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Subject: Cluzzle: The game for poor artists and great logicians rss

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Jason Hinkley
United States
Irving
Texas
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Ever played a game of Cranium? In my experience, everyone enjoys playing with the clay more than any other aspect of the game. If you are like me, you may have thought to yourself "Why doesn't someone make game using just the clay?". Well, someone has.

Cluzzle is a game that rewards poor artistic talents and strong skills in deduction. Each player starts with a small-ish, individual board (shaped similarly to the crust from a piece of pizza), a container of clay, four disks with question marks on it, a pencil and a guess sheet. The game also comes with sand timers, a center board with a scoring track and a deck of cluzzle cards. Each player gets a cluzzle card and has to sculpt something listed from their cluzzle card (using their clay) on their individual game board. There may be rules regarding a time limit for scuplting but, if so, we don't use the timers for that purpose. The trick to the game is to choose something from the card that you think the rest of the players from the game will be able to guess but you do not want them to guess it too quickly. After each player has finished scuplting their respective masterpieces, they can move their individual board so that it flushes with the outside edge of the main center board. The clay, individual boards and question disks come in six different colors allowing you to match them with each player so people know who to direct their questions to regarding each sculpture. Once all the scupltures are completed, you take turns asking each other questions (of the "yes or no" variety) about their respective sculptures. This is where one of the timers is usually flipped over, but my game group doesn't bother with the timers until questioning starts to stall. Once you determined what you think a given scuplture is supposed to represent, you write your guess next to the respective color in the first coloumn of your guess sheet. Once everyone has written down guesses for each of the objects, the players share their guesses with the respective scuplters. If anyone guesses the correct answer to one of the sculptures, that player (and any other player that guessed correctly) gets one point. The scuplter also gets one point. If no one guesses the correct answer for a given scuplture, the process is repeated for a second turn. Correct answers during the second turn earn the scuplter and correct guessers two points apiece. The process is repeated for a third turn if there are an scupltures that have still not been guessed correctly and three points go out to the sculpter and correct guessers in the third round. If a sculpture lasts three rounds without being guessed correctly, no points are awarded to the artist or guessers. So, you want the other players to guess what your scuplture is supposed to represent. You just want them to guess as late in the round as possible. The game is played over the course of three rounds, the player with the highest score after this is the winner.
 
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Brian Schroth
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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deitied wrote:
Ever played a game of Cranium? In my experience, everyone enjoys playing with the clay more than any other aspect of the game. If you are like me, you may have thought to yourself "Why doesn't someone make game using just the clay?". Well, someone has.


If you really want a game that is just like Cranium's clay questions, try Rapidough. It is essentially the same thing, but with an extremely fun mechanic for victory conditions: Every time you win a round, you get to take a little plunger full of clay out of your opponent's clay. Eventually, they run out, and you win!
 
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