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Subject: Played for the first time with non-gamer family rss

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Moe45673
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I posted this on another forum and after reading it over, realized it was actually a review so thought I'd toss another vote into the fray.

About me: I just turned 31. I am fairly new to boardgaming outside of Monopoly/Risk/Casual(Apples to Apples, etc) fare. However, I have loved strategy games, amongst others, on the PC for years (ladies). The reason I never played boardgames was pretty much lack of exposure and associates who actually play them, though whenever I heard about games like Settlers I always REALLY wanted to play them, but the sad fact of boardgaming is, unlike PC gaming, you need IRL friends who want to play boardgames.

Without further ado, on to the review! (Doo doo doo doo doo):

Played last night: players were my parents, my mid-20s sister, my mid-teens sister, and fiance. So 6 people. Only played one game (due to my dad having to run to a meeting) and while we love to do things together and are a very close family, we rarely play boardgames (though they love games like Scattergories and when we were younger, we'd play games like Guess Who or table hockey).

My dad and mid-20s sister loved it from near the beginning (of course, mid-20s sister has heard of mafia/werewolf before so she already knew how this game could be fun) and both kept asking good questions like "why would a spy do this" or "why would a resistance member vote like this" etc etc. My mom was exhausted and barely saying anything and not focusing. Mid-teens sister, despite being pretty smart normally, was acting like an idiot in the beginning and asking questions about things I had already explained 5 times but by the end of round 2 seemed to have gotten it, although she was sabotaging herself by making everyone think she was a spy when it turned out she wasn't (not intentionally). Fiance was acting kinda confused. I had a bit of fun but wasn't able to take part so much in the banter due to trying to keep everyones attention focused and keep the rules clear which is quite annoying, as any gamer in a non-gamer setting can advocate.

Resistance won in 4 turns (spies only won one round).

By the end of the game, it turned out that my dad and mid-20s sister were the spies. I never saw it coming with my mid-20s sister as she asked a question (that mid-teens sister later astutely pointed out) that only someone who wasn't a spy would ask. And it turned out later that that was her evil plan all along, she had asked it to make us think it but it was so subtle that most of us didn't notice. Truth is, at one point it took her a while to pick out her mission pass/fail card, to which I specifically said "Only a spy would take so long to pick out their mission card!" (which is true) but I was so convinced of her innocence that I said it jokingly and passed it off as her newness to the game. My dad really enjoyed it as well, so much so that he left 10 minutes late to a meeting he had to run to (in other words, after the game ended). My mom who was exhausted said after the game "I was starting to pick it up by the end though still confused, but it was fun trying to figure out who were the spies" to which I responded in an aggravated manner "That's what makes the game fun and the whole reason it was designed!" My mom was acting like it was just a side effect of pretending to be in a resistance when the truth is the theme is really a tacked on kinda thing and has almost nothing to do with how the game is played. So I know she'd be down for playing again. Truth is, I was certain she was a spy since a common n00b mistake in the game is if you're a spy, you don't say much since you already know who the spies are so there's nothing to figure out!

What really annoyed me was that by the end, fiance said she didn't like it. Not that she did not have fun, but she really didn't care if we never played it again. This annoyed me because I bought it specifically for us to play at get togethers in our home and I need her support to pull it out to wary guests. I'm going to make her play again because a lot of the time, the first game is a bit annoying what with trying to explain the rules and everyone thinking the game is much more complicated than it is. Fiance was like "I didn't understand all the voting and everything" to which I responded "Look: The leader of the round chooses people to go on the mission, people vote on if they like the group, if the vote passes the group puts in their pass/fail cards and based on that one of the teams gets a point. How is that complicated". I played with the expansion plot cards, that may have been a mistake as they were mainly put in for 7+ player games where the spies seem to win a lot more and noone even ended up playing their cards anyhow, so it was just another deck of cards that could have overwhelmed people.

Anyhow, overall I'm really happy that my dad and two sisters were really into it and we can totally wrangle my mom into another game. I heard them talking afterwards about the tactics and who did what during the game which is inarguably a great success. I also have more siblings (large family) who are out of town and I know at least one of them would love this game, especially with myself, my dad, and my sister promoting it.

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Travis Worthington
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Great review, hope you can get the fiance back to play again.

I strongly recommend playing without the plot cards to start - you may or may not want/need them. I really do see them as an expansion - and like most good expansion they should be added after you are familiar with the base game.
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Agent J
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I think it may be that she doesn't understand what her vote should be. It's kind of like when voting for the President... if you don't understand the policies, or the parties, how do you know who to vote for? My advice to this is always this:

"If you are more sure of another group than this one, vote no. If you know there's a spy on it, vote no. If you're not ready to go, vote no. Otherwise, vote yes."
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Simon Blome
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Nice report! (Although I would say it belongs to "Sessions".)

This reminds me of me being on a visit to my aunt and uncle last week. I don't see them often, so we actually never had a board game party together.
I guessed that they weren't big fans of board games, but I gave it a shot. My choices were Through the desert (since it as an easy to teach abstract and my uncle loves all things Egyptian) and Wizard as an easy trick-taking game.
Both games should be finished in an hour or less, so call them "baits".

At the evening, my Aunt said cheerfully right after the welcome: "Oh, what's that? Do you have games there?" (in German, of course)
I thought, that was a good sign, because she showed real interest.

After dinner, we sat together in the living room. My aunt turned the radio on and I had a discussion with my uncle about soccer (yeah, we're german^^).
Everyone felt comfortable and I took the chance and mentioned, that I had a game or two with me and asked, if they wanted to play something.

... Silence.

My uncle: Hm... (He looked at my aunt.) What about you?
My aunt: Well... I don't know, what about you? (She looked at him.)

... Silence.

I was a bit confused. I said, that I would show them my games and then they could decide, whether it was their taste or not.

Both agreed.

I briefly explained the games with the emphasis on Through the desert and my uncle looked at it with a decent interest (I thought so).

After the introduction, I looked at them with new hope, but then came the bomb:

My aunt: We play any games actually...
My uncle: We play Trivial Pursuit sometimes, but after a few rounds we ask each other: 'Do you want to play on?' and then we stop.


And that was my board game party with my (by all means) non-gamer relatives. ^^
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Colin Sham
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That's exactly what a Cylon would say!
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joshsmith80 wrote:
T Worthington wrote:
Great review, hope you can get the fiance back to play again.

I strongly recommend playing without the plot cards to start - you may or may not want/need them. I really do see them as an expansion - and like most good expansion they should be added after you are familiar with the base game.


The game is simple enough to begin with them IMHO


I've introduced the game to about three or four different groups and I would disagree with your sentiment. A social game can live with complexity if everyone helps each other. This is not the case for Resistance. Everyone must play secretly, so no one can ask a question about the rules without the possibility of torpedoing the game. For many, that's enough to keep them silent. And if that's the first game and one of the spies outs themselves? Well you're ruining everyone's initial impression (despite attempts to explain 'soft-reveals' etc.)

Anyhow, the plot cards often add order of operation questions (interrupts, when to play what etc) that you should keep it simple in the teaching game. Give people a feel for the core of the game. And if the group wants to, add complexity to give that 'gaming' feel.

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Robert Stewart
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Neontek wrote:
Quote:
"Look: The leader of the round chooses people to go on the mission, people vote on if they like the group, if the vote passes the group puts in their pass/fail cards and based on that one of the teams gets a point. How is that complicated".


surprise


All you need is to hornswoggle the vitricator and fangledarp the twishplatter, and based on that one of the teams gets a point. How is that complicated?

Or, without the sarcasm:

You've got at least five concepts compressed into one sentence there - leader, mission team, vote, mission cards, scoring - sure, once you know the game, it's simple enough, but, for example, until you understand that sending a spy on a mission is a bad thing (unless you are also a spy), you're not going to understand which way to vote on a proposed mission team. If I were trying to explain the game, I'd start with victory conditions, and work backwards (missions, votes, leaders); if I were trying to teach the game, I'd start by dealing out character cards and play through a game with plenty of explanations on the way.
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Moe45673
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*Thoughts from a much more experienced OP*

Normally, I do such things as start from the goal and work backwards. However, this was after the game was played. She saw how it worked. My sentence has 4 points in it (Choose, Vote, Play Mission, Award Victory). If I was teaching the game and she didn't understand and I said that, yes, I agree, I would be a bad teacher.

Having said all that, Fiance (now wife) is a big fan of 1812: The Invasion of Canada and I can probably get her to play that with me once a week, in addition to my semi-weekly group play. Score
 
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