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Subject: The poor misunderstood genius sitting in the corner... rss

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Brian McCormick
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Hey all, I have not been buying very many new games over the past 6+ months so I thought I would revisit games that I reviewed in the past (if I added a lot more plays since the first review). Everyone loves to gush (or bash) a new game, but not as many people are willing to go back several months later and see if their original opinion held up. Android is a game that doesn't see table time all that much in my group (anyone who owns this game will probably nod their head in agreement), but I have managed to play Android 6 times since my review last August for which I played it four times in preparation for the review. You can see that review here: What an adventure!. You can read that old review if you want but in a nutshell: I like Android, especially the amount of replayability, but the complexity was something of a headache. The central complaint in my first Android review was this:

Aurendrosl wrote:
The anti-elegance There are heavy games with elegant rules that mesh well together (Caylus, for example) and then there are heavy games where the rules bounce around like a dozen golf balls in a laundry dryer. Android is like a hundred golf balls in twenty dryers.


One thing I want to mention is that I've played this game 2p (yes, it's 100% compatible with no rule changes even though the box says 3-5p) up to 4p. The 3-4p version is full of exciting "take that" moments, but the 2p version is more relaxed and allows you to explore the mechanics a bit more. Let's take another look at Android to see if the game has blossomed or wilted over the past several months.

The Good

Play it again and again - there are several playable characters, each with wildly divergent plots, abilities, movement rules, Twilight cards, and restrictions. Each character has a life of its own, and even playing the same murder mystery over and over again with different characters offers a new experience. Android also includes multiple murder mysteries, each of which have their own variables. To top that off, there are several hefty player-made variants (best of which is The Director's Cut v3.0 IMO), adding even more ways to play this game. Android is not a mere boardgame. It is practically a storytelling system akin to Tales of the Arabian Nights or an RPG.

OH HEAVENS! MY EYES ARE BURNING! - a.k.a "this game has some very beautiful pieces". The art quality in Android is among Fantasy Flight's best. One thing that really makes the art stand out is it sticks to the theme and feel while also being easy on the eyes. Most FFG games manage to be one or the other. The rulebook is full of gorgeous half-page illustrations, and the character sheets, suspects, tokens, and the board itself are all lovingly painted with some of the best imagery seen in a boardgame. Art is subjective, but I think any boardgamer would be hard-pressed not to enjoy Androids visual flair.

Cool theme - the few mystery/detective games out there tend to fall into either a modern-day setting or a Jack the Ripper setting. Android manages to be a sci-fi mystery game that doesn't fall back on the usual sci-fi tropes of alien invasions and space warfare. Whether a theme is good or not is completely up to personal taste, but I happen to enjoy Android's theme and there aren't many other boardgames with a theme like this.

Dark cards - in Android, you can play Dark cards on the matching opponent during their turn (reminds me of Interrupt cards from Star Wars Customizable Card Game) if certain conditions are met. This is just one of Android's many brilliant mechanics. It drives the narrative because there's a gameplay mechanic behind the narrative. In other words, people want to push the story because it actually benefits them in-game. This is not an easy feat to accomplish. Many other boardgames have tried and failed to combine gameplay with narrative. Android succeeds.

A non-cutthroat Ameritrash - Though there are so many little rules and a lot going on at once, Android is hard to classify. You aren't trying to kill other players (there is no player elimination, in fact). You aren't grabbing territory. Sure, you can hurt and hinder other players with Dark cards and other options, but for a very Ameritrashy game, Android is lower on the competitive scale than you might expect. It's not a Euro, but it's not Ameritrash. Unlike most other similar games in this genre, Android does not revolve around combat, item gathering, and player elimination.

Easy to play - Yes. I said it. I knew it would rile you up. Yes, YOU! You came in here to talk about how impossible Android is, and now here I am claiming that it is easy to play. How can I make such a claim? Because I said so, and I am the writer of this review. In all fairness, we need to make a distinction between easy to learn and easy to play. Android is not easy nor quick to learn. A lot of awesome games can be tough to learn. However, once you understand the mechanics (easily grasped after a single playthrough), it is a very easy game to play. There is very little turn-to-turn confusion, and although each player turn is basically freeform (a strength, not a weakness IMO), the available options and the benefit of each option is pretty easy to see.

A storyteller is YOU! - I'm a fan of narrative in games. Some games build narrative into the very fabric of a game, and others allow it to evolve naturally. I'm not going to claim that one method is better than the other, but Android is one of the best (if not the best) boardgame I've played that uses "pre-made" narrative to drive the gameplay. There are other games like Arkham Horror that also use flavor text, but Android's events and plots are vague enough so that it doesn't feel like the game is saying "do this because it's the only way to progress the story", but the events and plots are specific enough so that you do feel as though your character is moving through a story, a struggle. This is a careful balancing act, and I haven't seen it replicated in many other boardgames.

You are cool if you own Android - this final point is a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it would be fair to say that Android is a game that you either love or hate. It's also a game that has not received a lot of attention, so if you enjoy introducing your group to unique and under-the-radar boardgames, Android just might fit the bill. Who knows? You might fall in love with it.

The Bad


The fiddly, Duke! The fiddly! - Why does this game take so long to setup? I don't know. I suppose the initial placement of suspects, evidence, and players has to do with the specific murder, plots, and characters being used. Once you get the feel of the game, setup time doesn't take as long, but it can be a daunting task your first few games. AN EXCEPTION APPROACHES: Android's setup is a pain, but the gameplay itself is NOT as fiddly as its big brother, Arkham Horror. In fact, I was amazed by how little turn-to-turn upkeep you have to deal with in Android. Do yourself the favor of organizing the pieces in a plano box, plastic bead box, etc., though.

Are we there yet? - As mentioned previously, learning Android's rules is a drag. It's a big drag. WHen teaching my wife this game, I had to separate the rule explanations into two consecutive nights, not only because they're long, but also because it can be too much to absorb in one sitting. Android haters: I'm with you on this one. The rules take a while to learn. Now, the rules are GOOD and they MAKE SENSE once you play the game, but they are tough to learn.

Are we detectives or crooks? - A valid (though completely overblown) complaint against Android is that you're not exactly "discovering" the murderer like you might in a game of Clue. Instead, you're putting evidence down on suspects and trying to pin them with the crime. Thematically, you might argue that this still accurately simulates "discovering" who the murderer is, but for those expecting "Clue: Blade Runner Edition", Android won't quite fit the bill in its out-of-the-box form. However, the aforementioned Director's Cut turns Android into a more Clue-like game, so that's worth checking out.

It's about the trip, not the destination - Android isn't exactly a VP-seeking game. In my opinion, it is best enjoyed by simply trying to explore your character's story and figure out the murder/conspiracy. Yes, the winner is determined by who has the most Victory Points, it's true, but I can't imagine playing Android as a dry efficiency-driven sort of game. With that said, many players will not like Android's emphasis on story instead of victory.

The Random

goo "This game is hard to learn" - Yes, but that does not accurately reflect on how fluid the actual gameplay is or how little upkeep there is during the game.

goo "It takes way too long to play" - Actually, a bit of patience and preparation helps deal with this problem quite easily. Simple solution: teach and play this game in a 2p (or just maybe 3p) format. You have fewer people to teach and you can wrap up the game in under 90 minutes. Not only will you be able to play Android more often, but when The Big Day comes for a 4-5p Android session, you can invite players who already know how to play. It has worked wonders for me.

goo "The box quality is poor" - Yes. My box had several mysterious creases after owning it for only two weeks. It's weird.

goo "The box and BGG entry both say '3-5 players' but you keep mentioning playing with 2. Huh?" - this was something another Android player on BGG pointed out to me: the only player-dependent rule in the entire game is the one that determines how many suspects you will use. The number of suspects is the number of players plus one. So, a 2p game will have 3 suspects, a 3p game will have 4 suspects, and so on. In all my games of Android, I have never once run into an issue playing it 2p. Give it a try!

goo "Why would I buy Android instead of games like Castle Ravenloft, Arkham Horror, etc." - Two aspects of Android set it apart from most of the other games in this genre. First, Android does not emphasize combat and item-finding, while most other games in the genre focus heavily on these two things. Second, Android's theme and mechanics are very unique, as opposed to the "dungeoncrawler"-style games we keep seeing hit the market.

The Verdict

Since reviewing Android last August, my esteem of the game has increased. It consistently surprises, not just because there are a lot of cards to see, but also because the interaction of all the various plots, events, characters, and murder mysteries creates a unique experience each and every time. I enjoy replaying the same murder mystery with the same character because it still manages to be a different experience. Neither the setup time nor rule system (my main complaints in my first review) are a big deal now that I've had more time to mess around with the game. In other words, for those who are struggline to grasp the game: keep at it.

Android is worth owning. Heck, it's worth owning as just a 2p game, in my opinion. It's chock-full of choices and variety all while remaining very fluid and understandable once you actually jump into the game. I hope I have addressed many of the complaints and concerns that surround Android. As more and more of these "adventure" games crop up on the market (many of them with expansions), it's worth looking back at Android if you want a stand-alone adventure game that is more than the sum of its parts.

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Anthony DuLac
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In my experience, when people have to consistently defend something as being "misunderstood" or "unfairly categorized" it's probably deserving of those titles.

Great review but I'm still cheerfully avoiding this game like the plague.
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Eric Jome
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Aurendrosl wrote:
"This game is hard to learn"


How hard something is to learn is often dependent on who you have for a teacher, not on the subject itself. I find that Android is easy to teach and learn the basics. Focus on teaching the following;

1) How do I win this game? - This is a point scoring game. Whoever has the most points in the end will win. You get points if the person you think is guilty gets convicted, by getting your personal life to turn out for the best, and by investigating the conspiracy behind the murder.
2) When will it end? - When we get to the end of 2 weeks, the game ends. Each day each person gets a turn. A turn consists of spending your action points.
3) What do I do on my turn? - You have some action points called Time. Doing things like driving around town, following up on a lead, drawing a card, playing a card - these things cost action points; it takes Time to do them.

Quote:
"It takes way too long to play"


This is a game where each person takes their turn. Their turn consists of spending their action points. While one player takes their turn, the other players must usually just wait. If you are used to games that use phasing (each person takes a discrete small action in sequence) then this will likely seem like a lot of sitting and waiting. There is a lot to consider on one's turn which can lead to analysis paralysis - like almost all action point allocation games. While it is not your turn, you can plan your next turn, but it likely won't be enough to fill the waiting time. Also, you need to watch for triggers that let you play Dark cards on other players when it is not your turn, but this can entail a lot of detailed watching for a rare special move the opponent makes.

Quote:
"The box quality is poor"


Android is a heavy game with lots of cardboard and paper in it. It is prone to damage itself or other games if it isn't stored on a flat, stable, strong surface.
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Eric Jome
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wytefang wrote:
In my experience, when people have to consistently defend something as being "misunderstood" or "unfairly categorized" it's probably deserving of those titles.


Yeah. Like rock music. That's obviously crap because people have had to constantly defend it from the haters.
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John Di Ponio
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Took me a session to get the game...but it has proven to be a game that I and the people I have introduced, enjoy very much! Is it fiddly? Yes a bit...but the game offers so much that I can put up with the fiddly part of it.
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Matt Rice
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cosine wrote:
wytefang wrote:
In my experience, when people have to consistently defend something as being "misunderstood" or "unfairly categorized" it's probably deserving of those titles.


Yeah. Like rock music. That's obviously crap because people have had to constantly defend it from the haters.


Nice one!
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Jon W
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cosine wrote:
Yeah. Like rock music. That's obviously crap because people have had to constantly defend it from the haters.

Did we teleport into the movie Footloose or something? When's the last time someone had to defend rock music?

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Brian McCormick
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waddball wrote:
cosine wrote:
Yeah. Like rock music. That's obviously crap because people have had to constantly defend it from the haters.

Did we teleport into the movie Footloose or something? When's the last time someone had to defend rock music?


I think cosine was being sarcastic, as in:

"Yeah, people who hate Android are right, and anyone who defends it is just in denial about how bad the game is! Just like rock music, which is also crap, because society hated it at first and the people who liked it were just cult members who wanted to be counter-culture"...all in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way, of course.

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Erik Mallinson
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I finally purchased this game a little over a week ago. I totally agree with this review. Teaching the rules is a bear but playing through afterward is incredibly easy. We had a few setbacks when some more esoteric rules were not explained, namely sacrificing as many cards to pay the cost as you would like. But overall it was easily played through.

I will second the box quality though. One of the corners on the cover is torn down the side and it’s basically gone from game shop to house, opened and closed twice (we left the entire game out for a whole week without moving anything). I had a hard time punching chits out too, some tore even though I was quite gentle with it. I did not have the same problem with other FFG titles.

I also agree with the 2-Player thing. It’s great.
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Jason Birzer
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cosine wrote:

Quote:
"The box quality is poor"


Android is a heavy game with lots of cardboard and paper in it. It is prone to damage itself or other games if it isn't stored on a flat, stable, strong surface.


I've managed to punch a hole in the box. It is not very sturdy at all, components or no components.

As for setup, I noticed that many components are character specific. While I haven't played it yet, I've seperated the character stuff with the hope of mitigating that.
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Ian Ross
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Owned the game and finally decided to play it last week. We ended up playing for something like 6 hrs but when it was all over, we said, "wow. that didn't seem like any time at all." A sign we were all engrossed, engaged and entertained.
I gotta say, I think the reason people seem to have these negative reactions to certain games is because they keep comparing new games they play to others they play, rather than trying to keep the mind clear and just playing the game for what it is. It's not Clue. Sure people are entitled to their opinion, but since when is playing a game supposed to be like any other game just because they're similar. Hell checkers is played on the same board as chess, I don't hear people saying chess sucks because it's not enough like checkers.
And as for the fiddly argument, well hello. That's a lot of boardgames. Ues this little counter to keep track of how many turns have passed, and this little counter to make sure that you've used that unit. etc. etc. Do wargamers argue over how fiddly a game is?
Lastly, if you're still reading by this point , the thing this game showed me is the huge bias that can be prevalent on the BGG. I realize now I gave a bit too much weight to my fellow geeks' opinions. I know the arguments about how much is invested in games etc. but sometimes you don't get what you pay for, I've been to several restaurants where this is the case, and sometimes you find a game that's quite good.
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Jon W
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Aurendrosl wrote:
I think cosine was being sarcastic

Right. I just found it a weird and inapt metaphor. Perhaps it's because I agree with the thrust of what wytefang wrote earlier. I don't think you're being overly defensive here, but I do think that, generally, where there's smoke, there's fire (a hopefully apt metaphor). I'm not "avoiding this game like the plague", but I'm not sure whether your review has made me more, or less, skeptical about it.

Well-written, engaging review, though.
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Eric Jome
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waddball wrote:
I don't think you're being overly defensive here, but I do think that, generally, where there's smoke, there's fire (a hopefully apt metaphor).


This is not a game for all people or all times. It is long, complicated, and excessively detailed. You have much too much waiting and not enough playing when you have more than 3 players. There's a steep learning curve between learning the rules and playing well. It's got a lot of randomness and chaos.

The main issue I have is that the things that many people have said are wrong with this game are not wrong. Specifically, the theme and mechanics mesh nicely. The core problem in reviews is that someone had an epic failure expecting Clue: Blade Runner Edition and this isn't that game. Instead of reviewing the game on it's own merits and flaws, it's been unfairly tarnished by a mischaracterization. You aren't seeing people defending it from fair criticism, but rather trying to right an unfair wrong.

There's nothing wrong with disliking it for reasons that are actually true. There are certainly quirks and flaws, but the only one we keep hashing over and over is not one of them.
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Jon W
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cosine wrote:
The core problem in reviews is that someone had an epic failure expecting Clue: Blade Runner Edition and this isn't that game. Instead of reviewing the game on it's own merits and flaws, it's been unfairly tarnished by a mischaracterization.

Fair enough, but I didn't read anything so specific into the prior remarks (and honestly, it's been a long time since I've thought about this game; I remember being quite interested in it at one point, which is why I read this review).
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Calavera Soñando
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Sometimes the answer really is, "you just don't get it" or "you just don't understand."

As to WHY there is this contingent of those who don't know the secret handshake?

I would love to say Android's detractors are simply too busy fondling their wood to understand, but let me put it in less offensive terms: I'd say it has something to do with comfort level/exposure to something different. Take a look at the top 100 games--while things have certainly adjusted themselves in the past year, for the past decade, there has been this static nature to the type of games one would find there, and this static quality set a very particular expectation that a game is good if and only if it looks like another good game - has the same mechanics, or provides the same experience, or is "elegant" or "well-balanced."

Setting aside the simple flaws in the logic here (Game X (which I love) is elegant and balanced, therefore all good games must be elegant and balanced), when a game like Android comes along that defies these expectations, even if it is exceptional and groundbreaking, just the fact that it challenges a pervasive groupthink is enough to mean it will be controversial.

My own hope is that Kevin Wilson will continue to defy groupthink with his exciting designs... I am presently enjoying another of his somewhat misunderstood gems: Sid Meier's Civilization. It is ludicrously imbalanced, to the point of really upsetting some of the wood fondlers who have tried it, but as I have argued with Android, it is an INTENTIONAL aspect of the design that forces us to change and adapt our strategies instead of clinging to our old ways and continuing to complain.

Anyhow, thanks for the wonderful review!
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Chris J Davis
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MScrivner wrote:
Sometimes the answer really is, "you just don't get it" or "you just don't understand."

As to WHY there is this contingent of those who don't know the secret handshake?

I would love to say Android's detractors are simply too busy fondling their wood to understand,


At this I LOL'd.

But also: I don't think the vast majority of people who would play Android are Eurogamers. For the most part, you will be getting Ameritrashers playing this game. And criticising it (e.g, Michael Barnes).

Quote:
but let me put it in less offensive terms: I'd say it has something to do with comfort level/exposure to something different. Take a look at the top 100 games--while things have certainly adjusted themselves in the past year, for the past decade, there has been this static nature to the type of games one would find there, and this static quality set a very particular expectation that a game is good if and only if it looks like another good game - has the same mechanics, or provides the same experience, or is "elegant" or "well-balanced."


I'm one of Android's biggest critics, and not only am I as Ameritrashy as they come, but I also love games that try to break the mold. And I really don't think that most people criticise Android because it tried to be different.

Quote:
Setting aside the simple flaws in the logic here (Game X (which I love) is elegant and balanced, therefore all good games must be elegant and balanced), when a game like Android comes along that defies these expectations, even if it is exceptional and groundbreaking, just the fact that it challenges a pervasive groupthink is enough to mean it will be controversial.


So your argument basically is that even games that are a hideously unbalanced mess can still be good...? Okay. I suppose you can argue that to some degree.

Quote:
My own hope is that Kevin Wilson will continue to defy groupthink with his exciting designs... I am presently enjoying another of his somewhat misunderstood gems: Sid Meier's Civilization. It is ludicrously imbalanced, to the point of really upsetting some of the wood fondlers who have tried it, but as I have argued with Android, it is an INTENTIONAL aspect of the design


You say this as if it's fact, but what evidence do you have to back this up? It seems to me unlikely that a designer would *intentionally* design a game to be ludicrously imbalanced (unless there was a good reason to design it that way, which I would say is certainly not the case with Sid Meier's Civ). Rather more likely is simply that the game is badly designed.
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Calavera Soñando
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bleached_lizard wrote:
It seems to me unlikely that a designer would *intentionally* design a game to be ludicrously imbalanced (unless there was a good reason to design it that way, which I would say is certainly not the case with Sid Meier's Civ). Rather more likely is simply that the game is badly designed.


Well, not to derail the thread, but in the case of Civ, the alleged imbalance is in which victory path you choose. Culture is documented as significantly harder to achieve (I actually run the thread where we are gathering the data that proves this). However, each Civilization seems to have a roughly same average number of total wins. This evidence suggests that the imbalance, at least in the area of victory type, WAS intentional - a simulation of the video games where culture victories ARE harder to achieve, and lots of time and energy was put into making the civ's themselves rather equal in terms of their potential for victory. The fact that there is an outcry that not all victory conditions are equal proves the groupthink I am speaking of. Darkmot and a couple of other players have started to unlock some of the really unique tactics a player seeking a culture victory can employ, and they are completely OUTSIDE the box of the other three victory paths. Those complaining that the game is broken or imbalanced and then making variants to "fix" it are overlooking this intentional part of the design. Culture is a unique challenge - arguably it's an abstraction of a highly undefinable quality inherent to any civilization. How does one measure the quality or ranking of American culture, for example? When I compare our reality TV programs and strip malls and fast food to my most recent trip to Florence, Italy, I'd say we were probably pretty far back on the culture track relative to those Romans. And yet in terms of our economic, military, and technological progress, we are nearly at the top. How does one translate this in game terms? This intangible? THAT's why culture is harder to achieve. That's why it is INTENTIONALLY imbalanced (though again, please note, you have an equal chance of winning as the Americans as you do the Russians or the Chinese or the Romans or etc.) That you cannot see this, again suggests my original premise... "you just don't get it."

As to Android... your dislike of the game is well known. It seems every time someone posts a positive review of it, you have to show up and poop in the bed. I will ask you again what I have asked you before: if you hate the game so damn much, why do you spend your time lurking it's forums and replying to every fan?

Regardless, the fact that you had to variant away Kevin Wilson's vision with your abominable variant suggests that you really didn't get what he was trying to do. Rather than adopting your play style to the experience the game offered you, to decided to change the game.
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Io Stesso
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wytefang wrote:
In my experience, when people have to consistently defend something as being "misunderstood" or "unfairly categorized" it's probably deserving of those titles.

Great review but I'm still cheerfully avoiding this game like the plague.


This way of reasoning is technically called "nonsense".
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Aswin Agastya
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Great review. You nailed it about Android being easy to play. I've been saying over and over than it's simple, despite the amount of rules and components.
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Fabian Trunz
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I have to say I am part of the "I don't get Android" crowd. To me it kind of felt like Snakes and Ladders where you have no real control over what is happening, and I just don't feel the theme at all. Here you're putting a jigsaw puzzle together, there you collect some random cardboard, and over there you try to have more points on your suspect than other people have on theirs.

Oh, and here's some cards with flavor text meant to make you think there's some story to this you can influence.
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Brian McCormick
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MScrivner wrote:
Take a look at the top 100 games--while things have certainly adjusted themselves in the past year, for the past decade, there has been this static nature to the type of games one would find there, and this static quality set a very particular expectation that a game is good if and only if it looks like another good game - has the same mechanics, or provides the same experience, or is "elegant" or "well-balanced."

I'm all for "elegant" and "well-balanced", but those aspects are about as important as "theme" or "card stock quality", especially balance.

In other words, "balance" is not the be-all-end-all standard for every single boardgame, because there is a massive difference between a game being "balanced" and a game being "fair". "Balanced" is placing two dudes on a flat plain and shouting "fight". "Fair" is giving one guy a rocket launcher and the other guy a knife but placing them in a twisty maze. It's not at all balanced, but it could be seen as fair.

Fair but unbalanced games tend to be really fun and crazy. Those games are full of those desperate dice rolls where you NEED a 6 to survive, and then you either fail or succeed gloriously. Balanced games are also often fair, but they become thinking exercises. They're so balanced that you're never really on the edge of your seat (generalization) hoping for that ONE awesome dice roll or card draw or whatever.
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Aswin Agastya
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Bekasi
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Oddly, I consider Android to be an elegant game. I mean, you have personal drama, murder, and conspiracy, more than enough ingredients to create a very bloated game. But here everything is handled elegantly, making it very playable.
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David Siskin
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Playa Del Rey
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Brian,

I am SO with you. I only got to play Android once and it got such a bad rep in my group it never saw the table again, which is a real shame.

Taking your lead, I'm trying to incite some 2p games to get the ball rolling.

Many thanks for your inspiring review.
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Chris J Davis
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MScrivner wrote:
bleached_lizard wrote:
It seems to me unlikely that a designer would *intentionally* design a game to be ludicrously imbalanced (unless there was a good reason to design it that way, which I would say is certainly not the case with Sid Meier's Civ). Rather more likely is simply that the game is badly designed.


Well, not to derail the thread, but in the case of Civ, the alleged imbalance is in which victory path you choose. Culture is documented as significantly harder to achieve (I actually run the thread where we are gathering the data that proves this). However, each Civilization seems to have a roughly same average number of total wins. This evidence suggests that the imbalance, at least in the area of victory type, WAS intentional - a simulation of the video games where culture victories ARE harder to achieve, and lots of time and energy was put into making the civ's themselves rather equal in terms of their potential for victory. The fact that there is an outcry that not all victory conditions are equal proves the groupthink I am speaking of. Darkmot and a couple of other players have started to unlock some of the really unique tactics a player seeking a culture victory can employ, and they are completely OUTSIDE the box of the other three victory paths. Those complaining that the game is broken or imbalanced and then making variants to "fix" it are overlooking this intentional part of the design. Culture is a unique challenge - arguably it's an abstraction of a highly undefinable quality inherent to any civilization. How does one measure the quality or ranking of American culture, for example? When I compare our reality TV programs and strip malls and fast food to my most recent trip to Florence, Italy, I'd say we were probably pretty far back on the culture track relative to those Romans. And yet in terms of our economic, military, and technological progress, we are nearly at the top. How does one translate this in game terms? This intangible? THAT's why culture is harder to achieve. That's why it is INTENTIONALLY imbalanced (though again, please note, you have an equal chance of winning as the Americans as you do the Russians or the Chinese or the Romans or etc.) That you cannot see this, again suggests my original premise... "you just don't get it."

As to Android... your dislike of the game is well known. It seems every time someone posts a positive review of it, you have to show up and poop in the bed. I will ask you again what I have asked you before: if you hate the game so damn much, why do you spend your time lurking it's forums and replying to every fan?

Regardless, the fact that you had to variant away Kevin Wilson's vision with your abominable variant suggests that you really didn't get what he was trying to do. Rather than adopting your play style to the experience the game offered you, to decided to change the game.


Oh, I see - so it's more than just a game, it's a commentary and reflection on the current state of the world we live in. Got it.

Tell you what - why don't you pop a quick e-mail off to Kevin Wilson asking his if he intentionally designed these two games to be completely imbalanced and see what he says. Might end this discussion once and for all.

Oh, and you may have noticed I don't really post very much in the Android forums nearly as much any more (though still lurk). I only take the time to reply to the really outrageously ludicrous posts. kiss
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Erik Mallinson
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Winchester
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bleached_lizard wrote:
Oh, and you may have noticed I don't really post very much in the Android forums nearly as much any more (though still lurk). I only take the time to reply to the really outrageously ludicrous posts. kiss


It’s one thing to write a negative review but by chiming in about how much you hate it every time someone posts you’re wasting the time of everyone who ever reads this board, ever. Maybe this will shed some light on why people keep complaining about you:

I just recently discovered Android. I saw it in the game shop and decided to read more about it. I read some of the reviews and the comments. Negative, mostly. I was still interested in it. Fast forward to a couple weeks ago. I saw my local shop still had it. I went back and read reviews and comments on here another time, and there were some emerging nice reviews about it. So basically what may have been to you two years of casually dissing Android to me was all condensed into a couple of days.
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