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Subject: So I'm considering getting into AGOT LCG: Your comprehensive guide rss

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Max Fightmaster
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So you're thinking of getting into AGOT LCG?

Good. It's a rare gem of a game; deep, strategic and dripping with theme. It has a core-set which gives it an excellent casual entry point, a wealth of add-ons and extra options for people who want to take it further, can be played as a self-contained board game or as a competitive CCG, and there's even a whole series of, genuinely excellent, books that you can get into if you want to really immerse yourself in the world that the game portrays.

The only real downside of AGOT LCG is that, as the first of FFG's LCGs, it got off to a bit of a weird start with its distribution and chapter-pack content. Other games (Call of Cthulhu and Warhammer: Invasion) learned from its errors and consequentially seem less daunting to approach for first-timers. Which is a real shame, as AGOT is an absolutely fantastic game and the only thing that new players need is a friendly guide to help them navigate through their first few purchases while they get a handle on the game (and on the odd production choices that pepper FFG's early days with the game).

With that in mind, I've written this guide as a handbook for anybody considering giving AGOT a whirl.


Quick-Fire Questions:

Is it like Magic?

Well, it's a card game that you can expand ad infinitum and in which each player will be playing as some kind of different faction and using their own deck, so kind of. The real difference is in the way that the gameplay works.

In the most basic terms physically possible (which I realise will cause lovers of both games to howl in pain):

In Magic you have one deck, which you use to play characters onto a field, those characters subsequently run at your opponent in one big challenge, your opponent responds by putting their characters in the way of the attackers (usually lining up a blocker against each attacker) and each pairing battles it out. The game is won by getting characters past the blocking line so that they can inflict damage directly on the opponent, who loses after taking a certain number of hits.

In AGOT you have one big deck and one smaller one. The big deck is used to play characters onto a field, the small one is used to play a single card each turn which toggles the amount of resources that player will generate and how much damage they will do to their opponents (as well as generating other individual effects). Characters on the field can commit to one of three different challenges (unlike Magic, AGOT players can make up to three challenges per turn) in which all of the attackers square up against all the defenders at once (no individual punch-ups here), at the end of the challenge the winning attacker is granted a specific benefit depending on which type of challenge they initiated. The game is won by accumulating 15 points of power (no individual life totals, think 'victory points' instead), which can be stolen off of opponents as the result of a particular type of challenge, generated by winning challenges in various overwhelming ways and granted by other in-game effects.

In summary, the two games play out very differently, but there's plenty of crossover that ex-Magic players will probably enjoy.


Do CCG era cards work with LCG ones?

100% yes. Absolutely the same game.

The power level has shifted somewhat, with many CCG cards having noticeably bigger effects than their LCG descendants, but nothing so major as to make them incompatible (indeed, there's plenty of CCG reprints running around in the LCG environment).

Unlike CoC LCG, the card-back has remained the same between the two games, so you wouldn't need to sleeve anything if you were mixing eras together. That said, the card-face design did change mid-way through the CCG's lifetime, so CCG cards that don't come from the last two printed blocks (Iron Throne edition + House of Thorns/Talons, and Five Kings edition) will look a bit funny. However rest assured that they are entirely compatible and play no differently, they just look slightly odd.

Finally, 'Influence' only appeared as a resource and a mechanic in Valyrian edition, so cards from the dawn of the game won't reference it. This is not a particularly big deal. Likewise, 'Crests' only appeared as a mechanic in Iron Throne edition, so earlier cards will not have effects that impact them. Again, not a big deal.


So I'm convinced. I want to get into AGOT LCG and supply all of the cards for a playgroup. What should I do?


1. Core-Set
Obviously your first port of call is the Core-Set. It has four decks inside and is great value for money. Buy it, try it, give each of the houses an outing and see who you like the best. I think that the pre-set decks benefit from having their plot decks shuffled around a bit, a topic on which I have elaborated here: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/520495/kots-and-pots-pre-con...


2a. More-Set
I would strongly recommend that the second purchase for an AGOT enthusiast should be a second Core Set.

Why? Because it's excellent value and it lets you start building reliable AGOT decks that do a little more than thumping down characters, tooling them up with attachments and battling over short-term opportunities. Don't get me wrong, the core-set is great fun as a single copy and there is hours of entertainment in it. However, bagging a second gives you the opportunity to make decks that have a genuine game-plan, a consistent resource-generation engine and which can adapt intelligently to the developing flow of the game. In other words, you will get more fun out of playing this game with four consistently better decks than you will in adding new trinkets to the out-of-the-box starters.


Interlude: The Art of building a good AGOT deck

Allow me to explain:

The first step for budding AGOT deck-builders is the following simple ratio which, while not a hard and fast rule and which tournament-level decks often deviate from, is an excellent starting point for a good intermediate deck that remains fun to play without just being random:

25% Characters costing 2 gold or less
25% Characters cosing 3 gold or more
25% Resource Generating Locations
25% Awesome stuff (i.e. attachments, events, locations that have interesting effects)
+ Plot Deck

Adhering to this ratio will usually give a player a deck that can; put out several characters early (in the setup and first turn) to get themselves into the game quickly, drop powerful characters and effects in the late game, surge back from a reset (Valar Morghulis, Westeros Bleeds, etc) with affordable minions, and not get crippled by having to sacrifice a massive character every time it loses a military challenge.

It's difficult to stress how important getting a decent split of cheap/expensive characters is and how frustrating a game will be if you go overboard on 'cool effects/weapons' and spend your days drawing nothing that can actually compete in a challenge for you.


Sorry, so that Core-Set thing you were talking about?

Yes. Go buy the second core set.


2a. Continued

It feels wrong somewhow; but getting it will give you the ability to turn all of the starter decks into good intermediate decks that flow smoothly and which will really reward clever play. It also gives you a second set of the 28 starter plots, which is an absolute godsend for future deckbuilding and tinkering.

Trust me; getting the second core-set is a far better investment for your playgroup than going straight to the chapter packs. Further, it will eventually make buying them so much more rewarding once you begin expanding your collection in that direction.


2b. Everybody needs new neighbours

Once you've got four decent core-set decks battling it out, it's time to bring the fifth and sixth factions of Westeros into the fold.

The easiest next step is the Princes of the Sun box, which brings you two sets of the House Martell starter deck. As outlined in the thread I linked to earlier, this box is basically giving you what the four starter houses will have once you own two core-sets. Frankly, it's a no-brainer, if you like the game then you've basically got to get this.

On the other hand, the Greyjoys aren't so new-user friendly. FFG made a poor decision in the way they distributed this box, having it include only one set of cards and a large lump of (basically functionless) plastic. To bring the Ironmen into the game on an equal footing with all of the other five houses, you need to buy this (frankly overpriced) box twice. Whether you enjoy the game enough to make that worth doing is a call for you. Obviously, I'm a big fan and think it's worth biting the bullet, but if you were going to hold off a purchase until later down the line, Kings of the Sea would be it.


UPDATE: Since originally writing this post, FFG has republished both Princes of the Sun and Kings of the Sea in the new distribution format (i.e. now both boxes contain three copies of each card, where previously they respectively contained only two copies or one copy of each). As such, that makes both of them much better products that I now recommend wholeheartedly. Duplicate purchasing of KotS is now (thankfully) completely unnecessary, and PotS is even better than it was before.


3. The Three Chapter Packs you meet in Heaven.

Once you have all six factions in the game, it's time to start looking at Chapter Packs.

Going at the packs earlier than this will lead to you buying cards that you have no home for (new Martell/Greyjoy cards aren't much good if you don't have a deck to house them in) and which won't actually help your existing decks (flashy new 8-cost armies aren't going to help a deck that can't afford to play them, etc).

However, once you're in a position to make the most of them, the new packs are absolutely fantastic additions to your collection. In particular, I would recommend that every new AGOT player run out and find the following gems:

Refugees of War: Thirty out of Forty of its cards are characters that cost 2 gold or less (and almost every single one of them is excellent). No single pack will let you balance your existing decks so well as this one and it is the only pack that I would even contemplate advising people to purchase at the same time as their first core-set. I have waxed lyrical about its myriad benefits before (http://boardgamegeek.com/article/5640093#5640093) and can only advise new players to purchase it as an absolute first-priority

Sacred Bonds: As above, brings several high-utility cheap characters to the table as well as a cycle of vicious events, some dual-house characters and a couple of other individual heavy-hitters. Frankly, it's just got plenty of good stuff.

Ancient Enemies: An old favourite for new players as it contains six new plots (all of which are house-specific and awesome). It also has a fair amount of other decent playable kit that will find a happy home in your decks.


4. Big boxes and chapter pack cycles.

From here on out it's pretty much up to you and your playgroup how you proceed. Most likely you'll consider picking up a cycle of chapter packs to beef up your decks with and to add a little bit of thematic variety. At present your options (in no particular order) are:

The Tale of Champions Cycle: If I could have babies with just one cycle, it'd probably be this one (or King's Landing). It's full of awesome, thematic cards, and its focus is on unique characters (i.e. all of the people you know and love/hate from the books); it's a complete no-brainer to recommend it. The only 'drawback' is that many of its cards have effects that only work in multi-player games, so if you're planning on playing AGOT purely as a 1v1 (e.g. plots that let you pick extra multiplayer titles, characters that redirect challenges) then these might be slightly frustrating for you. On the other hand, if you're looking to play mostly multiplayer, then this is one big long rollercoaster of cards that make you will make you say "Holy what! That's insane!" while cheerfully atom-bombing your opponents' plans (for example: With madness like This).

The Maesters/Oldtown Cycle: Personally, I just couldn't love this cycle. The main theme is the 'Maesters' trait, with plenty of cards that specifically interact with Maesters and/or cards with the Learned crest. Objectively speaking, it probably would work quite well for new players... each house gets powerful cards of its own, and there's enough splashable Maesters tech (and 'Chain' attachments to power them up) to let you mix a few into each house to give your game a fresh twist. But to be perfectly honest with you, I just find it hard to love a cycle that's themed around pacifist raven-fanciers.

The Brotherhood Cycle: Which is a really great option. All of the packs contain three copies of every card, the 'tribal' theme lets you make decks that radically change the feel of each house (should you choose) and the Brotherhood give you the option of making a dedicated neutral deck of vagabonds and robbers, or of just slipping their various unique characters into decks that can utilise their individual powers.

The King's Landing Cycle: Another of my 'most loved' cycles. The 'Shadows' mechanic is brilliant fun and adds a whole new dimension to the game. However, while some shadowy cards are good standalones that happily slot into any deck you you fancy (Qyburn, Varys, Pyromancers Apprentice, etc), some are nigh-on unusable outside of a 'shadow heavy' build (Shae's Mance, Tunnels of the Red Keep, Maegery Tyrell, etc). Now that the cycle is available in the new distribution format you should be able to build 3 (maybe 4) decks that focus really heavily on shadow cards, which means that only a fraction of the new new stuff will have to take a seat in your spares box until you're ready to remix your decks for a second time. Basically though, because Shadows stuff is so much fun, and because the set has pure AGOT theme for blood, it easily places in my top three (Two? One?) most-recommended cycles (especially now that FFG have started packing deluxe expansions with new shadow-tech). Do it, you won't regret it.

Defenders of the North Cycle: Another good option. Gives you the option of making (insanely powerful) pure Night's Watch or Wildling builds that will easily crush all of your other decks, or of spreading Night's Watch and Wildling cards more evenly throughout the existing factions, giving them all a nice dash of Northern flavour and patching up their respective weaknesses as you go. Indeed, I used to be sceptical about these packs, but after doing a bit of online deckbuilding I realised that giving each of the existing six house decks one/two of the new agendas, then adding a few appropriately traited characters to them would probably make for a fun playing experience. Highly recommended, especially if you're a fanboy for the Jon Snow storyline in the books.

Clash of Arms cycle: Not a bad choice. Some of its card effects are hold-overs from the CCG days (Kingdom locations, traited plots, etc) and used to feel a bit weird/useless in the early days of the LCG, but that problem is mitigated somewhat by the fact that Kings of the Sea and Princes of the Sun deliberately brought out cards that could make them (sometimes very vaguely) relevant again. This cycle does contain a high number of 'good' cards and it's not tied up with any kind of 'new mechanic gimmick' like Shadows or The North Agendas, which differentiates it from the two cycles described above. The big problem with buying it now is that it's still only available in the old distribution format.

A Time of Ravens: Personally, I'd avoid this like the plague. Sure, it's got some great cards. Yes, Refugees of War and Scattered Armies are excellent chapter packs in their own right (for a casual player). But. And this is a big but. If you're making all of the decks for a playgroup, then it's impossible to realistically add the 'Summer/Winter' mechanic to all six of your decks without multi-buying the first two packs of this cycle two or three times. Further, even if you do take the step of doing that, you're then stuck with including the same three/four cards in almost every single deck that you make in order to let each house engage with the (in my personal opinion, incredibly poorly designed and implemented) new season-changing mechanic. No doubt somebody disagrees with me on this, but I'd advise cherry-picking the Refugees and Scattered Armies packs and ignoring the rest.


Deluxe Expansions: Lords of Winter, Kings of the Storm, Queen of Dragons, Lions of the Rock

If you want to make a competitive Stark, Baratheon, Targaryen, or Lannister deck, then these are great (read: essential and brilliant) buys. If you're just looking to supply balanced decks for a playgroup, then they're not quite so awesome unless you pick up all four at the same time.

That said, they are good value for money, and purchasing any one of them ought to let you create an additional 'seventh' deck to add to the mix (i.e. a second build of an existing house. See earlier links for my attempt at a 'House Tully' Stark build that would stand up to other two core-set builds) and will also net you a small number of neutral cards that can be spread throughout the other houses.

Basically, it doesn't take a genius to figure out that these packs give their respective houses a massive shot in the arm, but only do so much to help you build six individual balanced decks.

Some people have asked "Hey, I hate the idea of buying two Core Sets, so could I just buy one Core Set, then get these?", to which I would say:

Yes, you could... and it would work. But I wouldn't wholeheartedly recommend it. If you do it that way then you'll still be lacking multiple copies of the 'building block' cards in the Core that make solid deckbuilding easy (and really help to balance a playgroup's decks), you'll be paying more overall (and more per card), you'll be dumping a whole load of 'advanced' and niche cards into your cardpool before getting to grips with the basics of each house, and you'll be leaving Greyjoy and Martell in the dust.

On the other hand, that's just, like, my opinion, man. Going straight to the deluxes would work, and if that's what you feel would be the best way forward for you; get at it.


Conclusion

Which, somewhat exhaustingly, concludes the state of the game at present.

If it isn't obvious already, I can't recommend AGOT enough. It's as expandable (or as un-expandable) as you want it to be, and it provides a brilliant play experience. If you've got even one other person who is interested in giving it a whirl, I'd counsel you to dip your toes into the waters of the core-set and to see what Westeros has to offer.
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James Crosfield
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What a great article, many thanks.
James
 
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Mark T
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Quote:

...
Deluxe Expansions: Lords of Winter, Kings of the Storm

If you're just looking to supply balanced decks for a playgroup, then they're not quite so awesome.


Amen to that. Added KotS to the pool and now our Baratheon player seems to be doing some steamrolling (I blame the cards exclusively and not, obviously, any ineptitude on my part). Going to have to pick up LoW sooner than I thought.
 
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Matthew Chua
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Very helpful info for those getting into the game. Kudos!
 
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Steven
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Bravo! Any chance of a primer on AGOT LCG drafting?
 
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Max Fightmaster
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celiborn wrote:
Bravo! Any chance of a primer on AGOT LCG drafting?


I'm flattered, but I'd feel a teeny tiny bit like a charlatan holding out my thoughts as a fully formed and workable method.

I took a look at the Warhammer: Invasion drafting rules and mingled them with my (limited) experience of Magic 'cube drafting', then cooked up a homebrew method of drafting AGOT that would see each player piloting a different house (which I guess is what people most want out of the experience, rather than playing themeless mashup two/three house builds)... but I've never actually tried it out in practice as my current playgroup is all about constructed decks.

When I get a bit of time over the Christmas Holidays (heading back to the hometown for the break, lots of time for thinking about AGOT but nobody to actually play against) I'll try to scribble down my ideas so that the community can give them a bit of critique.
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James Ludlow
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doormat wrote:
Quote:

...
Deluxe Expansions: Lords of Winter, Kings of the Storm

If you're just looking to supply balanced decks for a playgroup, then they're not quite so awesome.


Amen to that. Added KotS to the pool and now our Baratheon player seems to be doing some steamrolling (I blame the cards exclusively and not, obviously, any ineptitude on my part). Going to have to pick up LoW sooner than I thought.


What I noticed is that the Knights theme deck that is built from 1 Core set + 1 Baratheon expansion is just a bit slower than most tournament decks around here. It's no powerhouse, although it is a fun deck to play, but versus the other decks that will be possible from the OP's card pool it should be pretty dominant.

Of course, he was talking about balancing a set for 6 players. If you just want to have two decent decks to bash against each other then the Stark versus the Baratheon theme decks should be pretty fun.

 
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Mark T
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jdludlow wrote:


What I noticed is that the Knights theme deck that is built from 1 Core set + 1 Baratheon expansion is just a bit slower than most tournament decks around here. It's no powerhouse, although it is a fun deck to play, but versus the other decks that will be possible from the OP's card pool it should be pretty dominant.

Of course, he was talking about balancing a set for 6 players. If you just want to have two decent decks to bash against each other then the Stark versus the Baratheon theme decks should be pretty fun.



She actually put together a very effective Asshai deck that my feeble Martell build seems unable to keep down. The Targ guy has had more luck. Based on 5 total games, 3 using the CPs the OP advised on earlier, Bw/oB so far, as well as Core x2, PotS, KotS.
 
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Barry Roy
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i just picked up this game. Would anyone like to play?

Barry

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jdludlow wrote:

What I noticed is that the Knights theme deck that is built from 1 Core set + 1 Baratheon expansion is just a bit slower than most tournament decks around here. It's no powerhouse, although it is a fun deck to play, but versus the other decks that will be possible from the OP's card pool it should be pretty dominant.


Yeah, the decklists included in the expansion boxes are meant to introduce new players to deck building, they are not tournament level decks by themselves... though turning them into such usually doesn't require a whole lot of more money spent, and they are a very good blueprint to work from.
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Dan Kotlewski
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Max:

I just wanted to say thank you for your constant posts about this game. They have been really helpful and helped steel my resolve to buy a collection that you recommended (2 Core, 2 KotS, 1 PotS, 3 CPs from Heaven) in order to get my friends involved in the game. Now just to build decks that are balanced for my friends' enjoyment!

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Michael Black
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Thank you for the information and understandable explanations. This thread helped me decide to make the jump, and I' very excited about playing.

One thing I'm still confused about (forgive me if the answer is obvious or posted somewhere else. I've not had the chance to play yet and my internet access is intermittent, so I've little time for research on my own):

Can decks with diffenrent mechanics play against each other without adding specialized cards? More specifically, could a king's landing cycle oriented shadow heavy house deck play against two other season based decks (raven cycle) without providing specialized cards in areas the respective decks dont focus on? (Example-season based cards added to the kings landing shadow deck describe above).

I want to set up a 3 player game with differing mechanics to see what is the most fun for my play group, but I dont want to spring for all the cost of shadow and season cards for every deck in play. Will they still work together without doing this?

Any feedback/guidance would be appreciated.

Michael
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Drew Dallas
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Well it generally doesn't matter what your opponent is running. This isn't a cooperative game so you don't have to make opponents decks have any synergy. Yeah it can be nice to have some season stuff to combat someone elses season tech or some anti-shadow to hurt an opponents shadow, but it isn't necessary and you usually can't afford the deck space to account for everything.

If you are just starting out though I wouldn't buy the chapter packs with seasons or shadows. The most recent chapter packs (Brotherhood Without Banners cycle) all have cards which will fit nicely into the core set decks and every card comes 3x each.
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Iron James Rackham
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Regarding Clash of Arms
Grift wrote:
The big problem with buying it now, is that it's probably going to be re-printed in the new, better, distribution format in the New Year (2011).

Why is that probable? Did someone at FFG say they will? That would mean it's best to wait a while before getting two of the chapter packs from heaven...
No similar plans to reprint KotS I take it?
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Max Fightmaster
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Mblack wrote:
Can decks with diffenrent mechanics play against each other without adding specialized cards? More specifically, could a king's landing cycle oriented shadow heavy house deck play against two other season based decks (raven cycle) without providing specialized cards in areas the respective decks dont focus on? (Example-season based cards added to the kings landing shadow deck describe above).


Yes, they absolutely could.

Decks that run a Shadow theme will happily use their mechanics against any opponent, no matter what theme that opponent is relying on (and the same goes for Seasons, etc).

What you might miss out on however, is the ability to interact effectively with your opponent's theme. For example, in the matchup you describe, the Shadows player would have no way of shutting-down the Season player's 'Winter/Summer' effects. Likewise, the Season player would be unable to take shots at any cards in Shadows. While it is possible to build 'Season control' into a Shadow deck with the right cards, it's much easier to build in effects that care about opponent's Shadows (and again, the same goes for Seasons).

That's not a massive problem. But it's something to be aware of, as the level of interaction between your deck's respective themes will rise if all decks are running cards designed to deal with them (e.g. if all of your decks are running cards that care about Season states, or about cards going into/out of Shadows).

Darksbane wrote:
If you are just starting out though I wouldn't buy the chapter packs with seasons or shadows. The most recent chapter packs (Brotherhood Without Banners cycle) all have cards which will fit nicely into the core set decks and every card comes 3x each.


That's probably not a bad suggestion.

I'm a huge Shadows fanboy (and did I mention that I really hate Seasons?), but the fact that the BWB cycle's themes are easily comprehensible to beginners and don't introduce any radical new mechanics is a big shout in its favour. Plus, it's hard to argue with the improved distribution format...

ironJames wrote:
Why is that probable? Did someone at FFG say they will? That would mean it's best to wait a while before getting two of the chapter packs from heaven...
No similar plans to reprint KotS I take it?


It's probable because they just did the same thing with the first cycle of Call of Cthulhu LCG packs. Plus, there were murmurs from the mini conventions that they held at the FFG Event Centre, that Clash of Arms was likely to be next in line.

Given the scarcity of the CoA packs at present, I'm willing to bet that we'll have reprints announced before the end of 2011. Unfortunately though, there's been no news on KoTS.

On the subject of the two chapter packs, I'd still advise new players to get them if they can. Both are excellent packs in their current form. Sure, they'll be even better when they're re-printed, but I still rank them as the best 'entry point to the game' packs on offer, even in their current state.

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Drew Dallas
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Grift wrote:


It's probable because they just did the same thing with the first cycle of Call of Cthulhu LCG packs. Plus, there were murmurs from the mini conventions that they held at the FFG Event Centre, that Clash of Arms was likely to be next in line.

Given the scarcity of the CoA packs at present, I'm willing to bet that we'll have reprints announced before the end of 2011. Unfortunately though, there's been no news on KoTS.



The difference though is the CoC cards were sold out at FFG, and virtually impossible to find on the secondary market. FFG still has every pack of CoA for sale in their web store and they are farily easy to find in places like ebay and miniature market. Although I'd love it if they reprinted them with the 3x distribution I'm not expecting it.
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Iron James Rackham
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Grift wrote:
Unfortunately though, there's been no news on KoTS.


The reason I was asking is that I got the core set and (rather unexpectedly) KotS for christmas. And while I'd love to include house Greyjoy in the game, there's a lot of other stuff that I would prioritize higher than buying a second copy of the product with the worst value. My KotS is still in shrink, so I'm considering trying to exchange it for PotS for or something (especially if they would reprint KotS in x3).

So, what's the main problem with building Greyjoy using only one KotS (and we're talking building fun, balanced decks for casual play)? If it's the scarcity of (income and discount) locations, I found some ccg singles in an OLGS (1 copy of Gatehouse, several Iron Island Fiefdoms etc). Would including some of those and switching in some CP content make Greyjoy a realistic option vs slightly modified core decks?

Oh, and BIG kudos for all the info!
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Max Fightmaster
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Darksbane wrote:
The difference though is the CoC cards were sold out at FFG, and virtually impossible to find on the secondary market. FFG still has every pack of CoA for sale in their web store and they are farily easy to find in places like ebay and miniature market. Although I'd love it if they reprinted them with the 3x distribution I'm not expecting it.


You are right, the circumstances of the two products aren't the same. There's no arguing that the CoC packs were completely sold out when FFG made their decision.

But simply put, what I'm saying is that when FFG does think it right to re-print CoA, and inevitably they will when they regard those packs as sufficiently scarce, a point which we are surely fast approaching (especially here in Europe, where they are almost impossible to locate), then they will be re-printed in the new distribution format. Personally, I anticipate that will happen later this year (especially if hearsay from various conventions is true), but that is of course only my own opinion.

ironJames wrote:
what's the main problem with building Greyjoy using only one KotS (and we're talking building fun, balanced decks for casual play)? If it's the scarcity of (income and discount) locations, I found some ccg singles in an OLGS (1 copy of Gatehouse, several Iron Island Fiefdoms etc). Would including some of those and switching in some CP content make Greyjoy a realistic option vs slightly modified core decks?


Yes. For fun casual play, you could absolutely manage a Greyjoy deck using only one KotS.

My suggestion would be to use a few proxy cards (or singles if you can find them) to pad out their resource base, then to use cards from CPs to flesh out the rest of the deck as you go along. If you do get a second Core Set in the end, then you can compensate fairly well by letting GJ take first pick of the good unique neutral cards that it contains.

Also, for discussion about building decks with the card collection that you've currently got, there's a fairly good thread here: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/520495/kots-and-pots-pre-con...
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Drew Dallas
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Well, allow me to eat my words.
Kings of the Sea just announced to be released this spring with the new 3x of each card.
http://www.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_news.asp?eidn=1893

I've rarely been happier to be wrong
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Mike Kraus
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Now I wish I would have held off on ordering the old one... Oh well.
 
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Stephen Sekela
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I Bought 2 copies of the original KotSea a few months ago after first getting in to the game. I don't regret it at all, and am thrilled that FFG made this decision - much MUCH better to help attract new players. And as a bonus, I'm sure that many of us might find buyers for our extra resin cards !

Who knows, I may even be tempted to buy the new KotSea, even though I already have the 2 sets and don't really NEED 3 X of certain cards to make a good deck. Would be a great and relatively economical way to finally get to play "Kingsmoot", which looks like a lot of fun! (Yeah I know you could do that with houses other than Greyjoy...)
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Iron James Rackham
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Darksbane wrote:
Well, allow me to eat my words.
Kings of the Sea just announced to be released this spring with the new 3x of each card.
http://www.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_news.asp?eidn=1893

I've rarely been happier to be wrong


Cool, thanks!
Now I'm just keeping my fingers crossed they'll allow me to change my copy (still in shrink) for PotS...
 
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Zack Parsons
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Thanks a lot for the OP Max, it was a great help. I'm still not certain if I am going to buy into AGoT or not. I'm a big fan of the books and so is one of my other players, and the fact that the game runs so well multiplayer is a big bonus. However I'm worried with the format of LCGs (Basically having every card available to you, that the decks will kind of stagnate. One thing I very much enjoy about MTG is building the best deck I can out of random cards)

I've already bought into Warhammer: Invasion and didn't find it as fun as I expected to.
 
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Drew Dallas
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One thing that helps avoid stagnation is that cards are released every month. I used to play Magic but I like LCGs much better. Every card is available in Magic too, you just have to pay much much more.
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Max Fightmaster
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Darksbane wrote:
Well, allow me to eat my words.
Kings of the Sea just announced to be released this spring with the new 3x of each card.
http://www.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_news.asp?eidn=1893

I've rarely been happier to be wrong :D


Incredible news really.

If somebody had asked me last week whether I wanted to bet a hundred quid against KoTS being reprinted in a new format this year, then I would just have lost a big pile of cash.
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