$10.00
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
SNT10 wrote:
Thanks for the mention about Made in U.S.A. Many people I talk with seem to have the dilusion that you have to go to China. This is wrong on many levels.

Looney Labs writes occasionally about their decision to manufacture their pyramids and other game stuff in the US, and the higher financial costs of that versus the advantages of supporting the local economy, more ecological manufacture and local transport, etc.
E.g.
http://www.looneylabs.com/ecofluxx-foundation/other-topics.h...
http://www.wunderland.com/LooneyLabs/StoveStuff/IcehouseRFQ....
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Simon Arthur

Georgia
msg tools
Simon from Big Blue Saw here. I just thought I'd mention that we've made various tokens, badges, counters, and the like from wood, plastic, metal, and various other materials. We don't mind small orders at all, and we'd welcome game developers prototyping a new game or looking to start making a few sets.

http://www.bigbluesaw.com

We are located in Atlanta, Georgia. We typically ship all parts in 1-3 business days, which means that if you're not too far away, you might have your parts in hand the very next day after you order.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Mahaffey
United States
Columbia
South Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
GAME ARTIST
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Simon, do you have a process for printing color imagery onto metals, plastics, and woods or are labels necessary in truth?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Simon Arthur

Georgia
msg tools
We can't do a full color image, but we do work with color engraveable plastics. These allow you to do a contrasting engraved color against a solid field of another color. We also have plastics with pre-printed full color patterns, like woodgrain, stone, and the like.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian Moffett
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Anyone know what the Copyright issue is in the UK?

I have designed a game, tested it and as I'm a Graphic Designer created the artwork too. The only thing I need to be sure on is the Copyright.

I have heard that if you post something to yourself and don't open it that is one form of Copyright as it will be date stamped.

Is this correct or do I have to make it legal somehow.

Many thanks
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
norman rule
United States
Columbia
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Mofman wrote:
Is this correct or do I have to make it legal somehow.


If you're looking to protect yourself and your work, you really need to research this issue yourself, to your own satisfaction.

"I read it on BGG" shouldn't be sufficient for your own piece of mind.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Byron Collins
United States
Suffolk
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Mofman wrote:

Is this correct or do I have to make it legal somehow.

Many thanks


From copyright.gov (US copyright office)-

"I’ve heard about a “poor man’s copyright.” What is it?

The practice of sending a copy of your own work to yourself is sometimes called a “poor man’s copyright.” There is no provision in the copyright law regarding any such type of protection, and it is not a substitute for registration."

I'm not sure about it from the UK standpoint, but it's not sufficient in the US.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Masri
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
Hi Mofman,

Quote:
Anyone know what the Copyright issue is in the UK?

I have designed a game, tested it and as I'm a Graphic Designer created the artwork too. The only thing I need to be sure on is the Copyright.

I have heard that if you post something to yourself and don't open it that is one form of Copyright as it will be date stamped.

Is this correct or do I have to make it legal somehow.


Copyright is handled differently in the UK to the US. So far as I understand, the US has always leant towards registering and the need to assert copyright with the copyright symbol or similar.

In the UK, copyright is automatic. Simply create something original and you have the copyright. The difficulty comes with proving that you were the originator. If you google "UK copyright" you will definitely find .co.uks ready to offer a paid registration service, but it's worth a look through the UK Government website on Intellectual Property. It's very well written, in clear, plain English: www.ipo.gov.uk

And in particular: this page on your Automatic Rights

As you'll see from the snippets I've copied here, sending yourself a copy in the post isn't "one form of copyright" but it is one way of providing date-specific proof, should it be needed.

Here are a handful of quotes from the government website:
"There is no official copyright register because copyright is automatic. There are certain steps you can take to protect your rights, but you do not have to register anywhere."

"...a creator could send himself or herself a copy by special delivery post (which gives a clear date stamp on the envelope), leaving the envelope unopened on its return (ensuring you also know what is inside each envelope in case you do this more than once). Alternatively you could lodge your work with a bank or solicitor. It is important to note, that this does not prove that a work is original or created by you. But it may be useful to be able to show the court that the work was in your possession at a particular date."

Hope this helps.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
San Antonio
Texas
flag msg tools
Style Over Substance
badge
"In loving memory of Mariel."
mb
One of the most awesome things I've found here on BGG!

Now a question:

I don't see anything about safety testing or anything for the game or its components. Wouldn't different countries have different rules? For example, would the US stop a product from coming in if it didn't have some sort of seal of approval--or would they simply force a kind of recall once people started dropping because of poisonous paint...
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Byron Collins
United States
Suffolk
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
awakeneddragon wrote:
One of the most awesome things I've found here on BGG!

Now a question:

I don't see anything about safety testing or anything for the game or its components. Wouldn't different countries have different rules? For example, would the US stop a product from coming in if it didn't have some sort of seal of approval--or would they simply force a kind of recall once people started dropping because of poisonous paint...


That's a good point. In the US, CPSC (US Consumer Product Safety Commission) is the lead office charged with providing information on the CPSIA (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008). Many interpretations of the law in the US are still ongoing as shown by a recent docket CPSC-2010-0029 where the interpretation of a "Children's Product" is discussed. The action is for "Final Interpretative Rule". There was a meeting scheduled to discuss the docket today (Sept. 9th, 2010).

So issues and interpretations of the law are still ongoing, but, it is US law. IMHO It's best for each manufacturer to seek out and determine how to apply the CPSIA requirements to their own product line- to figure out if they produce items subject to mandatory testing for lead and other hazards, and go from there. There is no clear and concise answer for manufacturers of games/toys. Even the commission is still in limbo over interpretations of just what is a "children's product".

For example, from the CPSC-2010-0029 docket, "Section 235(a) of the CPSIA amended section 3(a)(2) the Consumer Product Safety Act (“CPSA”) by creating a new definition of “children’s product.” 15 U.S.C. 2052(a)(2). “Children’s product” is defined as “a consumer product designed or intended primarily for children 12 years of age or younger.”

For many game publishers, esp. wargame publishers like myself, we don't market or sell games intended for use by children 12 years of age or younger. My most recent product, Spearpoint 1943 specifically states on the box "Ages 13 and up." That's no coincidence and it's a direct response to the CPSIA. That said, it's certainly true as well. I don't intend that children play my wargames and it generally is accepted that most wargamers are adults.

If for example I were manufacturing a "children's game", I would be very careful to go through with the testing. I'd be marketing to children, introducing a product for use by children, and would have to apply the mandatory testing requirements of CPSIA for that game. At least that's how I've been interpreting CPSIA so far.

There are many discussions / arguments online about the law which you can find with a google search, but to check out the law itself, the best source is the CPSC website specific to the act: http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/cpsia.html.

Hope this helps. I know it's not a definitive answer and doesn't cover many specific cases / issues, but it is certainly an important consideration for any game manufacturer / publisher.

The recent 2010 GAMA Trade Show (industry-only convention) had a good brief about CPSIA and what it means for publishers- more are planned for future years as the law evolves and is (hopefully) better interpreted by the Commission and everyone involved.
3 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
eric hanuise
Belgium
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
These two GAMA seminars can be downloaded as podcasts from here :
http://www.pulpgamer.com/gama/135015/gts10-02-consumer-produ...
http://www.pulpgamer.com/gama/135020/gts10-03-consumer-produ...
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Herb Petro
United States
INDIAN TRAIL
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
The reason that the "mail it to yourself" concept is ridiculous is that you can mail yourself a large, empty envelope with postage covering a large amount of weight, keep the empty envelope for years, and then years later put anything you want in the envelope, seal it, and then claim you mailed and received it years earlier.

Those who want to learn the basics of U.S. copyright may do well to refer to this Stanford University website: http://fairuse.stanford.edu/
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg CZ
Hungary
BUDAPEST
Budapest
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Geeklist for illustrators, graphic designers

might also be useful (if it gets filled...)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gabriele Gabba
South Africa
flag msg tools
Re: Game Design & Self-Publishing – A Resource for Game Designers
This article is HUGELY helpful! You are an absolute legend for taking the time to help others. The world needs more people like you!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Board Happy
United States
Virginia
flag msg tools
The product safety requirements imposed by the US have given rise to a thriving industry in China, in addition to the manufacture of toys and games. There are many companies who do the inspecting of the manufacturing plants and each product they produce. They are paid by U.S. inventors and distributors who need eyeballs and advocates on the ground. By U.S. standards, the services are inexpensive yet very necessary. I recently attended the International Toy Fair and many of these agencies rented booth space alongside the toy and game distributors.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
San Antonio
Texas
flag msg tools
Style Over Substance
badge
"In loving memory of Mariel."
mb
Any chance of putting up info about how to get a licence to a franchise? Though many companies will probably manufacture there own product with their own licences, they might at least be open to, might they not?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Byron Collins
United States
Suffolk
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
awakeneddragon wrote:
Any chance of putting up info about how to get a licence to a franchise? Though many companies will probably manufacture there own product with their own licences, they might at least be open to, might they not?


Honestly, I'm not familiar with that process since it's not something I'm currently involved with. However, I'd be glad to post (and credit) someone else who could speak to that process as part of an article edit.

Any takers?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Mucchiello
United States
Edison
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
awakeneddragon wrote:
Any chance of putting up info about how to get a licence to a franchise? Though many companies will probably manufacture there own product with their own licences, they might at least be open to, might they not?

That probably has not "How to" because it is different for every "franchise" out there. Gaining a license to make Star Wars product is going to be very different from getting a license to make a Martha Stewart product.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
San Antonio
Texas
flag msg tools
Style Over Substance
badge
"In loving memory of Mariel."
mb
Have you gotten franchises for both of those properties? (^_-)

Regardless of the differences, I think a general idea would be good enough to give people a headstart if they were so inclined. Just as there is no one way to design, pimp, and even produce a game, the addition of the information would add quite a bit to an already excellent guide.

Let's take a for instance: Nintendo. They have a good number of properties. But there are many others that pass through their hands simply because the games that end up on their system have to go through them. So. I recognize getting a license for Mario would be different than getting one for Mappy--and depending on the license I probably would have to research quite a bit to get to the real owners.

Again, I think people sharing their experience would be valuable. What did they say when approaching for a license? What did they say when said company didn't actually own the license--and didn't provide forwarding info? Etc.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Mucchiello
United States
Edison
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
awakeneddragon wrote:
Again, I think people sharing their experience would be valuable. What did they say when approaching for a license? What did they say when said company didn't actually own the license--and didn't provide forwarding info? Etc.

The people who have experiences with licensed properties are people who work full time in game design for larger companies. The people who negotiate licenses are managers and lawyers. They don't post here.

Not even the designers at Hasbro wake up one morning and start working on a Star Wars game. They get the assignment from their manager only after Hasbro and Lucas Arts have completed, signed contracts in place for X number of games over Y number of years focusing specifically on A, B, and C parts of the Star Wars Universe.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
San Antonio
Texas
flag msg tools
Style Over Substance
badge
"In loving memory of Mariel."
mb
Hmm, the low opinion you have of BGG is interesting. My impression of BGG is that here is a community of boutique gamers. It is not a small or insignificant community--as evidenced by the amount of people that donated for the 2011 support BGG fund, if nothing else. That said, I assume that any company that produces games will spend at least a little time in communities like this one, if for no other reason than to use the very open tools (Want to find out the game rankings? Want to know what people are reporting plays for? Etc). From what little of marketing I studied in university that seems plausible.

You do bring up a point, of licence holders approaching game manufacturers. If I'm Nintendo and I want to promote my product I'll mosey over to Bandai and chat with them. It is probably true that we miniscule gnats trolling here at BGG would have no chance of getting a license. Maybe that's why so many illegal and skirting-the-illegal PnP games are self-published here. And then companies go to BGG and tell them to take content down; everyone gets angry.

Silliness. My call was for information to bolster an excellent tread--an interesting read. I'd love to know how a toy manufacturer like Toy Vault got the license to Godzilla: Was it a natural extension of their toy license? I'd love to have some idea of trying to resurrect something long dead, like Jase and the Wheeled Warriors, in a game: Someone must have dug around for info on such properties. And, by extension, I'd love to know why big companies like Hasbro will still produce games like Battleship Galaxieswithout licences--it's definitely cheaper being generic, but is it also more likely to attract people that normally don't care at all about Battlestar Galactica or Star Wars?

I thought the point of this thread was to difinitively provide such information. Oh well.

I'll wonder on my own if Hasbro's greater and greater interest in boutique games will have any effect on license holders and on game manufacturers in general. Oh well.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Mucchiello
United States
Edison
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
awakeneddragon wrote:
Hmm, the low opinion you have of BGG is interesting.

Explain this. I said lawyers and upper management of Hasbro don't POST in this forum. That's why you will not get an answer to your question here directly from someone who has negotiated a big license agreement.

Quote:
My impression of BGG is that here is a community of boutique gamers. It is not a small or insignificant community--as evidenced by the amount of people that donated for the 2011 support BGG fund, if nothing else.

Yes, gamers like this place. That has nothing to do with game makers spending their valuable time READING and POSTING to this little sub-forum.

Quote:
That said, I assume that any company that produces games will spend at least a little time in communities like this one

Certainly, many do.

Try this: it is Chris Pramas of Green Ronin Publishing answer questions about how GR acquired the RPG publishing rights to DC Comics characters for a superhero RPG.

Pay particular attention to the "1st question", "Where are you in the development of these books?" and "Will we only be seeing the four books,..."
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Evan Williams
United States
Fairborn
Ohio
flag msg tools
I recently discovered a web site that should be at the top of your list of links

http://www.thegamecrafter.com

This site will let you upload your custom art and rules, then print and ship any number of copies of your game you want (1 to as many as you're willing to pay for) as well as set up a storefront to sell your game from and give you 50% of the royalties of whatever price you set for your game above the production cost. They print boards out of the same card-stock used for their poker sized playing cards, and will also ship your game with components like dice, play money, pawns, winks, stickers, wood tokens, and felt bags for parts. The box used to ship your game doubles as the storage box to save on shipping and production costs.

I'm hoping that the game I am entering in the solitaire print and play contest does well, and that I can use that success to sell that game using http://www.thegamecrafter.com

contest thread: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/644090/solitaire-print-and-p...
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Mucchiello
United States
Edison
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
You should do a search on BGG for thegamecrafter. Many people have varying things to say about it. We've definitely heard of it before, though.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Byron Collins
United States
Suffolk
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
For those who are subscribed to this post- if you're interested in an up-to-date series of discussions on various topics related to publishing, please check out the blog I've started here on BGG called Publisher Perspective. The plan is go well beyond this OP and draw from my own experience in the industry to give a bit of insight into publishing.

Here's a link to the blog if you're interested, and as always, feedback is welcome - (please comment on the individual post).

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/blog/497

Best--
4 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Prev «  1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.