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Ender Wiggins
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The rule book contains an example of play, to illustrate how the game of 2 de Mayo works. However, since the example is mostly text, it can be difficult to follow, and it also contains a couple of minor errors. I have reconstructed, corrected, and edit the example, and with the help of my camera and photo editing software, I have added pictures to provide you, the loyal reader of BGG, a pictorial illustration of the game-play. The aim is to help you follow along with the example of play, and get a sense of how the game works. So welcome to a sample game of 2 de Mayo!

In our example game, Phil is the Spanish (red), and Karsten is the French (blue). To win, Karsten (as the French) must fulfil the following three criteria at the end of ten turns:
1. All Spanish forces (red cubes) must be eliminated.
2. All access areas to Madrid (Areas 1, 6, 16, and 20) must be occupied by at least one French force (blue cube).
3. The French player must not have lost four or more forces (blue cubes).
Phil will win (as the Spanish) if he can prevent Karsten from achieving any of the above objectives.

We take up the game from the starting setup, which is the same for every game.



Turn 1

1. Preparation: After setting up the game, Phil and Karsten are randomly assigned each side. Phil receives the Spanish forces, and therefore picks the card José Blas Molina y Soriano from his deck.

Karsten chooses Artillería (Artillery) that the French player can choose from at the start of a game. After shuffling the decks, Karsten announces that he is playing Artillería (Artillery), and leaves the card in a visible space next to the board:



2. Orders: Each player writes down the following:
Phil (Spanish)
9-14
15-14
12-14
17-15

Karsten (French)
6-7
19-16


This reminds us that the French player has his movements limited to a maximum of two, unless they originate from Areas 14, 15 or 16, clearly noticeable on the map.

3. Movement: Both players reveal their orders and they are executed. Therefore, the Spanish cubes in Areas 9, 12 and 15 all converge in Area 14, and the one in Area 17 goes to Area 15. Besides, Phil plays the card José Blas Molina y Soriano, and uses it on his cube in Area 10. This card’s effect extends to the Movement Phase in the next turn, so he leaves the card in plain view as a reminder.



Karsten moves two cubes from Area 6 to 7, and two more from Area 19 to 16.



4. Resolution: The only contested Area is number 10, but thanks to the card played by the Spanish player, there is no casualty assigned to the Spanish group (Remember the French strength in that Area amounts to 3, due to the card Artilleria (Artillery).

Turn 2

1. Preparation: Both players decide to draw a card. Phil gets Las Manolas de la Puerta de Toledo (The Manolas in Puerta de Toledo), so he is happy to have maintained a cube in Area 20. Happiness does not last long because Karsten draws Colaboración con los Franceses (Collaboration with the French), which is immediately played, and makes the Spanish player discard his only card.



2. Orders: Each player writes what follows
Phil (Spanish)
10-17
8-9
14-12

Karsten (French)
16-15
11-12
7-9


3. Movement: Orders are revealed, and the Spanish player, Phil, moves his cube in Area 10 to 17 (Note: this is only possible thanks to having played the card José Blas Molina y Soriano in the previous turn, because normally half the cubes rounded up must be left behind when leaving a contested area by the Spanish groups), the cube in Area 8 to Area 9, and the three cubes in Area 14 to Area 12. This last move is lucky, for it “guesses” the French movement.

The French player, Karsten, seeing this decides to carry out the order 11-12 with only one cube from Area 11. He also moves two cubes from Areas 16 to 15, and two from Area 7 to Area 9.



Therefore there are three contested areas (9, 15 and 12).



4. Resolution: Strengths in each contested area are calculated, and casualties are delivered.



In Area 9, the French has Strength 2 (for having two cubes)while the Spanish, only Strength 1. Therefore, the Spanish loses his cube. The same happens in Area 15. In Area 12, on the contrary, the Spanish player has Strength 3 (for having three cubes) and the French only 1 (for only one cube), and therefore the French cube is eliminated.



The Spanish thus have two casualties, the French have one. After resolution, the board looks like this:



Turn 3

1. Preparation: Both players decide to draw cards. Phil gets Un tiesto mata al hijo del General Legrand (A flowerpot kills the son of General Legrand), and Karsten “Paz, Paz…que todo está compuesto” (“Peace, peace, everything’s been settled”).



2. Orders: Each player plans the following:
Phil (Spanish)
12-11
17-9
20-17

Karsten (French)
0-16
9-15


3. Movement: The Spanish moves his three cubes from Area 12 to 11, one from Area 17 to 9, and the one in Area 20 to 17. The French player moves two cubes from Area 9 to 15, and the five outside Madrid, adjacent to Area 16, to Area 16. (Note: Remember it is turn 3 already, and therefore forces outside Madrid are allowed to move already).



It is interesting to note that due to simultaneous French control of Areas 15 and 16 and being the card Artilleria (Artillery) in effect, the Spanish player cannot enter those areas, unless they become vacant or due to the effect of Los Presos de la Cárcel de la Corte (The Inmates of the Court Jail).

4. Resolution: The French cube in Area 11 is eliminated.



Turn 4

1. Preparation: Both players decide to draw a card. Phil gets Capitán Luis Daoíz, while Karsten gets La Turba se dispersa (The Mob Breaks Up). This last card must be played immediately to allow the Spanish player to split the group in Area 11.



2. Orders: The following orders are given
Phil (Spanish)
2 cubes 11-14
9-7
17-18

Karsten (French)
0-1
16-15
0-6


3. Movement: Phil moves two cubes from Area 11 to Area 14 (he is able to split this group thanks to the event card La Turba se dispersa (The Mob Breaks Up)), the cube in Area 17 to 18, and the one in Area 9 to Area 7. Then, five French cubes come into Area 1 and other five to Area 6 from outside Madrid. From Area 16, Karsten decides to move three cubes to Area 15.



4. Resolution: There are no contested areas, so there are no conflicts to be resolved.

Turn 5

1. Preparation: Phil draws a card, Los Presos de la Cárcel de la Corte (The Inmates of the Court Jail). Karsten decides not to draw a card.

2. Orders: These are the orders issued:
Phil (Spanish)
18-19
11-13
14-12
7-5

Karsten (French)
15-14
15-9
6-7
6-5


3. Movement: Phil carries out his orders, and with that in mind, Karsten moves one cube from Area 6 to 7, three from Area 6 to 5, one from Area 15 to 9, and five from 15 to 14.



4. Resolution: Only Area 5 is contested.



Consequently a Spanish cube is eliminated.



Turn 6

1. Preparation: Karsten decides to not draw a card again, while Phil gets El Alcalde de Móstoles (The Mayor of Mostoles). Now the French player has three less cards than the Spanish player. Unless Phil plays one of his cards, Karsten could negate Phil the option to draw a card in the next Preparation Phase.

2. Orders: Each player plans the following
Phil (Spanish)
12-15
4-3

Karsten (French)
1-2
0-20


3. Movement: Phil plays the card Los Presos de la Cárcel de la Corte (The Inmates of the Court Jail), in order to move to Area 15, because Artillería (Artillery) is in play.



He also moves the cube in Area 4 to Area 3. Karsten moves five cubes from outside Madrid to Area 20, and six cubes from Area 1 to Area 2.



4. Resolution: A French cube is eliminated in Area 15.



This cancels the effects of Artilleria (Artillery) for Areas 15 and 16, because they are no longer simultaneously under French control. If they ever revert to French control, the effects of Artillería (Artillery) will again be applied to Areas 15 and 16.



Turn 7

1. Preparation: Karsten sees his plan of denying the Spanish drawing more cards fail, because Phil played a card on the previous turn, and as a consequence, he only holds two more cards than the French. In spite of this, Karsten decides not to draw again, while Phil gets Los Soldados se escapan de los cuarteles (Soldiers flee their barracks), which is no longer playable because it is already Turn 7.



2. Orders: More orders are written down:
Phil (Spanish)
15-16
13-16
19-16

Karsten (French)
16-19
20-18
14-15
2-3


3. Movement: The Spanish player moves two cubes from Area 15 to 16, and one from Area 13 to 16. The order 19-16, on the other hand, is not fulfilled, because the French player moves two cubes from Area 16 to 19 (and therefore “pushes back” the Spanish only cube). Besides that, Karsten moves five cubes from Area 14 to 15, six from Area 2 to 3, and four from Area 20 to 18.



4. Resolution: A Spanish cubes is eliminated in Area 3, even when the Spanish player plays the card Capitán Luis Daoíz.





Another Spanish cube is eliminated in Area 19.



The Spanish now have five casualties, the French have three:



Turn 8

It's turn 8, and the end is near, because the Spanish only have three remaining units. But can they hold off the French to win?



1. Preparation: The Spanish player draws a card (he is able because, again, he played a card last turn, and therefore he does not have three more cards than the French player). The card is Teniente Jacinto Ruiz. Since three French cubes have already been eliminated, and since the Spanish player can also play the card El Alcalde de Móstoles (The Mayor of Mostoles).



Phil plays both cards, and the Spanish side achieves victory. Teniente Jacinto Ruiz for the win!



Final word

I hope this illustration of game-play helps people learn the game, and understand how the flow of play works!

My complete pictorial review of the game can be found here:
A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview: Scotland Yard for two players and with a twist?
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/378007


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The complete list of Ender's pictorial illustrations of game-play: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/42866
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Kevin Warrender
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Very nicely done. Makes the sample game much more understandable.

My only question is, in Turn 7, had the Spanish player used the Capitán Luis Daoíz card during the resolution of Area 19, would the red cube be saved?
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Железный комиссар
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Good to see 2 de Mayo given some exposure and made more accessible. Quick, distinctive game, with pronounced asymmetry.
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Scott Henshaw
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jerkules wrote:
Very nicely done. Makes the sample game much more understandable.

My only question is, in Turn 7, had the Spanish player used the Capitán Luis Daoíz card during the resolution of Area 19, would the red cube be saved?

It would be given a reprieve of one turn. Since the battle would be a tie, the units stay put and cannot move the next turn. Without more units moving in changing the balance, the battle would resolve the following turn as a French win 2-1.
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Daniel Val
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Excellent session report!

Thank you for such nice support of 2 de Mayo.
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Artur Roszczyk
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Very nice :) Without reading and viewing this I could still didn't know for sure how the card Los Presos de la Cárcel de la Corte works. Now I know everything perfect :) That's really cool :)
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Mark crane
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That is a fascinating looking game. How many cards are there? I ask because that font makes my brain bleed and if I buy it I'd probably make up my own.

Ah, who am I kidding, I'd just keep the originals but whine a lot.
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Железный комиссар
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craniac wrote:
That is a fascinating looking game. How many cards are there? I ask because that font makes my brain bleed and if I buy it I'd probably make up my own.

Ah, who am I kidding, I'd just keep the originals but whine a lot.


22 cards, 11 per player. 10 turns --> 1 card unplayed unused in a full game. It's quite a compact game.
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David G. Cox Esq.
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Very nicely put together.

One question: during the Turn 1 Resolution Phase, as the French player has a strength of 3 in Area 10 and the Spanish player only has a strength of 1, why is it that the Spanish unit is not destroyed?


 
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Scott Henshaw
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Because the card the Spanish player used avoids the resolution phase for that turn in one area, in this case area 10.
"Phil plays the card José Blas Molina y Soriano, and uses it on his cube in Area 10. This card’s effect extends to the Movement Phase in the next turn, so he leaves the card in plain view as a reminder."

The card text is visible in the third picture.
ScottH.


da pyrate wrote:
Very nicely put together.

One question: during the Turn 1 Resolution Phase, as the French player has a strength of 3 in Area 10 and the Spanish player only has a strength of 1, why is it that the Spanish unit is not destroyed?


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Steve Hope
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What determines the number of orders you can issue in each turn?
 
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Artur Roszczyk
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Mainly it depends of the side you're playing. Chosing French you can give two orders in a turn (f.e. to two groups, or one group that will split). Chosing Spaniards you can issue orders for as many your groups that you want and that you can. So in the beginning that will be many orders...

But there are also cards and special areas for French troops. One French card allow to issue up to 5 orders! Also if your move starts from area: 14, 15 or 16 it doesn't counts to your move limits. So f.e. you can issue 2 normal orders and 1 order for the group moving from 14. And that would be perfectly OK :)

Have fun and playing French think really good about using your cards in the beginning...
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Jamey Philipp
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This is just what I needed to get this game going! Thanks!
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The root of all evil... but you can call me cookie.
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Thanks a ton this is tremendously helpful.
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Wonderful report. So nice to see someone taking the time to give some love to a well deserving game. Cheers!
 
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chad schroeder
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Austin
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Thank you for this gameplay sample!

One thing that really concerned me though was the Spanish player's card combo at the end to win the game. Seemed too easy.

The second thing was the font used on the cards. I too find it eye-straining on an otherwise beautiful game.
 
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