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Subject: Guide - How to Play Netrunner rss

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Mat Nowak
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Netrunner is an amazing game. Unfortunately the rulebook is a little hard to read in that the flavour text within tends to sometimes overshadow the details you need to know to actually play the game and the order in which it explains the rules sometimes confuses more than it helps.

I struggled a lot with learning how to play Netrunner at first but now I feel I’ve gotten the rules down pat for the most part. I figured I can pass what I’ve learned along and simplify the rules as much as possible in the hopes of teaching this fine game to those that otherwise would not be able to play it. So if you happen to have a starter set of Netrunner at home or maybe a small collection but just have not been able to get your head around the rules maybe this will help! Or maybe you've recently taken interest in the game after the flurry of activity this board has had and have been wondering how the game works and what the fuss is about. That's great too!

Before We Begin...


I assume you already have a set of two decks to play with: one Runner deck and one Corporation deck. (If not, there have been plenty of forum topics about the construction of decks on BGG that you can check out.) Besides the decks you will also need some sort of chits or tokens to denote the in-game currency and various other items.

Goal of the Game:

The Corporation Wins if:
- They score agendas worth a total of 7 agenda points
- They cause the Runner to discard more cards than he is holding
The Runner Wins if:
- He liberates a total of 7 agenda points from the Corporation
- The Corporation is not able to draw a card because their deck is exhausted

Start of the Game:

The Corporation begins with:
- 5 cards from their deck
- 5 bits worth of currency (use some sort of tokens/chits to represent bits)

The Runner begins with:
- 5 cards from his deck
- 5 bits worth of currency
- 4 MU (Memory Units) for the purposes of installation of programs

Important Icons:

The following icons show up on many different cards so it is important you know what they mean.




For example, in order to use South African Mining Corp (a Corporation card), the Corporation player needs to spend 3 actions to gain 6 bits from the bank.

The Corporation’s Turn:

The Corporation always plays first. Their turn consists of always drawing one card from their deck and then they must perform 3 actions which may consist of any of the following:
- Draw another card from their deck (known as their R&D, or Research & Development)
- Take a bit from the supply
- Install an agenda, ice, node, or upgrade card (Install means to put into play)
- Play an operation card
- Advance a card that is capable of being advanced
- If the Runner is tagged, pay 2 bits to destroy one of the Runner’s resource cards
- Perform an action by a card they already have in play.

The Runner’s Turn:

The Runner must take 4 actions during their turn, which may consist of any of the following:
- Draw a card from his deck (known as their stack)
- Take a bit from the supply
- Install a hardware, resource, or program card
- Play a prep card
- Make a run on a data fort
- If the Runner is tagged, pay 2 bits to lose a tag
- Perform an action by a card he already has in play

Both the Corporation and Runner may perform the same action multiple times during their turn if they wish to do so.

Turn End:

At the end of their turn, each player discards down to their maximum hand size, which began the game at 5 cards. (Note: Whenever the Corporation player discards cards he always places them in his discard pile face down. The Runner keeps his discards face up.)

The Corporation’s Play Area:

The Corporation player’s area consists of 3 major sections at the start of the game which are referred to as central data forts:
- R&D (their deck) [short for Research & Development]
- The HQ (their hand of cards) [short for Headquarters]
- The Archives (their discard pile, which is empty at the beginning)



Besides these 3 areas, the Corporation player will be able to create areas off to the side which are called subsidiary data forts. It is only in these subsidiary data forts where Agendas will be advanced and eventually scored for points. Node cards can also be installed only in subsidiary data forts. There is no limit to the number of subsidiary data forts the Corporation can have.



Let’s now take a look at what a typical Agenda card looks like.

Agendas:
Agendas are installed vertically and face down, and only in subsidiary data forts. Only one agenda can occupy a given data fort at a time. The Corporation player can simply play an Agenda creating a new subsidiary data fort or overwrite an existing agenda or node card in a subsidiary data fort on their turn, trashing the existing card. (The trashed card is placed face down in the Archives).



At the bottom right of the Agenda card is the number of agenda points the Corporation player will gain when this Agenda is scored. When the Agenda is scored, not only will the Corporation gain these points but they will also receive the bonus that is written on the card. There are a variety of different agendas in the game that have varying bonus effects and point values.

Now, scoring an agenda is no easy task. Listed at the top right of the agenda is its difficulty. This is the number of times this agenda needs to be advanced before it is scored. Advancing an agenda by one requires one action and one bit. Whenever the Corporation advances a card they will need to place an advancement counter onto the card. Once the required number of advancement counters has been placed on the Agenda, the Corporation can flip over the card to reveal it, automatically scoring the appropriate number of Agenda points and resolving the bonus the card provides.

If a Runner is able to access an Agenda before it is fully advanced, he automatically steals/liberates it and claims the Agenda points, ignoring the bonus effect written on the card as it only applies when the Corporation scores the agenda.

Nodes:
Besides Agendas, subsidiary data forts can also house Nodes. These cards provide the Corporation with some benefit and can sometimes serve to distract the Runner from stealing actual Agendas if he believes a node is an Agenda. This is because sometimes nodes can be advanced; if so, this will be indicated on the card.



Nodes are installed vertically and face down, and only in subsidiary data forts, just like Agendas. The effect of the Node doesn’t come into play until the Corporation activates, or rezzes, the Node by paying its Rez Cost listed on the top right of the card. If the Runner ever accesses a Node, he can pay its trash cost with his own bits to put it on top of the Corporation’s Archives.

Upgrades:
Upgrades are cards that serve to improve the data fort they are installed in. Upgrades can be installed in ANY data fort (even central ones). There is also no limit to the number of Upgrades that can be in a given data fort.



Upgrades are installed vertically and face down just like Agendas and Nodes. If an Upgrade is installed in a central data fort, it is placed behind the appropriate pile. (If an Upgrade is installed inside HQ, it is placed behind the bit pool.) Upgrades must be revealed and rezzed to take effect.

ICE:
Now that you know the 3 types of cards that can be installed in data forts you’ll need to next learn about the cards that serve to protect them from being accessed by the Runner. Intrusion Countermeasures Electronics, or ICE for short, are those cards.



ICE is installed horizontally and face down in front of the data fort it is to protect. The first piece of ICE on a data fort can be installed at no cost to the Corporation. If the Corporation player wishes to install additional ICE onto a data fort, they must play 1 bit for each ICE card already installed on that fort. New ICE is always placed in the outermost position, in front of any existing ICE. (If the Corporation player so wishes, they can trash any existing pieces of ICE already on the fort to lower the cost of the new ICE being installed. This does not use up any actions.)



ICE can only be rezzed when the Runner approaches it during a run on that fort. At that time, the Corporation can choose to either pay the rez cost of the ICE, flipping the card over and activating the ICE’s subroutines, or to let the Runner through the ICE unscathed (in that case the ICE remains face down).

Once ICE has been rezzed it remains active and need not be paid for again. (It helps to denote whether ICE has been rezzed or not with tokens or chits. I personally place a token over the rez cost as an indicator that it has already been paid for). Subroutines listed on ICE will be explained later on in this post in the Runner section.

It is important to note that there are 3 types of ICE: Sentry, Wall, and Code Gate.

Operations:
Operations are cards with one-time effects that are immediately executed and then sent to the Archives.



To play an Operation card, the Corporation player spends an action, pays the cost, executes the card’s effect, and then trashes it.

Rezzing Corporation Cards:

With the exception of agendas, the Corporation player's installed cards must be rezzed before they can be used. Whenever a card is rezzed, it is turned face up. ICE cards can only be rezzed when they are approached by the Runner during a run. Other cards can be rezzed at the following times:

- At the start of either player's turn
- After each action (regardless of whose turn it is)
- During a run while the Runner approaches a piece of ice and while the Runner passes a piece of ice;
- Just before the Runner accesses a fort's contents, whether or not the Runner encountered ice during the run.

The Corporation rezzes a card by paying enough bits from their bit pool to the bit bank to satisfy the rez cost, which is in the upper right corner of the card. (Some cards have a rez cost of 0.) Cards are never partially rezzed. The full cost must be paid to rez a card. Once rezzed, a card is turned face up and stays active until it leaves play.

It is important to note that rezzing a card does not require an action.

Corporation Play Summary & Tips:

That’s essentially it for the Corporation. As the Corporation player you will be creating new subsidiary data forts by installing Agendas, Nodes, or Upgrades. Protect your central and subsidiary data forts with ICE and advance Agendas to score to 7 points to win. Distract the Runner by creating subsidiary data forts that house nodes that can be advanced. The Runner will believe you are advancing an agenda and will waste time and bits on running on that fort. Install ICE that you cannot yet rez due to insufficient bits. The Runner may be scared off by the amount of ICE protecting a data fort and not bother running on it until later.

There are a few more things you need to know to be a successful Corporation player, and we'll cover them next as we talk about how to play the Runner.




The Runner’s Play Area:

The Runner’s play area is much less distinct than the Corporation. Any cards the Runner installs will be placed in front of him as he chooses. There are no defined areas in which cards need to be installed, but it helps to keep installed cards grouped by their type for ease of play.

There are 4 types of Runner cards: Program, Hardware, Resource, and Prep cards. Unlike some of the Corporation cards which are installed face down and can be rezzed later, all Runner cards are installed face up and must be rezzed at the time of their installation.

Prep:
These are analogous to Operations. At the upper right is the cost that must be paid for in bits so that the card effect can immediately take place. Afterwards, the card is placed face up in the Runner’s discard pile (called the trash). These are the only Runner cards that are discarded after they are used. Every other type of Runner card stays in play in front of the Runner after being installed.



Resources:
The Runner can have any number of resources in play. Installing a resource takes an action and the required number of bits listed on the upper right of the card.



During the course of the game, if the Runner is given a tag by the Corporation, the Corporation can trash one of the Runner’s resources on their turn by taking an action and paying 2 bits.

Hardware:
The Runner can have any number of hardware installed. Installing a piece of hardware takes an action as well as the required number of bits listed on the upper right of the card.



Programs:
Every program card has a Memory Unit (MU) cost. The Runner begins the game with 4 MU. The combined cost of the Runner’s programs in play cannot exceed the number of MU he has. Installing a program takes an action as well as the required number of bits listed on the upper right of the card. The Runner can choose to overwrite one or more programs they already have in play, whether or not they need to free up MU. This trashes the program(s).



If at any point the Runner has too many programs in play for the MU he has, he must immediately trash enough programs to correct the situation.

Making a Run on a Data Fort:

In order to steal an agenda from a data fort the Runner needs to make a run on that data fort and deal with any ICE that is protecting it. If he is able to make it past every piece of ICE from the outermost to the innermost guarding a data fort, his run is considered to be successful. If there is no ICE protecting a given data fort, the Runner can access that data fort automatically when he makes a run on it.

The reward for successfully making a run on a data fort depends on the data fort itself.

A successful run on R&D (the Corporation’s deck) results in the Runner looking at the top card of R&D. If it is an Agenda, he reveals the card to the Corporation player and automatically steals it and receives the listed amount of Agenda points. Otherwise, he has the option of paying the trash cost of the card with his own bits to send it to the Corporation’s archives. If he doesn’t want to do this he simply leaves the card on top of R&D.

A successful run on HQ (the Corporation’s current hand of cards) results in the Runner looking at one random card from the Corporation’s hand of cards. If it is an Agenda, he reveals the card to the Corporation player and automatically steals it and receives the listed amount of Agenda points. Otherwise, he has the option of paying the trash cost of the card with his own bits to send it to the Corporation’s archives. If he doesn’t want to do this he simply gives the card back to the Corporation’s hand.

A successful run on the Archives (the Corporation’s discard pile) results in the Runner looking through ALL the cards in the Archives. The Runner takes any and all Agendas he finds there and scores them. Afterwards all the cards remain in the Archives.

A successful run on the a subsidiary data fort results in the Runner looking at all installed cards in that data fort. If an Agenda is installed there, the Runner automatically takes and scores it. The Runner may pay the trash cost on any installed Nodes or Upgrades in the data fort to send them to the Corporation's Archives.


Dealing with ICE:
There are 3 stages in dealing with a piece of ICE:
1) Approach - The Runner is approaching a piece of ICE. If that piece of ICE is not already rezzed, the Corporation player can rez it at this point, flipping the card face up if it hasn’t been revealed yet.
2) Encounter - If the ICE is rezzed, the Runner encounters it and must deal with all its listed subroutines. The Runner can use any of his ice breaker programs to break the subroutines (preventing them from taking effect). If the ICE is not rezzed or if all the subroutines are broken that piece of ICE is passed by the Runner. Any unbroken subroutines take effect, in listed order from top down on the card. If none of the unbroken subroutines end the run the Runner passes the ICE.
3) Post-Encounter - The Runner has the choice to either approach the next piece of ICE, or to jack out (voluntarily ending the run). This is the only time the Runner can jack out.

Icebreakers:
Icebreakers are programs the Runner will need in order to break through subroutines on ICE they pass when they make a run on a data fort.



Each piece of ICE has one or more subroutines on it. To break a subroutine the Runner needs to have an icebreaker program in play. Each icebreaker affects a certain type of ICE it references (walls, code gates, sentries). In the above image for example, the Black Dahlia icebreaker can break sentry subroutines (but it won’t help you in dealing with code gate or wall ICE).

If the Runner has an appropriate type of icebreaker in play the next thing he needs to do is ensure his icebreaker has enough strength to break the subroutines on the ICE. The Icebreaker’s strength is listed in the lower right corner of the card. In order to be even able to break a subroutine the Icebreaker needs to equal or exceed the ICE’s strength (which is listed on the lower left of the card, or lower right of the card when viewed from its side). Most icebreakers allow the Runner to pay a certain amount of bits to increase the strength of the icebreaker. In the above image for example, the Runner can pay 2 bits to increase the strength of Black Dahlia by 1. He can pay this amount as many times as he needs to get the icebreaker strong enough.

Once the icebreaker is strong enough, the Runner can pay the appropriate amount of bits listed on the icebreaker to break a subroutine. Usually a single icebreaker is used to break all the subroutines of a given piece of ice, but the Runner may break each subroutine with a different icebreaker.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The increase in Icebreaker strength only lasts for the current piece of ICE the Runner is dealing with. If the Runner passes that piece of ICE and then encounters a second piece of ICE, he’ll need to pay to increase the strength of his icebreaker again if that ICE is stronger than the base strength of his icebreaker.



Let’s use the above image as an example. The Runner approaches the piece of ICE. The Corporation decides to rez it by paying 7 bits. The ICE is now active and the Runner will need to deal with all the listed subroutines. Black Dahlia can break sentry subroutines, and Triggerman is a sentry type ICE. Triggerman only has a strength of 3, so the Runner does not need to pay any bits to increase the strength of Black Dahlia. There are two subroutines listed, so the Runner can pay 4 bits in total to break both of them (it costs 2 bits to break one sentry subroutine with Black Dahlia).

If the Runner does not break all the subroutines of a piece of ICE, he suffers the effect of each of the unbroken subroutines, in the order they are listed on the card. A subroutine that ends the run does so immediately, and any following subroutines do not take effect.

Going back to the above example, if the Runner didn’t have enough bits to break both subroutines but he had enough to break only one of them, he might break the second subroutine but allow himself to suffer the effects of the first subroutine. In that case the Corporation player would choose one of the Runner’s programs and trash it. Afterwards the Runner is considered to have passed through the ICE successfully.

Damage:

Some cards or subroutines on ICE will allow the Corporation to cause damage to the Runner. There are 3 types of damage that can be suffered by the Runner.
- Net Damage - the Runner discards one random card for each net damage he suffers
- Meat Damage - the Runner discards one random card for each meat damage he suffers
- Brain Damage - the Runner discards one random card AND his maximum hand size is decreased by one for each brain damage he suffers

If the Runner is forced to discard more cards than he currently has or has a maximum hand size of less than zero at the end of his turn, he is considered flatlined (dead) and the Corporation automatically wins.

Trace Attempts:

Some cards or subroutines on ICE will allow the Corporation to perform a trace attempt on the Runner. If the trace succeeds, something bad usually happens to the Runner.

What this means for the Corporation:
- If a card calls for a trace, it is indicated by the term "trace n", where n is the trace limit. The trace limit is the maximum number of bits the Corporation can spend on that trace.
- The Corporation player’s trace value starts are 0 for each trace attempt.
- The Corporation can increase the trace value, paying 1 bit for each point in increase.
- These bits are secretly chosen. The Corporation hides the amount of bits they are paying in their hand until both players simultaneously reveal how much they are paying.

What this means for the Runner:
- The Runner needs to select one card that he has installed that provides him with a base link value. Otherwise he is considered to have a base link value of 0.
- In order to increase the link, the Runner needs to use any installed cards he has to allow him to increase his link value. Usually cards that provide base link values also allow the Runner to increase the link, but other cards can do this as well. The Runner can use any number of other non-base link value cards to increase his link.
- Unlike the Corporation, there is no limit to how much the Runner can spend to increase his link value.

Trace Attempt Protocol:
1) Both players secretly note how many bits they are spending to establish their trace and link value.
2) The Runner states which base link card in play, and which cards that aren't base link cards, he is using to establish his link value.
3) Both players simultaneously reveal how many bits they are spending.
4) Compare the Corporation’s trace value to the Runner's link value. If the trace value equals or exceeds the Runner's link value, the trace is successful for the Corporation player.



In this example, the Corporation player plays the operation card Chance Observation because the Runner attempted a run during his last turn. This initiates a trace attempt on the Runner. The Corporation player secretly decides to spend from 0 to 5 bits. The Runner declares that he is using his Baedeker’s Net Map as his base link card. This gives him a base link value of 1 instead of 0 (at a cost of 0 bits). He then decides to spend 3 bits, making his total link value 4 (base link of 1 + 3 bits = 4). The Corporation reveals how many bits he spent. Surprise! 4 bits, making the Corporation’s trace value 4. Since the trace value = the link value, the trace is successful, and the Runner is given a tag. (Note tags with some sort of chit/token).

Tags:

Tags are usually given to the Runner with successful trace attempts but they can be gotten in other ways as well. If the Runner is tagged the Corporation can spend an action and pay 2 bits during their turn to trash one of the Runner’s resources. To get rid of a tag the Runner can spend an action and pay 2 bits during his turn to lose one of his tags.

Runner Play Summary & Tips:
As the Runner you will need to get some icebreakers installed so that you can break through any ICE that the Corporation installs. You will need to establish ways to get additional bits as running on data forts can become quite expensive. Pay attention to what the Corporation player does - sometimes they will bluff that they are advancing an agenda while in fact they are preparing a trap node for you. Some Runner cards allow you to expose the Corporation's face down installed cards. These can be quite useful.

Closing Thoughts:

That’s it! You should be able to get into a game and play through it to conclusion. It may take a few turns or even a complete game or two before things click but Netrunner is definitely worth it.

I realize I might have missed a thing or two, so if you noticed anything missing or something that is somewhat unclear let me know and I’ll try to fix it.

Happy Running! Or Corporation-ing, if that is your thing!
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Jens Kreutzer
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Superb guide!

Quote:
Advancing an agenda by one requires one action.


... and one bit.
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Mat Nowak
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Tinweasel wrote:
Superb guide!

Quote:
Advancing an agenda by one requires one action.


... and one bit.

Yes, you're right. Let me add that in. Thanks!
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Geo
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Great guide! Now all that you have to do is to convert it to pdf and upload in the files section.

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Ian Johnstone
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Mateui, I cannot thank you enough

Pure Awesome!!
 
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Jon W
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Great guide, hopefully it helps a lot of people.

Quote:
If the Runner is forced to discard more cards than he currently has or has a maximum hand size of zero he is considered flatlined (dead) and the Corporation automatically wins.

This should actually be LESS THAN zero.

You can linger with a hand size of zero, drawing cards during your turn but then discarding down to your max hand size. Basically, if damage puts you in the negatives, you're dead. If it puts you down to zero, you just squeaked by.
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Mat Nowak
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waddball wrote:
Great guide, hopefully it helps a lot of people.

Quote:
If the Runner is forced to discard more cards than he currently has or has a maximum hand size of zero he is considered flatlined (dead) and the Corporation automatically wins.

This should actually be LESS THAN zero.

You can linger with a hand size of zero, drawing cards during your turn but then discarding down to your max hand size. Basically, if damage puts you in the negatives, you're dead. If it puts you down to zero, you just squeaked by.

Yes, you're right. I changed that sentence to reflect the correct rule. Thanks!

Geoman wrote:
Great guide! Now all that you have to do is to convert it to pdf and upload in the files section.

I don't know why I didn't think of that. Luckily I wrote this all in Word first so converting it to PDF will be easy. In fact, I just took the time to do it and have uploaded it to BGG, pending approval. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Ian Johnstone
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I was wondering about rezzing Corps cards.

Does this sound about right?

Rezzing Corporation cards:
Ice can only be rezzed upon Runner approach (during run).
Other cards can be rezzed:
Start of either player's turn.
After each action.
When Runner approaches ice and while Runner passes a piece of ice.
Just before Runner accesses a fort's contents.
Must pay rez cost and turn face up, doesn't cost an action.
 
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John Fiala
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Great guide!

It's been a while since I played, but it's my impression that any node can be advanced by the corp player as a bluff. If it's revealed as a node and advances don't do anything for that node, the advance counters are wasted, but it's still something you can do to try and tempt that pesky runner into the black ice.
 
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Matt Dodor
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Man, where was this when I learned how to play Netrunner? Great job!
 
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Mat Nowak
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jcfiala wrote:
It's been a while since I played, but it's my impression that any node can be advanced by the corp player as a bluff. If it's revealed as a node and advances don't do anything for that node, the advance counters are wasted, but it's still something you can do to try and tempt that pesky runner into the black ice.

Well, the rulebook states that "The only cards that can be advanced are agendas, and those nodes that indicate they can be advanced." I can't find mention of being able to advance a non-advanceable card anywhere. In the Netrunner rulings v1.5 used by the Top Runners' Conference there's a sentence that states "@"Advancing a card" is spending an action and a bit to add an advancement counter to one of your installed cards that can be advanced. "Advancing a card" is simply one of several methods of adding an advancement counters to a card. (Sparky, Netrunner-L, 6/12/96)" So I don't think it's legal to do so.

vorpal_Cortex wrote:
Rezzing Corporation cards:
Ice can only be rezzed upon Runner approach (during run).
Other cards can be rezzed:
Start of either player's turn.
After each action.
When Runner approaches ice and while Runner passes a piece of ice.
Just before Runner accesses a fort's contents.
Must pay rez cost and turn face up, doesn't cost an action.

Rezzing a card doesn't require an action so yes, the Corporation player can rez his non-ICE cards at the times you mentioned above. The rules about timing and priority when both players want to do something simultaneously are that the Runner gets to perform any functions he likes, and then the Corporation can perform any functions they like. The Runner does not have an opportunity to respond after the Corporation performs their functions. It's kind of confusing but the rulebook gives this example to clarify: "For example, at the end of a run, the Runner has a card in play that allows him or her to search his or her stack for a program and install it. The Runner decides not to use that card, and then we rez an upgrade that deals Net damage to the Runner. It is too late for the Runner to use the card to find a program to prevent the Net damage, but if the Runner already had a card installed that prevented Net damage, he or she could still use that card."

I probably should include this in the guide, since it's pretty important to know. Thanks!
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Josh Morgan
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Excellent guide. I've never played but now feel like I could jump into a game easily!
 
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Lyle Williams
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I would thumb this entry a thousand times, if I could!!!!DDDDDD

I have four packs of this game, three still in shrink wrap, and I have never been able to figure out how to play- - until now!!

I have been told for years about what a great game this is and now I understand Netrunner for the first time!!

Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting this!!DDDDDD

I'm now eagerly looking forward to the pdf in the file section!

 
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Ludovic schmidt
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jcfiala wrote:
Great guide!

It's been a while since I played, but it's my impression that any node can be advanced by the corp player as a bluff. If it's revealed as a node and advances don't do anything for that node, the advance counters are wasted, but it's still something you can do to try and tempt that pesky runner into the black ice.


Hi, no you can't, you can only advance cards that let you advance on it ( by the rules themselves agenda and some specials node where it is written on it)
i made exactly the same confusion when i started

enjoy !
 
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Ludovic schmidt
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Thanks for this guide it will helps !
 
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Joe Kundlak
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Very, very good read!
I am still a bit lost (but less now) and you know what would totally get me (and other noobs) on the right track?

An AAR/after-play report with details on the cards and actions played... It would not necessarily need card pictures/texts (although that would make it awesome, not just great), this can be researched online...
 
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Mat Nowak
Canada
Halifax
Nova Scotia
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Joeyeti wrote:
Very, very good read!
I am still a bit lost (but less now) and you know what would totally get me (and other noobs) on the right track?

An AAR/after-play report with details on the cards and actions played... It would not necessarily need card pictures/texts (although that would make it awesome, not just great), this can be researched online...

That's a great idea. I'll look to put something together and add it onto the first post.

For those waiting for the PDF to be approved to BGG, it's finally up: PDF Version.
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Julian Lemonnier
France
Texas
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Excellent job good friend! Extremely usefull for those who don't want to read the unreadable rulebook. Nice !
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Jon W
United States
Aurora
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labellerouge wrote:
the unreadable rulebook

Hm, I learned it cold from the rules only. I agree it's frustrating from a pure mechanics perspective, as important facts are sometimes buried in odd places, but I still find it an enjoyable read (for a rulebook). It feels experimental and fits the cyberpunk theme pretty well. All it really needed was a comprehensive summary of play (replace the index and advertising space at the end). Oh well. Still, far from "unreadable".
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Aaron Lewicki
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Milford
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It was very "readable", but also very hard to learn the rules from. It's worth wondering what would have become of the game if it was released today, in the age of YouTube video tutorials. I think my issue with learning it was that none of the overviews seemed to summarize how the mechanics and objectives mixed together, and what little I did understand was then confused by using the non-standard terminology of the game setting. Basically:

There are scoring cards hidden somewhere in the Corp player's deck. All the runner has to do is find them to score them, regardless of whether they're in the Corp player's deck, hand, or played to a fort. The Corp player has to try to get the scoring cards from his deck, to his hand, to a fort, then get enough tokens on them to score them. It's basically a mis-direction game, with the Corp player trying to get the Runner to waste valuable resources against worthless targets, while the Runner tries to guess which targets are "real" while building up enough offense to make sure any runs will be successful.

Then there are all sorts of combo possibilities, different types of offensive/defensive abilities, hand and resource management. It's one of the few CCGs I've seen where gameplay is actually as fun as deck customization.
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Stefan Lopuszanski
United States
North Wales
Pennsylvania
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So hear me roar! RAWR!
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Her Serenity, The Lady of Pain.
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Awesome! I've been struggling with the rule book, but this should definitely help. If only there was a video explaining it ... I tend to learn better by seeing things in action.

Still, going to definitely use this to help me learn how to play. Now if finals would just end sooner so I can get to playing this game...
 
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Joe Kundlak
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I think the rulebook explains things fairly straightforward (just read yesterday), but any video is better than thousand words
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Jeff Koenig
United States
Eden Prairie
Minnesota
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"Games that want to get out."
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It may be helpful for people with cards but not a starter deck and beginners if someone could post a list of common cards that would be similar to a balanced starter deck.
 
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Michael Nock
Switzerland
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Joeyeti wrote:
An AAR/after-play report with details on the cards and actions played... It would not necessarily need card pictures/texts (although that would make it awesome, not just great), this can be researched online...


For your consideration: http://blackbox.phtn.de/?cat=5
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Joe Kundlak
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photon,

thx, that is nice. But this would be the SECOND aar I would check - after any video one
 
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