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B. G. Kubacki
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d10-0 DISCLAMER

Well, you probably already know that I hate the game (how did ya guess?). If you had the chance to read my comparison/review of World of Warcraft: the Board Game and World of Warcraft: the Adventure Game, you probably already know a lot of what you’re going to find in the review you’re looking at now. If you are a person, who considers himself or herself a fan of WoW: tBG, I am hereby declaring that I do not want to offend you. So, if you really love it, stop reading now, please. This may be unpleasant.

However…

If you played the game once or twice and right now are considering to buy your own copy, or you have recently purchased a copy of it and someone wants to buy it from you, do read on. It may save you a lot of time, some money and a big, very big disappointment.

Also, I would like to apologize in advance to anyone and everyone who will find my views redundant. I know that some of the issues touched upon in my text have already been addressed by other Geeks (myself included, actually), but I simply cannot write a text that would be incomplete or that would fail to show what a horrid creation this seemingly beautiful product actually is.

I am giving you a chance to turn back now… if you do not take it, bear no grudge against me, for I am only the messenger. And a somewhat ruthless reviewer.

d10-1 COMPONENTS

Overview

Fantasy Flight Games knows how to rub Ameritrash lovers the right way. The overwhelmingly big box contains 136 plastic figures (120 monsters and 16 player characters), more than 450 chits (hit, shield, poison, quest and God-only-knows-what tokens), 336 small cards, 132 big cards, 3 big boss cards, 9 really-really-big character cards, 21 eight-sided dice (red, green and blue), two player aids, a thick manual and a board. Lots and lots of stuff.

To be quite honest, it’s hard not to get awestruck and overwhelmed by what you find in the box right after you open it. The first problem, however, arises as soon as you start punching the chits out and ripping the shrink wrap of the decks. You really (and I mean: really) need some plastic bags, boxes or any other clever means of organizing the contents of the game. Obviously, FFG did not provide any store-in-order aids, so you are on your own here. And if a thought of keeping it all just “in the box” ever crosses your mind, then you will be on a straight path into spending your gaming night doing what Cinderella was ordered to do by her evil and twisted stepmother. Only there will be no doves to help you.

Artwork

The artwork of all the cards is rather nice. However, you need to be a fan of the heroic fantasy pulp style to really appreciate the depictions of the characters (big weapons, strange poses, overgrown weapons, lots of colours). You also need to have no problem with using some images taken straight out of the online game (most monsters are depicted using their somewhat imperfect in-game incarnations). I personally believe, however, that it is all outweighed by the sheer beauty of the board.

Durability

It’s probably no surprise that a game this big takes up a lot of space. I never possessed a table that would be able to comfortably fit that monstrosity, so I would always have to play on the floor. This means, that the durability of some components was tested in a way the manufacturers never intended them to be. And I must say, that when it comes to the figures, the game passed the test in flying colours.

Now, I know some of you Geeks out there said that the little plastic dudes were easy to break. I find it really hard to believe: the monsters from my set were stepped on a couple of times. The only damage ever done was to the foot of my friend, who accidentally encountered a red Murloc, stalking its next prey in the recesses of my rug. Suffice to say, that the little plastic bastard actually drew blood.

However, it is not as good when it comes to cards and chits. Especially the smaller ability and item cards suffered at the ever-shuffling hands of the players. This actually is a problem, since (in Poland at least), it is nigh-impossible to find sleeves for the smaller cards. The bigger ones (quests and events) are probably as durable as their lil’ bros, but here, no damage was ever done due to a proper use if a deck protector. The situation is rather similar with the chits. The ones used rarely, or at least touched not very often are still lookin’ good, whereas the ‘hit’ and ‘shield’ tokens, fiddled with during every combat, have already started to “wear off”.

The overall quality of the components is good, decreasing from “great” when you open the box and falling into “medium” category as you play subsequent matches. What I found particularly annoying in mid-game is that when you have to put some figures and tokens on one region, there is sometimes just not enough space (yes, the game takes, like, the whole room, and there is still no place for something on the board). Consequently, chaos emerges and it all eventually leads to somebody killing more or less monsters then he or she should have, due to “inexplicable mob migration”.


d10-3 GAMEPLAY

Quests

The essence of the basic game is to make your characters level up via completing quests, randomly selected from the proper deck. Every faction has its own set of quests and within every set, the cards come in four colours: grey, green, yellow and red. The grey quests are drawn before the game begins. They’re nothing more than a blue milk run for level 1 characters. The other cards are drawn immediately after any other quest is completed, so that the amount of quests for every faction is always constant. The players have the choice of the colour of the quest they draw, so they have limited control over how difficult the new challenges are.

How do the quests work? Well, every card has location, type and number of monsters as well as a list of rewards the quest will provide. When you complete it, you get to draw the given number of treasures, receive some gold and experience points. To finish a quest, your character or characters have to visit the given location and take out the monsters therein. Simple, straightforward, repetitive and boring. Unfortunately, none of the quests require anything but mob hunting. You never have to just visit places or gain some items. You just slay the monsters. Over, and over, and over again.

What is really strange about the quests, is that they are faction specific. Every time you generate quest mobs, you put a faction token next to them, which means that the other side cannot see, hear or encounter them. Of course, some may say that it is similar to the online game, where quests were given by faction-specific questgivers and the players would never have to compete for the quests between factions. I would like to point out, however, that virtually nothing stood in the way of a Horde player who wanted to visit Alliance territory just to slaughter some vile things running around here and there. Moreover, the character would receive normal experience for killing the enemies. So why not allow the players in WoW: tBG to mess up the quests of the opposing faction? I really don’t know. And I will come back to that issue in the “Interaction” section of my review.

What I failed to mention up until now, is that the game has a limited turn-clock. It means that after 30 turns (15 turns per faction), the game ends and the players have to face off in a Alliance vs. Horde duel to the death. It is possible to avoid that by destroying one of the bosses chosen as the main antagonist by the players before the game, but I must admit it was extremely difficult to beef up the characters enough, to stand a chance against any of the bosses before the endgame. During all my WoW: tBG sessions, I saw these duels only thrice, once of which ended up in a faction wipe and an overall defeat due to a lost turn. Thus, we come to yet another important and painful issue of the game. The turn-clock.

Since every faction has only 15 turns to finish the game (or, actually, get ready for the final duel), time becomes the most important resource. In the light of that, what can spoil the game completely is some bad luck with drawing the quests. I have mentioned that every card spawns monsters in a specific location. If the quest locations are close to the characters, with a little bit of luck, a faction may quickly advance both territorially and level-wise. If, however, the monsters spawn in remote places (and it almost never happens to both factions at the same time), one party is levelling up, while the other group just tries to reach their preliminary quests. To spice things up, the quest cards also generate neutral (blue) monsters, which serve as means of hampering the characters’ free movement (every character crossing a region with a neutral monster in it, must stop and fight it). Since the blue baddies do not (yes, stupid as it is, it is the truth) give any XP or prizes whatsoever, the frustration of an unable-to-reach-any-quests faction rises quickly and practically infinitely. Especially, that if you fall a level behind the enemy faction, you will never be able to catch up.

Interaction

Next to none. These three simple words are really all there is to it. Sure, the characters may battle each other and loot their respective backpacks (which usually contain nothing of real value – you equip the good stuff and sell the old immediately) but they do not receive any other rewards for killing each other. Since completing quests equals levelling, nobody gives a rats bottom about hunting other PC’s, which often ends up in enemy faction characters camping in the same site (sometimes in preparation to complete two different sets of monsters residing there).

Again, there was an effort made to pit the factions against each other – but if failed miserably. There are instances called “wars” that come up from the event cards from time to time. Essentially, it means that two tokens are put in two regions of the board. Whichever faction is able to gain control of the two regions, wins the war and earns some peanuts. By “peanuts” I mean a silly amount of XP and less gold you would get as a tip, being a Tauren waiter in an Ogrimmar restaurant. Again, since time is of the essence, wars are usually won “on the way” to some meaningful quests.

The only moment, when things actually get somewhat heated up, is when an event card states, that each faction may complete one of the opposing faction’s quest. Regrettably, that also rarely become a real race, since usually both factions complete the closest quests, doing their opponents a kind of a favour (the possibility of drawing a new quest, which may spawn monsters closer to the characters’ current location).

The last instance of interaction appears with “Auction House” event cards. The players try to outbid each other to get some moderately powerful item. Again, the conflict only arises if it so happens that both factions have enough dough to take part. Otherwise, it’s just an event like any other.

Combat

At its heart, World of Warcraft: the Board Game is a paper hack’n’slash. This means, that the most important element of the whole game is its combat. And in the case of WoW: tBG, it is detailed, complicated and fascinating. For the first 8-9 times.

To explain it as simple as possible, every character has a pool of dice to throw in every round of combat. The blue dice generate distance damage (which has the edge of striking before melee attacks), the red dice generate regular hits and the green dice generate defence. Every character takes his pool (basic dice plus everything and anything he finds on his character, ability and item cards) and throws it. Every number that is equal to or higher than the opponents armour value is a hit, indicated by a specific token put in a special area on the board. Then comes the phase of activating abilities that either burn energy, or require ‘spotting’ a specific number on a specific die already thrown, to throw some extra dice, activate a reroll or some extra damage. Then, for every hit token, the opponent discards one of his hit or defence tokens. Whoever has less tokens is dealt the amount of damage equal to the number of damage token left on the opponents damage-token area. That is how PvP combat work – in case of monsters, you have to deal with a set number of damage dealt every round (so, first you have to soak it using your own hit/defence tokens) before you can deal any damage. Since the mobs have no dice of their own, they automatically trigger the abilities they have if they spot the appropriate number on one of your dice (usually 1 or 2).

Now, it may all seem really interesting. You have a lot of class abilities, some extra dice and effects provided by magic items and weapons, lots of combinations and possibilities. It, however, quite quickly turns out, that most of the characters have a maximum number of two ‘working’ strategies and that after you gather enough resources to become a tough guy, you spend long minutes in silence and solitude, throwing, spotting, spending and regaining energy and health, then rerolling the dice and finally putting a heap of chits on a nice looking area of the board. It becomes dull and mind numbing, increasing the downtime of other players to the point of them falling asleep or playing Mag*Blast on the side, while you still “play with your dice”.

Finally, the last battle between the factions takes ages to finish, especially if both parties are well balanced, ant throw zillions of dice just to deal two o three damage points, which will be quickly soaked up by the beefy warrior or the warlock’s Voidwalker, or even better: cured by the Druid, Priest, Shaman or Paladin. Then again, after six or seven turns of that excruciating experience (with both factions having actually lost three or four health points altogether), the energy runs out, and the battle continues with much fewer dice (a little relief). I must admit, it becomes somewhat amusing to look at mages/warlocks/druids/priests trying to beat each other to death with sticks and stones.

To conclude, I will mention the most astonishing discovery we made during combat (the final, PvP combat that is). When things get really epic, it turns out that FFG provided you with a tonne of useless chits (life and energy for instance: there are way more of these than you will ever use) but failed to give you enough of them to accommodate all that can pop up during combat between high level characters. You have to use other tokens, to be able to complete the attack! Now, that is atrocious!

On a side note: there are also way too many event cards. You draw one every now and again (not even every turn) and the box includes… what? Fifty two of them? Why? You use no more then ten during every game, so why do you need fifty? Especially, when that humongous box lacks something way more essential to a hack’n’slash?


d10-4 THE FUN

None. Well, there was a time when I loved the game but right now, when I look at the box, I can only think about my aching joints (as I have mentioned, this gigantic game does not seem to fit on any regular table) and a feeling of sleepiness, creeping on me during the downtime. That happened especially when other players would have to turns of combat while I had two turns of movement and maintenance.

What I loved the game for, then? Well, after my first session (8 hours straight) I thought to myself: “The game took an awfully long time, but when I get rules right, it will go much faster and I will be able to fully explore and appreciate the vast possibilities that it gives me.” Later, it turned out that I was wrong in both cases. The game never gets shorter (all the dice-rolling and chit-fiddling), although we managed to “squeeze” the last play in under 6 hours, and the vastness of possibilities becomes just a short list of set schemes to realize as quickly as the game allows. And this is the bottom line of this review: if you played the game and think it is really good, if you assume it will get even better when you play it again, you are wrong! It only gets more dull, more repetitive, more annoying. There will always be downtime, even if all your fellow players chip in to help you with your counting and chit-fiddling (that, by the way, irritates me even more than the actual downtime: people trying to “help” me by spotting dice and moving tokens for me).

So I stopped loving the game. I do not have the heart to get rid of it, I still love how the components look, but I pretty much hate the rest. So, do not get fooled. Do not think that a game containing a tonne of carton and 130 figures simply must be good. And if you played the game once or twice, know, that it will never be better. It will only be worse.

So heed my warning and stay away from this time consuming, bloated abomination! For you may discover one day, that real life passed you by, as you rolled hundreds of meaningless dice and that your firstborn child started dating somewhere between the final round of the PvP and the end of the cleanup. Your girlfriend/boyfriend/wife/husband will leave you and your dog/cat will die and you will still be chasing that last quest and grinding ‘till dawn to make it to the fifth level.

But seriously: it’s a bad game that gets worse. Stay away from it. It is godawful. thumbsdown
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The Galaxy is Just Packed!
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Re: „It’s a trap!” or why you should avoid his godawful game.
But Blaze, I'm still not sure how you FEEL about the game.

Nice review. Passionate but evenhanded.

I disagree with several of your points, but others are spot-on.

Good luck with your ensuing flame war.
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B. G. Kubacki
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Re: „It’s a trap!” or why you should avoid his godawful game.
Believe it or not, there will be no war here. I am actually sorry to write so many bad things about this game... it has many nice elements that just did not add up to a nice game. And it's such a darn shame... soblue

I wonder if there is a way to tag the game as godawful...
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Alex Martinez
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Well, I don't necessarily agree with your assessment, but I won't bother posting a long rebuttal. It's not necessary because this is a solid review, presenting an opinion in a well-written manner. Good job.
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Maik Hennebach
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A rare instance of a useful negative review, mostly because you manage to differentiate between facts and your opinion. And while I don't agree with the opinion (I still quite it a lot after a dozen or so plays), this might be due to our games being closer to the three hour mark. If my first trial run had lasted for eight hours, there would not have been a second, I'm sure.

One point where your facts got muddled, possibly:
Quote:
Whichever faction is able to gain control of the two regions, wins the war and earns some peanuts. By “peanuts” I mean a silly amount of XP and less gold you would get as a tip, being a Tauren waiter in an Ogrimmar restaurant.

War rewards are per character, not per team, so you get double or triple peanuts. Which, in my experience, does elevate them from peanuts to a significant boost, especially if your team's in the rear. Obviously, seeing it my way increases the possible interaction quite a bit.
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Søren Staugaard
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I played this game with two factions only twice. Both plays were more or less to the letter of what your review describes - excruciatingly long and frustrating. Too much downtime, too much fiddling about, too little interaction. I don't think I'll ever play it that way again.

However, I've played it 4-5 times using the cooperative option now, both on my own and with company. I find that to be very enjoyable although not something I can finish in one setting. By no means is WoW: tBG my best game, but it does hold a special place on the shelf.
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Surya Van Lierde is pure Eurosnoot and proud of it!
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Not that I do enjoy the game any more (I did in the beginning, before I became Eurosnoot), but it never took us much more than 4h to play...
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Sam hudson
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WAR, war never changes...
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IMO (at least the 3 times I played it) It ALWAYS ends in PVP combat. If you die once you might as well conceed and start over. The recovery is so long that you will fall behind in the arms race and be B-slapped during PVP. All the other player has to do is wait it out.
 
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B. G. Kubacki
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About that dying...
Sometimes, dying while facing a too difficult quest is something good. You do loose a turn but you save two turns it would take you to get near another quest (and after you die, you respawn right next to it).

I agree with you, a faction wipe (if not a single character death) usually means that there is no point in playing on. Unless, perhaps, the opponet had a stroke of bad luck drawing the quests and the wipe just evened the odds
 
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Will
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What a good game. I think I am going to play it this weekend. Thanks for the reminder
 
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Will
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I didn't understood why you insulted me in the other thread MARK but now I do. It's ok not to like a game. But next time you might want to read the:

* Use common courtesy in your posts
* Respect others

That was placed there for a reason.

By the way this game is AWESOME if you care for the adventure and Character growth and not for the interaction and SUCKS if you are looking to have frequent talks with the other team. It's just like the video game.
 
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Mark Bond
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I think it's very important when reviewing WOW:TBG to consider how utterly different it is (or can be) as a solo or 2-player game than as a 4-6 player game.

I say this, because if my first experience with WOW:TBG had been a six-player game with six newbies who didn't know the rules, I would've run screaming from the game, and/or died of boredom in the 7th hour.

However, as a 2-player game, there's little downtime, things move pretty fast, and frankly, I've had a lot of fun with it. When my girlfriend and I play, we ignore PVP entirely, and treat it as a race to beat the Overlord. And we've really enjoyed it.

I'm only suggesting here that some of the biggest criticisms I see against WOW:TBG can be mitigated or negated entirely by playing a 2-player game (1-2 characters each) with a house rule or two.
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Simon Lundström
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Täby
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Perhaps completely irrelevant, but this game works well with a Game Master. I was the game explainer at a con, and held two guys busy for some 2 hours with being the "game engine" and speeding the game up, explaining the rules.

They had tons of fun, and amazingly as it may sound, so did I! I followed what they did, commented on the combats, checked the dice so they were OK, and so on. These both newbies didn't have to check what the other side did, I kept them updated. And it was fun seeing how quickly this game can be played.
 
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Gabriel Kuriata
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I knew when something was wrong, when a friend of mine - a die-hard fan of WoW(PC) came with this game and said "I've run a couple of simulations"... which meant he found the one and only pathway to victory (to defeat all of the bosses before round 25, while everyone is on level 4 - ALWAYS, NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS).
 
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Jeff
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Gabriel_Kuriata wrote:
I knew when something was wrong, when a friend of mine - a die-hard fan of WoW(PC) came with this game and said "I've run a couple of simulations"... which meant he found the one and only pathway to victory (to defeat all of the bosses before round 25, while everyone is on level 4 - ALWAYS, NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS).


lol - ah, the min/maxer type - the guy who custom builds his RPG character to kill in a single round using a butter knife... I remember the type well...

Sadly, my experience in WoW the MMORPG (yes, I'm a dual-class computer gamer/boardgamer... well, triple classed if you add RPG's, but I think they're really a subset!) is that WoW online tends to attract these guys for the hardcore players - always examining what equipment and builds will give you absolute maximum effectiveness, to the last decimal point; and anyone who doesn't have this 'perfect build' is wrong.

Thankfully, being a casual player, I merrily ignore these covenents and just play how I want. yeah, I'm a lot less effective (especially if I encounter those hardcore players on the other team!) but I have fun with it, so my goals are met...


More on-topic, I hate to say it but the more I read reviews (even this one!) the more I think this IS the game for me. I love the idea of character building/progression, and I'll most likely be playing the game solo or co-op play with one other person (if I can interest the wife in playing!) so I think the downtime issue will be moot. Long games - heck, I love long games; I just leave 'em up on the table in the basement, and get back to them when I can.

So, it seems to me that (at least for me) most of the negatives people have cited aren't negatives, and all the positives are reinforced. It's a little too soon to celebrate (I have a copy ordered already, but haven't hasd a chance to actually get hands-on experience) but I'm hopeful that this is a title I'll get a lot of play out of!

I'll have to post some solo session reports and see if I'm pleased, or disappointed with the results...

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Greg Todd
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Quote:
To finish a quest, your character or characters have to visit the given location and take out the monsters therein. Simple, straightforward, repetitive and boring.


So a good simulation of the on-line game then.

I think your review was usefull to me as I was only so-so about the game on the first play. I'd like to play it again, but this has convinced me I don't need to buy it.

My review to anyone who's thinking of buying the game would be:
It's a dice-rolling game. If you like rolling loads of dice (and there's nothing wrong with that) then it may be for you. But if you're looking for role-play, interesting characters, story or any real RPG-type atmosphere, then this is completely lacking. (again, like the on-line game).
 
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Alex Martinez
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I kind of disagree with the above post, though not entirely. I guess it just depends on what you define as RPG. Personally, I enjoy this game because you get to watch the characters grow and become more powerful over time. I also see the dice as more than just a handful of randomizers. The colors actually mean something and reflect the characters well.

I don't think a board game could ever really capture an atmposhere or interesting story. It just doesn't work that way. A story is controlled by a skilled writer, not by randomly designed game elements.

As for the complaints that it's not RPG enough, I always find this amusing. Dungeons and Dragons, the grandfather of RPG games, was exactly like WoW when it started. Kill monsters. Get gold. Level. If the game evolved beyond that it was a funtion of the players, not the rules. And the same can be said for WoW in both board game and online game format. Personally, I find myself building the characters up in my head, giving them personalities, and enjoying their adventures, reveling in their success and regretting their failures. It's not the rules that make me do this. It's a willingness to get into the game.

Of course, if a player can't get into a game, it doesn't really matter. WoW in either board or online form can be overwhelming. And players who don't want to worry about rules, who see a bunch of dice in their hands and not an abstract way of representing a character's abilities, will not get into this. And that's just fine.

Personality, I like the game. But I don't play it a lot because of the time factor. I don't find it lacking in atmosphere or story, but maybe that's because I put those in myself.
 
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Greg Todd
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Thanks for the thoughtful response.

I should say that I do like a game that you can get into, and I think a good game can tell a story, or at least give you a story to tell, but I don't think this one does.
You said

Quote:
If the game evolved beyond that it was a funtion of the players, not the rules.


I would also say that this applies to this game. I feel the mechanics don't support the theme; eg "character development" is just taking a card that lets you roll some more dice, there's not much in the way of interesting or unique abilities; the creatures you fight also only really vary in dice they roll and hit points; none of them really feel different to one another. If you get into the story while playing, that's great, but I think that's your creativity at work, not a function of the game design.

I don't dislike the game, in fact I've got a hankering to play it again. But like I said, I'll play it when I'm in the mood to roll buckets of dice and add things up and move chits about, not when I want a game with theme.

PS You make a good point about RPGs. When I said RPG, I was thinking of the small amount of RPGing I used to do, where we'd keep dice and mechanics to a minimum, and just talk most things through, mainly played for laughs. Anyone into the monster bashing, dice-rolling, table consulting RPGs would probably have something very different in mind when you say RPG, so that probably wasn't making my point very well.
 
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Alex Martinez
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Well, I understand where you're coming from. But I don't see the dice in the same way you do. Depending on what skills and equipment you have, those dice can change a lot. When I'm rolling the dice, I see the abstract made concrete. One of the things I like about the game is the color coded dice because to me they work beautifully. You have to take the dice into account and the general skills of your character. There's also a real choice in how you develop your character in terms of specialty and style. Sure, it might just seem like you pick green or blue dice, but these actually mean something. A character with lots of blue dice is deadly but vulnerable. A character with lots of red is an in your face fighter. And green are the tanks. The mix of dice gives you not only a good idea of what to expect from the character, but what kind of character they are.

Sure, at it's heart you just run around the board, roll dice, and repeat. But isn't that nearly every board game ever invented? Even the ones with great theme require a leap of imagination. I love Heroscape for instance and while it has a great toy factor, it still works because I see more than just dice and stats when I'm playing.

As for the RPG distinction, that's a personal definition. Everyone has their own version of it. That was just my point.

Although, to be clear, I'm not trying to defend the game. It's just a game. If you don't like it, that's cool. And every reason is legitimate, even if we might disagree. But this is a community designed to share opinions, so don't worry about sharing yours. That's the whole point of the site.
 
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Warren Hardison
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I stopped reading at 'Ameritrash'.
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Gary Bradley
United Kingdom
Unspecified
Scotland
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Raolin wrote:
I think it's very important when reviewing WOW:TBG to consider how utterly different it is (or can be) as a solo or 2-player game than as a 4-6 player game.


I respectfully disagree. I've played this game a few times with different numbers of players of varying gamergeekiness. It was a tedious dice-fest of downtime every play. This remains the worst game in my not very small collection. And the worst waste of my money since a guy sold me the Brooklyn Bridge. The only reason I haven't donated it free to a charity shop (I could not live with myself taking money off someone for this) is I've long forgotten where I put it. Which, given the size of the beast, is remarkable (it's about the same size as the Brooklyn Bridge).

Avoid this game!
 
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romano veronese
Italy
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mb
I have just played this game solo.
I read all the material on it here and in FFG, In the general forum i found hint to understand the lines that develop the game. I believe it a very subtle game, Sure you have to find people that have time to spent as play Chess or Go: while the other is thinking you think also.When your turn come you hit quickly and you could identificate in your role .
The PVP is not coming , but is overing your heads, it is a factor you have to put in your strategy and tactics. As chess there are opening that are obliged, you are not totally free; as Go you try to have control over territory, not directly on your opponent. After a lot of games I are not able to see one way to Victory .I like the fighting that many times is ended for a hit point.
I still loose many times at level 4 with some characters combination and weapon that push me to ask me if i doing wrong choice(for example too many green quest gives more xp point, but less square item...)
Then I like all the discussion about conflicting rules (overall with expansions that give more powers , more item...) . Then i also see potentiality in this game to be changed with fantasy in other kind of game with house rule.
I like it.
 
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Mike Forrey
United States
Dallastown
Pennsylvania
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mbmbmbmbmb
I felt like i was reading a review of WoW TAG for a second. Both are just god awful games with no redeeming value at all.
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