Recommend
97 
 Thumb up
 Hide
47 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Race for the Galaxy: The Brink of War» Forums » Reviews

Subject: After 740 plays :) rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
I want to review The Brink of War (BoW) and what it offers to competitive players of Two-Player Advanced (2PA) with goals.

The inspiration for this review comes from two places. Firstly, a data set was released recently published giving statistics from games including The Brink of War for Keldon’s Race For The Galaxy (RFTG) server. The data set reopened some formerly inconclusive debates within the community. I want to add an opinion I’ve held for a while but not been able to articulate.

Secondly, a well-written blog post from doubtofbuddha showed me that there were a large number of people in the community tired of the superficial reviews written without much experience of a game and its mechanisms. I have a lot of experience with RFTG. The data set released recently listed my accounts with a combined 760 plays, with my main account ‘UlyZed’ ranking fourth overall for 2PA. I’m hoping my experience might offer the sort of deep and mature review that challenges thinking about a game that deserves at least a second look and maybe even a third if you aren’t already playing it .

My perspective on 2PA before The Brink of War

With the second expansion, Rebel vs Imperium (RvI), the consensus seemed to be that none of the general paths to victory was dominant. RFTG as a standalone game, or with the first expansion only, skewed slightly to produce/consume strategies. With RvI, military and development strategies were considered roughly equivalent at the worst. The strength of dev-spam was highlighted by many (including myself) as an issue, but in the main most commentary I read felt 2PA RvI was a richly skill-testing environment.

So where does the skill come from in RFTG 2PA? Evaluation and Role Selection. RFTG is a continually shifting exercise in evaluation. At all times you need to be evaluating the cards in hand to determine their value as possible builds or discards. The interplay between linear and nonlinear pathways is especially sophisticated, mixing in knowledge of the deck with concerns about tempo.

When played only as a game of evaluation, RFTG feels like ‘multiplayer solitaire’. It is very easy to become enamoured with your hand or game state to the point of forgetting your empire doesn’t exist in a vacuum! The role selection mechanism is where the game moves from being a puzzle to being a contest.

Evaluating the worth of different cards comes from a long and enjoyable learning curve. It separates good players from poor ones. Understanding how the potential of your cards is amplified or minimised by yours and your opponent’s role selections separates the good players from the great ones.

For the most part, role selection is about understanding how your opponent’s tableau, hand size and past play biases particular roles. In 2PA specifically, good role selection comes from maximising your opportunities and denial of opportunity to your opponent. As every role can involve giving benefits to your opponent, you want to be playing in the roles that benefit you the most and your opponent the least.
This sounds very simple, but in practice it is incredibly subtle. In a single game of 2PA between players with strong evaluation skills you might only get a few chances to disrupt your opponent’s optimal development. Sometimes, you might need to set this up over several turns. As someone who is definitely competent with this game, I’m often surprised at how ‘shut out’ I can feel when playing the best players like Kesterer and Rain.

As far as formats go, I felt that RFTG plus The Gathering Storm (TGS) and RFTG plus TGS and RvI emphasised both the evaluation and role selection aspects well. I feel like The Brink of War (BoW) takes the 2PA game in another direction. It is my opinion this is solely due to the incompatibility of Prestige with the traditional skill-testing dynamic at play in earlier formats.

The Brink of War in 2PA
While RvI excited us with certain cards having a Prestige symbol included, Prestige as a mechanism wasn’t introduced until The Brink of War. Immediately it brought on strong reactions from the faithful. Many players were convinced it was too powerful; others (including the designers) reminded us of the learning curve we enjoyed in earlier iterations of the game. Many forceful opinions were put forward. The orthodoxy seemed to be that Prestige required adaptation and a tacit compliance with this view maintained.

The recent data set begins the discussion anew. Statistics are a powerful form of persuasion in our society. While many have abandoned the search for universal truths our fetish for objectivity remains. It is important we see the data as a starting point for discussion and not an end in itself. To that end I want to look at what the data does not what I think it means. Right now, it has reopened concerns about the power of Prestige, at least in 2PA.

I want to preface my commentary with a warning: I don’t consider Prestige ‘broken’. I don’t even consider it too powerful. However, I do not enjoy the Prestige mechanism in 2PA. I like it plenty in three-player games or more. When all is said and done, I also consider it an exceptionally well-articulated and thematically-integrated game concept. This is emphasised for mine given that BoW was not part of the original vision for the game.

Prestige moves the subtle balance between role selection and evaluation too far towards the latter. Sometimes you get lucky in RFTG. You draw the optimal combination of cards and play them unobstructed. Your opponent’s only chance to stop you was to use the role selection mechanism to minimise your opportunities (or perhaps takeovers in corner cases).

The interaction of the role selection mechanism is slight. Its advantages in tempo and advantage are often quantifiable in cards or victory points. If you can ‘leech’ a phase or use a phase productively while your opponent cannot, even an advantage as small as a one-build tableau lead can be game-winning.

It is my opinion that the Prestige advantage too easily overwhelms this aspect of the game. Instead of being too powerful, Prestige just puts more emphasis on evaluation. Like when you get that great draw, some cards make it too easy to gain or maintain the advantages of Prestige. In 2PA if you aren’t in the Prestige lead, the other player nearly always is. One VP a turn, with or without the card, is a big advantage between skilled players.

Prestige cards aren’t free of drawbacks. However, I think that 2PA, with its two role selections a turn (and potential to ‘double down’ on Develops or Settles as critical for ramming home advantage) minimises the weaknesses of many of the Prestige cards. Being able to build and trade immediately (always maintaining cards) is a fulcrum of 2PA skill; with Prestige this is magnified.

A game-changer
Given my opinions above you would think that I am not a fan of Prestige. In fact, the opposite is true. I enjoy the extra layer to the battle and as a game of competing empires it is a suitably realized and original take on the political or diplomatic angle taken in many games of similar theme. I am comfortable playing games with three or more players with Prestige and always feel satisfied the vast majority of my decisions are meaningful and enjoyable.

For 2PA, I think Prestige is radical. It changes the way advantage is gained and cultivated. I think it biases evaluation much more than role selection. For many players this might not be a bad thing. Personally, I don’t enjoy the decisions as much as in earlier, slower formats. I think Prestige means bigger effects and key cards dominate. It isn’t so much a worse game, than a different game.

There is certainly a learning curve to managing Prestige. It’s important to recognise that while Prestige might open up a strategy space of greater effects, other cards are still capable of generating a comparable or more powerful advantage in the right combination. Prestige might offer a more direct way to inexorable advantage, but BoW 2PA is not only about Prestige; it is simply defined by it, similarly to how the base set is defined by the advantages in the deck more readily available to players producing to consume.

In my experience, winning at BoW 2PA is about identifying the most powerful cards and how to play them, as well as how to play around them. It tightens your valuations. In earlier sets, the accrual of small advantages meant cards could be more widely useful. Without wanting to sound apologetic, it was almost inevitable that a larger deck would begin to create tiers of more powerful cards within it.
The effect of Prestige on 2PA is real. It changes the game. That doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad thing. The types of skill the Prestige environment encourages might not be a universal favourite but they shouldn’t be deemed strictly inferior. If given the choice in a 2PA game I prefer RvI, but I still consider the other formats playable even if they don’t express the type of contest I desire the most.

Looking to the future
I’d like to add a few things in the postscript. Firstly, I feel like the bar has been set very high with RFTG and I hope the design and development team and the player community understand I wanted to write comment that appreciated the system and contest the game presents. Clearly a lot of work is behind this game and it shows. I might not enjoy the Prestige mechanism as much as others, but I really enjoy its place in the game in its various facets.

The second point I wanted to make is how the card pool is dense enough now that customization of the deck feels like a viable alternative to the streakiness inherent in the larger deck size when all expansions are thrown in. I am not a great fan of the Prestige/Search mechanism; I think the Prestige powers and Search functions are hit or miss.

What I’d like to see is a discussion of how players might customize their RFTG decks to suit a particular purpose or highlight particular angles of play. My immediate thought has been to simply remove all the Prestige cards for 2PA, but include the non-Prestige BoW cards. Clearly homeworlds would need to be removed too (I have gone one step further and taken Galactic Developers from the homeworld selection as well).

I still really enjoy the game system of RFTG. My personal opinion is that the card pool has become so large and varied that you won’t please everyone all the time. I think the concerns around Prestige are legitimate, but the debate has been framed the wrong way. Perhaps a more direct discussion about what and where the skill is in the game would allow players to not only reconsider Prestige, but also determine the viability of the game as an enduring and meaningful contest between players gaming to win.

  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Davis
California
flag msg tools
Where should I start?
badge
Near the end?
mbmbmbmbmb
I hate when people review a game after only 740 plays.
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael J
United States
Folsom
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
It appears you think Prestige too important in 2PA games. That's fine. I believe you, after 740 plays. Would a simple scaling of Prestige in 2P make a difference? For example, Prestige chips are worth .5 of a pt each? Or perhaps one could ignore Prestige benefits at the end of each turn (such as the draw card and 1 bonus VP benefits), and just rely on the chips themselves? Has anyone else tried this? I for one, find the end-of-round bonuses for Prestige hard to manage (i.e. easy to forget), but collecting them during consume cycles and placement of Prestige worlds is easy to do.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
If anything I would probably just make them worth no Victory Points.

However, I like the mechanism, I just prefer the more incremental advantage game you play with the earlier sets. I think there is still skill in BoW 2PA, I just don't enjoy it as much (I must have a little after 740 plays!).
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
t w
United States
flag msg tools
I've never played The Brink of War expansion and have, compared to you, a meager bit of experience with the base game and The Gathering Storm. As a result, I couldn't really make heads or tails of your review, not understanding some of the mechanics and intricacies you refer to.

BUT: This is what the community needs, in my opinion - more detailed reviews or, rather, analyses of games and their underlying systems. Almost scholarly.

So thanks for putting it together. I appreciate it in the same way I might appreciate my favorite film dubbed into a foreign language I don't speak.
18 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Toby
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
louper wrote:
I've never played The Brink of War expansion and have, compared to you, a meager bit of experience with the base game and The Gathering Storm. As a result, I couldn't really make heads or tails of your review, but understanding the mechanics and intricacies you refer to. BUT: This is what the community needs, in my opinion - more detailed reviews or, rather, analyses of games and their underlying systems. Almost scholarly.


This is going to sound a little more odd still, but I haven't actually played RftG at all, so I didn't really know what this review was talking about either. (I read it because I wanted help in deciding whether to buy the game, and it was no help at all.)

But I completely agree with Todd. Detailed and almost academic analysis of a mechanic, whether and how it works, how it interacts with other mechanics, what effect it has on optimum strategies, what effect it has on the metagame... this stuff is really valuable for the community and raises the bar for the rest of us. I wish we had more of this approach, and I'd be delighted if it was for games that I play!

I'm glad not every review is like this, but I'm even more glad that some are. Good job.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin G
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
Don't fall in love with me yet, we only recently met
mbmbmbmbmb
Toby, I suggest reading reviews of the base game rather than the third expansion for that purpose otherwise I totally agree with your comments.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christopher O
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Summer grasses / All that remains / Of soldiers' dreams. - Basho.
mbmbmbmbmb
740 plays of a single game! Impressive... most impressive.

I admire your fidelity and dedication... truly the opposite of my own predilection to always be trying new games and systems.

Well done, sir.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Belgium
Brussels
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
mjacobsca wrote:
Or perhaps one could ignore Prestige benefits at the end of each turn (such as the draw card and 1 bonus VP benefits), and just rely on the chips themselves? Has anyone else tried this?


We've been playing 2PA games this way for a long time now - keep everything exactly the same, except there's no 'prestige leader' bonus. The game works perfectly that way, and prestige cards are not weaker than non-prestige cards - in many cases, they're still stronger.

Sometimes the amount of prestige you have matters because of cards rewarding you for it, or because of an objective. Other times, it's just extra points in a different shape. IMHO, this is just how it should be.

Thanks for the write-up, Alex!
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Delano
United States
Stamford
Connecticut
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Alex Brown wrote:
If anything I would probably just make them worth no Victory Points.

However, I like the mechanism, I just prefer the more incremental advantage game you play with the earlier sets. I think there is still skill in BoW 2PA, I just don't enjoy it as much (I must have a little after 740 plays!).


Care to guess how many games on Keldon out of 53000 would be affected by this change? By affected I mean a change in finish position not just a change in the winner.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
~2800, or 5.3%


Of course I'm ignoring the change in player's play style based on evaluating the worth of prestige, which sounds like the major issue for you, but I think it is interesting.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Armand
United States
Los Angeles
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow. Really interesting to hear such a well-reasoned assessment. After a tiny fraction of your 740 plays, maybe 40 at most, all of them 2PA against the AI, and a deliberate avoidance of strategy discussion threads, I've come to some similar conclusions and some more stark ones. I don't pretend to be anything like an expert; rather I think I can offer a "worm's eye view" of the same questions. Here's my take on the game mechanics as they were introduced:

Base game: find and exploit synergies between cards. Build an engine. Drive it to victory. Look at my completed tableau and appreciate the evolution of theme I achieved.

Goals: If I don't chase them I know I'm toast. I make a secondary back up engine out of a few cards to carry me over the top, but I don't worry about synergy within my tableau if it distracts. Just get the goals. I look at my completed tableau and see a small core, maybe a kernel, of a theme peeking out from between the random cards I had to play to win or block goals.

Prestige: if I fall behind on prestige in the first two turns and haven't drawn and played cards to equalize within the next two turns, I call it a loss and restart the game. It isn't impossible to chase goals when you're always behind, but it's a longshot. If, on the contrary, I draw cheap prestige cards in my opening hand, I play them even if they're otherwise useless and wait to see whether the AI can counter with prestige and stay in the game. Either way, If I finish the game I look back at an utter mess of unrelated scrapings with no conceivable logic other than a pursuit of pink diamonds and arbitrary goals. If I try to build a coordinated engine at the expense of a dogged pursuit of a prestige advantage and goals I always lose.

To reiterate, I'm a very green player. I'm sure this is a simplistic assessment. I'm sure there are layers of subtlety I don't yet appreciate. But at my level of understanding the game does not entice me to greater efforts. It seems to be going the wrong way, getting lighter rather than deeper, busier rather than more complex.

This isn't to say that I don't think it's a good game, just that if I do ever buy the physical copy (which is unlikely, my wife finds the iconography way too opaque) I won't buy the ones where goals and prestige were introduced.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt N

Pennsylvania
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
doctoryes0 wrote:
Goals: If I don't chase them I know I'm toast. I make a secondary back up engine out of a few cards to carry me over the top, but I don't worry about synergy within my tableau if it distracts. Just get the goals. I look at my completed tableau and see a small core, maybe a kernel, of a theme peeking out from between the random cards I had to play to win or block goals.


If you only chase goals, they will always decide the game, but the payout of five points for a big goal is not nearly as big as the payout from getting a good strategy (20+ points usually). It's very common for new players to overvalue the goals, but until you find someone good to play against, you won't be able to challenge that assumption.

Synergy > goals; goals are for tactical point-scoring, which may or may not be very important at that stage in the game.


doctoryes0 wrote:
Prestige: if I fall behind on prestige in the first two turns and haven't drawn and played cards to equalize within the next two turns, I call it a loss and restart the game.


You certainly will lose 100% of the time you fall behind with that strategy. However, a skilled player won't have that issue. That's also another good way to never challenge your assumptions about the game.

doctoryes0 wrote:
It isn't impossible to chase goals when you're always behind, but it's a longshot.


Chasing goals is not always done by throwing the first relevant cards you see out there; sometimes, setting up a card engine can make it trivial to overpower someone who has four developments and no hand.

doctoryes0 wrote:
If I try to build a coordinated engine at the expense of a dogged pursuit of a prestige advantage and goals I always lose.


You should probably work on building engines in earlier versions of the game first. BoW is a bad idea for anyone who does not have maybe 100 plays of the game, in my opinion. That's a snobby comment, but it's the third expansion, so I think I'm entitled. The base game is worth 100 plays at least anyway (300 for me).


doctoryes0 wrote:
To reiterate, I'm a very green player. I'm sure this is a simplistic assessment.


I would argue that it's wrong rather than simplistic; simplistic implies that it's an oversimplified form of the proper strategy. I do think that you will enjoy the game much more if you stick to the base set for a lot of plays; the "free points" in later versions will play a disproportionate role if you aren't skilled with regular strategy and tactics. The big fight on the main forums is sort of a version of this argument.
13 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serge
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice OP! It's almost like a review of the "faults" of 2PA itself, which was sorely needed.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
◄ əpıʌɐp ►
Italy
Bologna
BO
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Alex, your post is awesome!

I have just one question: why on earth Race for the Galaxy IS NOT in your top10?!?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
Bayushi Sezaru wrote:
Alex, your post is awesome!

I have just one question: why on earth Race for the Galaxy IS NOT in your top10?!?


Thanks Davide.

I think I burned out on RFTG to be honest. I still like to play 3er or 4er IRL, but only really with players who are reasonably experienced.

I certainly had too much of a good thing .
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ingo Griebsch
Germany
Bochum
North Rhine-Westphalia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Sorry, I don't get it, but are you playing 2PA with all 3 expansions or just this one? And if you use all expansions how do you get through the whole deck (even if you play 2PA)?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Lehmann
United States
Palo Alto
California
flag msg tools
designer
mbmb
d0gb0t wrote:
are you playing 2PA with all 3 expansions[...]? And if you use all expansions how do you get through the whole deck (even if you play 2PA)?

I believe Alex is playing with all 3 expansions. The BoW search feature sometimes results in going through a lot of the deck, even in 2P games.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
It's not uncommon to go through the deck regardless of the search function.

I use E+5 more than E1 and much of what I'm bothered by is the easy access to lots of cards in BoW.

For the record, in another thead Tom correctly assessed my issue as being a 'combo' issue rather than a Prestige issue.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serge
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I've never, ever seen a reshuffle in Brink of War 2pa. It's also never been anywhere near close. Hundreds of plays.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
Unless the AI is glitchy, I've discarded a unique card, only to have it returned, more times than I can count.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serge
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Alex Brown wrote:
Unless the AI is glitchy, I've discarded a unique card, only to have it returned, more times than I can count.

What? How? In 2pa? To have a reshuffle in a 2pa game would either require both players to play a game of "let's not build ever and I/I for 20 rounds", or a bizzaro-world sequence of Search whiffs (search on 6-dev and 20 of them are at the bottom of the deck, 1 in 10,000 chance).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Brown
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
mb
I'm not sure what yore trying to say. It happens to me, maybe not to you. I like to Explore a lot when I'm down on cards. I also might have observer bias and these are from Search games. Search: Uplift is very common.

Otherwise, maybe we just play differently.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serge
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Alex Brown wrote:
I'm not sure what yore trying to say. It happens to me, maybe not to you. I like to Explore a lot when I'm down on cards. I also might have observer bias and these are from Search games. Search: Uplift is very common.

Otherwise, maybe we just play differently.

My point is that playstyle, 2xSearch, Explore playstyle, none of it can cause a reshuffle in BoW 2pa. Except under rare, extreme circumstances.

Can anyone else chime in whether they ever see reshuffles in 2pa BoW and tell me i'm not crazy (or that i am)? I'm very confused right now.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd McCorkle
United States
Anderson
Indiana
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
entranced wrote:
Alex Brown wrote:
I'm not sure what yore trying to say. It happens to me, maybe not to you. I like to Explore a lot when I'm down on cards. I also might have observer bias and these are from Search games. Search: Uplift is very common.

Otherwise, maybe we just play differently.

My point is that playstyle, 2xSearch, Explore playstyle, none of it can cause a reshuffle in BoW 2pa. Except under rare, extreme circumstances.

Can anyone else chime in whether they ever see reshuffles in 2pa BoW and tell me i'm not crazy (or that i am)? I'm very confused right now.

F2F games 2PA - We've probably played 150-200 times with BoW (my nemesis logs plays and could probably supply a ridiculously accurate figure). We've ran out the draw deck maybe 10 times. Usually a result of 2 searches + explore powers + massive card flow (Imperium Lords and lots of military worlds for example). Usually the deck runs out on the last turn and we don't bother with shuffling and just grab random cards from the discard stack to finish out the game.

I'll call you mildly crazy. 5% of the time probably qualifies as rare, but I don't think it's that extreme. cool
3 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Serge
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
kusinohki wrote:
entranced wrote:
Alex Brown wrote:
I'm not sure what yore trying to say. It happens to me, maybe not to you. I like to Explore a lot when I'm down on cards. I also might have observer bias and these are from Search games. Search: Uplift is very common.

Otherwise, maybe we just play differently.

My point is that playstyle, 2xSearch, Explore playstyle, none of it can cause a reshuffle in BoW 2pa. Except under rare, extreme circumstances.

Can anyone else chime in whether they ever see reshuffles in 2pa BoW and tell me i'm not crazy (or that i am)? I'm very confused right now.

F2F games 2PA - We've probably played 150-200 times with BoW (my nemesis logs plays and could probably supply a ridiculously accurate figure). We've ran out the draw deck maybe 10 times. Usually a result of 2 searches + explore powers + massive card flow (Imperium Lords and lots of military worlds for example). Usually the deck runs out on the last turn and we don't bother with shuffling and just grab random cards from the discard stack to finish out the game.

I'll call you mildly crazy. 5% of the time probably qualifies as rare, but I don't think it's that extreme. :cool:

Interesting, i guess it's a playstyle thing somehow - very hard to believe. In my playgroup, 275 plays of BoW 2pa, 0 reshuffles. The closest we've ever come is probably 50-75 cards away.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.