Ender Wiggins
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Introducing The Resistance



We all know what the trouble with most party games is don’t we? So often they are fun for precisely 19.74 minutes, at which point we suddenly realize that being water-boarded by the helpful staff at Club Guantanamo would be better than having to endure another torturous minute of this game (that’s right Quelf, we’re looking at you)! Even with the few well developed party games like Mafia and Werewolf there are difficulties – what happens, for instance, if you are eliminated early on in the game? After all, it can only be fun if you actually get to play. If only it was possible to design a party game that could handle a sizeable number of people, keep everybody in the game until the very end (an end which was clearly defined and arrived before the fun stopped), proved easily accessible in terms of rules, and yet provided a fun, satisfying gaming experience. If only such a game existed, then we would be free from the miserable tyranny of games like Quelf, Cranium, and Loser!

What’s that you say? Such a game does exist? Really?! Your’re not kidding? What’s it called? The Resistance – I'm not sure I've heard of it before! But I’ve heard that resistance is futile, so can it really be any good? You say it is? And that intelligent and discerning gamers everywhere have loved it, and are demanding to play it over and over again? Hmmm, now I’m really curious – what more can you tell me about this wonder game?

Well, The Resistance is a social deduction game, in which the players assume the role of either a Resistance freedom fighter, or, a spy for a repressive government that is trying to thwart the efforts of the Resistance rebels. Players will use discussion, deception and intuition in an attempt to identify the members of the opposing force and ensure victory for their team. It comes in a small pocket-sized box and consists largely of cards, but wow, if ever there was potential to pack an incredible social game experience in a small box, this is it! This is a party game or social game that may prove to quickly become one of the most popular and one of the best. Let's find out more!




COMPONENTS

Game box

There is an well known saying that good things come in small packages – and The Resistance is another superb example of just how true that old adage actually is. That’s because The Resistance comes enclosed in a small but immediately endearing box. Have you ever had that experience where you picked up a book and you knew just by the way that it felt in your hands that it was going to be a good read? Well that’s how it feels when you pick up The Resistance for the first time – the box just feels good. Not only is it small and portable, making it convenient for carrying around to your favourite social events. But you have the immediate impression that there’s more inside this box then just some plastic chits and a few laminated cards. There’s a sense that this is a box that contains potential – the potential of generating good gaming experiences and lasting memories.



And, to be fair, this is more than just a romantic observation about the existential qualities of the box. After all, if you purchase The Resistance, you really aren’t buying a game so much as a game system. The box is small precisely because what you won’t find inside is a tonne of wooden cubes and plastic miniatures. What you do get is a system of rules that offers the prospect of a genuinely engaging and meaningful social experience. Just listen to what we read on the back of the box: "The Resistance is a highly interactive game of secret identities, deduction and deception. Players are members of an underground resistance organization fighting against a malignant government. But spies have infiltrated the resistance to thwart their plans, will the resistance be able to root out the dastardly spies in time?"



So what does it take to do all this? Cards, my friends, cards. And the people to play those cards! Inside the box we find a pleasant looking plastic box insert which houses all the cards, as well as some tokens and a score board.



But perhaps the most important component of this game experience is what's not in the box: you and your gaming group. The components may seem small and insignificant, but they will combine to create a social experience that few other games can provide! That being said, there are some physical components that come with the game, so let's give you a quick tour of what comes with the game!

Component list

Here’s a list of what you can expect to find when you look inside:
● 11 Character Cards
● 5 Team Cards
● 20 Vote Cards
● 10 Mission Cards
● 15 Plot Cards
● 6 Wooden Score Markers
● 1 Wooden Round Marker
● 1 Score Tableau



Overall the game components are of good quality. The various team, vote, mission and character cards are of a good size, durably made and should stand up to repeated play. The scoring tableau is functional and the artwork and design matches the style on many of the cards, so there is a pleasant sense of uniformity between the different elements of the game. The scoring and round markers have been upgraded from plastic poker chips to wooden markers in this production edition, and are a quality addition. Overall, the components are attractive, functional, and durable, and we were quite pleased.

Before looking at the individual components, let's give you a brief overview of the different types of cards. First of all there are character cards, which come in two types: Spies and Resistance.



The other cards mostly relate to making mission teams, and whether or not these missions succeed or fail.



Character cards

As mentioned already, the core concept of the game is that some players will be resistance operatives, others will be spies. The amount of each will depend on the number of players. For example, in a 8 player game, there will be 5 Resistance operatives and 3 Spies.



These roles are assigned randomly and secretly by shuffling and handing out the appropriate number of Character cards. So the game comes with ten character cards.

Six of these are Resistance characters - these are blue in colour, and feature the fist symbol (used for the Resistance team throughout the game).



Four of these are Spy characters - these are red in colour, and feature a round symbol (used for the Spy team throughout the game).



We really like some of the artwork on these cards, and using the distinct blue and red to indicate the different teams works well. While the cards are good quality, you certainly don't want them getting marked or otherwise identifiable, so we can see that some game groups may quickly put these particular cards into sleeves in order to protect them. These character cards will be handed out randomly (the number of spies vs resistance as determined in the chart above), and although the spies will get to reveal themselves to one another (much like the Werewolves in Werewolf), for the rest these roles remain secret - and this of course is the fun of the game!

Scoring tableau & scoring markers

It has a high quality linen finish, and is made of durable and thick cardboard, much like a mounted gameboard.



The scoring tableau is used to keep track of the amount of missions won by each team. The circled numbers 1 through 5 indicate the five "missions" that each game will have. First team to win three of the five missions wins the game! There are lovely wooden markers that are used to keep track of this - the black marker is placed on the current mission number, the red and blue markers will be placed on the scoring tableau to indicate missions won by the Spies or Resistance respectively.



It's also worth noting that the scoring tableau also functions as a kind of game reference card. On the bottom left it lists how many spies and resistance characters are needed depending on the amount of players. On the bottom right it lists how many characters will go on each of the five missions, also depending on the amount of players. Let's get to that next!

Team cards

In each of the five rounds of the game, a certain number of players - not all of them - will go on a number of missions. For example, as shown in the chart below, in an eight player game, 3 players will go on the first mission, 4 players will go on the second mission, 4 on the third, 5 on the fourth, and 5 on the fifth mission.



So which players get to do a mission? This is decided by players as follows: One person is designated as the Mission or Team Leader - and there's even a card to help remember who the current Mission Leader is.



Players take turns being Mission Leader, going clockwise around the table. This player will hand out "Team cards" in front of certainly players, proposing which ones he wants to be on the team for that particular mission. Here are the five Team cards used for that purpose:



If the Mission Leader is a Spy himself, obviously he'll try to get one Spy onto the team, to try to ensure that mission fails; but if the Mission Leader is a Resistance operative himself, obviously he'll try to make sure that there are no Spies onto the team, to try to ensure that mission succeeds. The difficulty - and the fun - of course is that not all the players knows who are the Spies and who are the Resistance!

Vote cards

Proposed teams aren't accepted automatically, and here's where the social element starts to play a role. After the Mission Leader has proposed a team, players vote simultaneously using Vote cards. There's two of these for every player, so everyone gets a "Reject" vote card and "Accept/Approve" vote card, which look like this:



So if you're a Resistance and think that one member of the proposed team is a Spy, you'd vote against the proposal, because the success of the mission is at stake! A proposed team needs to have a majority approval, otherwise the next player in turn becomes Mission Leader, and another team has to be proposed and accepted.

Mission cards

If a Mission Team is finally approved by a majority vote, then each of the players on that mission team gets two Mission cards, one for Failure (red, with the circle icon), and one for Success (blue, with the fist icon).



The Resistance of course wants missions to succeed but the spies want missions to fail... Each player on the team will secretly choose one of these cards - they're then shuffled together and revealed. If there is even one Fail card, the mission has failed, and a red token is placed on the scoring tableau for that mission. Now the fun begins as accusations begin to fly back and forth, and players try to figure out who is Resistance operative and who is a Spy! The dynamic social interaction will reach fever pitch as the next Mission Leader now needs to propose a new team for the next mission, and as players try to have their say about who should be on the next team in order to make it pass or fail. Spies will never reveal themselves as spies of course, but they may well accuse other innocent players of being spies!

Rulebook

So is all this hard to learn? Well we've just walked you through the components, and you pretty much know how to play the game already! The rules come on a single, double-sided, tri-folded sheet of paper (there are copies in English, French, and German), and they're clear, well organized and to the point.



They also contain a number of excellent illustrated examples, such as this example of an approved vote to establish a mission team:



One of the real benefits of this game is how quickly it can be picked up and taught to others. There is no doubt that you could easily be up and running within ten to fifteen minutes of peeling the shrink wrap off the box! Given the simplicity of the rules, you can also teach the game to new players in five to ten minutes.

Plot cards

The game also comes with an expansion called The Plot Thickens, which consists of 15 additional cards and a double sided rulesheet explaining how they work.



We'll explain the purpose of these a little later. These are especially useful for games with 7-10 players, where it can be very hard for the Resistance team to win, and they add special powers and possibilities that will give new opportunities to deduce who the spies and resistance characters are.

GAME-PLAY

Set-up

By now you pretty much know how to play the game already - and I've done little more than explain what the components are for! Yes, it's really that easy! But let's just walk you through the set-up and flow of play for a complete game.

1. Determine character roles. Begin by separating out the character cards and, depending on the number of players you have, select the required number of resistance and spy cards. Thoroughly shuffle these cards together and then deal out one card to each player - players can look at them, but must keep them secret! Next, in some random fashion, determine who the Mission Leader will be, and give him the Mission Leader card - he is responsible for attempting to form the first Mission Team, and the position of Mission Leader will pass from player to player as the game progresses). Finally, each player should be given two Vote cards – one which indicates a yes/approve vote and one which indicates a no/reject vote. The scoring tableau is placed in the middle of the table along with the scoring tokens.

2. Reveal Spies. Before you set about on your first mission, the spies should reveal themselves to each other. This is done in a `Werewolf' style fashion, by having the initial Leader request that all the players close their eyes and, then asking those who have been dealt Spy cards to open their eyes and to reveal their identity to each other. After a moment or two, the Leader should ask all the players to close their eyes, and when everyone is ready ask that all players open their eyes.

Here's an example of a five player set-up. For illustration purposes, the character cards are placed face up - obviously in a real game they would be secret and known only to the players themselves.



Flow of Play

Game-play consists of five rounds or missions, and each round has two phases - building a team, and then sending that team out to conduct a mission, which will either succeed (good for the Resistance!) or fail (good for the Spies!).

Build the Team

As noted above, the Mission Leader has the responsibility of forming a mission team. To do this, the Leader makes a proposal to all the players about which players he believes should be assigned to the team for that mission - he uses the Team cards to designate those whom he proposes be part of the team. The number of players to be designated to comprise the mission team will vary from round to round and is indicated in both the rules and on the scoring tableau. The players are given time to debate the proposal made by the leader but ultimately (and within a reasonable time limit) they will use their vote cards to determine whether or not the proposal made by the Leader succeeds or fails. Voting is done simultaneously. If the proposal fails, then the leader card passes to the next player in clockwise order and the above process is repeated.

Here's an example where a proposed team of three (the team cards are circled in red) is rejected by the majority. Hmm, could the team leader and the player at the top right be spies?!



Conduct the Mission

If, however, the proposal succeeds (that is, the majority of the ballots cast were in support of the proposed mission team) then players proceed to the next phase of the round – the mission phase. In this phase, the players who have been selected to be on the mission party cast their votes (this time using the Mission cards which, like the voting cards, are marked to indicate either a yea/success or nay/fail vote) to determine whether or not the mission succeeds or fails. When voting, players who are part of the Resistance must vote for the mission to succeed, whereas players who are spies have the option of voting for the mission to either succeed or fail. Usually Spies will vote for a failed mission, unless it's the initial round and they think they can allow the first mission to pass in order to establish their credibility as a supposed member of the Resistance, and then back-stab the Resistance team in the last round or two! When the mission cards are revealed and tallied the mission succeeds only if all of the votes that were cast were “succeed” votes. If even a single vote called for the mission to fail then fail it does (there are one or two small exceptions to this, depending on the number of players, which we won't detail here).

Here's an example of a failed mission (taken from the rulebook):



Successful or failed missions are marked on the scoring tableau with a red or blue marker, and then the game proceeds to the next round/mission, beginning with the team-building phase. As the game progresses, players will have more and more information to work with, such as voting patterns and results of previous missions, so the social element will become more and more intense - as will the tension, especially if a game goes to the wire of the fifth and final round, as it often does!

Game End

The game is played out over five rounds, all of which proceed as noted above, and the game can end in one of two ways. The game ends in victory for the Resistance if they are able to carry out three successful missions. Conversely the spies can achieve victory if they are able to bring about the failure of three missions. In addition, the spies also win the game if the Resistance is unable to organize the mission team at any point in the game (i.e this occurs when there are five failed votes on the formation of a mission team on any single mission).

In the example below from a five player game, the last mission fails, and the Spies win the game!



The Plot Thickens expansion

The Resistance has been designed to play with groups of five to ten people and our experience has been that it plays very well with any number of people in that range. The game has been designed to scale depending on the number of available players, by having a different number of spies/resistance characters, and a different number of players going on missions. This has been well calculated to ensure that the game plays out in a fun and fair way each time. Having said that, with seven or more players it can become more difficult for the Resistance to win the game – a fact which is even mentioned in the rules. The relative imbalance with more than seven players is mitigated, however, by inclusion of fifteen plot cards that are included in the Plot Thickens expansion - some are duplicates, so there are nine unique cards.



A separate double-sided sheet explains how the Plot cards work, and gives a useful reference explaining each one.



A specific number of these Plot cards, again dependent on the number of players, are drawn each round and will be distributed by the Leader to various players of his choice (be aware that there's a small misprint in the rules about the amount of cards distributed - see the errata here). The plot cards provide a range of special benefits to those who possess them. Some of those benefits include the ability to invalidate a successful mission team vote, or to look at the character card of another player, or to force a player to play their mission card face up. Here's two examples, "Overhead Conversation" and "In the Spotlight".



These plot cards not only help out the Resistance players in larger games, but help keep the game exciting and fresh.

Video tutorials

The publisher has also created two excellent video tutorials that explain the game and the expansion cards. In our estimation he's done an excellent job, and these are well worth watching to help learn the game:
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/video/4342/the-resistance/game-...
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/video/4445/the-resistance/expan...



CONCLUSIONS

What do we think?

It's highly regarded. The Resistance is currently ranked #12 in the list of BGG's top party games. Being in the top dozen games of a particular genre is an outstanding achievement on its own. To get this kind of reception so soon after a release is remarkable. If it maintains its current average rating as votes accumulate, it will soon overtake more well established party-style games like Werewolf and Tumblin-Dice, and it even has the potential to match the success of modern classics like Wits & Wagers and PitchCar on the list. All these games have their strengths, of course, but despite the small size of its box, The Resistance has no need to feel outclassed but these larger guns, and may in time prove just as popular. We can see it make a good run for next year's Golden Geek award in the party game category.

It's highly social. It can't be said enough that The Resistance is a really, really great social and interactive game. To be fair, you need the right group of people to really make this game shine. But if you have a gaming group that is made up of people who love to be social, to interact with each other (often in loud and accusatory ways) and who aren’t afraid of a little debate and deception then this is game that should definitely be part of your collection. The first night that we played it, we played three games in a row and there was plenty of demand for a fourth – a demand which surely would have been satisfied had it not already been after midnight. There was much shouting, many an impassioned and heartfelt plea that so-and-so was most definitely not a spy – and a heaping dose of betrayal and not just a little con artistry. We absolutely loved it and this game will see all kinds of play in the long haul. In that regard we can’t recommend this little game highly enough!

There's no player elimination. What makes this game better than Werewolf and Mafia is that everybody remains in the game to the bitter end. Nobody becomes an outcast, doomed to silence on the wrong side of the couch, while everyone else is still having fun. There's also no need for an independent moderator - everyone gets to play, all the way till the conclusion. This is a real strength, and in that regard The Resistance is superior to Werewolf.

There's room for deduction. Make no mistake, Werewolf is a fantastic game - in fact, one of our favourites! But often players are ousted purely on the basis of their rhetoric or lack of it, and accusations are made and innocent villagers executed purely on the basis of emotion or feelings. The Resistance improves on that by giving you some data to work with, such as whether a player voted to approve or reject a proposed team, and whether or not they were part of a team that conducted a failed mission or a successful one. In most cases the data alone is not enough to figure out who the spies are - otherwise the game would degenerate to a simple puzzle. But it does gives players something to work with when constructing their rhetoric, and making their arguments and accusations. It's not too much information, but it's enough to provide substance to the social discussions and debates that are inevitable with this kind of game. In that regard this also gives The Resistance more replayability, because you're not relying merely on the players to conduct verbal character assassinations, but players can also engage in discussions about who voted for what, and why - and that will change every game.

It's tense. In most cases, it is tremendously difficult to be absolutely certain just what team a person is on. Everybody can participate meaningfully right up until the final vote and the final mission. The amount of players on each mission has been carefully calculated, so often a game will proceed right to the final round, before the winning team is determined. The real tension comes when either the Spies or the Resistance have managed to acquire two failed or successful missions - sometimes both! That final mission team has to be rock solid for the Resistance to prevail at that point. The tension is delicious, however, as the most impassioned pleas are made as players beg and plead that they are most assuredly to be trusted in their claims to be Resistance!

It can be hard for the Resistance. It is actually really, really hard to play the Resistance characters. Ironically, the more effectively and passionately you play your role as freedom fighter the more people will be convinced that you are in fact a spy. If, however, you attempt to be less vocal and impassioned players can also interpret your succinct and logical contributions as obviously ruthless actions of a spy. There's also a fascinating dynamic and meta-game that can develop as you play several games back to back - your successful performance as a Spy in one game, may prove to be your undoing in the next game, because players will interpret your behaviour and link patterns to how you conducted yourself in an earlier game! It’s brilliantly maddening!

It can be a bit fiddly. As a disclaimer, let it be said out that this is only a minor complaint. But there is a bit of fiddliness involved in managing the Mission cards. You need to have two piles, one for the Mission cards that the current team has chosen, one for the Mission cards that the current team has discarded. Both piles need to be shuffled, so that nobody knows which card a particular person played. You need to watch out for the fact that the artwork on the back of the cards is `one-way', i.e. because the icons are only on half of the card, there is the potential that even after shuffling other players could remember who placed a certain card the the opposite direction to the other cards. We wonder if some of this could have been avoided, or if there's a better way to do this. Having one person in charge of distributing and collecting and shuffling the Mission cards is a partial solution, but still not entirely satisfactory. Nonetheless this is a minor niggle at worst, and not a major complaint.

It is easy to learn. The gameplay is easy to teach, and you can be up and running with new players in no time. Even older children should be able to manage quite fine. In our experience, 8 year olds will be able to understand the rules, but they could have some difficulties with some of the subtleties of playing, because of the small deductive elements. On the other hand children age 10 and older could play quite well. We've tried this with groups of all sorts, including gamers and non-gamers, and it's proven to be a hit in every instance.

The Plot cards are a good addition. When playing with a larger group, things can often be too difficult for the Resistance, and it's tough to get mission teams together that don't include Spies. The Plot cards solve this problem by giving players more information to work with. The Spies already know who is who, but this information will give the Resistance team a leg-up in picking out who the Spies are. The good news is that the Plot cards don't add much difficulty - you can even use them in a group with players who have not played the game at all. We wouldn't play 7-10 player games without them, otherwise the Resistance won't have much of a chance.

It compares favourably with Werewolf. Right now we prefer The Resistance to Werewolf, firstly because it negates the need for player elimination, secondly because players have some actual data they can use for deduction, and thirdly because it handles a smaller group with as few as five people. Werewolf, of course, has the advantage of catering to groups of more than ten players, and it will continue to be a well-loved favourite. But for groups of ten or less, we can see The Resistance quickly becoming the game of choice. There are groups who have played it dozens and dozens of times, so clearly it holds up well to repeated play. As players get to know the game, rather than becoming dreary, the play experience seems to improved and reach new levels of enrichment!

It is part of a great series. A few words also need to be said about the publisher Indie Boards and Cards. Run by Travis Worthington, who is an active BGGer, it focuses on distributing small and self published games in the hopes that they will reach and be appreciated by larger audiences. Despite its inconspicuous size and relatively new status as a publisher, Indie has been responsible for some of the newest hotness here on BGG. The Resistance is part of the Postcard Box series of games, that also includes the recent releases Haggis and Triumvirate, both of which have garnered considerable and well-deserved attention and have generated very favourable early reviews.



Beyond producing several much anticipated games, one of the really remarkable things about Indie Boards and Cards is that it’s not only a labour of love for those who run it (Travis is clearly a gamer who loves our shared hobby), but it’s also a business with a genuine social conscience. For every first run game that they sell, the folks at Indie have pledged to donate one dollar of the proceeds to Heifer International – an organization devoted to the cause of sustainable development in the U.S., Europe and the Third World. That’s putting your money where your mouth is! If you consider how slim profit margins must be in an endeavour like this, having the heart to cut those margins even finer by making charitable donations out of your revenue stream is something truly remarkable. Producing quality games like The Resistance in the process makes it even more remarkable.

What do others think?

The criticism

Not everyone is going to like The Resistance - and that's through no real fault of the game, but merely a reflection of the fact that gamers do have different tastes. Looking at the more negative comments on BGG, it's evident that the majority of naysayers don't care for party games or social games in general. Comments like "Not my cup of tea" and "The game is not bad, but party games are not the genre I like" typically accompany some of the lower ratings. People are of course entitled to this preference, and if you fall into this category, The Resistance might not be for you.

The praise

There's not a lot of criticism about the game itself, however, aside perhaps from some concern about fiddliness and almost an excess of components. For the most part, people are gushing with enthusiasm about The Resistance, and it's not hard to understand why!
"With the right group, this is the best party game I know." - Mark Klassen
"This game is fun, and tense tense tense when you get people working together on it. Such a great intuitive and logical experience." - Jeremiah Lee
"It's Battlestar Galactica without all the boring parts." - Tim (tofarley)
"Excellent and fast playing deduction/hidden role game for 5+, without player elimination. Has many of the great elements of Werewolf without certain issues." - Alex Rockwell
"Fantastic game, when you've got a reasonably sociable group this is a fantastic fit. Bluffing and deduction blend together rapidly with accusations and counter accusations flying, the only way to deduce who is spying is to translate their votes and the success of the missions they go on. Absolutely brilliant!" - George Leach
"Great social game and a nice alternative to Werewolf if you don't have sufficient players." - Martin Blackham
"A brilliant party game. It's quick, it's full of tension, laughs, false accusations, intrigues and doubt - a deduction psychology combo, but with barrels of fun. Lovely idea, well executed, and with great components." - David Dolzan
"Brilliant, absolutely brilliant. So boiled down, and yet so sharp." - Karl Bergström
"No moderation and no player elimination makes this game much better than Werewolf, apart from the limited number of players. Balance is perfect." - Lorenzo Giannotti
"If BSG and Werewolf had a baby, it would be this game." - Yeh Fang
"The best social game. " - Pol Cors
"A fantastic substitute for Werewolf, especially when you have a smaller number of players." - Jonathan Takagi
"Fantastic game. Games always come down to the wire." - Eric (Raid1280)




Recommendation

Is The Resistance for you? If you like social games of any kind, then buying this is a no-brainer. If you enjoy games with secret roles like Werewolf, Battlestar Galactica, Shadows Over Camelot, or Saboteur, then it's an absolute must-have. This is the kind of game where you will wake up the next morning thinking about how the game ended – and just how you could have failed to realize that the person sitting next to you was a spy. It's the kind of game that create experiences that are unforgettable, like the time when the one who finally slide the in knife in between your ribs and ended your fight for freedom turned out to be your spouse – oh the humanity! My friends, if you have the right group this is quite simply a must buy! This is not just any old party game - it's an essential! The next Golden Geek Awards are still a long way away, but we would not be shocked if The Resistance turns out to be the winner in the Party Game category. Highly recommended!



Credits: This review is a collaborative effort between EndersGame and jtemple.

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mb The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596

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Kevin Garnica
United States
Buena Park
California
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Well there you go again, Ender - I've tried to "resist" buying this game, but since my copy of Werewolf has been all played-out, this may in fact serve as its replacement.
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Todd France
United States
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IF ONLY I had a plan...
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The lesser of two evils?
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You lasted through 19 minutes of Quelf? I'm surprised you can still compose yourself enough to write this review...
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Cedric Jean-Marie
Canada
Gatineau
Quebec
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Amazing review, thanks.
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Tim
United States
San Antonio
Texas
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I just can't heap enough praise onto this game.

After 12 plays, I can say beyond the shadow of a doubt that this was the best game published in 2010, and quite possibly my favorite game of all time.

I have a hard time sitting down to a euro game now, because I feel compelled to accuse the other farmers of treason in Agricola.

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Nick
United States
Denver
Colorado
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My wallet begs you to stop writing these reviews.
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Steven
United States
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This game is a lot more beautiful than I had expected, since I first heard about it in its print-and-play variant.
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Chris Ferejohn
United States
Mountain View
California
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Pitying fools as hard as I can...
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pseudotheist wrote:
You lasted through 19 minutes of Quelf? I'm surprised you can still compose yourself enough to write this review...


Hey, I liked Quelf - though really the blue "rule" cards can probably be made in to a better game on their own.
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◄ əpıʌɐp ►
Italy
Bologna
BO
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Oh, no Ender! You did it again!

After reading half of the review I put the game in my wishlist.
By the end, I've put it inside an order...
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
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Lou Ann Barton: The Best! || The Dixie Hummingbirds: Thank You for One More Day || The Derek Trucks Band: Songlines
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Fine review, Ender. Extremely well written.


cferejohn wrote:
pseudotheist wrote:
You lasted through 19 minutes of Quelf? I'm surprised you can still compose yourself enough to write this review...


Hey, I liked Quelf - though really the blue "rule" cards can probably be made in to a better game on their own.

I'm with Chris. If your family is composed of lunatics, as mine certainly is, Quelf can be awesome. It's a once-a-year kind of awesome, not a let's-play-again awesome, but that doesn't mean it's not great fun when the time is right.
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Tim
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It looks like our little grassroots campaign is working! (Probably thanks in no small part to Ender's review)

The Resistance is currently #4 on "The hotness" list!
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Jeremiah Lee
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tofarley wrote:
I have a hard time sitting down to a euro game now, because I feel compelled to accuse the other farmers of treason in Agricola.
Absolutely. Once you've played games with lots of player interaction, it feels pretty meaningless (to me) to play a game where you're only really interacting with the game.
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Ben Harris
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Wishlisted!!!

Thanks Ender!
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Jeremiah Lee
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Raid1280 wrote:
It's a rare game of Agricola or Le Havre that provides the same excitement to be had in just one game of The Resistance.
"You're totally going to choose another wood token!"
"No man, I'm with you, I'm going to choose vegetables."
"Not gonna happen, look people, he chose actions first in the last round, and look what happened. He built a wooden house!"
"I'm not, it's not gonna happen."
"Let's show actions then..."
...*reveal*
"Spy!"

Agricola just doesn't have the thrill for me.
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Matt Musselman
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One of the best reviews I've ever encountered on BGG. Terrific!
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Mark Cookman
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Thank you Ender for giving this game the fantastic review that it so richly deserved. My group loves this game and we get more people who want to play it every time we bring it out. I ran a 4 hour session of this at our local game con. There is now a guy my wife won't talk to anymore, because he foxed her so many times during that 4 hours.
laugh

Your review, like the game, is a solid piece of work that commands respect.
Both rate my 2nd highest compliment: Mmmmmmm, UR good like bacon


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Mark Cookman
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celiborn wrote:
This game is a lot more beautiful than I had expected, since I first heard about it in its print-and-play variant.


+1 I made the original pnp version and gave it away to a friend because she liked werewolf so much. She went away to college taking it with her. I lucked into a copy because

Travis Worthington
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California
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2010 Releases ........................................ The Resistance, Haggis & Triumvirate ..................................... Now accepting submissions for 2011 releases ........................................ www.IndieBoardsandCards.com
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offered up a copy of this fabulous game if I would run it at our local con.

I thought about it for 3.2 picoseconds and said yes.


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Jeremiah_Lee wrote:
Raid1280 wrote:
It's a rare game of Agricola or Le Havre that provides the same excitement to be had in just one game of The Resistance.
"You're totally going to choose another wood token!"
"No man, I'm with you, I'm going to choose vegetables."
"Not gonna happen, look people, he chose actions first in the last round, and look what happened. He built a wooden house!"
"I'm not, it's not gonna happen."
"Let's show actions then..."
...*reveal*
"Spy!"

Agricola just doesn't have the thrill for me.


ROFL
 
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Chris
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Question about game (I know, shocking). Does the voting on the team part really work? It seems like this could deadlock the game if teams keep getting rejected.
 
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Jeremiah Lee
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LetsGetTrivial wrote:
Question about game (I know, shocking). Does the voting on the team part really work? It seems like this could deadlock the game if teams keep getting rejected.
If five in a row get rejected, it counts as a win for the spies. Makes it critical to find a way to accept a team.
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Tim
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Jeremiah_Lee wrote:
LetsGetTrivial wrote:
Question about game (I know, shocking). Does the voting on the team part really work? It seems like this could deadlock the game if teams keep getting rejected.
If five in a row get rejected, it counts as a win for the spies. Makes it critical to find a way to accept a team.


In a 10-player game, we actually lost this way once. One of the spies had a "No confidence", so when we were on our 5th voting attempt. We double-checked the rules, and sure enough, a no confidence counts as a failed vote.
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Jacob Lee
Canada
Victoria
British Columbia
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Your reviews are consistently better than the rulebooks. You should be a rulebook writer!
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Don Alexander
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Wow! I wish all reviews were as complete and detailed as yours. (including mine).

I actually bought this game and have yet to open it. I am starting our next gaming night with this now!

 
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Bill Jones
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Thanks for the excellent review Ender! Add me to the list of those who were convinced by this review to order the game - waiting anxiously for it to arrive now.
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Denis
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I can't wait for March now
 
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