$10.00
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb


Introducing Puerto Rico and the Two-Player Game

Since it appeared almost ten years ago, Puerto Rico has earned a well deserved reputation as a quintessential pioneer among eurogames, and is still considered an essential staple of many gaming collections today. With the game on the verge of celebrating its tenth anniversary, and still enjoying strong popularity despite heavy competition from newer crops of games, it's a good time to consider how Puerto Rico holds up as a two-player game.

When it was first released, Puerto Rico wasn't even considered a two-player game, but was marketed as suitable for 3-5 players. But given the enthusiasm with which the game was received, it wasn't too long before people were clamouring to find ways to make it playable for two players. An official variant was released by the publisher, and has been well received, and over time other customized variants have also appeared.

So how does the official variant change the game? And of all the two player variants that exist, which is the best? There's been a lot of threads and posts about two player variants over the years, so I went to some effort to read as many as I could find, play-test a number of them, poll other users about them, and compile some of my results and my own reflections in this review, which doubles as a reference and resource.

THE OFFICIAL ALEA TWO-PLAYER VARIANT

An Overview

This is the variant that was officially released by the publisher (Alea) after the game's publication. One of the reasons this two player variant was not included in the original game was simply because the designer and publisher wanted more time to test it before the game went to print. It appears that had their been more time for testing originally, the game would have included the rules for the two-player game and been labelled as suitable for 2-5 players.

How it works

In the Alea variant, the following changes are made to the original rules of the multi-player game:
Player setup: Each player begins with 3 doubloons, 1 Indigo (player #1 = Governor) or 1 Corn (player #2)
Remove: 3 plantations of each type, 3 quarries, 1 of each small violet building, 1 prospector role tile, 2 of each good
Use: 3 face up plantations, 5 quarries, 2 of each production building and 1 of each violet building, 6 remaining role tiles
Use: 65 VPs, 40 colonists plus 2 on the ship, 4 and 6 capacity cargo ships
Gameplay: Players alternate selecting a role as usual, until both have selected 3 roles. One doubloon goes on the remaining role card and then the other player becomes Governor.

Aside from the reduced amount of components, the biggest change is that both players choose 3 roles per round. It's a sensible change that keeps the game flowing nicely!


Complete set-up for the official Alea 2-player variant

Where to find it

The original discussion thread: 2-Player Official Alea Variant
A downloadable file: Puerto Rico variant for 2 players.doc

Other resources

Jeff Goris developed a player aid specifically for the official two-player game, which includes the variant rules, and assists in organizing the game: Additional PR Boards v2


The two-player game mat designed by Jeff Goris

Several others have developed customized boards for the two-player game, which include handy summaries of some of the changes. Some examples include the following:
PR 2 Player Board.pdf and Additional PR Boards v3

My Assessment

All things considered, the official variant is a very good variant, and does achieve the objective of making Puerto Rico work well with just two players.

Goods & VPs needed

Short play time. The official two player variant also plays quite quickly, and with experience can easily be completed in well under an hour. There's a bit of set-up time, but the fact that a complete game can be played so speedily, it becomes very attractive as a two player, for what it packs into that time frame.

Tense competition. The fact that there's only one of each violet building available also makes for tough choices, because you only get one shot at each building, and if your opponent beats you to the one you wanted, that's just tough luck for you. Not only is there intense competition for buildings, there's also intense competition for the spaces on the two ships, and the five quarries.

Imbalanced buildings. The two-player game is not perfectly balanced as it is in 3-5 player games, because certain buildings become less useful than in a multi-player game (e.g. Construction Hut), while others become more useful than in a multi-player game (e.g. Office).
More useful: With less players, the Trading House becomes hard to empty, so as a result the Office can be very important. Only having two ships available for shipping also keeps things tense, and this subsequently can make the Wharf a very strong building to have.
Less useful: Given the limited number of quarries in play, the Construction Hut is less useful than normal, and often goes unbuilt. I wouldn't favour increasing the amount of quarries to fix this, because competition for the five quarries can be important, so limiting them to just five is a good move - if there is going to be a `patch' for this weakness, rather than using all eight quarries to `rescue' the Construction Hut, I'd rather be inclined to use some of the expansion buildings in place of it.
Because of this imbalance the official two-player variant does feel slightly flawed, although it's not something that breaks the game by any means, and there are are simple `patches' that have been suggested to fix some of these imbalances (e.g. have two Office tiles in play).

Tough trading. In what some have dubbed the "doubloon crunch" issue, the two-player game can be tough financially, particularly in the early stages. This is created in part by the fact that with less players and thus less production happening around the table, it's hard to fill and empty the Trading House. As one player correctly remarks, "The Trading House is almost useless. Since there are only two players, the game can go half the game or more before there is enough diversity in occupied plantations to clear the trading house." On the other hand, you could argue that this difficulty forces the players to diversify. Others play with two Offices to get around the Trading House clearing issue. Alternative solutions to this problem are discussed later in this review.

Roles selection dynamics. Having players select three roles each creates several interesting dynamics. First of all, it means that only one role goes unchosen each round. Personally I didn't like this - it meant that you could almost count on seeing every role each round. Do you really want to see the Mayor come out every time for instance, or be able to count on seeing it consistently, or do you want players to make a conscious choice to select it? Sometimes towards the end of the round a role gets selected by default, because it's the only decent one of the two left. I find the game more interesting when only some of the roles are chosen, and when players have to think more carefully about their choices.

Governor Effect. A more important consequence of choosing three roles in turn means that the player who becomes Governor on the next turn gets back-to-back choices, an uneven rhythm of role choices which some have dubbed the "Governor effect". In Alea two-player variant, the Governor Effect allows you to safely choose Craftsman at the end of one turn, and then as Governor on the next turn you can choose Trader or Captain. I'll dub this the Craftsman Advantage, because if you choose Craftsman at the end of a round you have the advantage of choosing the next role. This replaces the usual Craftsman Angst of the usual multi-player game - where choosing Craftsman is a risk, because of how following players might benefit from it. You will find mixed feelings from gamers about the Governor Effect in the two player game, and it largely comes down to personal taste about the gameplay. Some like the nuances that result from this, because being able to choose two roles back to back can be used in interesting ways. Others will dislike this, preferring a style of play when the gameplay creates more angst for a player to choose Craftsman, knowing that an opponent might always be in a position to take advantage of it by choosing Trader or Captain on the next turn. I personally favour the amended variant described below which reintroduces this Craftsman Angst, by having the Governor chooses three roles and the other player chooses two roles each round - but I recognize that this is largely a matter of personal taste.

More control. There is less `chaos' than in a multiplayer game, since with alternate turns your fortunes are not as dependent on the whims of three or four other players at the table, but you have more control and can plan more.

Similar feel. The official two-player variant is certainly a satisfying and worthwhile game for two players, and doesn't have the awkwardness of the two player variants I've seen for Settlers of Catan. For the most part, it retains much of the charm and appeal of the original game. Alternatively, if you're looking for a different two-player game that also retains much of the feel of the original, you could play San Juan - the card game version of Puerto Rico, and which is an excellent game in its own right when played with just two players. But while San Juan is a satisfying alternative, I'd suggest that the official two-player variant of Puerto Rico is just as satisfying.

Room for expansion. The two-player game is more likely to become scripted than the multi-player game. Replayability of the two-player experience can be enhanced by making a random draw of 12 of the 24 building tiles, and even more by making a random draw of tiles that includes the expansion buildings.

It's very good with two players, and if there was a complaint it would be that the Governor Effect mentioned above removes some of the Craftsman Angst present in the multi-player game, and the fact that some slight imbalances need adjusting. But fortunately it's easy enough to deal with those minor grievances by making some simple modifications to the official variant!


Colonists and ships used in the official Alea 2-player variant

MODIFICATIONS TO THE OFFICIAL ALEA TWO-PLAYER VARIANT

Major Patches

Some of the idiosyncrasies of the official two-player variant are no reason not to play it, because despite these few niggles, it's still an excellent game, although perhaps not as beautifully balanced as when played with 3-5 players. Consequently, several adjustments have been suggested, in an attempt to `patch' the two player variant and improve it further.

Craftsman Angst (no Governor Effect): of 7 roles, governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 2 (Alea variant alternative)

One common criticism already mentioned about the official variant is from those who don't like the fact that having players choose 3 roles each allows the second player to get back to back role choices (i.e. the "Governor effect").

As articulated by one gamer: "When I read the rules of this variant I was turned off that every other round you'd get to pick 2 roles in a row (just as you became governor). This seemed completely antithetical to how Puerto Rico was supposed to work! You could craftsman and then immediately trade or captain -- craftsman fear would be gone. I didn't play it for a long time because of this." This concern is echoed by another: "The game works even with this mechanic, but since it basically removes craftsman-fear (which I consider central to the PR experience) I wish they'd done it a different way." Another player concurs: "Two issues the official variant has is that doubloons are a bit scarce, and Craftsman > Captain are too commonly exploited with the double-turn."

A popular and simple solution to this is to have the governor choose three roles and the non-governor choose only two roles, and adding a doubloon to the two unchosen roles. This eliminates the `Governor Effect', because players never get to choose back-to-back roles, and parallels the way that the choice of roles is handled in the two-player game of San Juan. It also adds a little more money into the game as a result of two roles going unchosen each round (i.e. effectively two doubloons are added to the role tiles each round rather than just one), and so one result of this rule variation is that it adds a lot more money into the game from an early stage. Some will feel that this detracts from the tight gameplay and tough finances of the official variant, while others will feel it improves it by making it less unforgiving. The key difference, however, is the change in feel that results from avoiding players getting back-to-back roles. What I like about this particular `patch' is that it creates more angst about choosing the Craftsman role, and it makes the two-player game feel more like a regular game wher eyou have to think carefully about not setting up your opponent to cash in on his turn! If you find that money is too plentiful, you could always eliminate the second Prospector as well, and have five out of six roles being chosen each round, or perhaps have the Governor add a doubloon to only one of the two unpicked roles (suggested by Larry Levy).

Craftsman Advantage (Governor Effect): of 6 roles, governor chooses 2 and opponent chooses 2 (Alea variant amended)

You don't mind the Governor Effect in the Alea variant? There's still room for improving it, however. One criticism of the official variant is that with each player choosing three roles a round, nearly all the roles are played each round. I personally haven't found that the doubloon crunch or money shortage resulting from this is as severe as sometimes suggested. But it does mean that each round can feel somewhat similar, and while roles might be chosen in a different order, in most cases you see almost all of them every round.

A quote from another gamer who shares this concern: "I prefer to take out one prospector (so there are 7 roles) and let each player pick two roles each round. I prefer this more than 3 for each with 7 roles because almost every role gets picked each round, so things like mayor get picked far more often then they should simply because there are few alternatives at the end of a round. This results in having more colonists than you really need and I feel sort of trivializes that element of the game."

The solution to this concern is to amend the Alea variant in a different way, by playing with just the six basic roles (eliminating the prospector entirely), and having each player choose only two roles a round. This means two of the roles go by unpicked each round, and helps make for more variable play from round to round. At the same time the finances of the official variant are unchanged, since the prospector is effectively replaced by a doubloon on an unpicked role, and thus there's still enough money in the game (perhaps slightly more since money is introduced after every four role choices rather than after every six role choices). Personally I prefer this to the official variant simply for the variety it introduces. So if you really like the official variant, this minor `patch' is definitely worth trying, and in my mind superior.

Summary

In summary, here then are the major choices for playing the two-player variant:
1a) Craftsman Advantage (Governor Effect): of 7 roles, governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 3 (Alea variant original)
1b) Craftsman Advantage (Governor Effect): of 6 roles, governor chooses 2 and opponent chooses 2 (Alea variant amended)
2) Craftsman Angst (no Governor Effect): of 7 roles, governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 2 (Alea variant alternative)


The 7 roles used in the official Alea 2-player variant

Minor Patches

Two Offices: This makes the Office available to both players, and helps address the fact that the Trading House can be hard to clear with the official two player variant, and prevents one player from getting a monopoly on it. One option is to replace the Construction Hut (which is almost never built in a two player game) with a second Office, although it has the disadvantage of taking away competition to build the Office.

Eight quarries: This proposal is an attempt to redeem the Construction Hut, which becomes underpowered in the official two player variant. But having eight quarries makes buying and building too easy, and the competition for the five quarries is good, so going to eight quarries breaks just as much as it fixes. A better solution is to replace the Construction Hut with an additional Office.

Only three plantations

Smaller Trading House: To address the fact that the Trading House can be very hard to empty with only two players, and thus a narrower variety of goods being produced, a solution some have proposed is to cap the Trading House size at 3 goods instead of 4 goods (see the proposal and discussion in this thread ).

Random buildings: Instead of using one of each of the 12 buildings, another possibility is to draw 12 random buildings from a pool of 24 (2 of each), which means you may have 2 of some buildings, 1 of others, and 0 of others. This also changes the game each time, and prevents players from following a set strategy, but it also limits their choices to some extent. Note that randomizing buildings from the expansion will be covered later in this review.

Changed number of ships, colonists, or VPs: Other people have proposed `patches' which experiment with the Alea variant by altering the number of ships, colonists, or victory points. Probably the most significant change is to increase the number of ships available from 2 to 3, which makes it easier to ship and decreases the likelihood of needing warehouses - I'm not persuaded this is an improvement. With less players in the game, there are usually less types of goods being produced, so I personally find that the tightness that results from only having 2 ships mirrors the tightness and competition for shipping that is present in a multi-player game. An under-used Trading House tends to be a weakness of the two-player variant as it is, so adding more ships only makes this problem worse. Until now I've also not seen compelling reasons for adjusting the number of colonists or VPs of the official Alea variant.

Popular Opinion

So which are the best adjustments to make? As I've already mentioned, I favour the two main changes as improvements over the original game, either where there are 6 roles in play and both players choose 2 each; or where there are 7 roles in play and the Governor chooses 3 and the opponent chooses 2. This latter variant is easily the most popular form of the game when adjustments are made to the Alea variant, as is evident from the following poll. So if you are going to try tinkering with the official variant, this is the path that is most proven and well-trodden - and with good reason.

Poll
If you do play with some changes to the official Alea variant, which changes do you prefer to play with?
Governor chooses 3 roles & opponent chooses 2, with one Prospector removed, leaving 2 roles unpicked (Alea variant: both choose 3 roles, with one Prospector removed, leaving 1 role unpicked)
Governor chooses 2 roles & opponent chooses 2, with both Prospectors removed, leaving 2 roles unpicked (Alea variant: both choose 3 roles, with one Prospector removed, leaving 1 role unpicked)
Trading house with 3 spaces (Alea variant: 4 spaces)
Three ships (Alea variant: two ships)
More or less VPs (Alea variant: 65 VPs)
More or less colonists (Alea variant: 40 in supply plus 2 on ship)
All 8 quarries (Alea variant: only 5 quarries)
12 of the 24 small buildings selected randomly, i.e. some have two copies and others have none (Alea variant: exactly one of all 12 different small buildings)
Other (please comment)
      182 answers
Poll created by EndersGame

Repackaged Patches

Several two-player variants have been making the rounds on BGG under different names, such as the Fernori variant, and Kungfro variant. In actual fact these are just variations of the Alea variant, which implement some of the above patches, especially the one which removes the Governor Effect. But for completeness, let me just give you an overview of these variants, what they consist of, and where to find them. It's worth noting that all the popular variants that repackage the original variant are essentially forms of the Craftsman Angst patch.

Kungfro variant

This revision of the Alea variant was suggested by Tibs (kungfro), and made available as a PDF file by Christopher Young.
Where to find it: Two-Player Variant Rules

This is the same as the Alea variant, but with following changes:
● each player begins with 2 doubloons (instead of 3)
● 8 quarries are available (instead of 5)
● Governor chooses 3 roles and opponent 2 roles per round (remaining 2 each get a doubloon), instead of 3 roles each

My comment: Effectively this is the Craftsman Angst patch (Alea variant alternative) described above, with two other minor changes. Having players select 5 instead of 6 roles per round does mean that money is more readily available, so this variant misses some of the `tightness' present in the original Alea rules. But iIt's a popular change to the Alea variant rules, however, so it certainly has its supporters. Removing the rule that limits the Quarries to only 5 was suggested by Kungfro in order to try to redeem the use of the Construction Hut, which is less useful under the Alea rules. Using all the Quarries does make the Construction Hut more viable, but it does take away the competition for the 5 Quarries which the designers of the Alea variant deliberately placed in the game. Aside from the change to the Quarries, this variant is essentially the same as the major patch which removes the governor effect and adds craftsman angst.

Kungfro's post about adjustments to building prices (see the thread here and the file here) is also worth looking at.

Fernori variant

This revision of the Alea variant was posted by Bruce H (fernori), who states that his group has playtested and refined it over the course of more than 100 plays.
Where to find it: Combined Alea & Fernori 2P Puerto Rico Variant
Current discussion thread: Our Final Two Player Rules for PR- Recapped (September, 2010)
Original discussion thread: Our final two player rules for PR (April, 2007)

This is the same as the Alea variant, but with following changes:
● use 3 & 5 & 7 capacity ships, instead of 4 & 6 capacity ships
● 3 space Trading House, instead of 4 space trading house
● 70 VPs, instead of 65 VPs
● Governor chooses 3 roles and opponent 2 roles per round (remaining 2 each get a doubloon), instead of 3 roles each
● Random buildings (draw 12 out of 24 buildings, ideally including 12 from the expansion set if available) instead of one of each

My comment: Effectively this is the Craftsman Angst patch (Alea variant alternative) described above, with several other changes. I've not tried the fernori variant personally, partly because it's essentially a combination of some of the common patches already suggested for the two-player game, including the major patch that removes the governor effect and adds craftsman angst. Unfortunately Bruce is not very active on BGG, and when asked to explain the reasons behind some of the other changes he's made to the Alea variant (eg revised number of VPs, and ships), he has not been the most forthcoming to provide a rationale for the specifics, which is a bit of a pity because his variant certainly seems to have the benefit of extensive playtesting. Reducing the size of the Trading House is one solution to the difficulty in clearing the Trading House, an alternative is to make two Offices available. An evaluation of adding ships in order to avoid the dominance of the Wharf has already been covered earlier in my review. As well as what is proposed here, I've also seen suggestions for using three ships with a capacity 4 & 5 & 6 or three ships with a capacity of 3 & 4 & 5.

Yehuda variant

This revision of the Alea variant was suggested by long time eurogamer and blogger Yehuda Berlinger (shade_jon).
Where to find it: Yehuda's two player variant for PR

This is the same as the Alea variant, but with following changes:
● each player begins with 1 doubloon (instead of 3)
● 37 colonists and 50 VP (instead of 42 colonists and 65 VPs)
● use 4 & 5 & 6 capacity ships (instead of 4 & 6 capacity ships)
● Remove both prospectors, Governor chooses 2 roles and opponent 1 role per round (remaining 3 each get a doubloon)

My comment: This is a more drastic modification of the Craftsman Angst patch, because it eliminates the Governor Effect by having the Governor select only two roles and the opponent only one role per round. Yehuda has some good comments to make about some of the potential weaknesses of the official variant, and so undoubtedly has considered this carefully. Having players only choose 3 out of 6 roles per round makes the flow similar to San Juan, but also adds more money to the game. For some justification for these suggested changes, see Yehuda's insightful comments on the Alea variant in this post.


End of a two player game

Adding the Expansion

Over time numerous additional building tiles have been created for Puerto Rico, both as part of an official expansion (Expansion #1 The New Buildings), and as part of the Alea Treasure Chest (Expansion #2 The Nobles). For a visual overview of all the new tiles (with added illustrations), and for an overview of the rules in using the expansion buildings see these files:
Base game and expansion buildings, illustrated
Official Puerto Rico Expansions & Variants

Methods of selecting tiles

There are several ways to use the expansion buildings with the official Alea variant, or some of its variations:

Drafting: Players draft buildings one at a time, respecting the costs noted on the board (i.e. only one purple building costing 1 doubloon, two costing 2, one costing 3, etc.) Note that selecting certain buildings will automatically eliminate others, given the requirement to respect the costs on the board.
Draft-as-you-go: A variant of this method is to keep all buildings in play, and eliminate excess buildings of a certain value/cost as soon as two have been purchased. As explained by one gamer who uses this method: "We put all the buildings (original + expansion) alongside the board and they get drafted as players build them. We still respect the number of buildings available at each price (as stated above: one 1-cost building, two 2-cost buildings, etc.). So, for example, once the first two 2-cost buildings have been chosen, the other 2-cost buildings are no longer available in the game. "

Random draw: Use a random selection of 12 small buildings out of the 24 by cost (i.e. one 1-cost building, two 2-cost buildings, one 3-cost building, etc), and use these to replace the originals; and 5 random large buildings out of the 7. Note that this method is used in the Fernori form of the Alea variant described above. With drafting, the same buildings tend to be chosen each time, so a random draw helps keep the game variable and forces the development of new strategies, especially when the popular and favourite buildings are absent from a selection.

As far as choosing suitable buildings for the two-player game, the following thread is worth consulting: Are there expansion buildings that are more suited to two player?


Small building tiles from the expansion (custom illustrated tiles)

Adjustments to specific tiles

Just like in San Juan, the Library can become too strong when multiple roles are selected per round. San Juan limits the Library to a single use per round in a two-player game, and the same restriction should be enforced in a 2 payer game of Puerto Rico.

When using the expansion buildings in multi-player games of Puerto Rico, it is suggested that certain pairs of buildings not be played together (e.g no Trading Post & Office, no Hacienda & Forest House, no Factory & Specialized Factory, no Villa & Jeweller) - the same restriction can be applied to the two-player game, or alternatively you could use a rule that if both are in play, that one player may not purchase both.

My assessment

The value of the expansion building tiles is that they help make the two-player game of Puerto Rico more replayable. The multi-player game of Puerto Rico is less likely to become scripted, due to a wide range of possible strategies, and because it is also dependent on the interaction and choices of the players at the table. But with a two-player game this can become more of a problem, so the expansion tiles become even more useful in extending the longevity of the two player experience. If you don't have the expansion, a random draw of 12 of the 24 buildings that come with the base game can also help with this as well.

FOUR-HANDED TWO-PLAYER VARIANT

Another somewhat popular variant is to use the set-up for a four player game, and where each player plays opposite boards, with your score being the lowest score of both your boards. It's commonly attributed to Joe Casadonte.

How it works

In this variant, the same setup as a four player game is used, but players control two boards each (seats 1 & 3 versus seats 2 & 4), treating each as an independent player.

As reported by Eric Nielsen, there are a few different ways to score the four-handed two player variant.

1. Combined score from both boards. This alters the feel of the regular four player game, because it introduces the "Governor effect" mentioned earlier in this review - if you take Craftsman at the end of a round, then your other board will be able to take advantage of this after becoming Governor on the next round. So there's very little Craftsman angst with this method of scoring.

2. The lowest score of your two boards. This feels more like the regular four player game by forcing more balanced play. One concern with this scoring method is that you could try a negative strategy of hurting your opponent's weakest board rather than building up your own, a strategy that you wouldn't see in a regular game.

3. Score the positional finishes. This involves awarding the 3/2/1/0 points to the boards that placed 1st/2nd/3rd/4th, and the combined scores from both boards can be used as a tiebreaker if necessary.

Where to find it

You'll find a description of and discussion about this variant in this thread: 2 players, 4 boards.

CONCLUSIONS

What do I think?

So what is the most popular way to play Puerto Rico as a two-player game? Here's the results of a poll:

Poll
If you play Puerto Rico as a two player game, with which rules do you prefer to play?
The official Alea variant with no changes
The official Alea variant with some changes (specify on next poll)
Four-handed with players doing two boards each
Other (please comment)
      222 answers
Poll created by EndersGame

Clearly half of those polled favour the official Alea variant. It's excellent, although personally I find that some of the minor `patches' make it even better. If you've never played the two-player game, I'd recommend starting with the Alea variant - you can always customize it to your taste after experiencing the semi-official version of the two-player game first.

Major patch recommendation

As far as `feel' is concerned, there's one key choice to make: do you want to play with the Governor Effect and with Craftsman Advantage instead of Craftsman Angst? Or do you want to play without the Governor Effect and with Craftsman Angst? And if you are playing with the Governor Effect, there's another option depending on how many roles you want to see go un-chosen each round and how tight you want money to be.

1. Craftsman Advantage (with the Governor Effect)
a) 7 roles (1 Propector removed from original 8), Governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 3; doubloon on 1 unchosen role at end of round (Alea variant original).
b) 6 roles (2 Propectors removed from original 8), Governor chooses 2 and opponent chooses 2; doubloon on 2 unchosen roles at end of round (Alea variant amended).

2. Craftsman Angst (without the Governor Effect)
a) 7 roles (1 Propector removed from original 8), Governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 2; doubloon on 2 unchosen roles at end of round (Alea variant alternative).

I like both forms of the game and find that each has its own appeal. But when playing with the Craftsman Advantage (Governor Effect) form of the game, I definitely prefer using only 6 roles (choosing 2 each), mainly because there's more variety from round to round with two roles going unchosen. Alternatively, if you decide you want to give the Craftsman Angst variant a try, you'll find a handy overview here: mb The Craftsman Angst variant

Minor patch recommendation

Once you've established your favourite flavour of the game, you can make some minor modifications if you wish. Of the ones discussed above, these are the minor patches I'd recommend considering or experimenting with:
● Trading House patch: Replace the Construction Hut with a second Office; or alternatively reduce the size of the Trading House from 4 to 3.
● Replayability patch: Do a random draw of buildings, ideally including some from the expansion.

At this stage I haven't seen a real need to tinker with the number of ships, colonists, or VPs from the Alea variant. Overall this means that the official Alea variant is highly satisfactory, and if changes are needed, they are fairly minimal - except perhaps the change in the number of roles available and chosen per round, in order to remove the Governor Effect and add Craftsman Angst for those who prefer this flavour of the game. These recommendations are by no means the last word on this topic - as I continue to explore the two player game, my own tastes and preferences might change. But if you're looking to try Puerto Rico with two players, this is an excellent place to start, and already has a proven track record of success.


Start of a two player game

What do others think?

The themometer of opinion about Puerto Rico as a two-player game fluctuates, but while there are some who feel somewhat `cold' towards it, certainly the majority of gamers speak positively about what it offers. Here's some sample comments of what people are saying about it.

Cold
"I think two-player PR is a waste of time since there are many better two-player games to be had." - Daniel Corban

Lukewarm
"I love Puerto Rico, but if your main criteria in adding games to your collection is that they play well with two, there are MANY better choices" - David Y
"It's not too bad with 2. My wife and I play it occasionally. It's certainly better with more, and I'm not sure I'd recommend it if you're only ever going to play it with 2, but if you have it, it's worth getting off the shelf for a 2-player game (where many 2-player variants are not)." - Ian Klinck
"If I want a PR like game for two players, I play San Juan." - Kevin Brown
"Yes, it plays quite well with 2. In my wife's opinion: it's okay, but she would rather save it for when we have more people around. So, I would gladly play it with 2. Would I buy it solely for two-player play? I'm not sure. There are so many other great games that work best (or only) for 2. In contrast, 2-player Settlers is kind of ridiculous (2-player trading fundamentally doesn't work). 2-player Puerto Rico isn't at all like that: it actually works, and is is a pretty good game." - Steven Backues
"I've had many a good time playing it two-player, so long as the official variant is used. Though, as others have said, there are better games out there for two people." - Bill Plumley
"The official verison works decently well - doesn't seem to capture me quite as much as with at least one more player - plus the setup is a bit of a pain for two players. We have recently bought San Juan as well and find this a very good alternative for two players." - Craig Liken
"San Juan is a much faster set up and a game better tailored to two-players." - Ben Harris
"I like 2-player PR, but if you're buying it and never expect to play it with more than 2, then I'd recommend something that's geared more toward two-players." - David G


Hot
"In my opinion, and after more than one hundred two-player games, it makes for a really interesting game." - Albert Rubrum
"Puerto Rico is excellent with 2. With 2, it is more of a zero sum game. There is more opportunity to plan and think through future turns. There is less chaos. I always enjoy two-player and it goes quickly. We can play in 45 mins or so." - Scott Roberts
"I've also found that it plays quite well with two." - Jeff Lingwall
"I enjoy the two-player game a lot. However, my wife and I now play with the variant where the governor chooses 3 roles and the non-governor chooses only 2, so that there are no more double turns and there is a little bit more money in the game (from putting doubloons on the unused roles). There are of course plenty of excellent two-player games. But few of them have as much meatiness in as little time as PR." - celiborn
"I'll vote FOR the two-player variant. I've played it a few times and it works well. Obviously the game is far better with more players, but it's still a good game with two." - David Dawson
"I really enjoy the game with 2 pl" - james_bond
"My wife and I have played this variant quite a bit and really enjoy it. This variant actually works VERY well, to the point where I almost prefer a 2-player game over any other number. With almost every role picked each round there's a lot of action, but timing is everything, and the decisions are every bit as hard as with more players." - James Fehr
"I think the official variant is great." - Alan Goodrich
"I really enjoy the two-player variant. Well worth playing." - Matthew Bond
"An excellent two-player variant. My wife and I enjoy it better as a two-player game in fact." - Rygel
"Twoplayer PR works great with the official alea-variant!" - BaSL
"two-player PR is better than San Juan for me. It's one of my favorite two-player games, actually." - Checkallday
"We played a lot of two-player games during our summer holiday, and loved it." Ann De Haes
"We will choose to play this before we pick a lot of other great two-player games we have, that should tell you how good I think it is." - jayjonbeach
"I don't like Puerto Rico in general, but even I would say that it's worth the price for the official two-player variant alone, which is actually a version of the game that I do kind of like." - Ava Jarvis
"I think the official two-player variant is excellent and is a logical extension of the rules with other numbers of players. Andreas Seyfarth (the designer) said that they would have included the two-player rules with the game, but they just didn't have enough time to fully playtest them before it was time to release it. But I think Puerto Rico makes a very good two-player game." - Larry Levy
"I think Puerto Rico plays just fine with two-players...my husband and I play it almost every night and, right now, it's our favorite game to play!" - Susan Butler
"Puerto Rico is an excellent two-player game, and I would choose it just as often two-player as multiplayer." - Sharon Khan


Overall it's very clear that the general consensus gives the two-player game of Puerto Rico a healthy grade, and a solid thumbs up, as is evident from this poll:

Poll
How would you rate playing Puerto Rico as a 2 player game?
I'd grade it A: Outstanding, I love it!
I'd grade it B: Very good game.
I'd grade it C: Average game, fair to middling.
I'd grade it D: Not very good, dislike it.
I'd grade it F: Fail, it's just a really bad game.
      246 answers
Poll created by EndersGame

Recommendation

The official Alea two player variant does an excellent job of turning multi-player Puerto Rico into a very satisfying game. It does introduce some small imbalances not present in the original game with 3-5 players, but most of these can be corrected with minor `patches', in particular the Craftsman Angst patch if you find yourself disliking the Craftsman Advantage that results from the Governor Effect. The fact that it plays so quickly helps make up for any weaknesses, and assists in making it an attractive choice to bring to the table if you only have two-players. If multi-player Puerto Rico is a very very good game, then two-player Puerto Rico is a very good game. Strongly recommended!


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mb The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596

Subscribe to this list to be notified when new reviews are posted.
  • [+] Dice rolls
Doug Click
United States
Blountville
Tennessee
flag msg tools
Nothing to see here
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: A Comprehensive Overview: An analysis of Puerto Rico as a two-player game, and a comparison of the most popular variants
Ender, amazing as always. You are one of the most insightful people on these forums and you always bring out the best in games.

By the way, "The official Alea variant with some changes (specify on next poll)"... the "next poll" is missing at this time.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Albert Rubrum
Canada
Trois-Rivières
Québec
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: A Comprehensive Overview: An analysis of Puerto Rico as a two-player game, and a comparison of the most popular variants
Thank you for this interesting article.

It has the merit of placing clearly in front of the reader the alternatives to the official Alea variant and to spark curiosity about those modifications.

I think I will try the craftsman angst variant (of 7 roles, governor chooses 3 and opponent chooses 2); I'm curious to see how it will affect our two player games.

We still like very much the official variant because when we play it we feel we are walking on a tight rope and a single mistake can give the advantage to the other player.

Bravo for the good work!

(Edited for bad spelling)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lance
United States
Moorhead
Minnesota
flag msg tools
The coolest best thing I have ever done in my life is being a father
badge
The Dread Pirate Caleb!! (age 2)
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: A Comprehensive Overview: An analysis of Puerto Rico as a two-player game, and a comparison of the most popular variants
Only Ender could find a way to review a 10 year old game and make it seem fresh.
19 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Sayburr wrote:
By the way, "The official Alea variant with some changes (specify on next poll)"... the "next poll" is missing at this time.

Very observant of you! That's because when I first posted the polls when I began researching this topic almost three months ago, the polls appeared in a slightly different order, as you see here:

mb Puerto Rico as a 2 player game, and which variants are best (POLL)

In my current review I presented the polls in a different order, so it's actually a reference to the poll that occurs earlier in the article, under the heading Popular Opinion (with the question: "If you do play with some changes to the official Alea variant, which changes do you prefer to play with?"). I'm not able to edit the text of the poll, so sorry if this causes any confusion.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter Marchlewitz
Canada
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Nicely compiled and reviewed!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dawson
United States
Cincinnati
Ohio
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
GREAT write up, and thanks for using my quote. I had no idea that there was so much variation. We haven't played two-player Puerto Rico in a while (we usually play Carcassonne or Hive or something shorter) but I might have to ask for it next time and try a few of these variants out.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Miller
United States
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I've always played the four-handed two player game. I knew there was a solid two-player, two-board variant out there, but I never knew where to look for it as well as any necessary modifications, so thank you very much for this thread.

One negative about the four-handed play is that you cannot play it whatsoever with anyone who's not well-versed in the game. It can be very overwhelming at first. I still quite like it, though; it allows me to play two games of PR in the time it takes for one! =)

--ElSoy
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Yehuda Berlinger
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Very nice. Please note that I created my variant based on someone else's variant, but I forget who. I can't take all the credit for it.

Also note that I feel that the two-player variant can favor the corn player a little. Some of my expansion buildings address this imbalance, though they weren't created specifically for that purpose.

In particular, I recommend removing the Small Market in favor of any other 1 cost building, and replacing Construction Hut with Small Fashion District, a 2 cost building that lets a player trade indigo (only) at +2 in the Trading House. I also recommend replacing Guild Hall with any other 10 cost building, for all games.

Yehuda
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Huzonfirst
United States
Manassas
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
The women's national team pulls off a stunning victory at the World Cup! U-S-A!!!
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent and very thorough article. I still see people wondering if there's a way to play PR with 2, so this should help spread the word that there is a very good official method.

I've always played the Alea rules without any changes and really like them. It's true that Governors have to be aware of the double turn effect, but one of the nice things about this is that it encourages the Craftsman to get selected more often (if the Governor doesn't pick it, she lets her opponent do a Craftsman-Captain or Craftsman-Trader back-to back). Without this effect, I'd worry that Craftsman would only get chosen when its doubloon supply is large, making the game less dynamic.

I have to say, though, that the two variants to the Alea rules that Ender cites (the 3-2 selection and the 2-2 selection with 6 roles) both seem to be well thought out and I would be tempted to try the former the next time I play. I do wonder about the supply of money with this variant. Seyfarth and Brueck were very careful in the way they introduced money into the game for each number of players and I really like the fact that money is so tight in the official 2-player version. The 3-2 variant raises the maximum money injection from 2 doubloons to 3 and that's a significant increase. If someone wanted to avoid the Governor effect but still keep the money supply the same, here's a further tweak you might try: do the 3-2 selection split, but after the Governor takes his third role, he also chooses one of the two remaining roles to receive the extra doubloon. The other leftover role gets no additional money. This eliminates the double-turn issue while still keeping the money injection the same. It also might make for some interesting choices for the outgoing Governor. I checked with Ender and he hadn't seen an earlier suggestion like this (I figured after he researched this article, he had to be the most qualified authority on 2-player PR!), so I guess that's an original variant. That either means the idea is brilliant or a total waste of time! At any rate, if anyone's interested, they can try it out and see for themself.
9 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serious? Lee
United States
Coppell
Texas
flag msg tools
Lost in thought.
mbmbmbmbmb
Great presentation and analysis of the various 2-player variants. Your reviews are a wonderful resource for the BGG community. Tip o' the hat to you, sir!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Houserule Jay
Canada
Mississauga
Ontario
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Another outstanding article, one that should somehow be "pinned" and easy to find since it contains so much important and pertinent information on the game.

I play Alea with a few small changes for balance but the one big one which I considered vital was the 3-2 role for many reasons.

Surprisingly playing with 2 boards each is quite good too especially with your lowest board scoring but its a more convoluted way compared to the Alea, its actually quite a bit more "meaty" though as you have much more planning to do, almost too meaty.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Crotty
United States
Broomfield
Colorado
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
ldsdbomber wrote:
Daniel Corban is wrong.

laugh I don't know if he is or not, but this is a hilarious comment!
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
scrotty wrote:
ldsdbomber wrote:
Daniel Corban is wrong.

I don't know if he is or not, but this is a hilarious comment!

It's easy to miss, but for those who didn't catch it, he was the minority gamer that I quoted in the review as saying: "I think two-player PR is a waste of time since there are many better two-player games to be had."

Lee (ldsdbomber), I too like your sense of humor!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fraser
Australia
Melbourne
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
badge
Ooh a little higher, now a bit to the left, a little more, a little more, just a bit more. Oooh yes, that's the spot!
mbmbmbmbmb
We have played the straight Alea 2 player version quite a lot and enjoyed it and I find it interesting that there is no comment on the one thing that we found can be an issue, let us call it the Captain Crunch.

The situation can arise where one player has the goods on both of the ships and the other player has two more types of goods that cannot be shipped and thus is in desperate need of a warehouse or two every time the Captain role is taken. This may take a couple of shipping rounds to set up, but we certainly did manage to set up in one game to quite devastating effect. The can be exacerbated even further if the crunch player has the Wharf as well.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Liken
New Zealand
Christchurch
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
EndersGame wrote:

Lee (ldsdbomber), I too like your sense of humor!


Brave call though from Lee.

Great review Ender - A bit like some others though, PR doesn't normally get the call when we have two players. I love it with 3 to 5, but just the set-up and the fact that you get so many roles to choose per round doesn't quite do it for me. I do recall that the games we did have were pretty close though - which is always good.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
liken@xtra.co.nz wrote:
A bit like some others though, PR doesn't normally get the call when we have two players. I love it with 3 to 5, but just the set-up and the fact that you get so many roles to choose per round doesn't quite do it for me.

Craig, your concern about getting so many roles to choose per round is exactly the reason why I personally prefer the amendment to the Alea variant, i.e. instead of players choosing 3 roles each out of 7 roles (with 1 Prospector removed), players choose 2 roles each out of 6 roles (with 2 Prospectors removed). It's listed as the "Craftsman Advantage: Alea variant amended" patch in the review. For me this makes the role choices more interesting, because it ensures that two of the `core' roles go unchosen each round, rather than just one (or even none if the Prospector is unchosen). When playing with the Governor Effect, I prefer this form of the game above the original rules, and recommend you give it a try to see if it addresses your concern about the original form of the the two-player game.

As for the set-up issue, we have all the components needed for a two-player game bagged separately, so that makes set-up a breeze - we can be playing in a matter of minutes.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Karlsen wrote:
We have played the straight Alea 2 player version quite a lot and enjoyed it and I find it interesting that there is no comment on the one thing that we found can be an issue, let us call it the Captain Crunch.

The situation can arise where one player has the goods on both of the ships and the other player has two more types of goods that cannot be shipped and thus is in desperate need of a warehouse or two every time the Captain role is taken. This may take a couple of shipping rounds to set up, but we certainly did manage to set up in one game to quite devastating effect. The can be exacerbated even further if the crunch player has the Wharf as well.

Thanks for your post Fraser. I think it's rare, but I can see the potential for this, and I suspect that I've seen something similar happen once, where one player effectively had a stranglehold on the game as a result.

But perhaps this problem is created in part by the Governor Effect and Craftsman Advantage, because there are times where one player might be able to take advantage of the back-to-back roles to monopolize the ships and create the scenario that you describe. So maybe it's even an argument in favour of using the Craftsman Angst variant (where the Governor Effect is eliminated by having the Governor choose 3 roles and the opponent choose 2 roles per round) as an alternative to the Craftsman Advantage form of the game. But the Craftsman Angst variant also has the potential to create situations where you're somewhat paralyzed, knowing that choosing Craftsman will only benefit your opponent more than you! To some extent these situations aren't necessarily flaws in the game's design, but are dependent on the game state and choices of the players earlier in the game, and part of the beauty of how the trajectory of a particular game can develop in different ways, and the tension that can arise.

And given how quickly the two player game plays, if you do find yourself on the worst end of a particularly severe whipping, you can always challenge your opponent to a follow-up game!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Julien Vion
France
Préseau
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I actually prefer the 3 roles/turn game (2 for the governor and 1 for the other), which mimics the 3-players game flow.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle C
United States
Humble
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for this excellent review! Puerto Rico is one of my favorite games, but I've been putting off getting it because I didn't realize that it can be played effectively with 2 players. I'll be able to play it with my wife and not worry about if my gaming group will want to play it or not.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fraser
Australia
Melbourne
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
badge
Ooh a little higher, now a bit to the left, a little more, a little more, just a bit more. Oooh yes, that's the spot!
mbmbmbmbmb
EndersGame wrote:
Karlsen wrote:
We have played the straight Alea 2 player version quite a lot and enjoyed it and I find it interesting that there is no comment on the one thing that we found can be an issue, let us call it the Captain Crunch.

The situation can arise where one player has the goods on both of the ships and the other player has two more types of goods that cannot be shipped and thus is in desperate need of a warehouse or two every time the Captain role is taken. This may take a couple of shipping rounds to set up, but we certainly did manage to set up in one game to quite devastating effect. The can be exacerbated even further if the crunch player has the Wharf as well.

Thanks for your post Fraser. I think it's rare, but I can see the potential for this, and I suspect that I've seen something similar happen once, where one player effectively had a stranglehold on the game as a result.

But perhaps this problem is created in part by the Governor Effect and Craftsman Advantage, because there are times where one player might be able to take advantage of the back-to-back roles to monopolize the ships and create the scenario that you describe.
Possibly, but I think the biggest cause, and I will admit it is not common, is the players specialising in different resources combined with there only being two ships available.

EndersGame wrote:
And given how quickly the two player game plays, if you do find yourself on the worst end of a particularly severe whipping, you can always challenge your opponent to a follow-up game!
Sure can, and do cool
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Larry Levy wrote:
I have to say, though, that the two variants to the Alea rules that Ender cites (the 3-2 selection and the 2-2 selection with 6 roles) both seem to be well thought out and I would be tempted to try the former the next time I play. I do wonder about the supply of money with this variant. Seyfarth and Brueck were very careful in the way they introduced money into the game for each number of players and I really like the fact that money is so tight in the official 2-player version. The 3-2 variant raises the maximum money injection from 3 doubloons to 4 and that's a significant increase. If someone wanted to avoid the Governor effect but still keep the money supply the same, here's a further tweak you might try: do the 3-2 selection split, but after the Governor takes his third role, he also chooses one of the two remaining roles to receive the extra doubloon. The other leftover role gets no additional money. This eliminates the double-turn issue while still keeping the money injection the same. It also might make for some interesting choices for the outgoing Governor. I checked with Ender and he hadn't seen an earlier suggestion like this (I figured after he researched this article, he had to be the most qualified authority on 2-player PR!), so I guess that's an original variant. That either means the idea is brilliant or a total waste of time! At any rate, if anyone's interested, they can try it out and see for themself.

Excellent comments Larry! Your thoughts about retaining the original nuances for the finances in the Craftsman Angst (3-2) variant are worth some consideration, and your suggestion about having the Governor assign just a single doubloon to only one of the two unchosen roles is certainly worth exploring, especially for those who think that the Craftsman Angst variant removes too much `doubloon angst'!

In fact, your remarks have prompted me to make a separate post about the 3-2 variant, and in particular to invite comments on your suggestion. Here's the article:

mb The Craftsman Angst variant (the most popular revision of the Alea two-player variant)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Plumley
United States
Sun Prairie
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
EndersGame wrote:

"I've had many a good time playing it two-player, so long as the official variant is used. Though, as others have said, there are better games out there for two people." - Bill Plumley


I think I have to agree with what this unlikable schmuck has to say on the matter. whistle

But really, I've played it plenty of other times since I said that, and I still say it's a solid game with the two-player variant. There are better two-player games, but there are worse games as well. Though most of those better two-player games can't also seat 3-5 like this can.

Splendid article, thanks for letting me know about my quotation. Now I want to try some of these other possibilities.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jamie Pollock
Scotland
Edinburgh
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I totally agree with Larry's comments re tightness of money being important. Moreover, I believe there are actually two good reasons behind the 3/3 split in the 2 player variant:

1. Tightness of money. With only one role bringing in doubloons every turn it keeps the inflow of money appropriate for there being only 2 players choosing the roles. With greater than 2 players, it's entirely possible you don't get the option to take the role with the money very often.

2. Enforcing the potential for a craftsman/captain. It's said craftsman angst isn't there in the vanilla variant, but when the potential to have this double role exists, this in itself creates tension! One cannot ignore the craftsman. You must predict and try to cater for this inevitability. Without it, and assuming both players are suitably charged with goods, it's entirely possible that taking the craftsman becomes a bad option for both players. Net result is no one ever does for fear of the other then taking the captain and booking the ships. For this reason I'm not sure the 3/2 split necessarily equals a better experience with more angst so to speak.

Rgds
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Morgan Fleur De Lys
United States
Nevada
flag msg tools
My girlfriend just got this game for me and we played it tonight as a 2-player game. Since we are planning to play a four-player game with some friends next week, we decided to play with four boards.

We took turns where my boards were numbers 1 & 3 and her boards were 2 & 4. There was no Governor Effect this way. We spent a lot of time rereading the rules to make sure we were playing it correctly, so we feel confident we made the correct choices each round. We treated each board independently, but decided that the highest player board was the winner for that player (she won, barely ). I'm open to choosing the lower of the two boards as the initial score to base the winner off of. (she would've tied me in that regard, but still won overall).

Anyway, I really like the idea of the official variant with Craftsman Angst, 3 Trader spaces to fill & 2 Offices as the only other changes. I'd like to try a variety of number of roles available to see how the difference of doubloons added at the end of each round affects the game.

Morgan
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.