$10.00
Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Twixt» Forums » General

Subject: Guidelines on board rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]

Eugene
Oregon
msg tools
mb
What is the significance of having a guidelines on the Twixt board, as seen here?

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
If your starting pin is on one side of the line a linear progression will reach your target edge, and on the other side it won't.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Eugene
Oregon
msg tools
mb
Compare this other board with guidelines. It shows a more simplified pattern. What gives?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
Its just a rotation.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randall Bart
United States
Winnetka
California
flag msg tools
designer
Baseball been bery bery good to me
badge
This is a picture of a published game designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Some people don't draw the guide lines as far as others. The lines aren't part of the game. The lines are an aid to the eye, so you can tell whether a 1:2 slope will reach the corner.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
AKQJX
United States
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Another way of putting it is that if you are forced to go outside the lines by your opponent, you are losing ground.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Bush
United States
Shipman
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Well that's my set and my POVray image, so I should probably say something. The guide lines are intended as a frame of reference, and to make the blank board more visually appealing. There is no rule change associated with these lines. 24x24 is really a huge grid compared to most abstracts. One very common element that shows up in the tactics is what could be called a ladder chase. These lines could come in handy if you want to know whether a simple 2:1 chase, which starts far from the corner it points to, will win for you or for your opponent. Of course your opponent may not make simple moves, but the lines can help all the same.

Apparently, I can't make up my mind how far to extend these lines. Lately I am of the opinion that ending them at i9, i16, P9, and P16, as shown in the photo, is plenty long enough for playing, is easier to do, and looks less cluttered.

Other than Barticus and myself, I know of no one who has "tattooed" their board in such fashion. I'm trying to start a tradition here, so if anyone does this, I hope they will share their experience. All you need is a straightedge such as a metal yardstick, clamps to hold the edge in place, blocks of wood to keep the clamps from damaging the table, an awl, a neutral color pencil, and patience. I would also like to hear feedback from anyone who has played on a physical board with these lines. Or, what do you think of the boards you see above?

Caveat: If you play with a row handicap, then half of the guidelines would be potentially misleading. It might be better to play row handicap games on a plain board.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
AKQJX
United States
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
If you just want to try it and don't want to mark your board (though they seem to be cheap to get around here), you can put down some type of pin-striping tape you find at some auto parts stores. Or narrow drafting tape, but I forget how small that comes, and may not exist with computer drafting now.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Eugene
Oregon
msg tools
mb
twixter wrote:
Or, what do you think of the boards you see above?

Really like the olive-beige color of yours.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randall Bart
United States
Winnetka
California
flag msg tools
designer
Baseball been bery bery good to me
badge
This is a picture of a published game designer
mbmbmbmbmb
twixter wrote:
Other than Barticus and myself, I know of no one who has "tattooed" their board in such fashion.

When you saw my board in 1999, you commented "Oh, you drew those lines too." I had drawn them just a month or two before, so I assume you invented those lines before I did, but you can't have been the first. In 1962 or even earlier, someone must have put his finger on the board counting spaces. Going from there to tatooing the board is clever, but it's not one in a million type clever, and a million people had played TwixT by then.

twixter wrote:
I'm trying to start a tradition here,

thumbsup for that.

The big issue to settle is where to end the lines. Ending on the diagonal as you did in the photo is generally good enough. Ending at third row as you do in the raytrace is logical but it looks weird. I went a row farther to where they meet, creating an eight pointed star. Someone did a picture where the lines went all the way to the edge of the board. I think someone made a picture. I remember a picture. Maybe I remember imagining a picture.


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Bush
United States
Shipman
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Barticus88 wrote:
Someone did a picture where the lines went all the way to the edge of the board. I think someone made a picture. I remember a picture. Maybe I remember imagining a picture.:)

My Jtwixt 0.7 by Kevin Walker does that. The lines go over top of the border lines and stop at the border holes, which looks ugly but the user could always make them disappear. It's open source, so if I really cared I could modify it. Jtwixt doesn't know how to play, but it's great as a virtual board and analysis tool.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.