.

The ones on the right I did the following to:
1) Washed in soapy water with a toothbrush
2) Primed them using white Liquitex Gesso
3) Base coated using Reaper's Shadowed Steel paint
4) Thinned Reaper's Pure Black with water and used it to wash the minis
5) Thinned Reaper's True Blue with water and went over their chests, eyes, and a few other places I wanted to appear glowing
6) Mixed in a bit of Reaper's Pre White into the blue and washed the glowing bits again
7) Repeated step 6 a few times washing a smaller area until it was just the very center of the glow, perhaps 4 passes
8) Applied a coat of Reaper's Brush On Sealer (the non-glossy version)


Couple lessons I learned from this:
For a wash you want a decent amount of contrast (light base color with dark wash) for it to work well. The dark metal color masks the wash a bit. If I used a lighter base color the wash would stand out more. The wash still worked like this, the details stand out a bit but they are more muted from what the original posted was asking about.

The glow effect didn't turn out too badly. It also needs high contrast (light glowing color with dark base color), but I don't really know how to balance the needs of this glow with the washing. The wash layers need to be extremely thin so that they don't hide the base color much. It might be helpful to mix in some of the base color as well to give it a better blend.

The eyes were the only thing that required anything like precision. When something glows it'll spread its color to the surrounding area so if the color spills out form the light it makes things look illuminated. When you wash first touch the brush to a paper towel so there's not a lot of paint, then you can dab it at the mini and it won't spread too far.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.