$10.00
Recommend
18 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Goofin' Around with Goofy» Forums » Reviews

Subject: My first goof was spending that $3 at the thrift store... rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Pete Belli
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb

Goofin‘ Around With Goofy is a memory and matching game for young children with a Disney theme. It was published by Fisher-Price and Mattel. The game is designed to be enjoyed by 2, 3, 4, or 5 kids at least three years old. I paid $3 for my copy at the thrift store.




The components are nice. The markers and cards are built tough to withstand the destructive energy of little fingers. I liked the packaging concept because the components were sorted at the factory and do not need to be “punched” out of a cardboard frame. Excited children often damage cards or tokens when they feverishly prepare a new game for play. The rule booklet is well organized. Since no reading is required to play the game it will be perused one time and tossed aside. As with a number of Mattel games I’ve purchased, the box is flimsy and poorly crafted.




Play is focused on the large Goofy device. This apparatus is nearly 12 inches tall and is sturdy enough to take a certain amount of abuse during a rough session with careless little boys. The legs are adjustable and can be moved into nine different positions, almost like the hands of a clock. The object of the game is to find an image which matches the current position of Goofy’s legs by randomly selecting cards from a set of 10 spread face-down on the table. A successful match rewards the child with a token, and the first kid to collect a complete set of four tokens is declared the winner.




This isn’t as easy as it sounds. The difference between one position and another can be subtle. Going back to our clock analogy, a slight shift in the arrangement of Goofy’s lower extremities will “change the time” but since his legs are of equal length (unlike the hands of a clock) the modification can appear to be slight. The designer has compensated for this ambiguity by providing a colorful background which gives the child another frame of reference for the new position of Goofy’s legs. The matching portion of the game is a challenge that could stimulate young minds.




There are two levels of play, one for younger kids and another more challenging option for older children. The basic rules are the same for both versions. The youngest player begins the game by positioning the legs, then randomly turns over a card from the assortment. If the card is a match for Goofy’s current pose, the kid gets a token. If it does not match, that card remains face-up and the next player turns over another card. A round continues until one youngster finds a match or the banana peel card appears.

The banana peel requires all of the cards to be flipped face-down and thoroughly mixed, essentially beginning a new round of play. This process sucks the oxygen out of the game, and it is hard for me to imagine young children becoming anything but frustrated while playing. A kid could get nailed with this card early in several rounds, effectively turning the game into a minefield of wasted energy.




The scoring tokens are called “Pocket Items” because they ostensibly fell out of Goofy’s pocket. The markers represent rubber chickens, cookies, yo-yos, or crayons. My favorite was the rubber chicken. The identity of each marker is not hidden so a kid with a successful match just grabs the one he or she needs. Good rule.

In the basic game the first player to collect a set including all four items wins, in the advanced game play continues until all of the items are recovered. The player with the most tokens vanquishes the other children. That could be a looooooooooong game, and the possibility of a marathon session increases because in the advanced game each revealed pose card is turned back over after an unsuccessful match attempt. I would rather have dental surgery.

There are a number of matching and memory games that are educational and entertaining, and offer a play experience which can stimulate a child’s interest in the board game hobby. This probably isn’t one of them.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Andersen
United States
Ada
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
"I would rather have dental surgery." Says it all. Thanks.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Hansen
United States
Salt Lake City
UT
flag msg tools
designer
Check out The Print and Play Games News Blog!
badge
Escape from Nooseneck High is Coming Soon!
mbmbmbmbmb
This review makes me sad that I quit doing the WTF FOTW Geeklist. I think this game might have been a winner.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Rumaley
United States
Williamsburg
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Just because the word GAME appears on the box is no reason to restrict your thinking. Simply mount Mr. G. in the rear window of your automobile and connect his legs to the turn signals. $3 salvaged.
5 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.