Kevin Duke
United States
Wynne
Arkansas
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We enjoyed running through a full campaign scenario of 1812 several weeks ago at the MidSouth Con event. Three of the five players were brand new and two had played one time (and gotten some things wrong). So count them all as pretty much beginners.

Both sides positioned and strengthened on the first turn, while both made tentative attacks in the second round. The British had hot dice and the Americans incredibly cold, so the British got out ahead by 2 points early.

Let me say that I don’t want to dwell on the dice and ‘bad die rolls’ but the Americans did have a remarkable pattern going, which seemed to extend turn after turn. In a big battle with lots of blocks present, they ran or missed a lot more than they hit. If they were fighting against just one or two blocks, they could—time after time—roll solid hits all around, getting 4 or even all 5. The British players found this quite entertaining, as they extended their lead to 4 points and then 5.

But the game just kept on going…because, as it turned out, the Truce card for the Native American player was the very last card in his hand. The US Militia had been forced to play their Truce about turn 4, and the US Regulars actually got their Truce card even sooner, but always managed to have some other move available (once doing largely nothing with a water move, rather than play the Truce).

Events shifted. The die rolls balanced out a bit, and the US players found themselves coming up short on reinforcements because so many of their blocks were out. (Not a bad thing!) With a couple good combinations and the right series of “when the colored chit comes out of the bag,” the US players were able to recover most of their lost areas and even seize a couple (including the lovely 2 pointer in the center!). Though the British regulars got the last move, they were limited to a water move and unable to take back enough.

The British would have won the game at turn 4, 5, 6, or even a narrow win on 7…but the game went all the way to 8 and the US players came from behind. It ain’t over til it’s over.

There was much pleasure at how this turned out, even from the British players (one of whom immediately bought a copy of the game… when you “lose” and still buy the game, that says something!).

1812 is definitely a keeper!
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Charlie Theel
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
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Nice session writeup.

You should post an entry for this game in the win statistics thread in the general forum.
 
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Jim Jackson

Gastonia,
North Carolina
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Bad dice. I have played this game at least 20 times, as of yet,I been unable to win as the Americans. Because, the worse dice rolls of the American Militia, they take areas with force, then flee. On the other hand, the Canadian Militia roll and kick butt, 3 dice, 2 hits and one command decision. The closest that I came to winning as the Americans was that I actually took Montreal, Napolean was defeated, card played by the British player, 2 regular British placed,Six American Militia killed or fled. Cost me a win.

You have to love this game, 30 years of wargaming behind me and this is actually the best! I know that the Canadian Militia dice are not loaded, it is just the luck of the roll. Most wargamers complain about luck, but let us face the facts, luck plays a major roll in war.

If you do not believe this, just ask the Japanese about Midway.

Can not wait for the next game in this series of games. Do not like losing, however; 1812 is excellent even when you get your tail end kicked. Eventually, my luck with the dice will change. Good tactics, will mitigate Bad Dice. By the way, the British did kick the Americans in the tail end in that war. Now I need to focus on good tactics.
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Bill Eldard
United States
Burke
Virginia
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Falcon2 wrote:
Bad dice. I have played this game at least 20 times, as of yet,I been unable to win as the Americans. Because, the worse dice rolls of the American Militia, they take areas with force, then flee. On the other hand, the Canadian Militia roll and kick butt, 3 dice, 2 hits and one command decision. The closest that I came to winning as the Americans was that I actually took Montreal, Napolean was defeated, card played by the British player, 2 regular British placed,Six American Militia killed or fled. Cost me a win.


I've played the game twice, each time with 5 players.

In my first game, I was the American militia, and the US got smashed. The British players captured both Pittsburgh and Albany and most points north. We capitulated.

In the second game, I was again the American militia, and (perhaps thanks to the previous experience) play was much more back and forth. The British player ended the game by playing his side's last Truce card while they were ahead on points. But the American Regular player was last in the turn order, and had some potent cards to play. He captured a couple of objectives, and the US side won!
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Mike Owens
United States
West Monroe
Louisiana
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I had the good fortune to be General "Can't Get Right" of the American militia in the game Kevin narrates. I enjoyed it thoroughly despite my demonstrated ineptitude with the dice. Good thing about being inept, it cuts down on debates as to who takes the losses in a battle.

Was impressed by many well thought out aspects of the design. The mustering mechanics guaranteed a certain ebb and flow (lots of your guys run away this time, they all come back next turn). The ebb and flow was kept within limits by the "you always get first fire on your soil, whether attacking or defending" rule. Hard to take and hold ground on the other side of the border.

Game was lots of fun and can see where rules should be easily adapted to other situations. Only complaints were use of colored blocks without identification made armies generic, some leader effects would have been nice and the naval aspect was abstracted out--no Battles of Lake Erie or Champlain.

Didn't buy the game because I don't know four other wargamers in my area (hometown of the Duck Commander) that I could round up to play it face to face. Seems like the fun factor would decrease with fewer players and PBEM would be very difficult to manage.

Thanks to Kevin and Jim for teaching us the game. If I see it set up at another con, I'll be happy to grab a chair and sit in.
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Kevin Duke
United States
Wynne
Arkansas
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First, Mike, your side did win the game, so you couldn't have been TOO inept!

As to the rest...

I can't fathom pbem with this one but do note a lot of folks play with fewer than five people. Some wonder how fun the game is when it goes beyond one person on each side controlling everything.

I see write ups from 4-5 player games and write ups of two player. Wish some folks who have done both would join in.
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James Cacy
United States
Brighton
Tennessee
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I've done both. Twice I've played in a 5 player game (British both times, and actually lost both times).

I have now played 3 one on one games also. Very much a different "feel" to the game being the only one to make choices. However, still such a varied selection due to the cards. The three games were ALL different in strategy, not only b/c of the opponent but because of the card play.

The first game went to turn IV and was ended with the British playing the truce cards with a 3-1 victory. The second game went to turn VII with the American's (me) having to play their final truce card and ending in a tie. The third game, was a 3-2 victory by the British, but with such a blood bath of blocks. Hardly any runs in this game, either you shot people or died ... which makes things VERY interesting for the US side.

I haven't a complaint in the world on this one! I see it being played well into the future!

Jim
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