Recommend
17 
 Thumb up
 Hide
8 Posts

Sub Search» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Sub Search - better than a 3-d version of Battleship rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man A Wildcat!
badge
Congratulations to Kansas State University football coach Bill Snyder for being inducted into the college football hall of fame.
mbmbmbmbmb
Milton Bradley’s Sub Search is often referred to as a 3-dimensional battleship. Because the game has similar playing pieces and uses the similar mechanic of guessing the location of hidden enemy vessel’s, the comparisons are not without cause. However, Sub Search requires far more strategy and is an overall better game.

The game is for two players only. It takes about 10 minutes to set-up and about 40 minutes to play.

The picture below shows one side of the game board. This is one player’s view. The top-level game board (red and yellow) represents the water surface and this is where the surface ships are placed. From the view in this picture, this player would place have his ships roam in the yellow portion. Your opponent, sitting across and seeing the same view, would have his surface vessels roam in the red portion.



The surface portions are portioned off in boxes (as opposed to hexes) and the boxes are numbered 1-36. Below are 3 levels, each with 3 levels and each numbered the same. Therefore, for instance, in the picture above, in the red portion, the closest far-right box is numbered “1” and each level below it, has the same number box numbered “1.” The top blue level (below the surface) is labeled ‘100’, representing a depth of 100 feet. The next two are labeled 200 and 300, respectively.

Besides a lot of white and red pegs (identical to those used in Battleship), each player has 3 submarine playing pieces, 1 mine piece, and 3 surface vessel pieces with holes in them (to hold pegs), and they look similar to ships from Battleship. There are also 3 flags pieces. There is one set of red parts and one set of yellow parts.



Each player places his three submarines on the various levels. The only restriction is that two submarines cannot occupy both the same square and same level. In the picture below, a submarine has been placed in square 10 at a depth of 300 feet.



Then, each player places his mine playing piece on the 100 foot level. The only restrictions are that they cannot occupy the same space as a submarine and cannot be above a submarine placed on the same numbered space below it (200 or 300 foot levels) He writes this location on a piece of paper and folds it up and places it in an open area.

Next, each player fills his surface vessels with white pegs (2, 3, and 4, depending on the ship) and places them on the edge of the board on his color, which will be the right portion, above his opponent’s submarines.

Each player then takes turns. He may move one ship 1, 2, or 3 squares in any direction. If he ends his turn on the same numbered space as his opponents mine, the number is announced and revealed from the piece of paper, and the ship and the mine is removed from the game. Whether he lost a ship or not, if he has any ships on the board (not the edge) with white pegs in it, he may attempt to drop a depth charge from that ship. (Note: it does not have to be the ship that moved that turned.) To drop a depth charge, he pulls out one of the white pegs from that ship and selects a level below his ship. For instance, if the ship is on square number 22, he would call out, “Number 22, Level 200”. If a submarine is located on that square, the opponent calls out “direct hit” and removes the submarine from the game. The other player would then go to his peg board (see picture below) and place a flag on that spot. If the submarine is located adjacent to the target (but not diagonally) or on the same space above or below the target, it is a “near miss” (think of the pattern like the legs of a jack). The opponent calls out “near miss” and the other player places a red peg in his peg board. Any other results are a “miss” and the attacking player places the white peg from his ship in the peg board (in the instance of a direct hit or a near miss, he places the white peg in this white peg tray).



Along with moving and dropping a depth charge, the same player may have his submarines fire a torpedo at a surface vessel. This can only happen if the surface vessel is in the same vertical row as the submarine. In other words, looking at the peg board above (which mirrors the playing surface), if you submarine is located on square 14, you could fire at a ship on squares 2, 8, 14, 20, 26, or 32. To fire on a ship, you spin the dial and if it lands in the red “Hit” portion (see picture below), the surface vessel is sunk and removed from the game. Firing on surface vessels is a desperation move because it helps locate your submarine. It is usually attempted when the surface vessels have a submarine located and are about to hit it on the next turn.



So to summarize, you may move a surface vessel, drop a depth charge, and fire on the surface vessels in the same turn. Any and all are optional. When a surface vessel runs out of depth charges (white pegs), it has to move back to the outside edge of the board and reload.

The first player to either destroy his opponent’s submarines or surface vessels wins the game. Overall, it’s a very enjoyable game. Even as a child, I grew bored with Battleship because it was a guessing game with little strategy. This game employs far more strategy. You must manage your ships wisely, lest you have all three run out of depth charges, and have to wait turns before you can fire again. You also have two different ways to win the game. Then the 3-dimensional aspect creates its own interesting situations. Battleship is a kid’s game. Sub Search is a game for older kids and their parents.
18 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Duff
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
airjudden wrote:
[ImageID=pic99461_md.jpg]


To make these work, get rid of all the extra letters in there. Just the number 99461 is all you want.

If you wish to control the size, then you manually add the words after the number, ie 99461 medium in the brackets.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ken watanabe
United States
mundelein
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
nice review,i'm hoping to get this one soon.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter
Canada
Port Coquitlam
British Columbia
flag msg tools
designer
Makers of Battlefields of Olympus
badge
My 2005 Honda Superhawk 996
mbmbmbmbmb
I had this one as a boy and played it many times with my brother. Ah the memories.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Packard
United States
Palmdale
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I have fond memories of playing this game as a kid in the early 70s. I didn't play it as much as I wanted, since I had trouble finding opponents for it on a regular basis.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave C.
United States
Maine
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for this nice, detailed review! I own this and eagerly await playing it with my son someday; preferably after a viewing of "Destination Tokyo" (my favorite WWII Sub movie)!

Do you own Carrier Strike!? It is another WWII-era Ameritrash game from the 70's. It's not as "deep" as Subsearch but it's still fun (especially with kids and after a viewing of "Midway").
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Beer be with you.
United States
Northlake
Illinois
flag msg tools
Settlers of Catan does not improve with your house rules. The best option if you don't like the rules as written is to just select another game.
mb
Cooz wrote:
It's not as "deep" as Subsearch


Clever !
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kirk Groeneweg
United States
Clear Lake
Iowa
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I always loved this game as a kid. Heck, I'll still play it if anybody asks. Just wish I would have kept the original box for it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.