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1848: Australia» Forums » Rules

Subject: When is a 2E a train... rss

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Stephane Brochu
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Outremont
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Howdy,

In our last game, the following situation arose:
The West Autralia railway had two trains: a 5+ and a 2E. it sold the 5+ to the Victorian Railway during the VR's OR. Now, when the WA's OR turn came around, it only had the 2E, which is not considered to be a train for the purpose of train limits AND the purpose of having a train (meaning that it would have to buy a train at the end of its turn). Since it was three spaces away from the Receivership zone AND it was 40L short of being able to buy a 8 train, it was important for it to run the 2E.
The question that came up was whether or not it was allowed to run since, according to the 2E exception rules (doesn't count against limit and doesn't count as a train) it's not really a train and you need a train to operate.
We rules that it should be able to run since it doesn't specifically state that it cannot run if it is the only train, but i'd like an "official" answer, if possible.

Thanks!
 
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Burster of Bubbles, Destroyer of Dreams.
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Sunnyvale
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You can always run the Ghan, as long as you have a route to Alice Springs.

In fact, it's quite possible for two companies to pay out (and increase in stock value) for the rest of the game if they both have Ghans and they have one permanent train, which they sell back and forth and never actually run.

 
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J C Lawrence
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Campbell
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Stock movement is controlled by whether the company pays a dividend or not, not by whether the company is obligated to buy or already has a train or not (though the two are often related). In this case the company runs the Ghan to Alice Springs (the only legal run for a Ghan -- I assume it had such a route), pays a dividend, moves the stock price forwards, and then discovers that it is forced to buy a train and does so.
 
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Chris Nasipak
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Rochester
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clearclaw wrote:
Stock movement is controlled by whether the company pays a dividend or not, not by whether the company is obligated to buy or already has a train or not (though the two are often related). In this case the company runs the Ghan to Alice Springs (the only legal run for a Ghan -- I assume it had such a route), pays a dividend, moves the stock price forwards, and then discovers that it is forced to buy a train and does so.


We discovered this during recent play and found it made for a highly amusing endgame possibility. One player was not certain he would be able to get permanent trains for all of his public companies, so he bought 2E's (and made sure he had runs) for all of them, with plans to simply swap what permanent trains he could back and forth as companies operated.

Makes for an interestingly flexible endgame.
 
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Pete Goch
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ecs05norway wrote:
clearclaw wrote:
Stock movement is controlled by whether the company pays a dividend or not, not by whether the company is obligated to buy or already has a train or not (though the two are often related). In this case the company runs the Ghan to Alice Springs (the only legal run for a Ghan -- I assume it had such a route), pays a dividend, moves the stock price forwards, and then discovers that it is forced to buy a train and does so.


We discovered this during recent play and found it made for a highly amusing endgame possibility. One player was not certain he would be able to get permanent trains for all of his public companies, so he bought 2E's (and made sure he had runs) for all of them, with plans to simply swap what permanent trains he could back and forth as companies operated.

Makes for an interestingly flexible endgame.


That does sound pretty cool. He could even withhold or take loans until he could afford a second permanent train. I suppose paying out and taking loans would be the ideal if you could manage to get capital quickly enough to make that diesel profitable. Or just pay out until you're far enough to the right to survive taking all the loans needed on a forced train purchase.

This game seems to give more money in dividends than share appreciation.
 
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Karsten Engelmann
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Springfield
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I do like how in 1861 and 18OE and others you have to pay out the share value or greater! Then the 2E gambit would generate some revenue, and keep stock from falling, but not advance the stock price.
 
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J C Lawrence
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Campbell
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Revenue-based stock price movement tends to make games which are exclusively about revenues, as versus games which are about (say) stock price. Getting a high stock price in 1830 requires rather a lot more than just getting good runs...
 
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